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Project Information

Project Information


Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board


Project Scope:

The ASEB was established in 1967 “to focus talents and energies of the engineering community on significant aerospace policies and programs." In undertaking its responsibility, the ASEB oversees ad hoc committees that recommend priorities and procedures for achieving aerospace engineering objectives, and offers a way to bring engineering and other related expertise to bear on aerospace issues of national importance. Among these issues are: research and development aspects of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen); NASA’s aeronautics research program; national aeronautics R&D policy and its implementation; space policy and programs, with a focus on human spaceflight and space operations; commercial space activities; and other aerospace engineering topics.

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-ASEB-21-P-396

RSO: Hartman, Colleen

Topic(s):

Space and Aeronautics


Parent Project(s): N/A


Child Project(s): N/A



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership


Ilan Kroo - (Chair)
Ilan Kroo (NAE) is professor of aeronautics and astronautics at Stanford University. Prior to joining the faculty at Stanford, he worked in the Advanced Aerodynamics Concepts Branch at the NASA’s Ames Research Center. His research in aerodynamics and multidisciplinary design optimization includes the study of innovative airplane concepts. He has participated in the design of UAVs flying pterosaur replicas, America’s Cup sailboats, and high– speed research aircraft. In addition to his research and teaching interest, he is director of a small software company and is an advanced cross-country hang glider pilot. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Kroo was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for new concepts in aircraft design methodology and for the design and development of the SWIFT airplane. He has a Ph.D. for aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University.
Brian Argrow
Brian M. Argrow is professor and chair of Smead Aerospace Engineering Sciences. He is also director of the Integrated Remote & In Situ Sensing Program (IRISS), and director emeritus of the Research and Engineering Center for Unmanned Vehicles (RECUV) at the University of Colorado Boulder. His research topics include small unmanned aircraft system design and airspace integration, aero-gas dynamics, sonic boom, and engineering education, with more than 100 research publications. Argrow has served as associate dean for education and is a CU President’s Teaching Scholar. He is a fellow of the Center for STEM Learning and a recipient of the W.M. Keck Foundation Award for Excellence in Engineering Education. Argrow co-chaired the first Symposium for Civilian Applications of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (CAUAS). He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and is chair-emeritus of the AIAA Unmanned Systems Program Committee (USPC). As well he organized and chaired the first major, joint AIAA/AUVSI event, and the Second Workshop on Civilian Applications of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (CAUAS-2). Argrow is an alumnus of the DARPA/IDA Defense Science Study Group, and he received the Air Force Exemplary Civilian Service Award for his service on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He served on the NASA Advisory Council’s UAS Subcommittee and several other NASA and NOAA advisory boards andcommittees. Argrow currently serves on the ASTM F38 Subcommittee for “Specifications for UAS Operations over People.” He has a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University ofOklahoma.
Robert D. Braun
Robert Braun (NAE) is director of Solar System Exploration at NASA JPL, he is charged with leading the center’s planetary science missions. Prior to this role, he was dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Colorado Boulder. He was the NASA chief technologist in 2010-2011, serving as the principle advisor and advocate for agency-wide technology policy and programs. Formerly, he was a faculty member in the Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) where he led a research and education program focused on the design of advanced flight systems and technologies for planetary exploration. Prior to joining the Georgia Tech faculty, Dr. Braun worked for sixteen years at the NASA Langley Research Center. While at NASA, he contributed to the design and flight operations of multiple spaceflight projects including the Mars Pathfinder mission. Dr. Braun is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the American Astronautical Society, and the author or co-author of more than 300 technical publications in the fields of atmospheric flight dynamics, planetary exploration systems, multidisciplinary design optimization and systems engineering.

Edward F. Crawley
Edward F. Crawley (NAE) is the Ford Professor of Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he is also the director of NEET, the New Engineering Educational Transformation. Earlier he was the director of the Bernard M Gordon MIT Engineering Leadership Program. He was a founder of the Systems Design and Management Program at MIT, served as the Department Head of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT, and as the Executive Director of the Cambridge (UK) MIT Institute. His research focuses on the domain of architecture, design and decision support in complex technical systems that involve economic and stakeholder issues. His current domains of architectural research include energy systems, Earth observation and human spaceflight. Crawley is a fellow of the AIAA, and the Royal Aeronautical Society (UK), and is a member of five national academies: in Russia, China, Sweden, the UK and the US. He has served as chairman of the NASA Technology and Commercialization Advisory Committee, and was a member of the Presidential Advisory Committee on the Space Station Redesign, and the U.S. Human Spaceflight Plans (Augustine) Committee. He was a visiting lecturer at the Moscow Aviation Institute, and is a Honorary Professor at Tsinghua University in Beijing. He was a finalist in the NASA Astronaut selection in 1980. He has founded five entrepreneurial companies, and currently sits on several corporate boards. He received an S.B., S.M., and Sc.D. in Aerospace Engineering from MIT.
William R. Gray, III
William R. Gray III is the chief test pilot of the USAF Test Pilot School (TPS) at Edwards AFB, California where he is responsible for aircraft and simulator curriculum events. He also provides flight test instruction in the T-38, F-16, and NF-16D variable-stability research aircraft. Gray joined the USAF TPS as its first civil service flight instructor in 2004, after a twenty-year Air Force career that included operational instructor pilot assignments in the T-37 and FB-111A, and flight test assignments in the F-15, F-15E, and F-117. He was the chief test pilot for the source selection flight test campaign that led to the selection of the T-6A. Gray’s last active duty assignment was providing safety oversight for hundreds of USAF flight test programs including the F-22, the CV- 22, the X-32, the X-35, the Global Hawk, and the YAL-1A Airborne Laser. During his time at the USAF TPS he has conducted original research into aircraft handling qualities, created novel flight test techniques and risk mitigation tools, designed and built an in-house reconfigurable flight simulator now used in multiple curriculum events and for unmanned aircraft flight control, modernized or redesigned several dozen complex flight test training events, mentored dozens of student and staff flight test teams conducting real-world concept exploration and risk reduction flight test programs, and introduced a series of talent- challenging flight evaluations into the student selection process. Gray’s flying career has spanned over 35 years, 6,000 hours, and 100 aircraft types including everything from hang gliders to the AV-8B Harrier. Gray has been awarded the AIAA Chanute Flight Test Award, the Society of Experimental Test Pilots (SETP) J. H. Doolittle and Ray E. Tenhoff Awards, and he is a Distinguished Alumnus of the USAF TPS. He is a fellow of SETP and president of its Board of Directors, and is a senior member of AIAA. Gray holds a M.S. in mechanical engineering from California State University at Fresno and a B.S. in physics from the United States Air Force Academy.
Susan J. Helms
Lt. Gen (r) Susan J. Helms (NAE) is principal and owner of Orbital Visions, LLC. She was commissioned from the U.S. Air Force Academy in1980, the first class to admit women into the ranks of the cadet corps. Upon graduation, she served as an F-15 and F-16 weapons separation engineer and a flight test engineer. Following completion of her Masters of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University, she served on the faculty of the U.S. Air Force Academy in the Department of Aeronautics. She was subsequently selected to attend the USAF Test Pilot School, Flight Test Engineer Course, Edwards AFB, CA, completing the year long school as a Distinguished Graduate. After graduation, she served as project officer on the CF-18 aircraft as a U.S. Air Force Exchange Officer to the Canadian Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment, at Cold Lake AFB, Alberta, Canada. As a flight test engineer, Lt Gen (R) Helms has flown in 30 types of U.S. and Canadian military aircraft. Selected by NASA in January 1990, Lt Gen (R) Helms became an astronaut in July 1991. On Jan. 13, 1993, then an Air Force major and a member of the space shuttle Endeavour crew, she became the first U.S. military woman in space. She flew on STS-54 (1993), STS-64 (1994), STS-78 (1996) and STS-101 (2000), and served aboard the International Space Station (ISS) as a member of the Expedition-2 crew (2001). A veteran of five space flights, Lt Gen (R) Helms has logged 211 days in space, and accomplished a spacewalk of eight hours, 56 minutes, a world record that stands today. After 12 years at NASA, Lt Gen (R) Helms transferred to Air Force Space Command in 2002. Over the next 12 years, she served in numerous staff positions and commanded the 45th Space Wing at Cape Canaveral AFS, FL. Her staff assignments include tours at Headquarters Air Force Space Command, Air Education and Training Command, and U.S. Strategic Command, where she was the Director of Plans and Policy (J5). From 2011 to 2014 Lt Gen Helms led more than 20,500 personnel responsible for providing missile warning, space superiority, space situational awareness, satellite operations, space launch and range operations. At the same time as Commander, JFCC SPACE, she directed all assigned and attached space forces providing tailored, responsive, local and global space effects in support of national and combatant commander objectives. Lt Gen Helms retired from military service in 2014. She holds a B.S., aeronautical engineering, U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO and an M.S. for aeronautics/astronautics from Stanford University, CA.
John C. Karas
John C. Karas retired as the vice president and general manager for Ground Based Strategic Deterrents at Lockheed Martin Space Systems. He is also deputy director for the Strategic and Missile Defense Systems, leading programs such as the Trident II D5 Fleet Ballistic Missile, Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Reentry Systems, Targets and Countermeasures and directed energy technology development. Prior to that, he was vice president and general manager, Human Space Flight for Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company where he was responsible for coordinating the corporation’s capabilities and assets for human space exploration. This included Shuttle operations on the company’s External Tank program and he serves on the advisory board of United Space Alliance. Likewise, exploration programs such as the Orion multi-purpose crew vehicle are under his direction. He also served as vice president, Business Development, and was responsible for strategic planning, advanced technology concepts. Karas was also director of the Advanced Space Systems and Technology department. In this position, he was responsible for management of operations research, system predesign, and technology development. Under his direction, the department focused on structures and propulsion technologies, including Single Stage to Orbit and National Aerospace Plane cryogenic systems and contracted R&D. Karas also served as manager of Advanced Avionics Systems; this group was responsible for new technology demonstration. These new technologies included developments such as adaptive GN&C, multiple fault-tolerant controls, a totally electric vehicle using electromechanical actuators and artificial intelligence. Mr. Karas earned his B.S. in electrical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and has taken advanced course work toward a M.S. in engineering and a M.B.A. in business administration.

Nicholas D. Lappos
Nicholas D. Lappos is a senior technical fellow for Advanced Technology at Sikorsky, a Lockheed Martin Company. He is also chairman of the board of the Vertical Lift Consortium, an industry consortium established to work collaboratively with the U.S. Government to develop and transition innovative vertical lift technologies to rapidly and affordably meet warfighter needs. He was elected to the Academy of Distinguished Engineering Alumni of Georgia Tech and awarded the Sir Barnes Wallis Medal by the UK Guild of Air Pilots and Navigators. He is an honorary fellow and technical fellow of the American Helicopter Society and received the Frederick Feinberg Award as most outstanding pilot and the Society of Experimental Test Pilots Tenhoff Award. Lappos holds 23 U.S. patents and three FAI world speed records. He has authored numerous technical papers for the American Helicopter Society, the Royal Aeronautical Society and the SAE and written articles for magazines such as Rotor and Wing, Interavia, and has a regular column in HeliOps Magazine. Lappos was elected chairman of the board of directors of the Vertical Lift Consortium in twice. Lappos is a U.S. Army Vietnam veteran, and served as a Cobra attack helicopter pilot. He was awarded the Bronze Star and the Republic of Vietnam’s Cross of Gallantry. Serving as a test pilot for Sikorsky for over 27 years, he has flown over 70 different helicopter types. With over 7,500 hours flight time, Lappos served as chief R&D test pilot for over 12 years. Lappos has served on numerous technical committees for NASA, the American Helicopter Society, the FAA and NATO’s Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development committees and working groups. Lappos has participated in the development of serval flight systems such as the S76, UH-60, RAH- 66, ABC, Fantail, Shadow, Fly-by-wire demonstrator, CH-53E, S92. He was the program manager for the S-92 program during its development, certification and introduction into production. During that time, the National Aeronautic Association awarded the S-92 Industry Team the Robert J. Collier Trophy. He has a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

George T. Ligler
George T. Ligler (NAE) is the proprietor of GTL Associates, a consultancy which has provided systems integration/engineering and product management services to clients on three continents. Since August 2018, Dr. Ligler has also been, on a half-time academic year basis, the Dean’s Eminent Professor of the Practice in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill/North Carolina State University Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering. He has served as a subject matter expert since the 1990’s to support the Federal Aviation Administration’s implementation of both satellite-based navigation and Automatic Dependent Surveillance- Broadcast (ADS-B) as components of the Next Generation Air Transportation System. He is currently co-chair of RTCA Special Committee-159 (Navigation Equipment Using the Global Navigation Satellite System) and is a former founding co-chair of RTCA Special Committee-228 (Minimum Operational Performance Standards for Unmanned Aircraft Systems). Dr. Ligler received the RTCA Achievement Award, RTCA’s highest award, in both 2006 and 2017 (co- recipient) for his contributions to satellite-based navigation system initiatives, ADS-B, and the development of standards for unmanned aircraft systems. Dr. Ligler is the current Chair of NAE Section 12, Special Fields and Interdisciplinary Engineering. Dr. Ligler holds a D.Phil. in mathematics and computation from the University of Oxford, with his studies supported by a Rhodes Scholarship.

Lester L. Lyles
General Lester L. Lyles (NAE) is an independent consultant. He retired from the U.S. Air Force (USAF) in 2003 as commander of the Air Force Material Command at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (AFB). General Lyles entered the USAF in 1968 as a distinguished graduate of the Air Force ROTC program. He served in various positions, including program element monitor of the Short- Range Attack Missile at USAF Headquarters (USAF/HQ), special assistant and aide-de- camp to the commander of Air Force Systems Command (AFSC), chief of the Avionics Division in the F-16 Systems Program Office, director of Tactical Aircraft Systems at AFSC headquarters, and as director of the Medium-Launch Vehicles Program and Space-Launch Systemsoffices. General Lyles became the AFSC headquarters assistant deputy chief of staff for requirements in 1989 and deputy chief of staff for requirements in 1990. In 1992, he became vice commander of the Ogden Air Logistics Center at Hill AFB. He served as commander of the center until 1994, when he was assigned to command the Space and Missile Systems Center at Los Angeles AFB. In 1996, General Lyles became the director of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization. In 1999, he was assigned as vice chief of staff at USAF/HQ. He served on the NASA Advisory Council. His numerous awards include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Astronautics Engineer of the Year from the National Space Club, the National Black Engineer of the Year Award, Honorary Doctor of Laws from New Mexico State University, and from Urbana University ; NASA's Distinguished Public Service Medal for serving on the President's Commission on Implementing the U.S. Space Exploration Policy. In 2009, General Lyles served on the Augustine Space Committee for developing the agenda for NASA’s human spaceflight missions. He served on the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board in the White House from 2009-2013, and , the State Department’s International Security Advisory Board from 2013-2017. Gen. Lyles currently chairs the NASA Advisory Council. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Howard University and his M.S. in mechanical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology Program at New Mexico State University.

Valerie M. Manning
Valerie M. Manning is the senior vice president of Customer Support at Airbus. She is responsible for the relationship and interaction between Airbus and all aircraft owners, operators, and maintainers of the more than 9,000 Airbus aircraft in service around the world. As such, Manning leads a large team of professionals residing globally— including the worldwide field service team, the customer support directors, the Airbus warranty program, credit and cash management, and all support or services contracts from initial aircraft sale until aircraft decommissioning. Manning has more than 25 years of service in government and civilian roles at Airbus, the United States Air Force, and McKinsey and Company. Prior to her current role, Manning served as vice president and head of Airbus Upgrade Services, where she led the sale, development, certification, and delivery of optional modifications to airframes, cabins, and systems for the Airbus fleet. At the parent company of Airbus, EADS (now merged with Airbus), Manning has served as the vice president and chief of staff to the Chief Technical Officer (CTO). She has also served on A380 and A400M technical assessment teams and has managed an EADS technology development and commercialization program. In her first role with EADS, Manning served as director of Strategy and Mergers and Acquisitions in North America. This position was preceded by employment as a consultant with McKinsey and Company, concentrating on aerospace and high-tech (internet) consulting. She also consulted privately in multidisciplinary optimization and supersonic design. Before McKinsey, Manning was employed General Motors as an aerodynamics engineer. She began her career in the U.S. Air Force and has served continuously on active duty or in the reserves since her commission upon graduation from university. This has included assignments in Manpower at Kelly Air Force Base, Acquisitions Security at the Space and Missile Systems Center at Los Angeles Air Force Base, the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Secretariat, the Joint Reserve Directorate within the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and as a member of the U.S. Air Force World Class Athlete Program where she represented the Air Force around the world in athletics competitions and competed in two Olympic Trials. Manning is a graduate of Air War College and completed Advanced Joint Professional Military Education at National Defense University’s Joint Forces Staff College. She currently residing in Toulouse, France, is an active instrument- rated pilot, and an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Manning graduated from Princeton University with a B.S. in mechanical and aerospace engineering, going on to earn an M.S. and Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University with concentrations in supersonic aircraft design, natural laminar flow, and multidisciplinary optimization. She complemented these degrees with a minor concentration in Orthopaedic Biomechanics.

Parviz Moin
Parvis Moin (NAS/NAE) is the Franklin P. and Caroline M. Johnson Professor of Mechanical Engineering and the director of the Center for Turbulence Research (CTR) at Stanford University. Established in 1987, CTR is devoted to fundamental studies of multi-physics turbulent flows and is widely recognized as the international focal point for turbulence research, attracting diverse groups of researchers from engineering, mathematics, and physics. Dr. Moin pioneered the use of direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation techniques for the study of turbulence physics, control, and modeling of fluid mechanics, and has written widely on the structure of turbulent shear flows. His current research interests include hypersonic flows, two-phase flows, aerodynamic noise, hydro-acoustics, aero- optics, propulsion, numerical methods for multi-scale problems, and low control. Dr. Moin is the co- editor of the Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics and associate editor of the Journal of Computational Physics. He is the recipient of the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, the AIAA Lawrence Sperry Award, American Physical Society (APS) Fluid Dynamics Prize, AIAA Fluid Dynamics Award, and NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal. Dr. Moin was inducted into the Royal Spanish Academy of Engineering in 2014. He is a fellow of APS and AIAA, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Moin received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Stanford University.
Darryll J. Pines
Darryll J. Pines (NAE) is the president of the University of Maryland, College Park. He was formerly dean of the Clark School of Engineering and the Nariman Farvardin professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland. His research interests include smart structures, structural dynamics and control; guidance, navigation, and control of aerospace vehicles. Previously, Dr. Pines was a member of the Technical Staff at Lawrence Livermore Lab, and served as Program Manager at DARPA. Dr. Pines is a reviewer for the Journal of Aircraft, the Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics, and the Journal of the American Helicopter Society. He earned his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Robie I. Samanta Roy
Robie I. Samanta Roy is Chief Operating Officer of Electra.aero, a next-gen aerospace company devoted to sustainable urban and regional mobility. Dr. Samanta Roy previously was with Lockheed Martin where he was initially the Corporate Vice President for Technology Strategy and Innovation under the CTO and then the VP for Technology in their Government Affairs office. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, Dr. Samanta Roy was a professional staff member with the Senate Armed Services Committee from 2010 to 2014 with the portfolio of the Department of Defense’s wide spectrum of science and technology- related activities. He came to that position from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy where he was the Assistant Director for Space and Aeronautics from 2005 to 2009 and was responsible for space and aeronautics activities ranging from human space flight to the Next Generation Air Transportation System. Prior to that, he served as a strategic analyst at the Congressional Budget Office and as a research staff member in the Systems Evaluation Division of the Institute for Defense Analyses in Alexandria, Virginia. Dr. Samanta Roy is a Fellow and former member of the Board of Trustees of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He also chaired the Industry Relations Committee of the International Astronautical Federation from 2015-2019 and continues to serve on the FAA’s Drone Advisory Committee and with the U.S. Air Force Reserve. Dr. Samanta Roy earned his Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT. He earned a master’s degree in space policy from George Washington University and diplomas from the International Space University and Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris.

Wanda A. Sigur
Wanda A. Sigur (NAE) is an independent consultant. She is retired from the position of vice president/general manager of civil space, space systems for Lockheed Martin Corporation. In this capacity, she had executive responsibility for national space programs relating to human space flight and space science missions; including planetary, solar, astrophysical, and Earth remote sensing for civil government agencies. These major programs included the Orion Multi- purpose Crew Vehicle, Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, GOES-R weather satellites; the Juno, Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL), Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN), Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey, and Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security- Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) planetary missions, and the company’s nuclear space power programs. Her responsibilities included research and science objectives and early development investments for the wide range of leap- frog technologies necessary to support anticipated space forward steps. Previously, Sigur was vice president of engineering for space systems for Lockheed Martin Corporation. In this capacity, she was responsible for leading the corporation’s space systems engineering product technical validation for military space, strategic and defense missiles, commercial satellites and civil space, including personnel development, engineering process development and deployment, engineering tools and training, with emphasis on ensuring operational excellence and first-time-right engineering. She has been an active participant in many Academies’ studies associated with future space technologies, particularly materials technologies, thermal protection systems, on-orbit materials processing, spacecraft design, on-orbit satellite servicing, energy systems, and human space exploration. Sigur received a B.S. for mechanical and materials science from Rice University and a M.B.A. from Tulane University. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and the chair of the Space Technology Industry- Government-University Roundtable (STIGUR).

David W. Thompson
David W. Thompson (NAE) an independent consultant for Orbital ATK Inc. (retired). He co- founded Orbital Sciences Corporation and served as its president and CEO from 1982 until 2018. Under his leadership, Orbital grew from a start-up to a $5.5 billion/ 14,000-employee enterprise by creating affordable space-related products for commercial satellite operators and government agencies. Before co-founding Orbital, Thompson was special assistant to the president of Hughes Aircraft Company’s Missile Systems Group and was an engineer at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. As a college student, he worked on the first Mars landing missions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and on space shuttle projects at NASA’s Langley Research Center and Johnson Space Center. Mr. Thompson holds an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School, an M.S. from the California Institute of Technology, and a B.S. from M.I.T.
Anthony M. Waas
Anthony M. Waas is the Richard A. Auhll Department Chair of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor where he holds the Felix Pawlowski Collegiate Chair since September 1, 2018. Prior to that he was the Boeing Egtvedt Endowed Chair Professor and Department Chair in the William E. Boeing Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the University of Washington, Seattle. Professor Waas’s research interests are: computational modeling of lightweight composite structures, robotically manufactured aerospace structures, 3D printing in aerospace, damage tolerance of composites, mechanics of textile composites and data science applications in aerospace engineering. Professor Waas was the Felix Pawlowski Collegiate Chair Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Director, Composite Structures Laboratory at the University of Michigan, from 1988 to 2014, prior to joining UW in January 2015. Professor Waas is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the American Society of Mechanical Engineering (ASME), and the American Academy of Mechanics (AAM). He is a recipient of several best paper awards, the 2016 AIAA/ASME SDM award, the AAM Jr. Research Award, the ASC Outstanding Researcher Award, and several distinguished awards from the University of Michigan. He received the AIAA-ASC James H. Starnes, Jr. Award, 2017, for seminal contributions to composite structures and materials and for mentoring students and other young professionals. In 2017, Professor Waas was elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences, and in 2018 to the European Academy of Sciences and Arts. In 2019, Prof. Waas was inducted as an ICCM World Fellow, and in 2020, he won the ASME/Boeing Best Paper Award, AIAA ICME Prize, multiple best paper awards and the ASME Warner T. Koiter Medal for lifelong contributions to understanding compressive instabilities in fiber reinforced composites. He was also elected as a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, UK. in 2020. Waas obtained his B.Sc. in Aeronautics with First Class Honors from Imperial College, London, 1982, the ACGI, the MS and Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Applied Mathematics (minor) from Caltech.
Michael I. Yarymovych
Michael I. Yarymovych (NAE) is president of Sarasota Space Associates, an aerospace consultant providing services to the aerospace industry and government. He was Senior Fellow of the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) and has served on numerous SAB, AFSB and Defense Science Board studies. He retired from the Boeing Company in 1998 as Vice President of International Technology in the Information, Space and Defense Systems organization. Prior to the merger of Rockwell International with Boeing he was Vice President and Associate Center Director of the Systems Development Center, which focused the corporation’s resources on new high technology advanced concepts requiring the skills of many divisions. He had joined Rockwell in 1977 as Vice President Engineering of the Aerospace Operations in leadership positions of programs such as the Space Shuttle, Global Positioning System and the B1B strategic aircraft. Dr. Yarymovych completed his B. Eng. Sc. in aeronautical engineering magna cum laude at New York University, earned his M.S. in engineering mechanics from Columbia University and the D. Eng. Sc. in engineering mechanics also from Columbia, as a Guggenheim Fellow.

Sherrie L. Zacharius
Sherrie L. Zacharius retired as vice president of technology and laboratory operations at The Aerospace Corporation, June 1 2019. She was responsible for more than 300 scientists and staff in the electronics and photonics, space materials, and space science applications laboratories, where research is conducted on space materials, propulsion, remote sensing, batteries, solar cells, and the space environment. She was responsible for corporate technical strategic planning efforts and also managed the Aerospace Technical Investment Program, which includes the corporation’s independent research and development budget. Before assuming her current role, she served as general manager of Physical Sciences Laboratories. Prior to that, she supported the Global Positioning System as principal director of User Systems in the Navigation Division. In this role she was responsible for leadership and management of Aerospace resources used in the development of military user equipment, satellite operations, and the Nuclear Detonation Detection Systems within the Global Positioning System Joint Program Office. Zacharius has been involved in both independent research and development and staff planning activities across the corporation and has published papers on space applications of polymers and composites. Zacharius is an associate fellow of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics, and is a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, the Tau Beta Pi Honor Society, and Women in Aerospace. She is currently serving on her third independent review panel for the Department of Energy. In 2017, Zacharius received the Chief of Staff of the Air Force Award for Exceptional Public Service, for outstanding support to the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. Dr. Zacharius received her Ph.D. in polymer science and engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Events


Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

The 178th meeting of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board.  Some sessions will be open to the public.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
N/A

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  aseb@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3477

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Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

The 176th meeting of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board.  Some sessions will be open to the public.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
N/A

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  aseb@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3477

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

The 174th meeting of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board.  Some sessions will be open to the public.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
N/A

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  aseb@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3477

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

The 172nd meeting of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board.  Some sessions will be open to the public.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
N/A

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  aseb@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3477

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

The 170th meeting of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board.  Some sessions will be open to the public.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
N/A

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  aseb@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3477

Agenda
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Supporting File(s)
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Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

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Publications

Publications

No data present.