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Project Information

Project Information


Climate Conversations: Pathways to Action


Project Scope:

Climate Conversations: Pathways to Action events feature conversations between experts, stakeholders, and communicators from across science, engineering, and medicine. The webinars build on - but aren't limited to - recent Academies reports, and focus on critical and timely topics to inform the rapidly changing science-to-action landscape. Potential future topics include: extreme events, international collaboration, and health and climate. 

The webinars are scheduled to occur from 3-4 pm ET on the third Thursday of every month through 2021, with the exception of August.

Subscribe to the Climate at the National Academies newsletter for updates, or check back here for more details.

Status: Current

PIN: DELS-BASCPR-21-P-340

RSO: Reich, Alex

Topic(s):

Earth Sciences


Parent Project(s): N/A


Child Project(s): N/A



Geographic Focus:
North America

Committee Membership



Committee Membership

No data present.


Events


Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

Join us for a conversation about reducing emissions in the health sector and how those efforts can inform climate action in other sectors. 

Climate change exacerbates and creates new risks for human health through threats such as extreme heat and vector-borne diseases. As part of its charge to protect human health and well-being, the health sector is beginning to tackle the challenge of decreasing its greenhouse gas emissions. Victor Dzau (President of the National Academy of Medicine) moderated a conversation with Gary Cohen (Health Care Without Harm) and Jodi Sherman (Yale University) about the challenges of decarbonizing the health sector, how those efforts fit into broader efforts to address climate change, and lessons that can be shared with other sectors.

View the webinar below. If the video or audio isn't playing for you, try refreshing your page.

Climate Conversations: Pathways to Action is a monthly webinar series from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that aims to convene high-level, cross-cutting, nonpartisan conversations about issues relevant to national policy action on climate change.

 

Participant Bios

Gary Cohen is the co-founder and president of Health Care Without Harm, created to transform the health care sector to be environmentally sustainable and support the health and climate resilience of communities. He has helped build coalitions and networks globally to address health impacts related to climate change and toxic chemical exposure. A pioneer in the environmental health movement, he was awarded the Champion of Change Award for Climate Change and Public Health by the White House in 2013 and received a MacArthur Fellowship and “Genius Grant” in 2015.

Jodi Sherman is Associate Professor of Anesthesiology at Yale School of Medicine and Associate Professor of Epidemiology in Environmental Health Sciences at the Yale School of Public Health, where she is the founding director of the Program on Healthcare Environmental Sustainability. She also serves as the Medical Director of Sustainability for Yale New Haven Health. As an internationally recognized researcher in the emerging field of sustainability in healthcare, her research in life cycle environmental emissions assessment seeks to establish sustainability metrics to guide clinical decision-making, health care administration, and public policy.

Victor J. Dzau, M.D., is the President of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and Vice Chair of the National Research Council. Dr. Dzau is Chancellor Emeritus and James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of Medicine at Duke University and the past President and CEO of the Duke University Health System. At the NAM, he launched the Grand Challenge in Human Health and Climate Change to reverse the negative effects of climate change on health and social equity by activating the entire biomedical community, communicating and educating the public about climate change and health, driving changes through research, innovation and policy, and leading bold action to decarbonize the health care sector.

Disclosure: The webinar participants have no financial or commercial relationships to disclose related to this online educational activity. The views expressed in the conversation are those of the participants and do not necessarily represent the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Amy Mitsumori
Contact Email:  amitsumori@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

Join us for a conversation that connects the policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions with the science of measuring those emissions.

As the world gathers at COP26 and commits to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, it is critical that our scientific capabilities to monitor those emissions directly informs policies and supports accountability. Valerie Karplus (Carnegie Mellon University) moderated a conversation with Arlyn Andrews (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and Bart Croes (California Air Resources Board, formerly) about how scientists and policymakers work together at different scales to monitor and verify emissions, and about how that knowledge can help determine if approaches to reduce emissions are effective at addressing climate change.

Climate Conversations: Pathways to Action is a monthly webinar series from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that aims to convene high-level, cross-cutting, nonpartisan conversations about issues relevant to national policy action on climate change.

Participant Bios

Arlyn Andrews leads the Carbon Cycle Greenhouse Gases group within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Global Monitoring Laboratory. As a leading expert in greenhouse gas measurements and their interpretation, she has contributed to the development of carbon dioxide and methane sensors for surface, aircraft, balloon and satellite platforms and to NOAA's CarbonTracker modeling framework for estimating greenhouse gas emissions and removals.

Bart Croes is the retired Chief of the Research Division for the California Air Resources Board, where he was responsible for air quality standards, emissions and atmospheric processes research, and greenhouse gas mitigation. He has published peer-reviewed articles on emission inventory evaluation, air quality data analysis, and climate change impacts on California.

Valerie Karplus is an Associate Professor in the department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. Karplus studies resource and environmental management in organizations across diverse national and industry contexts. She is an expert on China’s energy system and its impacts on air pollution and climate change, working collaboratively with scholars in China for nearly 20 years.

Disclosure: The webinar participants have no financial or commercial relationships to disclose related to this online educational activity. The views expressed in the conversation are those of the participants and do not necessarily represent the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://tracking-emissions.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Amy Mitsumori
Contact Email:  amitsumori@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

A conversation about how to prepare for and face increasingly extreme events in a changing climate.

 

A recording of the webinar is available to view below.

About this Event

As a result of climate change, extreme events such as floods, wildfires, storms, and heat waves are already becoming more dangerous and destructive. Marshall Shepherd (University of Georgia) moderated a conversation with Craig Fugate (former FEMA Administrator) and Marissa Aho (Washington State Department of Natural Resources) about the connections between climate change and extreme events, and about how communities and governments at different scales can plan for and become more resilient to the risks from extreme events today and into the future.

Climate Conversations: Pathways to Action is a monthly webinar series from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that aims to convene high-level, cross-cutting, nonpartisan conversations about issues relevant to national policy action on climate change.

Participant Bios

Marissa Aho is the Policy Director and Chief Resilience Officer for the Washington State Department of Natural Resources. She previously served as the Chief Resilience Officer for both the City of Houston and the City of Los Angeles, where she led the development and implementation of the cities’ resilience strategies, which focused on preparing for catastrophic events and addressing chronic stressors.

Craig Fugate served as President Obama’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Administrator from 2009-2017 and currently provides senior level advice and consultation in the area of disaster management and resiliency policy. He led FEMA through multiple record-breaking disaster years and oversaw the Federal Government’s response to major events such as the Joplin and Moore Tornadoes, Hurricane Sandy, Hurricane Matthew, and the 2016 Louisiana flooding.

J. Marshall Shepherd is the Director of the University of Georgia’s Atmospheric Sciences Program and the Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor of Geography and Atmospheric Sciences. A leading international expert in weather and climate, he is the former President of the American Meteorological Society, a Senior Contributor to Forbes magazine, and the host of The Weather Channel’s award-winning Sunday talk show Weather Geeks.

Disclosure: The webinar participants have no financial or commercial relationships to disclose related to this online educational activity. The views expressed in the conversation are those of the participants and do not necessarily represent the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://extreme-events.eventbrite.com/

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Amy Mitsumori
Contact Email:  amitsumori@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

A conversation about the connections between climate change and security.

A recording of the webinar is available to view below.

 

About this Event

Climate change is impacting and exacerbating risks to security at home and abroad. Lisa Friedman (The New York Times) moderated a conversation with Erin Sikorsky (The Center for Climate and Security) and Swathi Veeravalli (U.S. Africa Command) about how different parts of the security community are thinking about climate risks, what implications these risks hold for policy and planning, and where there are capacity gaps or aspects of climate security that need more research.

Climate Conversations: Pathways to Action is a monthly webinar series from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that aims to convene high-level, cross-cutting, nonpartisan conversations about issues relevant to national policy action on climate change.


Participant Bios

Erin Sikorsky is the Deputy Director of the Center for Climate and Security, and the Director of the International Military Council on Climate and Security. Previously, she served as the Deputy Director of the Strategic Futures Group on the National Intelligence Council in the U.S., where she co-authored the quadrennial Global Trends report and led the U.S. intelligence community’s environmental and climate security analysis. She is also the founding chair of the Climate Security Advisory Council, a Congressionally mandated group designed to facilitate coordination between the intelligence community and U.S. government scientific agencies.

Swathi Veeravalli is a Foreign Affairs Specialist at United States Africa Command. She is an interdisciplinary research scientist with expertise in developing the capability to better understand how climate variability impacts humans and the environment, particularly related to how compound climate-fragility risks threaten U.S. and international security.

Lisa Friedman is a reporter on the New York Times climate desk, focusing on climate and environmental policy in Washington D.C. She has covered nine international climate talks and chased climate-related stories from the bottom of a Chinese coal mine to the top of snow-capped Himalaya Mountains.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://climate-security.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Alex Reich
Contact Email:  areich@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

A conversation on the role of infrastructure and engineering in building a climate resilient future.

About this Event

Mariette DiChristina (Boston University) moderated a conversation with John L. Anderson (President of the National Academy of Engineering) and Thomas P. Bostick (former Commanding General of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) about the different kinds of infrastructure and systems susceptible to climate impacts, the wide range of engineering solutions that can play a role in building a resilient and net-zero future and the ways to help prepare the next generation of engineers for such a monumental task.

A recording of the webinar is available to view below.

For those who are interested, please see these related issues of The Bridge, from the National Academy of Engineering: Engineering and Climate Change (spring 2020), Engineering for Disaster Resilience (summer 2019), and A Vision for the Future of America’s Infrastructure (summer 2018).

Climate Conversations: Pathways to Action is a new monthly webinar series from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that aims to convene high-level, cross-cutting, nonpartisan conversations about issues relevant to national policy action on climate change.

 

Participant Bios

John L. Anderson is the President of the National Academy of Engineering. He was most recently Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering and president of the Illinois Institute of Technology. Before that he was provost and executive vice president at Case Western Reserve University, following 28 years at Carnegie Mellon University and 5 years at Cornell University.

Thomas P. Bostick is a Senior Executive with more than 30 years of experience in both the public and private sectors. He served as the 53rd Chief of Engineers and Commanding General of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, where he was responsible for most of the Nation’s civil works infrastructure and military construction. An expert in crisis response, he controlled the nuclear codes during the tragic events of 9-11, and he led the nation’s recovery effort following Hurricane Sandy.

Mariette DiChristina is the dean of the College of Communication at Boston University and a nationally recognized science journalist, most recently as editor-in-chief and executive vice president of Scientific American.

 


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://infrastructure.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Alex Reich
Contact Email:  areich@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

A conversation on the possible risks and benefits of solar geoengineering as part of a portfolio of responses to climate change.

Solar geoengineering refers to a set of possible strategies to help reduce global warming by increasing the amount of solar radiation reflected away from Earth. Frank Sesno (George Washington University) moderated a conversation with Marcia McNutt (President of the National Academy of Sciences) and Chris Field (Stanford University) about how and whether solar geoengineering could fit into broader efforts to address climate change, the role of research in helping inform decisions about implementation, and the complex global ethics and governance issues associated with solar geoengineering. The webinar included discussion of the new National Academies report Reflecting Sunlight: Recommendations for Solar Geoengineering Research and Research Governance, which was chaired by Dr. Field.

A recording of the webinar is available to view below.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://solargeoengineering.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Alex Reich
Contact Email:  areich@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

A conversation about the social cost of carbon and equitable climate policy in the United States.

The social cost of carbon is a metric used for incorporating the economic impacts of carbon emissions into federal decision-making. Justin Worland (TIME) moderated a conversation with Richard Newell (Resources for the Future) and Rachel Cleetus (Union of Concerned Scientists) about the social cost of carbon, its importance for addressing the climate change challenge, and considerations for how it can advance equitable and economically sound policies. The conversation also touched on the social cost of other greenhouse gases.

View a recording of the webinar below.

Climate Conversations: Pathways to Action is a new monthly webinar series from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that aims to convene high-level, cross-cutting, nonpartisan conversations about issues relevant to national policy action on climate change.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://costofcarbon.eventbrite.com/

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Alex Reich
Contact Email:  areich@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

A conversation about the climate crisis and COVID-19 pandemic, and steps to a more resilient and equitable future.

Almost exactly one year after U.S. COVID-19 lockdowns began, Laura Helmuth (Scientific American) moderated a conversation between Georges Benjamin (APHA) and Kris Ebi (University of Washington) that was both reflective about the intersections between climate change and COVID-19 over the last year, and forward-looking at the state of progress on addressing these issues in the U.S.

A recording of the webinar is available to view below.

Climate Conversations: Pathways to Action is a new monthly webinar series from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that aims to convene high-level, cross-cutting, nonpartisan conversations about issues relevant to national policy action on climate change.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://climate-covid19-convo.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Alex Reich
Contact Email:  areich@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

A conversation about what it means to decarbonize, and about quick and equitable actions to put the U.S. on a path to net-zero emissions by 2050. 

The recording of the webinar may be viewed below.

You can access the National Academies' recent report, Accelerating Decarbonization of the U.S. Energy System (2021), here.

Climate Conversations: Pathways to Action is a new monthly webinar series from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine that aims to convene high-level, cross-cutting, nonpartisan conversations about issues relevant to national policy action on climate change.

For the inaugural webinar, Mariette DiChristina (Boston University) moderated a conversation with Ben Preston (RAND) and Steve Pacala (Princeton University) about the most actionable opportunities for decarbonization in the United States. The webinar included discussion of the new National Academies report, Accelerating Decarbonization of the United States Energy System, which was chaired by Dr. Pacala.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://climate-convo-decarb.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Alex Reich
Contact Email:  areich@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

Publications

No data present.