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Project Information

Project Information


National Science, Technology, and Security Roundtable


Project Scope:

The open exchange of scientific and technical information has long been a fundamental tenet of science and an important feature of academic and federally-funded research in the United States. Recent reports of foreign governments acquiring information and materials from foreign students and faculty studying and working in U.S. institutions and from U.S. faculty engaged in collaborative research activities abroad are raising concerns that the open exchange of U.S. scientific and technical know-how may be presenting new national and economic security risks in an increasingly global and competitive environment. NASEM will establish a National Science, Technology, and Security Roundtable to provide a neutral venue where individuals from the national intelligence and law enforcement communities can meet with representatives from industry and the academic research community to discuss current threats, benefits, and potential risks. The Roundtable will: 1) explore critical issues related to protecting U.S. national and economic security; 2) identify and consider security threats and risks associated with federally funded research and development; 3) identify effective approaches to communicating threats and risks; 4) share best practices for addressing and mitigating the threats and risks; and 5) examine potential near- and long-terms responses by stakeholders in the research enterprise to mitigate and address the risks associated with foreign threats.  Proceedings of the Roundtable discussions will be produced as will an overarching summary at the end of four years.

Status: Current

PIN: PGA-POLICY-20-15

RSO: Turekian, Vaughan

Topic(s):

Agriculture
Behavioral and Social Sciences
Biology and Life Sciences
Computers and Information Technology
Conflict and Security Issues
Earth Sciences
Engineering and Technology
Health and Medicine
Industry and Labor
Math, Chemistry, and Physics
Space and Aeronautics
Policy for Science and Technology


Parent Project(s): N/A


Child Project(s): N/A



Geographic Focus:
North America

Committee Membership


John C. Gannon - (Co-Chair)
John C. Gannon, PhD, is the former Chairman of the National Intelligence Council. He is currently an adjunct professor in the graduate Security Studies Program at Georgetown University. He served in numerous position at the Central Intelligence Agency, including as Director of European Analysis, as Deputy Director for Intelligence, Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Analysis and Production, and as Chairman of the National Intelligence Council. After his retirement from CIA in 2001, he served in the White House as the head of the intelligence team standing up the Department of Homeland Security and later on the Hill as the Staff Director of the House Select Committee on Homeland Security. He retired from the UK-owned BAE Systems in 2012 as President of the $1.7-billion Intelligence and Security Sector, which supported intelligence, defense, and homeland-security missions. In 2014-15, he was the Executive Director of the Congressionally-directed 9/11 Review Commission of the FBI. He earned his BA in psychology at Holy Cross College, and his MA and PhD in history at Washington University in St. Louis. Gannon is a member of Council on Foreign Relations, and the Board of Directors of Voices of September 11th. He has served on numerous committees of the National Academies.
Richard A. Meserve - (Co-Chair)
Richard A. Meserve, JD, PhD, (NAE) is President Emeritus of the Carnegie Institution for Science. He is also Senior Of Counsel at the law firm of Covington & Burling LLP. Before assuming the Carnegie presidency in April 2003, he was Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), having served since October 1999. He currently serves as Chairman of the International Nuclear Safety Group, chartered by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Early in his career, he served as legal counsel to the President’s science advisor, and was a law clerk to Justice Harry A. Blackmun of the United States Supreme Court and to Judge Benjamin Kaplan of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. Dr. Meserve received a B.A. from Tufts University, a J.D. from Harvard Law School, and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and has previously served on numerous committees and boards of NASEM.
Maria T. Zuber - (Co-Chair)
Maria T. Zuber, Ph. D., is Vice President for Research and E. A. Griswold Professor of Geophysics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. As Vice President for Research at MIT, she oversees the MIT Lincoln Laboratory and more than a dozen interdisciplinary research laboratories and centers. She is also responsible for intellectual property and research integrity and compliance, as well as research relationships with the federal government. A geophysicist, Dr. Zuber is a world leader in the study of planetary interior structure and deformation. She led the determination of the first high-resolution structural models for the Moon, Mars, and the asteroid Eros and she has developed a pioneering suite of quantitative models for the interpretation of planetary deformations. Dr. Zuber holds a B.A. in Astrophysics and Geology from the University of Pennsylvania, as well as a Sc.M. and a Ph.D. in Geophysics from Brown University. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.
Chaouki T. Abdallah
Chaouki T. Abdallah, PhD, joined the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) on September 1, 2018 as a Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering (ECE) and the Executive Vice President for Research (EVPR). Prior to that, he was a professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) at the University of New Mexico (UNM). He also served as Chair of the ECE department at UNM between 2005 and 2011, and as Provost of UNM between July 2011 and August 2018. Between January 2017 and February 2018, he also served as the 22nd President of UNM. As the chief research officer of Georgia Tech, Abdallah provides overall leadership for the Institute’s $1 billion portfolio of research, economic development and sponsored activities, including the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI), eleven interdisciplinary research institutes (IRIs), and related research administrative support units. He also serves on the executive committee of the Council on Research for the Association of Public & Land-Grant Universities (APLU), the executive committee for the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable (GUIRR), and the advisory committee for the Center on Measuring University Performance (MUP).

Abdallah obtained his Bachelor’s of Engineering (BE) degree from Youngstown State University in 1981, and his MS and PhD in Electrical Engineering from Georgia Tech in 1982, and 1988 respectively. Abdallah conducts research and teaches courses in the general area of systems theory with focus on control, communications, and computing systems. Abdallah is a senior member of IEEE, is a recipient of the IEEE Millennium medal, and is fluent in English, French, and Arabic. the requested bio.

Thomas Fingar
Thomas Fingar, PhD, is the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research (APARC) Distinguished Fellow in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), Stanford University. From 2005 through 2008, he served as deputy director of national intelligence for analysis and, concurrently, as chairman of the National Intelligence Council. Dr. Fingar served previously as assistant secretary of the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research (2000-2001 and 2004-2005), principal deputy assistant secretary (2001-2003), deputy assistant secretary for analysis (1994-2000), director of the Office of Analysis for East Asia and the Pacific (1989-1994), and chief of the China Division (1986-1989). Between 1975 and 1986 he held a number of positions at Stanford University, including senior research associate in the Center for International Security and Arms Control (CISAC). Dr. Fingar is a graduate of Cornell University (A.B. in Government and History, 1968), and Stanford University (MA, 1969 and PhD, 1977 both in political science).
Edward B. Held
Edward Bruce Held served for three decades as a clandestine operations officer of the Central Intelligence Agency. Following his retirement from CIA, Mr. Held served as Chief of Counterintelligence at Sandia National Laboratories where he earned the trust and support of the Sandia scientific community to implement a cost effective program to aggressively counter the activities of foreign intelligence services targeting the laboratory. Impressed by this successful strategy, Energy Secretary Steven Chu asked Mr. Held to return to federal service as Director of DOE’s Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence to lead all intelligence and counterintelligence activities at DOE and the DOE-owned national laboratories. Secretary Chu was particularly appreciative of Mr. Held’s success in expanding DOE strategic influence on national cyber defense policy. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper awarded Mr. Held the National Intelligence Superior Service Medal for “transforming the Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence to meet threats to the national security of the United States.” In June 2013, Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz asked Mr. Held to return to federal service again and assume the responsibilities of DOE Associate Deputy Secretary as well as Acting Undersecretary for Nuclear Security with responsibility for leading the National Nuclear Security Administration, a $12 Billion dollar enterprise with 35,000 government and laboratory employees. Secretary Moniz praised Mr. Held’s leadership of NNSA as “transformational”. He is currently retired.



J. Michael McQuade
J. Michael McQuade, PhD, is Carnegie Mellon University’s Vice President for Research, providing leadership for the University’s research enterprise and advocating for the role that science, technology and innovation play nationally and globally. From 2006 to 2018 he served as Senior Vice President for Science & Technology at United Technologies Corporation, where he provided strategic oversight and guidance for research, engineering and development activities that focused on a broad range of high-technology products and services for the global aerospace and building systems industries. Dr. McQuade held senior positions with technology development and business oversight at 3M, Imation and Eastman Kodak. He served as Vice President of 3M’s Medical Division and President of Eastman Kodak’s Health Imaging Business. He has broad experience managing basic technology development and the conversion of early stage research into business growth. Dr. McQuade holds Ph.D., M.S. and B.S. degrees in physics from Carnegie Mellon University. He served as a member of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board and is a member of the Defense Innovation Board.


Kathryn A. Moler
Kathryn Moler, PhD, is the Vice Provost and Dean of Research, the Marvin Chodorow Professor, and Professor of Applied Physics and of Physics at Stanford University. She conducts research in magnetic imaging, develops tools that measure nanoscale magnetic fields, and studies quantum materials and devices. Among other honors, she received a national Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, held a Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, received the William L. McMillan Award “for her fundamental studies of the superconducting pairing state, Josephson vortices, and the role of interlayer coupling in high-temperature superconductors,” and was elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society. To honor her sustained commitment to teaching, the American Association of Physics Teachers awarded her the Richtmyer Award for Outstanding Leadership in Physics Education, and Stanford appointed her as the Sapp Family Fellow in Undergraduate Education. She was previously the Senior Associate Dean of Natural Sciences in the School of Humanities and Sciences and the Director of the Stanford Nano Shared Facilities. She is a member of the NanoFront (TU-Delft/Leiden) Scientific Advisory Board and the Physics Frontier Center—Joint Quantum Institute Advisory Board.
John S. Binkley - (Ex Officio Member)
John Stephen Binkley, PhD, is Principal Deputy Director in the Office of Science at the U.S. Department of Energy.
Lyric A. Jorgenson - (Ex Officio Member)
Lyric Jorgenson, PhD, is the Acting Associate Director for Science Policy and the Acting Director of the Office of Science Policy at the NIH. In this position, she provides senior leadership in the development and oversight of cross-cutting biomedical research policies and programs considered to be of high-priority to NIH and the United States Government. Prior to this role, she served in numerous roles across the agency, including Deputy Director of the Office of Science Policy, and has led the development of numerous high impact science and policy initiatives such as the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS). Dr. Jorgenson also served as the Deputy Executive Director of the White House Cancer Moonshot Task Force in the Office of the Vice President in the Obama administration, where she directed and coordinated cancer-related activities across the Federal government and worked to leverage investments across sectors to dramatically accelerate progress in cancer prevention,

Dr. Jorgenson earned a doctorate degree from the Graduate Program for Neuroscience at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities where she conducted research in neurodevelopment with a focus on learning and memory systems. She earned a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Denison University.

Rebecca Keiser - (Ex Officio Member)
Rebecca Spyke Keiser, PhD, is Chief of Research Security Strategy and Policy at the National Science Foundation (NSF). She has served as head of OISE since coming to NSF in 2015. The office promotes an integrated, international strategy and manages internally focused programs that are innovative, catalytic and responsive to a broad range of NSF and national interests.

Keiser is the first CRSSP, a position established in March 2020 to ensure the security of federally funded research while maintaining open international collaboration. In this role, Keiser provides the NSF director with policy advice on all aspects of research security strategy. She also leads NSF’s efforts to develop and implement efforts to improve research security and the agency’s coordination with other federal agencies and the White House.

Michael S. Lauer - (Ex Officio Member)
Michael S. Lauer, MD, is the Deputy Director for Extramural Research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), where he serves as the principal scientific leader and advisor to the Director of the NIH on all matters relating to the substance, quality, and effectiveness of the NIH extramural research program and administration. He received education and training at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Albany Medical College, Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, and the NHLBI’s Framingham Heart Study. He spent 14 years at Cleveland Clinic as Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics. During his tenure at the Clinic, he led a federally funded internationally renowned clinical epidemiology program that applied big data from large-scale electronic health platforms to questions regarding the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular disease. From 2007 to 2015 he served as a Division Director at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), where promoted efforts to leverage big data infrastructure to enable high-efficiency population and clinical research and efforts to adopt a research funding culture that reflected data-driven policy. He has received numerous awards including the NIH Equal Employment Opportunity Award of the Year and the Arthur S. Flemming Award for Exceptional Federal Service in recognition of his efforts to grow a culture of learning and accountability.


Linda S. Lourie - (Ex Officio Member)
Linda S. Lourie, JD, is the Assistant Director for Research and Technology Security at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), where she leads implementation of the National Security Presidential Memorandum (NSPM)-33 on a National Security Strategy for U.S. Government-supported Research and Development, as well as matters involving the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), export controls, intellectual property, and technology transfer issues.

Prior to this position, Linda was the Associate General Counsel (Acquisitions and Logistics) in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), where she provided legal guidance on CFIUS, Defense Production Act COVID-19 response, Artificial Intelligence, 5G, Trusted Capital, and international acquisition matters.

Linda has previously served as the General Counsel of the Defense Innovation Unit (DIU); DoD Associate General Counsel (International Affairs); the first Director for Rule of Law at the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan; at the White House on the Presidential Task Force on Export Control Reform; at the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad, Iraq; the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) in Geneva, Switzerland; and private law firms.

Linda received her A.B. cum laude in Fine Arts from Harvard University, her M.A. from NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts in Medieval Islamic Art History, and her J.D. from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. She is a Life Member of the Council on Foreign Relations and has received numerous awards for her government service, including the Secretary of Defense Award for Exceptional Civilian Service.

Thomas Mason - (Ex Officio Member)
Thomas E. “Thom” Mason, PhD, has served as the Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory since November 2018. Previously he was the Senior Vice President for Global Laboratory Operations at Battelle where he had responsibility for governance and strategy across the six National Laboratories that Battelle manages or co-manages. Prior to joining Battelle, Thom worked at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for 19 years, including 10 years as the Laboratory Director. Under his leadership, ORNL saw significant growth in programs, new facilities, and hiring while achieving record low safety incident rates. Before becoming Laboratory Director, he was Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Neutron Sciences, ALD for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), and Director of the Experimental Facilities Division. During his time in Oak Ridge, Thom was active in the community serving as Chair of the Oak Ridge Public Schools Education Foundation as well as Innovation Valley, the Knoxville-Oak Ridge area regional economic development organization. He moved to ORNL from the University of Toronto where he was a faculty member in the Department of Physics and previously worked as a Senior Scientist at Risø National Laboratory and a Postdoc at AT&T Bell Laboratories. For the past 30 years, he has been involved in the design and construction of scientific instrumentation and facilities and the application of nuclear, computing, and materials sciences to solve important challenges in energy and national security. Thom has a PhD in Experimental Condensed Matter Physics from McMaster University and a BSc in Physics from Dalhousie University.


Bindu Nair - (Ex Officio Member)
Bindu Nair, PhD, is Deputy Director for Basic Research at the U.S. Department of Defense.


Events


Event Type :  
-

Description :   

This was the fourth meeting of the National Science, Technology, and Security Roundtable. The Roundtable is a neutral venue where individuals from the national intelligence and law enforcement communities can meet with representatives from industry and the academic research community to discuss current threats, benefits, and potential risks. 


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://scitechsec4.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dominic LoBuglio
Contact Email:  dlobuglio@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2402

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

This is the third meeting of the National Science, Technology, and Security Roundtable. The Roundtable is a neutral venue where individuals from the national intelligence and law enforcement communities can meet with representatives from industry and the academic research community to discuss current threats, benefits, and potential risks. Members and speakers will continue their discussion from the first meeting (Nov. 30, 2020) and second meeting (March 11, 2021), hear from additional experts, and chart the Roundtable's future path.

Audience members with comments or questions during the event may submit them by email to Dominic LoBuglio at dlobuglio@nas.edu.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://scitechsec3.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dominic LoBuglio
Contact Email:  dlobuglio@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2402

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
-

Description :   

This is the second meeting of the National Science, Technology, and Security Roundtable. The Roundtable is a neutral venue where individuals from the national intelligence and law enforcement communities can meet with representatives from industry and the academic research community to discuss current threats, benefits, and potential risks. Members and speakers will continue their discussion from the first meeting (Nov. 30, 2020), hear from additional experts, and chart the Roundtable's future path.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://scitechsec2.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dominic LoBuglio
Contact Email:  dlobuglio@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2402

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

This is the first meeting of the National Science, Technology, and Security Roundtable. The Roundtable will be a neutral venue where individuals from the national intelligence and law enforcement communities can meet with representatives from industry and the academic research community to discuss current threats, benefits, and potential risks. Members and speakers will discuss the Roundtable's mission and goals, followed by a closed session to plan next steps.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://roundtable-mtg1.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dominic LoBuglio
Contact Email:  dlobuglio@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2402

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

Publications

No data present.