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Project Information

Project Information


A Framework for Equitable Allocation of Vaccine for the Novel Coronavirus


Project Scope:

An ad hoc committee of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will develop an overarching framework for vaccine allocation to assist policymakers in the domestic and global health communities in planning for equitable allocation of vaccines against Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The expectation is that such a framework would inform the decisions by health authorities, including the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), as they create and implement national and/or local guidelines for SARS-CoV-2 vaccine allocation. As part of this effort, the committee will consider the following:

  • What criteria should be used in setting priorities for equitable allocation of vaccine?
  • How should the criteria be applied in determining the first tier of vaccine recipients? As more vaccine becomes available, what populations should be added successively to the priority list of recipients? How do we take into account factors such as:
    • Health disparities and other health access issues
    • Individuals at higher risk (e.g., elderly, underlying health conditions)
    • Occupations at higher risk (e.g., health care workers, essential industries, meat packing plants, military)
    • Populations at higher risk (e.g., racial and ethnic groups, incarcerated individuals, residents of nursing homes, individuals who are homeless)
    • Geographic distribution of active virus spread
    • Countries/populations involved in clinical trials
  • How will the framework apply in various scenarios (e.g., different characteristics of vaccines and differing available doses)?
  • If multiple vaccine candidates are available, how should we ensure equity?
  • How can countries ensure equity in allocation of COVID-19 vaccines?
  • For the US, how can communities of color be assured access to vaccination?
  • How can we communicate to the American public about vaccine allocation to minimize perceptions of lack of equity?
  • What steps should be taken to mitigate vaccine hesitancy, especially among high-priority populations?

As part of the overall study, the committee will produce a discussion draft of the framework for public comment, and hold a public workshop to solicit feedback from external stakeholders.

Status: Current

PIN: HMD-HSP-20-20

Project Duration (months): 4 month(s)

RSO: Brown, Lisa



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 08/06/2020

William H. Foege - (Co-Chair)
William Foege is Emeritus Presidential Distinguished Professor of International Health, Emory University, and a Gates Fellow. Dr. Foege, an epidemiologist, worked in the successful campaign to eradicate smallpox in the 1970s. Dr. Foege became Chief of the CDC Smallpox Eradication Program, and was appointed director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1977. In 1984, Dr. Foege co-founded the Task Force for Child Survival, a working group for WHO, UNICEF, The World Bank, UNDP, and the Rockefeller Foundation. Dr. Foege served The Carter Center between 1986-1992 as its Executive Director, Fellow for Health Policy and Executive Director of Global 2000. Between 1992-1999, he contributed to the Centre's work as a Fellow and as Executive Director of the Task Force for Child Survival and Development. Between 1999-2001, Dr. Foege served as Senior Medical Advisor for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
Helene D. Gayle - (Co-Chair)
Helene Gayle has been president and CEO of The Chicago Community Trust, one of the nation’s oldest and largest community foundations, since October 2017. Under her leadership, the Trust has adopted a new strategic focus on closing the racial and ethnic wealth gap in the Chicago region. For almost a decade, she was president and CEO of CARE, a leading international humanitarian organization. An expert on global development, humanitarian and health issues, Dr. Gayle spent 20 years with the Centers for Disease Control, working primarily on HIV/AIDS. She worked at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, directing programs on HIV/AIDS and other global health issues. She also launched the McKinsey Social Initiative (now McKinsey.org), a nonprofit that builds partnerships for social impact. Dr. Gayle serves on public company and nonprofit boards, including The Coca-Cola Company, Colgate-Palmolive Company, Brookings Institution, the Center for Strategic and International Studies, New America, the ONE Campaign, the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and the Economic Club of Chicago. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Public Health Association, the National Academy of Medicine, the National Medical Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics. Named one of Forbes’ “100 Most Powerful Women” and one of NonProfit Times’ “Power and Influence Top 50,” she has authored numerous articles on global and domestic public health issues, poverty alleviation, gender equality and social justice. Dr. Gayle was born and raised in Buffalo, NY. She earned a BA in psychology at Barnard College, an MD at the University of Pennsylvania and an MPH at Johns Hopkins University. She has received 18 honorary degrees and holds faculty appointments at the University of Washington and Emory University.
Margaret L. Brandeau
Margaret Brandeau is Coleman F. Fung Professor of Engineering and Professor of Medicine (by Courtesy) at Stanford University. Her research focuses on the development of applied mathematical and economic models to support health policy decisions. Her recent work has examined HIV and drug abuse prevention and treatment programs, programs to control the opioid epidemic, and preparedness plans for public health emergencies. She is a Fellow of INFORMS (The Institute for Operations Research and Management Science) and a member of the Omega Rho Honor Society for Operations Research and Management Science. From INFORMS, she has received the Philip McCord Morse Lectureship Award, the President’s Award (for contributions to the welfare of society), the Pierskalla Prize (for research excellence in healthcare management science), and the Award for the Advancement of Women in Operations Research and the Management Sciences. She has also received the Award for Excellence in Application of Pharmacoeconomics and Health Outcomes Research from the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) and a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation, among other awards. She is a member of the NIH Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council and a member of the Stanford-Lancet Commission on the North American Opioid Crisis. She previously served as a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors, a Federal Advisory Committee to the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and served on several Institute of Medicine committees. Professor Brandeau earned a BS in Mathematics and an MS in Operations Research from MIT, and a PhD in Engineering-Economic Systems from Stanford.
Alison M. Buttenheim
Alison Buttenheim, is Associate Professor of Nursing and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Buttenheim is a leading expert in the application of behavioral economics to infectious disease prevention. Her research agenda has focused on vaccine acceptance and vaccine exemption policy in the US, zoonotic disease prevention in Peru, and HIV prevention in South Africa. She is Associate Director of Penn’s Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics, as well as Associate Director of Penn’s National Clinician Scholar Program, and Director of Engagement at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics at the University of Pennsylvania. She was recently appointed as Commissioner to the Lancet Commission on Vaccine Refusal, Acceptance, and Demand in the United States. Dr. Buttenheim holds a Ph.D. in Public Health from the University of California, Los Angeles, and an MBA from the Stanford University Graduate School of Business.
R. A. Charo
R. Alta Charo (BA biology, Harvard 1979; JD law, Columbia 1982) is the Warren P. Knowles Professor of Law and Bioethics at the University of Wisconsin, where she teaches public health law, biotechnology policy, and bioethics. In government, she has worked at the former congressional Office of Technology Assessment, the US Agency for International Development, and the FDA. From 1996-2001, she served on President Clinton’s National Bioethics Advisory Commission. A member of the National Academy of Medicine, Charo co-chaired the National Academies’ committees that wrote guidelines for embryonic stem cell research and recommendations for US policy and global principles regarding human genome editing. She was a member of IOM committee on the safety of the pediatric vaccine schedule and the committee to review of the smallpox vaccine program. At present she is a member of the World Health Organization’s committee on global governance of genome editing, and serves on several Academies activities, including committees on emerging infectious diseases and on emerging science and technology issues. Alta Charo reports having had a consulting contract in the past with Janssen/J&J for issues related to research ethics and clinical trial design.
James F. Childress
James Childress has been University Professor, the John Allen Hollingsworth Professor of Ethics, Professor of Religious Studies, and Professor of Research in Medical Education at the University of Virginia, where he is now an emeritus professor. Dr. Childress also served as the Joseph P. Kennedy, Sr., Professor of Christian Ethics at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University and a Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago Divinity School and Princeton University. In 1990, he was named Professor of the Year in the Commonwealth of Virginia by the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education, and in 2002 he received the University of Virginia’s highest honor—the Thomas Jefferson Award. In spring 2010 he held the Maguire Chair in American History and Ethics at the Library of Congress. Dr. Childress is the author of numerous articles and several books in various areas of ethics, including (with Tom Beauchamp) Principles of Biomedical Ethics, now in its 8th edition and translated into several languages. Dr. Childress was vice chair of the national Task Force on Organ Transplantation, and he also served on the Board of Directors of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), the UNOS Ethics Committee, the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee, the Human Gene Therapy Subcommittee, the Biomedical Ethics Advisory Committee, and several Data and Safety Monitoring Boards for NIH clinical trials. He was a member of the presidentially-appointed National Bioethics Advisory Commission (1996-2001). Dr. Childress is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and he has participated in and chaired several studies at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. His current research focuses on public bioethics, public health ethics, and just-war theory and practice. Dr. Childress received his BA from Guilford College, his BD from Yale Divinity School, and his MA and PhD from Yale University.
Ana V. Diez Roux
Ana Diez Roux is Dean and Distinguished University Professor of Epidemiology in the Dornsife School of Public Health at Drexel University. Dr. Diez Roux is internationally known for her research on the social determinants of population health, the study of how neighborhoods affect health, and urban health. Her work on neighborhood health effects has been highly influential in the policy debate on population health and its determinants. She has led large NIH and foundation funded research and training programs in the United States and in collaboration with various institutions in Latin America and is currently Principal Investigator of the Wellcome Trust funded SALURBAL (Salud Urbana en América Latina) study. Dr. Diez Roux has served on numerous editorial boards, review panels and advisory committees including the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) of the Environmental Protection Agency (as Chair), the Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC) of the National Center for Health Statistics, the Committee on Health and Wellbeing in the Changing Urban Environment of the International Council for Science (ISCUS), and CDCs Community Preventive Services Taskforce. She has received the Wade Hampton Frost Award for her contributions to public health from the American Public Health Association and the Award for Outstanding Contributions to Epidemiology from the American College of Epidemiology. She is an elected member of the American Epidemi¬ological Society and the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research. She was elected to the National Academy of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 2009.
Abigail Echo-Hawk
Abigail Echo-Hawk is an enrolled citizen of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma. She is currently the Chief Research Office at Seattle Indian Health Board and the Director of Urban Indian Health Institute, a national tribal epidemiology center serving urban-dwelling American Indians and Alaska Natives.
Currently, Abigail is part of multiple committees, Boards, and workgroups that are focused on ending health disparities through health equity approaches including the Best Starts for Kids Board, the March of Dimes Health Equity Workgroup, the Tribal Collaboration Working Group with the NIH All of Us Research Program, the Advisory Committee for Health Equity Research at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the NIDA American Indian and Alaska Native Collaborative Research Engagement Workgroup, and Data for Indigenous Justice Board. In the past, Abigail spent eight years as the Tribal Liaison with Partnerships for Native Health at the School of Public Health at The University of Washington. In 2016, she became the Co-director of Partnerships of Native Health at the Washington State University Institute for Research and Education to Advance Community Health. Abigail was also the Tribal Relationship Facilitator at the Institute of Translational Health Sciences at the University of Washington from 2010 to 2015. In 2015, she became a Board Member for the Center for Indigenous Law and Justice. Abigail has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Interdisciplinary Studies and a Master of Arts degree in Policy Studies, both from the University of Washington who honored her with the Distinguished Alumna of the Year Award in 2011. She is an expert in American Indian and Alaska Native health, including strengths and resiliencies as well as disparities and was recently awarded the Washington State Public Health Association Secretary of Health Award and 2020 Indian Woman of the Year by a national organization of Indigenous women. Abigail began working in health equity in 2000 as a community advocate to address the high rates of infant mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN). After recognizing the lack of evidence-based practices that were informed and shaped by AI/AN communities, she began working in research on health disparities and achieving health equity in 2010.
Since then, Abigail has been the tribal liaison for 26 multi-year, NIH-funded studies of Native health. Her role in each study was to ensure that relationships between academia and Native communities are bi-directional and grounded in health equity principles. In her current role as the Director of Urban Indian Health Institute (UIHI), Abigail directs the only national tribal epidemiology center, and they are conducting COVID-19 epidemiologic surveillance with urban Indian health programs. In addition, UIHI is focused on health equity approaches ensuring AI/AN access to prevention and treatment of COVID-19 through Indigenous public health and epidemiology practices. An essential component of Abigail’s work in facilitating protocols and ground rules for research partnerships has included negotiating equity through tribal data-sharing, control, and ownership. Many communities have experienced untrustworthy practices where agencies and individuals have exploited and used data with little to no meaningful impact, while people of color continue to bear the burden of health disparities. Data is increasingly valued as a resource that represents opportunities for improving community well being and health outcomes if it is used in an equitable manner. Abigail works nationally with collaborative partnerships to ensure equitable health outcomes for people of color and other marginalized communities. Much of her work involves community-based participatory research, with a strong emphasis on cultural humility, respect for tribal sovereignty, and achieving health equity to undo health disparities. In addition to the relevant health equity-focused publications listed below, Abigail is a co-author of several manuscripts in development.
Christopher J. Elias
Christopher Elias is the president of the Global Development Division at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, where he leads the foundation’s efforts in a diverse range of program areas aimed at finding creative new ways to ensure solutions and products get into the hands of people in poor countries who need them most. Focusing on areas with the potential for high-impact, sustainable solutions that can reach hundreds of millions of people, Chris oversees Global Development’s portfolio in Emergency Response; Family Planning; Maternal, Newborn & Child Health; Nutrition; Polio Eradication; and Vaccine Delivery. A common theme of these programs is innovative and integrated delivery, including an emphasis on strengthening of primary health care systems. Chris’s professional background is in public health and medicine. Prior to joining the Gates Foundation in February 2012, he worked in various positions and countries for international nonprofit organizations, most recently serving as the president and CEO of PATH, an international, nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the health of people around the world by advancing technologies, strengthening systems, and encouraging healthy behaviors. Chris holds an M.D. from Creighton University, having completed postgraduate training in internal medicine at the University of California San Francisco, and an M.P.H. from the University of Washington, where he was a fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine.
Baruch Fischhoff
Baruch Fischhoff is Howard Heinz University Professor, Department of Engineering and Public Policy and Institute for Politics and Strategy, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). A graduate of the Detroit Public Schools, he holds a BS (mathematics, psychology) from Wayne State University and a PhD (psychology) from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the National Academy of Medicine. He is past President of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making and of the Society for Risk Analysis. He has chaired the Food and Drug Administration Risk Communication Advisory Committee and been a member of the Eugene (Oregon) Commission on the Rights of Women, the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee and the Environmental Protection Agency Scientific Advisory Board, where he chaired the Homeland Security Advisory Committee. He has received the American Psychological Association (APA) Award for Distinguished Contribution to Psychology, CMU’s Ryan Award for Teaching, an honorary Doctorate of Humanities from Lund University, and an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship. He is a Fellow of APA, the Association for Psychological Science, Society of Experimental Psychologists, and Society for Risk Analysis. His books include Acceptable Risk, Risk: A Very Short Introduction, Judgment and Decision Making, A Two-State Solution in the Middle East, Counting Civilian Casualties, and Communicating Risks and Benefits. He has co-chaired three National Academy Colloquia on the Science of Science Communication, as well as its committees on applying decision science to intelligence analysis and its committee on foundational science for cybersecurity.
David M. Michaels
David Michaels is an epidemiologist and Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health at the Milken Institute School of Public Health of George Washington University. He served as Assistant Secretary of Labor for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration from 2009 to 2017, the longest serving in the agency’s history. From 1998 to 2001, Dr. Michaels was Assistant Secretary of Energy for Environment, Safety and Health, charged with protecting the workers, community residents, and environment in and around the nation’s nuclear weapons facilities. In that position, he was the chief architect of the historic initiative to compensate nuclear weapons workers who were sickened by radiation, beryllium, and other toxic exposures. Much of Dr. Michaels' work has focused on protecting the integrity of the science underpinning public health, safety, and environmental protections. On the this topic, he is the author of Doubt is Their Product: How Industry's Assault on Science Threatens Your Health (Oxford University Press, 2008) and The Triumph of Doubt: Dark Money and the Science of Deception (Oxford University Press, 2020). He is a recipient of the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award, and the American Public Health Association’s David P. Rall Award for Advocacy in Public Health. Dr. Michaels is a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Toxicology Program, the Administrative Conference of the United States, and the Lucian Leape Institute of the Institute for HealthCare Improvement. He currently provides consulting advice on protecting workers from COVID-19 exposure to the Actors’ Equity Association and the National Football League Players Association.

Jewel Mullen
Jewel Mullen is Associate Dean for Health Equity and Associate Professor of Population Health and Internal Medicine at the University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School, as well as Director of Health Equity at Ascension Seton. An internist and psychosocial epidemiologist, Mullen is the former Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services where she also served as the acting Assistant Secretary for Health and acting Director of the National Vaccine Program Office. Formerly the commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Public Health, she led the agency’s successful implementation of an expanded childhood vaccine program. She also completed bioethics training and served on the Ethics Consultation Service at the University Of Virginia School Of Medicine. A former President of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Dr. Mullen is a current member of the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Editorial Board. She also serves on the COVID-19 Expert Advisory Panel for the City of Austin, Texas. Dr. Mullen serves as a public health advisor to the Carnival Corporation and advises the Director of the CDC Foundation on development of internal organizational equity goals.
Saad Omer
Saad B. Omer is the Director of the Yale Institute for Global Health, a Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at Yale University, Schools of Medicine and Public Health and an Adjunct Professor at Yale School of Nursing. He has conducted studies in the United States, Guatemala, Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Australia and South Africa. Dr Omer’s research portfolio includes epidemiology of respiratory viruses such as influenza, RSV, and - more recently - SARS-Cov-2 (COVID-19); clinical trials to estimate efficacy of maternal and/or infant influenza, pertussis, polio, measles and pneumococcal vaccines; and trials to evaluate drug regimens to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Moreover, he has conducted several studies on interventions to increase immunization coverage and acceptance. His work has also included public health preparedness strategies to effectively respond to large emerging and re-emerging infectious disease outbreaks. Dr Omer’s work has been cited in global and country-specific policy recommendations and has informed clinical practice and health legislation in several countries. Dr. Omer is the Co-Chair of the Lancet Commission on Vaccine Hesitancy in the US, serves on the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) Working Group for Vaccine Hesitancy and is on the Board of Trustees for the Sabin Vaccine Institute. He is also a member of the WHO Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety, the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) Working Group on COVID-19 Vaccines, and the WHO SAGE Working Group on Measles and Rubella Vaccines. Dr. Omer is also currently an academic affiliate for the GAO’s Office of Evaluation Sciences. He has previously served on several advisory panels including the U.S. National Vaccine Advisory Committee, Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria - Vaccine Innovation Working Group, WHO Expert Advisory Group for Healthcare Worker Vaccination, and the Public Health Committee of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

Daniel E. Polsky
Daniel Polsky is the 40th Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Health Economics at Johns Hopkins University. He holds primary appointments in both the Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Carey Business School. From 1996-2016 he was on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was the Robert D. Eilers Professor at the Wharton School and the Perelman School of Medicine. From 2012-2019 he served as executive director of the Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics. Dr. Polsky a national leader in the field of health policy and economics, has dedicated his career to exploring how health care is organized, managed, financed, and delivered, especially for low-income populations. His own research has advanced our understanding of the cost and quality tradeoff of interventions whether they are changes to large federal programs or local programs. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. He serves on the Health and Medicine Committee for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He serves on the Congressional Budget Office’s Panel of Health Advisers and was the senior economist on health issues at the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. He received a Master of Public Policy degree from the University of Michigan in 1989 and a PhD in economics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1996.
Sonja A. Rasmussen
Sonja Rasmussen is Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics, Epidemiology, and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Florida (UF) College of Medicine and College of Public Health and Health Professions where she serves as director of UF’s Precision Health Program, which focuses on integration of genomics into clinical care. Dr. Rasmussen joined UF in 2018 after 20 years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, where she held several scientific leadership roles. In her recent roles as a public health leader, she served as Deputy Director of the Influenza Coordination Unit, responsible for CDC’s pandemic influenza preparedness and response activities, and led CDC’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, an office with a $1.3 billion annual budget and >900 staff members, as Acting Director during the 2014 Ebola response. She served as Editor-in-Chief of CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Series, the #1 journal in the field of epidemiology according to number of citations, and as the Director of the Division of Public Health Information Dissemination. Dr. Rasmussen was lead author of the paper confirming Zika virus as a cause of birth defects, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2016. She served in leadership roles during several CDC responses to public health emergencies, including 2009 H1N1 influenza, H7N9 influenza, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and Zika virus. Dr. Rasmussen received her BS in Biology and Mathematics with magna cum laude honors from the University of Minnesota-Duluth, her MS degree in Medical Genetics from the University of Wisconsin, and her MD degree with honors from University of Florida. She completed her pediatrics residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and her fellowship in clinical genetics at Johns Hopkins and University of Florida. Dr. Rasmussen is currently serving in a leadership role at the University of Florida in its response to COVID-19, including consulting with university leadership about containment and mitigation measures. She has published seven papers focused on what is known about this new virus in children and pregnant women. She is an author on >240 peer-reviewed publications and is the lead editor of The CDC Field Epidemiology Manual, released by Oxford University Press in 2019.
Arthur L. Reingold
Arthur Reingold is Professor and Head of the Division of Epidemiology at the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley, having joined the faculty there in 1987. His research interests encompass the prevention and control of infectious diseases in the US and internationally, particularly infections spread via the respiratory route and vaccine preventable diseases. He has previously served on the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the US Department of Health and Human Services and on the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on immunizations (SAGE) of the World Health Organization. He was elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine (now the National Academy of Medicine) in 2003 and has previously served on multiple committees of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Art Reingold reports having prepared a report and been under a retainer agreement with a law firm in connection with a lawsuit regarding a patent dispute between Merck and Pfizer related to PCV13 vaccine. He is no longer under retainer.
Reed V. Tuckson
Reed Tuckson is Managing Director of Tuckson Health Connections, LLC, a health and medical care consulting business that brings people and ideas together to promote optimal health outcomes and value through innovation and integration across the fields of prevention; public health; consumer activation; quality care delivery; the translation of science and technology into value producing interventions; and optimization of big data and analytics. Previously, he enjoyed a long tenure as Executive Vice President and Chief of Medical Affairs for UnitedHealth Group; Senior Vice President for Professional Standards of the AMA; Senior Vice President of the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation; President of the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science; and Commissioner of Public Health for the District of Columbia. Currently, Dr. Tuckson is President of the American Telemedicine Association and he serves on the Board of Directors of LifePoint Health, a leading hospital company dedicated to providing high-value care and services to growing regions, rural communities and vibrant small towns across the nation; Cell Therapeutics, Inc., a public corporation concerned with the development of cancer pharmaceuticals; and he is a special advisor to the CEO of ViTel Net, LLC, a leading innovator in telehealth solutions. Additionally, he serves on the National Advisory Council for Complementary and Integrative Health of the National Institutes of Health; he is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine, serving in a leadership position on the use of data and analytics in healthcare; he is a Board Member of The Arnold P. Gold Foundation, which is concerned with advancing humanism in medical care; an Advisory Board Member of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics; and a Trustee of the Board of Howard University. Previously, Dr. Tuckson was a member of the Advisory Committee to the Director of the National Institutes of Health; served as Chairman of the Secretary of Health’s Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society; and he has served on several U.S. Government cabinet level health advisory committees concerned with health reform, infant mortality, children’s health, violence, and radiation testing. He is a graduate of Howard University, Georgetown University School of Medicine, and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania’s General Internal Medicine Residency and Fellowship Programs, where he was also a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar studying at the Wharton School of Business.
Michael Wasserman
Michael Wasserman is a geriatrician and President of the California Association of Long Term Care Medicine. He has been an advocate for vulnerable older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic, as the lead author of “Diagnostic Testing for SARS-Coronavirus-2 in the Nursing Facility: Recommendations of a Delphi Panel of Long-Term Care Clinicians,” and, “An Aspirational Approach to Nursing Home Operations During the COVID-19 Pandemic.” He is Editor-in-Chief of Springer’s upcoming textbook, Geriatric Medicine: A Person Centered Evidence Based Approach. He previously served as CEO for Rockport Healthcare Services, overseeing the largest nursing home chain in California. Prior to that, he was the Executive Director, Care Continuum, for HSAG, the QIN-QIO for California. In 2001 he co-founded Senior Care of Colorado, which became the largest privately owned primary care geriatrics practice in the country, before selling it in 2010. In the 1990’s he was President and Chief Medical Officer for GeriMed of America, where he helped to develop GeriMed’s Clinical Glidepaths. In 1989, in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Doctor Wasserman published "Fever, White Blood Cells and Differential Count in Diagnosing Bacterial Infection in the Elderly,” the findings of which are now part of the McGeer Criteria, used widely in nursing homes to evaluate residents for infections.Dr. Wasserman is a graduate of the University of Texas, Medical Branch. He completed an Internal Medicine residency at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and a Geriatric Medicine Fellowship at UCLA. He was formerly a Public Commissioner for the Continuing Care Accreditation Commission. He was the lead delegate from the State of Colorado to the 2005 White House Conference on Aging, and co-chaired the Colorado Alzheimer’s Coordinating Council. Dr. Wasserman serves on the Boards’ of the Wish of a Lifetime Foundation and the American Geriatrics Society’s Foundation for Health in Aging.

Committee Membership Roster Comments

Note: There was a change in the committee membership with the appointment of Dr. Michael Wassermen effective 07/30/20.

Events


Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The Committee on Equitable Allocation of Vaccine for the Novel Coronavirus will discuss its new report, titled Framework for Equitable Allocation of COVID-19 Vaccine. This free public release webinar will take place on Friday, October 2, 2020 from 10:00-11:00am ET.

The release of the final report follows the September release of a discussion draft that sought public input. In addition to an updated framework for equitable allocation of COVID-19 vaccine, the final report includes recommendations for ensuring equity in distribution, administration, and access to vaccine; for effective community engagement, risk communication, and strategies to promote vaccine acceptance; and for global considerations.



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Lisa Brown
Contact Email:  COVIDvaccineframework@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Virtual closed meeting of the Committee on Equitable Allocation of Vaccine for the Novel Coronavirus. 


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Lisa Brown
Contact Email:  COVIDvaccineframework@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. William Foege
2. Helene Gayle
3. Margaret Brandeau
4. Alison Buttenheim
5. R. Alta Charo
6. James Childress
7. Ana Diez Roux
8. Abigail Echo-Hawk
9. Christopher Elias
10. Baruch Fischhoff
11. David Michaels
12. Jewel Mullen
13. Saad Omer
14. Daniel Polsky
15. Sonja Rasmussen
16. Art Reingold
17. Reed Tuckson
18. Michael Wasserman

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

• Discussion of Draft Recommendations

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

• Draft Recommendations

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 14, 2020
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Virtual closed meeting of the Committee on Equitable Allocation of Vaccine for the Novel Coronavirus. 


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Lisa Brown
Contact Email:  COVIDvaccineframework@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. William Foege
2. Helene Gayle
3. Margaret Brandeau
4. Alison Buttenheim
5. R. Alta Charo
6. James Childress
7. Ana Diez Roux
8. Abigail Echo-Hawk
9. Christopher Elias
10. Baruch Fischhoff
11. David Michaels
12. Jewel Mullen
13. Saad Omer
14. Daniel Polsky
15. Sonja Rasmussen
16. Art Reingold
17. Reed Tuckson
18. Michael Wasserman

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

• Discuss revisions to be made to the foundational principles, primary goal, allocation criteria, and allocation phases in response to comments from the public.
• Focus on finalizing the remaining sections related to program administration, vaccine hesitancy, risk communications and community engagement, and global considerations.
• Discuss and finalize report recommendations
• Discuss remaining timeline and current work plan

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

• Briefing Book

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 10, 2020
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

On Wednesday, September 2, from 12:00 to 5:00 pm ET, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will host an open online session to receive public comments on a Discussion Draft of the Preliminary Framework for Equitable Allocation of COVID-19 Vaccine, as part of a study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study will recommend priorities to inform allocation of a limited initial supply of COVID-19 vaccine, taking into account factors such as racial/ethnic and other health disparities, as well as groups at higher risk from COVID-19 due to health status, occupation, or living conditions. Input from the public, especially communities highly impacted by COVID-19, is essential to produce a final report that is objective, balanced, and inclusive.

A discussion draft of the preliminary framework will be available for download starting 24 hours advance of the session, on Tuesday, September 1, at 12:00 pm ET. The draft can be accessed at nationalacademies.org/VaccineAllocationComment and the comment form can be accessed at nap.edu/vaccine

If you would like to make a comment on September 2, please complete our speaker sign-up form (in addition to registering for the event using the signup on this page). Please note that, due to time constraints, we cannot guarantee that that all of those who sign up to make comments will be selected to do so.

You will receive a confirmation email and follow-up contact with further instructions dependent on whether or not you are selected to speak. You may make a comment as an individual or on behalf of an organization. All members of the public selected to speak will be given a specific time slot during the session and must limit their remarks to 5 minutes. Only those who receive a time slot and additional instructions from National Academies staff will be afforded time to speak. Due to the large volume of interested parties and limited time available, we cannot guarantee the opportunity to make oral comments for all those who sign up using the above form. Therefore, we encourage you to consider the written comment opportunity from September 1 to September 4 (more information below). Please contact COVIDVaccineFramework@nas.edu with questions.

You may also attend the September 2 session without making a comment. Simply register to attend using this Eventbrite registration and no further action is required.

Written Comment Period: September 1 (12:00 pm ET) - September 4, 2020 (11:59 pm ET)

Members of the public are encouraged to submit written comments for consideration by the study committee (as individuals or on behalf of an organization). The public comment period will be open for 4 days, from 12:00 p.m. ET on Tuesday, September 1, until 11:59 p.m. ET on Friday, September 4. Commenters will be able to download and review the discussion draft before submitting a comment through a form (uploaded documents accepted). All materials and comments received will be placed in the committee’s Public Access File, and may be provided to the public upon request. The discussion draft and comment form will be available at nationalacademies.org/VaccineAllocationComment starting at 12:00 pm ET on September 1.

For more information, please visit the study webpage.



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Lisa Brown
Contact Email:  COVIDvaccineframework@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Virtual closed meeting of the Committee on Equitable Allocation of Vaccine for the Novel Coronavirus. 


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Lisa Brown
Contact Email:  COVIDvaccineframework@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. William Foege
2. Helene Gayle
3. Margaret Brandeau
4. Alison Buttenheim
5. R. Alta Charo
6. James Childress
7. Ana Diez Roux
8. Abigail Echo-Hawk
9. Christopher Elias
10. Baruch Fischhoff
11. David Michaels
12. Jewel Mullen
13. Saad Omer
14. Daniel Polsky
15. Sonja Rasmussen
16. Art Reingold
17. Reed Tuckson
18. Michael Wasserman

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

• Reflected on the discussion draft of the framework that was submitted for external review
• Discussed any critical reviewer comments on the discussion draft of the framework and discussed next steps for addressing reviewer comments
• Discussed program administration, evaluation, and assessment issues to ensure effectiveness and equity
• Discussed vaccine hesitancy, risk communication, and community engagement considerations
• Discussed global considerations
• Discussed draft report recommendations
• Discussed remaining timeline and current work plan
• Identified information needs and potential approach to the upcoming virtual public listening session held under the committee’s auspices

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

• Briefing Book
• Background Literature

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
August 25, 2020
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Virtual closed meeting of the Committee on Equitable Allocation of Vaccine for the Novel Coronavirus. 


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Lisa Brown
Contact Email:  COVIDvaccineframework@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. William Foege
2. Helene Gayle
3. Margaret Brandeau
4. Alison Buttenheim
5. R. Alta Charo
6. James Childress
7. Abigail Echo-Hawk
8. Christopher Elias
9. Baruch Fischhoff
10. David Michaels
11. Jewel Mullen
12. Saad Omer
13. Daniel Polsky
14. Sonja Rasmussen
15. Art Reingold
16. Reed Tuckson
17. Michael Wasserman

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

• Overarching goals and guiding principles of the allocation framework
• The priority populations and phases
• Various scenarios that the committee will need to consider in applying its framework (e.g., different characteristics of vaccines and differing available doses, different populations, and means of dispensing vaccines)
• The draft outline of the report and draft text completed up to this point
• Current work plan and finish assigning writing roles as needed
• Identify draft report recommendations
• Identify information needs and future workshop approach

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

• Briefing Book
• Background Literature

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
August 17, 2020
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Virtual meeting of the Committee on Equitable Allocation of Vaccine for the Novel Coronavirus is open to the public on August 7 from 3:15 p.m. - 6:15 p.m. ET. Please refer to the final agenda for additional details. 



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Lisa Brown
Contact Email:  COVIDvaccineframework@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. William Foege
2. Helene Gayle
3. Margaret Brandeau
4. Alison Buttenheim
5. R. Alta Charo
6. James Childress
7. Ana Diez Roux
8. Christopher Elias
9. Baruch Fischhoff
10. David Michaels
11. Jewel Mullen
12. Saad Omer
13. Daniel Polsky
14. Sonja Rasmussen
15. Art Reingold
16. Reed Tuckson
17. Michael Wasserman

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

• Overarching goals and cross-cutting principles of the allocation framework
• Discussion of draft report
• Various scenarios that the committee will need to consider in applying its framework (e.g., different characteristics of vaccines and differing available doses, different populations, and means of dispensing vaccines)
• Hierarchy of vaccine recipients, and specifically priority populations and tiers
• Information needs, future meeting topics, and potential approach to writing assignments.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

• Briefing Book
• Background Literature

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
August 10, 2020
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Virtual closed meeting of the Committee on Equitable Allocation of Vaccine for the Novel Coronavirus. 


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Lisa Brown
Contact Email:  COVIDvaccineframework@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. William Foege
2. Helene Gayle
3. Margaret Brandeau
4. Alison Buttenheim
5. R. Alta Charo
6. James Childress
7. Ana Diez Roux
8. Abigail Echo-Hawk
9. Christopher Elias
10. Baruch Fischhoff
11. David Michaels
12. Jewel Mullen
13. Saad Omer
14. Daniel Polsky
15. Sonja Rasmussen
16. Art Reingold
17. Reed Tuckson
18. Michael Wasserman

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

• Overarching goals and cross-cutting principles of the allocation framework
• Various scenarios that the committee will need to consider in applying its framework (e.g., different characteristics of vaccines and differing available doses)
• Hierarchy of vaccine recipients, and specifically priority populations and tiers
• Need for modeling (demographics of risk groups, epidemic spread in key populations)
• Information needs, future meeting topics, and potential approach to the upcoming virtual public workshop held under the committee’s auspices

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

• Briefing Book
• Background Literature

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
August 04, 2020
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Virtual meeting of the Committee on Equitable Allocation of Vaccine for the Novel Coronavirus is open to the public from 4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. ET. Please refer to the final agenda for additional details. 



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Lisa Brown
Contact Email:  COVIDvaccineframework@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. William Foege
2. Helene Gayle
3. Margaret Brandeau
4. Alison Buttenheim
5. R. Alta Charo
6. James Childress
7. Ana Diez Roux
8. Abigail Echo-Hawk
9. Christopher Elias
10. Baruch Fischhoff
11. David Michaels
12. Jewel Mullen
13. Saad Omer
14. Daniel Polsky
15. Sonja Rasmussen
16. Art Reingold
17. Reed Tuckson

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

• Overview of the committee process and related administrative issues
• Standard bias and conflict of interest discussion according to NRC procedures
• Overview of the study (meeting timeline and discussion on how to frame the draft report)
• Discussion of the Statement of Task and how to approach it

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

• Briefing Book
• Background Literature

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 31, 2020
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications