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Project Information

Project Information


Science, Technology, and Health Capabilities within the Department of State at an Inflection Point: Workshop Series


Project Scope:

A committee will organize two multi-day workshops to address how the capabilities and organizational framework of the Department of State and USAID could be strengthened to prepare for the global science, technology, and health (STH) challenges in the next ten years as they affect U.S diplomatic and development policies. The workshops will explore different approaches for structuring and redefining State Department and USAID programs in the face of increasingly unexpected events such as COVID-19 and other potential future pandemics, natural disasters, coastal corruptions, and anticipated events such as changing U.S. policy towards China and new technologies. Broad areas of focus include: health-related challenges, environmental-related challenges, urbanization, and emerging technologies. The workshops will also assess past experiences addressing emerging diseases (e.g., the PEPFAR program) and examine the interactions between State and USAID and international organizations. A Proceedings-in-Brief of each workshop will be issued. 

Status: Current

PIN: PGA-NETWORKS-20-04

RSO: Stoepler, Teresa

Topic(s):

Biology and Life Sciences
Conflict and Security Issues
Engineering and Technology
Math, Chemistry, and Physics
Policy for Science and Technology



Geographic Focus:
Global

Committee Membership


Cathy Campbell - (Co-Chair)
Cathy Campbell, co-chair, has dedicated her career to advancing international science and technology cooperation. She previously served as President and CEO of CRDF Global, which she joined in 2002. Campbell served from 1998 to 2002 as director of the Office of International Policy and Programs, Department of Commerce’s Technology Administration; as well as executive director of the U.S.-Israel Science and Technology Commission. From 1995 to 1997, she was a senior policy analyst in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Campbell was the U.S. State Department’s program officer for Soviet/Russia science and technology affairs from 1989 to 1994. She has worked with and traveled extensively to Eurasia, the Middle East, East Asia and Latin America. Campbell serves as a member of the Board of Governors, U.S.-Israel Science and Technology Foundation; the External Advisory Board of the Pennsylvania State University School of International Affairs; Board of Directors, BalletNova; and the Advisory Council for Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology. She is a AAAS Fellow and previously served as a Visiting Scholar, AAAS Center for Science Diplomacy.
Andrew Hebbeler - (Co-Chair)
Andrew M. Hebbeler, co-chair, is a former life scientist with foreign affairs, national security, global health, and science and technology (S&T) policy experience. Currently, he is Senior Director and Lead Scientist for Global Biological Policy and Programs at the Nuclear Threat Initiative. Previously, he served in leadership positions at the State Department's offices of Science and Technology Cooperation (OES/STC), the Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary of State (E/STAS), and Cooperative Threat Reduction (ISN/CTR). From 2013-2015, he was Assistant Director for Biological and Chemical Threats at the Obama White House Office of Science and Technology Policy where he oversaw American S&T efforts to combat infectious disease and chemical weapon threats. Prior to his White House position, Dr. Hebbeler led the State Department's Biosecurity Engagement Program, a $40M program that prevents terrorist access to potentially dangerous biological materials and dual-use infrastructure and expertise, while supporting efforts to combat infectious disease and enhance public and animal health worldwide. Andrew Hebbeler was born in Cincinnati, Ohio and received his Bachelor’s degree in biology and philosophy from Thomas More College in Crestview Hills, Kentucky. He completed his doctoral work in the laboratory of C. David Pauza at the University of Maryland, Baltimore where he focused on understanding an unconventional lymphocyte population that is important during immune responses to infectious disease and cancer. Before joining the State Department, Dr. Hebbeler was a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Warner C. Greene at The J. David Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco, California.
Mike Nelson
Michael R. Nelson directs the Carnegie Endowment’s Technology and International Affairs Program, which helps decision makers understand and address the impacts of emerging technologies, including digital technologies, biotechnology, and artificial intelligence. Prior to joining Carnegie, he started the global public policy office for Cloudflare, a startup that has improved the performance and security of more than 10 million websites around the world. Nelson has also served as a principal technology policy strategist in Microsoft’s Technology Policy Group and before that was a senior technology and telecommunications analyst with Bloomberg Government. In addition, Nelson has been teaching courses and doing research on the future of the internet, cyber-policy, technology policy, innovation policy, and e-government in the Communication, Culture, and Technology Program at Georgetown University. Before joining the Georgetown faculty, Nelson was director of internet technology and strategy at IBM, where he managed a team helping define and implement IBM’s next generation internet strategy. He has served as chairman of the Information, Communication, and Computing Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), serves as a trustee of the Institute for International Communications, and was selected to be a “Global Leader of Tomorrow” by the World Economic Forum. From 1988 to 1993, he served as a professional staff member for the Senate’s Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space and was the lead Senate staffer for the High-Performance Computing Act. In 1993, he joined Vice President Al Gore at the White House and worked with President Bill Clinton’s science adviser on issues relating to the Global Information Infrastructure, including telecommunications policy, information technology, encryption, electronic commerce, and information policy.


Johnathan Pershing
Jonathan Pershing is the Program Director of Environment at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. He leads a team of grantmakers focused on climate change and environmental conservation in the U.S., China, India, Europe and Latin America. He joined the foundation in January 2017. Previously, Dr Pershing served as Special Envoy for Climate Change at the U.S. Department of State and lead U.S. negotiator to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change. He played a key role in successfully negotiating landmark climate change deals with nations such as China, India, the European Union, Canada and Mexico. In this capacity – as well as in his earlier capacity as Deputy Special Envoy — he was instrumental in securing the 2015 Paris climate agreement, and subsequently, as senior international climate advisor to the White House and Secretary of State, was charged with overseeing its early implementation. Prior to that, Dr Pershing served as the Senior Climate Advisor to the U.S. Secretary of Energy and the Principal Deputy Director of the Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis, and earlier as the Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Office of Policy and International Affairs at the Department of Energy. He was a key architect of the “Mission Innovation” commitment to double climate and clean energy research and development budgets around the world, and a major contributor to the first ever “Quadrennial Energy Review,” a deep assessment of U.S. energy policy. Dr Pershing spent six years as the director of the Climate, Energy and Pollution Program at the World Resources Institute; five years as the Head of the Environment Division at the International Energy Agency in Paris; and for nearly a decade in the 1990s, he served the Science Advisor and Deputy Director of the Office of Global Change in the U.S. Department of State. He holds a Ph.D. in geology and geophysics from the University of Minnesota. A scientist by training, he served as a lead author, review editor and contributor for reports of the Nobel-prize winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He has taught at the University of Minnesota and at American University, and he has published and lectured widely on climate and energy issues. In addition, he lived and worked for several years in Alaska in the energy and mining industry.
Annica Wayman
Annica Wayman is the Associate Dean for Shady Grove Affairs in the College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences at University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). In this role, she is responsible for directing UMBC’s Bachelor of Science in Translational Life Science Technology (TLST) and Master’s of Professional Studies in Biotechnology at The Universities at Shady Groove (USG) campus. Prior to this, she spent over eight years at USAID, first as a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow and later as Division Chief of the Research Partnerships for Development Unit in the Global Development Lab. Annica and her team developed and managed research programs and policies related to the field of international development including the Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research Program (PEER).
Teresa Stoepler - (Staff Officer)
Teresa Stoepler is executive director of the InterAcademy Partnership for Policy, part of a network of more than 140 science, engineering and medical academies around the world that provides scientific advice to international organizations and national governments. She is also a senior program officer with the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Policy and Global Affairs Division where she leads the Pakistan-U.S. Science & Technology Cooperation Program and contributes to other international scientific capacity-building programs. As an elected member of the Global Young Academy, Teresa co-leads an initiative to support the reintegration of at-risk and refugee scholars into research environments in their host countries. Previously, she was an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science & Technology Policy Fellow at U.S. Geological Survey where she helped the U.S. government develop a standing capacity to build “crisis science” teams following environmental disasters. She holds a B.S. in Biology and Botany from Humboldt State University and a Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from the George Washington University. Trained as an ecologist, Teresa’s previous research focused on plant-insect interactions, including pollination, parasitism, and disease ecology in both natural and agricultural systems.

Events


Event Type :  
Workshop

Description :   

The COVID-19 pandemic has placed renewed focus on strengthening the capability of U.S. foreign and development policy to anticipate and respond to major global challenges that threaten American prosperity and security. Similarly, great power competition, urgent existential threats such as climate change, and rapidly advancing emerging technologies underscore the importance of assessing how science, technology and health (STH) are integrated into American diplomatic and development missions – and whether the U.S. Department of State (State) and USAID are maximally leveraging STH to meet pressing challenges in a changing world.  Through this three-day workshop we hope to identify creative approaches to strengthen the role of STH at State and USAID and achieve U.S diplomatic and development goals in the next 5-10 years.

Session 3:  Science, Technology and Health Organizational Opportunities and Challenges 

at the U.S. Department of State and USAID

Tuesday, September 29, 2020

12:00 – 3:00 pm ET

Note: This third and final session of the workshop takes place a week after the first two sessions to inform the discussions on this topic. 

 

This session will focus on how the Department of State and USAID can better use S&T to deliver on their diplomacy and development objectives, and outlines potential areas of reform. 

 

12:00 Welcome and Summary of Session 1 and 2 themes

 

12:10 Plenary Panel 

Does the structure, processes, and organization of State/AID enable them to address the current global landscape? If not, what reforms are needed to do so?

 

1:00 Breakout Sessions 

Participants will be placed in one of three concurrent breakout sessions they have pre-registered to attend. In each breakout session, speakers and participants will discuss how organizational elements and processes of State and USAID need to adapt to the changing landscape discussed in the first two sessions of the workshop. 

 

Breakout 3.1: Environment, Science, Technology and Health Integration Within 

State and USAID

How can environment, science, technology and health (ESTH) issues be incorporated better into foreign affairs activities (including State - beyond OES; USAID, and other parts of the USG foreign policy establishment)?

 

Breakout 3.2: Eliminating Structural Racism and Promoting Inclusivity

What are the structural barriers to full participation? What are novel approaches to promoting diversity and inclusivity at State and USAID?

 

Breakout 3.3: Science, Technology and Health for Decision-Making and Innovation 

How can State and USAID harness more data and analytical tools from more disciplines to make smarter and faster decisions?

 

2:05 (Tentative) Closing Plenary

 

2:35 Final synthesis wrap up and Q&A

 

3:00 Close workshop

Registration is now closed for this session.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Flannery Wasson
Contact Email:  fwasson@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Workshop

Description :   

The COVID-19 pandemic has placed renewed focus on strengthening the capability of U.S. foreign and development policy to anticipate and respond to major global challenges that threaten American prosperity and security. Similarly, great power competition, urgent existential threats such as climate change, and rapidly advancing emerging technologies underscore the importance of assessing how science, technology and health (STH) are integrated into American diplomatic and development missions – and whether the U.S. Department of State (State) and USAID are maximally leveraging STH to meet pressing challenges in a changing world.  Through this three-day workshop we hope to identify creative approaches to strengthen the role of STH at State and USAID and achieve U.S diplomatic and development goals in the next 5-10 years.

Session 2:  Global Science & Technology Enterprise 

Tuesday, September 22, 2020

12:00 – 3:00 pm ET

The main objectives of the second session of the workshop are to identify how the changing landscape of science and technology, geopolitics, and means for engagement impact State and USAID. 

12:00 Welcome and Summary of Session 1 themes

 

12:10 Plenary: Perspectives from around the world

The current transnational issues with which the U.S. is grappling – those of health, climate, urbanization, and emerging technologies – are similarly impacting other countries. This panel will feature officials from around the world who are at the forefront of national and regional efforts to integrate science, technology, and health into their foreign policy priorities and planning. 

 

1:00 Breakout Sessions 

Participants will be placed in one of three concurrent breakout sessions they have pre-registered to attend. In each breakout session, speakers and participants will discuss critical areas of the global S&T and geopolitical landscape in the context of how these topics impact the work of State and USAID. 

 

  • Breakout 2.1: American Competitiveness in a Rapidly Changing S&T and 
    • Geopolitical Landscape
    • What are the key opportunities and challenges that shifts in global R&D investments, infrastructure, actors, and governance present for U.S. foreign policy priorities?
       
  • Breakout 2.2: Promoting Participation in S&T at All Levels of Society 
    • How do we recover from a period of global isolation and anti-racism awakening to an improved state of full and equal S&T participation in which we are prepared for future global pandemics and other challenges?
       
  • Breakout 2.3: International Security and the Promise and Perils of Emerging 
    • Technologies
    • How can State and USAID (and the expert agencies they work with) maximize the benefits and minimize the risks from emerging technology, and what are the most important focal areas?
       

2:30 Return to Joint Session

Chairs will distill the key themes from the discussions in their breakout sessions followed by plenary discussion and Q&A.

3:00 End of Session 2

Registration is now closed for this session.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Flannery Wasson
Contact Email:  fwasson@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Workshop

Description :   

The COVID-19 pandemic has placed renewed focus on strengthening the capability of U.S. foreign and development policy to anticipate and respond to major global challenges that threaten American prosperity and security. Similarly, great power competition, urgent existential threats such as climate change, and rapidly advancing emerging technologies underscore the importance of assessing how science, technology and health (STH) are integrated into American diplomatic and development missions – and whether State and USAID are maximally leveraging STH to meet pressing challenges in a changing world. Through this three-day workshop, we hope to identify creative approaches to strengthen the role of STH at the U.S. Department of State and USAID and achieve U.S diplomatic and development goals in the next 5-10 years. The workshop will have three sessions, with each session opening with a plenary followed by three concurrent breakout sessions.

WORKSHOP OVERVIEW

Session 1: Placing Transnational Challenges at the Center of U.S. Foreign Policy

Monday, Sep. 21, 10:00am - 1:00 pm ET

Select from one of three breakouts:

1.1: Strengthening U.S. and Global Health in the COVID-19 Era

1.2: Mitigating Climate Change and Protecting the Environment

1.3: Opportunities and Challenges in Urbanization and the Future of Cities

Registration is now closed for this session.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Flannery Wasson
Contact Email:  fwasson@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

Publications

No data present.