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Project Information

Project Information


Examining the Long-term Health and Economic Effects of Antimicrobial Resistance in the United States


Project Scope:

The National Academies will convene an expert committee to examine the long-term medical and economic impacts of increasing antimicrobial resistance in the United States. The study shall examine progress made on the U.S. National Strategy and Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria, including domestic and international strategies employed by NIH, CDC, FDA, ASPR, USDA, and USAID.

Opportunities to add to the current body of knowledge include:
• advising on effective strategies to scale up global detection of resistant infections and infection prevention and control efforts – especially outside of the U.S. and Europe;
• assessing progress and gaps in determining the risk to human health from environmental sources and reservoirs of antibiotic resistant pathogens and genes;
• assessing progress and gaps in tracking how interventions in agriculture impact public health;
• assessing progress and gaps in tracking how interventions in agriculture affect animal health and welfare and how to improve interventions;
• assessing the impact of incentives for antibiotic development (BARDA’s project Bioshield, 2019 CMS IPPS, for example) on the health of the antibiotic pipeline;
• assessing methods to improve projections of the burden of AMR and its economic impacts, with an eye toward informing the development of incentives for antimicrobial products;
• assessing progress and gaps in developing, benchmarking, and tracking rigorous quantitative measures of the impact of various strategies to mitigate AMR, with a focus on relevant, timely, and actionable measures;
• assessing the need for and advise on key diseases and antibiotics for which animal-specific antimicrobial susceptibility testing breakpoints are needed; and
• assessing the need for and explore how to incentivize and promote cooperative relationships between industry and professional societies to prioritize test development of new diagnostics for use in veterinary settings, especially animal-side diagnostics that allow precise selection of antibiotics.

Status: Current

PIN: HMD-BPH-20-07

Project Duration (months): 22 month(s)

RSO: Buckley, Gillian



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 08/19/2020

Guy H. Palmer - (Chair)
Dr. Guy Palmer holds the Jan and Jack Creighton Endowed Chair at Washington State University (WSU) where he is Regents Professor of Pathology & Infectious Diseases and the Senior Director of Global Health. He also serves as Chair of WSU Global Health- Kenya. Dr. Palmer was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2006, is a Medical Sciences Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is a founding member of the Washington State Academy of Sciences, where he served as President from 2012-13. His recent service to the NIH includes as a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors (ad hoc), and prior service as chair and permanent member of the Host Interactions with Bacterial Pathogens study section and for the NIH-sponsored National Academies workshop on Critical Needs and Gaps in Understanding Prevention, Amelioration, and Resolution of Lyme and Other Tick-Borne Diseases. Dr. Palmer served the National Academies as a member of the Board on Global Health and on the membership committee of the National Academy of Medicine. He serves on the Executive Roundtable of the Washington Global Health Alliance and chairs the Pacific Northwest Antibiotic Resistance Coalition. Dr. Palmer earned a BS (Biology, summa cum laude) and a DVM, both from Kansas State University and received his PhD in infectious diseases from WSU. He completed his residency in pathology and laboratory medicine and is board certified in pathology. He holds honorary doctorates from the University of Bern (Switzerland) where he completed his fellowship in the Institute of Pathology, and from Kansas State University, where he serves on the External Advisory Board for the Biosecurity Institute. He has been recognized with the Poppensiek Professorship at Cornell, the IBM Professorship at Colby, the Schalm Lecturership at the University of California, the Distinguished Scientist Lectureship at NIH, the Science in Medicine Lectureship at the University of Washington, and the Merck Award for Creativity.
Michael Baym
Michael Baym is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Informatics at Harvard University. His research is centered around the problem of antibiotic resistance, at the intersection of experimental, theoretical and computational techniques. His work ranges from understanding the basic mechanisms of evolution to the development of algorithms for computation on massive biological datasets. Baym received his PhD in Mathematics from MIT and was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard Medical School in Systems Biology. He has won several awards including a Packard Fellowship, a Pew Biomedical Scholarship, and a Sloan Research Fellowship. He is also a part-time inventor, holding over four dozen issued US patents.


Cesar de la Fuente
Cesar de la Fuente is a synthetic biologist, bioengineer and microbiologist and a Presidential Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn). Using an interdisciplinary approach, de la Fuente seeks to expand nature’s repertoire to build novel synthetic molecular tools and devise therapies that nature has not previously discovered. De la Fuente is using computers to address the dire public health problem of antibiotic-resistant infections, which are predicted to become the leading cause of death in our society by the year 2050. As the leader of the Machine Biology Group at UPenn, de la Fuente aims to develop computer-made molecules that will replenish our current antibiotic arsenal. He has already made fundamental discoveries involving the computer-guided design and discovery of antibiotics to combat antibiotic resistance and has achieved considerable recognition for this work. Prof. de la Fuente was recognized by MIT Technology Review in 2019 as one of the world’s top innovators for “digitizing evolution to make better antibiotics”. He was selected as the inaugural recipient of the Langer Prize (2019), an ACS 2020 Kavli Emerging Leader in Chemistry (2020), AIChE’s 35 Under 35 Award (2020), and received the ACS Infectious Diseases Young Investigator Award (2020). In addition, he was named a Boston Latino 30 Under 30, a 2018 Wunderkind by STAT News, a Top 10 Under 40 of 2019 by GEN, a Top 10 MIT Technology Review Innovator Under 35 (Spain), 30 Rising Leaders in the Life Sciences, and he received the 2019 Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Young Investigator Award. His scientific discoveries have yielded over 75 peer-reviewed publications and multiple patents.
Jennifer Dien Bard
Jennifer Dien Bard is an Associate Professor of Pathology with Clinical Scholar designation in the Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California. She is the Director of the Clinical Microbiology and Virology Laboratories at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and the Chief of Academic and Research Development in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at CHLA. Dr. Dien Bard is also the program director of the Medical and Public Health Microbiology postdoctoral fellowship program at CHLA. She is a Diplomate of the American Board of Medical Microbiology.
Dr. Dien Bard serves on several committees and working groups for organizations including the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the Antimicrobial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG). She is currently a member of the CLSI Methods and Development Standardization working group and co-chair of the Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species ad hoc working group. She also serves as a member of the ARLG Pediatric working group and ARLG diagnostics committee. She is a voting member of the CLSI Principles and Procedures for Blood culture and have served on the ASM Laboratory Medicine Best Practice Guidelines Committee for the diagnosis of Clostridioides difficile infection and Bloodstream infections. Dr. Dien Bard also served on the Editorial board of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology and was an Invited Editor for the Journal of Applied Laboratory Medicine Sepsis and Infectious Diseases Special Issue. Prior to joining this committee, Dr. Dien Bard consulted with BioFire Diagnostics, Accelerate Diagnostics and Karius, Inc. She is also a site Principal Investigator at CHLA for trials sponsored by Luminex Corporation, BioFire Diagnostics, and Qiagen.
Dr. Dien Bard has published over 80 scientific papers and is a frequent speaker in the areas of rapid molecular diagnostics for the identification of infectious diseases pathogens and detection of genotypic and phenotypic antimicrobial resistance. Her clinical research studies explore the application and effects of laboratory diagnostic, particularly molecular diagnostics, on patient diagnosis, antimicrobial utilization and overall clinical outcome. Dr. Dien Bard received her BSc in Medical Laboratory Sciences and PhD in Medical Sciences from the University of Alberta, Canada. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship in Medical and Public Health Microbiology at UCLA.

Marta Gomez-Chiarri
Marta Gómez-Chiarri is an aquatic pathologist and Professor at the University of Rhode Island (URI), where she has been since 1997. Marta earned her Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) in 1992. Previous to joining URI, she was a postdoctoral fellow at Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, where she worked with biotechnological approaches to the culture of several aquatic species, including trout and abalone. Marta held the position of Chair of the Department of Fisheries, Animal, and Veterinary Sciences (2014 – 2020) and is currently the Graduate Coordinator for programs in the areas of Aquaculture and Fisheries and Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems. She is also coordinator of the interdisciplinary Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems undergraduate program, a major that explores the food chain, from farm to plate to waste and back, emphasizing sustainability, impacts on human health, and resilience from economic, environmental, and societal viewpoints. Marta’s research interests include the use of multidisciplinary approaches to the prevention and management of diseases in marine organisms, from probiotics and microbial-microbial interactions to genomics and comparative immunology. Her collaborative national and international research on marine diseases is driven by a desire to ensure equitable access to healthy food that is sustainably produced.
Guillame Lhermie
Guillaume Lhermie is Associate Professor in Animal Health and Veterinary Public Health Economics at University of Toulouse, France, and Adjunct Assistant Professor at Cornell University, USA. Veterinarian by training, he also has an MSc in Economics and a PhD in pharmaco-epidemiology and innovation. Before working in academia, Dr. Lhermie worked in veterinary private practice for few years, as well as in the pharmaceutical industry, as R&D project manager and medical director over 8 years. Dr. Lhermie research interests are in One Health and Infectious Diseases challenges specifically the interface of animal agriculture and human health. He is studying the economics of antimicrobial use and resistance at the farm, supply chains, and global levels. Most recently, his research emphasis has been focusing on sustainability challenge, where he develops qualitative and quantitative models aiming to analyze the impact of antimicrobial use on social-ecological systems, to inform policymakers. Dr. Lhermie also serves as expert in animal health economics for governmental organizations and NGOs.
Preeti Malani
Preeti N. Malani, MD, MSJ is the University of Michigan’s Chief Health Officer and Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases. She is also the director of the University of Michigan’s National Poll on Healthy Aging. Her clinical expertise includes both infectious diseases and geriatric medicine. Dr. Malani is a graduate of the University of Michigan. She received her MD degree from Wayne State University School of Medicine. Prior to medical school, she completed a Master’s in Journalism at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. She completed her Internal Medicine residency and Infectious Diseases fellowship at the University of Michigan where she also received a Master’s Degree in Clinical Research Design and Statistical Analysis. Dr. Malani completed fellowship training in Geriatric Medicine at the Oregon Health and Science University. She has had a long standing interest in both the clinical and policy aspects of antimicrobial resistance, infection prevention, and infections in older adults. Dr. Malani has published more than 150 peer-reviewed articles and editorials and has edited five books. She continues to dabble in journalism and her recent work has appeared in a variety of publications including NPR, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Michigan Rivals, Health Affairs blog, and JAMA News. She serves on the public health committee of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
Eleftherios E. Mylonakis
Dr. Eleftherios Mylonakis, Charles C.J. Carpenter Professor of Infectious Disease at Brown University, is also the Chief of Infectious Diseases at Rhode Island Hospital and the Miriam Hospital and Director of the COBRE Center for Antimicrobial Resistance and Therapeutic Discovery. He is Assistant Dean for Outpatient Investigations and Director of the Center for Outpatient and Longitudinal Medical Research at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Professor of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology. He was previously attending Physician of Infectious Disease at Massachusetts General Hospital and served as an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Mylonakis studies host and microbial factors of infection and the discovery of antimicrobial agents. His research encompasses both clinical and laboratory studies and the use of mammalian and invertebrate model hosts systems to identify novel antimicrobial compounds and the elucidation of evolutionarily conserved aspects of microbial virulence and the host response. He has 8 patents, edited five books and published almost 400 articles in the peer-reviewed literature. He is currently named as a PI on a study of novel antimicrobials for Chemic Labs.
Iruka Okeke
Iruka N Okeke is a Professor of Pharmaceutical Microbiology at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria and a Fellow of the Nigerian and African Academies of Science. Her research group investigates the mechanisms bacteria use to colonize humans, cause disease and gain drug resistance. She also studies laboratory practice in Africa. Iruka is a member of Nigeria’s Technical Working Group on Antimicrobial Resistance and her laboratory currently provides the genomic surveillance service for Nigeria’s antimicrobial resistance surveillance system as part of a collaborative UK National Institute for Health-supported Global Health Research Unit.
Iruka received B.Pharm., M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from Obafemi Awolowo University (formerly University of Ife), Nigeria and post-doctoral training at the University of Maryland, USA and Uppsala Universitet, Sweden. She has held Fulbright, International Federation for Science, Branco Weiss (Society-in-Science) and Institute for Advanced Studies (Berlin) fellowships as well as academic positions in Nigeria, the UK and the USA. Iruka is author/ co-author of several scientific articles and chapters as well as the books Divining Without Seeds: The case for strengthening laboratory medicine in Africa (Cornell Univ Press) and Genetics: Genes, Genomes and Evolution (Oxford Univ Press). She editor-in-chief of the African Journal of Laboratory Medicine. Iruka is on the Wellcome Trust’s Surveillance and Epidemiology of Drug Resistant Infections Consortium (SEDRIC) advisory board and currently serves as a volunteer drug resistance consultant to the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (CDC), WHO and other organizations.


Emmanuel Okello
Emmanuel Okello is an Assistant Cooperative Extension Specialist in Antimicrobial Stewardship at University of California Davis. The goal of his extension program is to develop antimicrobial stewardship guidelines and best management practices that reduce the spread of antimicrobial resistance while maintaining the health and welfare of the herds and flocks. His research work is focused on understanding the dynamics and risks for antimicrobial resistance in livestock, and the development of health management strategies for reduced antimicrobial resistance and improved health and welfare of herds and flocks. Other areas of interest include the use of alternatives to antibiotics to control infectious diseases in livestock, and the development and evaluation of vaccines and rapid diagnostics tests. Prior to joining UC Davis faculty in 2018, Okello was a postdoctoral scholar at the UC Davis Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center in Tulare, California. His postdoctoral research included surveillance for antimicrobial resistance on California dairies and developing decision tools to guide antimicrobial drug use for dairy cows. Okello earned his Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine from Makerere University in Uganda, Master of Molecular Biology from Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and a PhD in Bio-Engineering Sciences from Vrije Universiteit Brussel in Belgium.
Aylin Sertkaya
Aylin Sertkaya, Ph.D. is a Vice President and Senior Economist at Eastern Research Group, Inc. (ERG) with over 20 years of experience in health economics, econometrics, health policy analysis, and program evaluation. Throughout her career at ERG, she has formed and led teams of economists, scientists, and nationally recognized subject-matter experts to support dozens of high-profile regulatory initiatives, working closely with federal agency economists and policymakers. Her applied research has been published in peer-reviewed journals, such as American Journal of Infection Control, Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Clinical Trials, and Human and Ecological Risk Assessment. Dr. Sertkaya has led dozens of economic/policy analysis studies related to antibacterial products, diabetes intervention, unit dose medication barcoding, adoption of MedDRA for post-marketing periodic safety report submissions to FDA, drug compounding, among others under contract to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. Her research on antibacterial products includes 1) the development of an analytical framework for evaluating the impact of different types of incentives on antibacterial product development, including drugs, vaccines, and rapid point-of-care diagnostic (see published reports Analytical Framework for Examining the Value of Antibacterial Products and Economic Incentives for the Development of Rapid Point-of-care (POC) Diagnostic Devices for C. Difficile, Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), and Neisseria Gonorrhoeae), 2) evaluation of the market performance of antibacterial drugs against their clinical value; examination of potential market failures that underlie lack of appropriate current or projected antibacterial therapies, and modeling the economic burden of antimicrobial resistance (ongoing project). Dr. Sertkaya holds a Ph.D. in Economics and a dual Bachelor’s in Physics and Economics.


Michelle Soupir
Dr. Soupir an associate professor in the Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Department; a member of the graduate faculty in the Civil, Construction, and Environ- mental Engineering Department; and Environmental Science and Sustainable Agriculture graduate degree programs at Iowa State University. Her research focuses on soil and water quality, nonpoint source pollution control, watershed management, and water quality monitoring. She uses both lab and field scale studies to examine the occurrence, fate and transport of pathogens, pathogen indicators and contaminants of emerging environmental concern (CoEECs) such as antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria to surface and tile drainage systems. Findings from her work have implications to improve the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) development and implementation process, identify the impact of land use practices on water quality, and develop management practices to reduce pollutant transport. She works with landowners, commodity groups, and state and federal agencies to answer environmental questions and inform policy. Her goal is to protect public health and find ways to provide access to clean water for everyone.
Andy S. Stergachis
Andy Stergachis, PhD, MS, BPharm, is Professor of Pharmacy and Global Health and Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology and Health Services, Director of the Global Medicines Program, and Associate Dean for Research, Graduate Studies and New Initiatives, School of Pharmacy, University of Washington (UW). He is also Interim Director of the UW Biomedical Regulatory Affairs Program. Previously, he served as Chairman of the UW’s Department of Pharmacy and the Department of Pathobiology, and Associate Dean of the School of Public Health and founding Director of the UW Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research and Policy Program, now the CHOICE Institute. He is an author of 166 peer-reviewed publications in areas such as pharmacovigilance, pharmacoepidemiology, and clinical epidemiology. A licensed pharmacist, he served as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association for 6 years until 2019. He was a member of the Drug Safety and Risk Management Advisory Committee, US FDA, and chaired the Expert Panel on the Review of Surveillance and Screening Technologies for the Quality Assurance of Medicines for USP through 2020. His current research in the field of antimicrobial resistance includes serving as co-investigator for a study to estimate the magnitude and trends in the global burden of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Called the Global Research on Antimicrobial Resistance (GRAM) Project, he collaborates with the UW Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation and the University of Oxford. He recently worked with the USAID-funded Medicines, Technologies, and Pharmaceutical Services (MTaPS) Program and MSH to conduct antimicrobial consumption and antimicrobial use projects in Tanzania. His completed research includes having directed a pharmacovigilance pregnancy registry study on the safety of first trimester antimalarials in sub-Saharan Africa countries. He is a pioneer in validation and use of large linked databases to evaluate the safety of medicines used in the US and, separately, in low- and middle-income countries. He has developed novel approaches for safety surveillance of drugs and vaccines and has contributed to strengthening the evidence-base for pharmacy services aimed at improving health and economic outcomes. Dr. Stergachis is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and a Fellow of the American Pharmacists Association and of the International Society for Pharmacoepidemiology. He has served on multiple NAM committees, including the Committee on Evidence-Based Practices for Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response; Committee to Review Long-Term Effects of Antimalarial Drugs; Committee on Strengthening Regulatory Systems in Developing Countries; and the Committee to Assess the U.S. Drug Safety System.


Mary E. Wilson
Mary E. Wilson, M.D. is Clinical Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco and Adjunct Professor of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Her academic interests include antibiotic resistance, the ecology of infections and emergence of microbial threats, travel medicine, tuberculosis, and vaccines. She is a fellow in the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American College of Physicians, the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and the International Society of Travel Medicine. She has served on the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the CDC, the Academic Advisory Committee for the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico, and on five committees for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, where she was Vice-Chair of the Forum on Microbial Threats through 2019. She was a member of the Pew National Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production, whose report, Putting Meat on the Table: Industrial Farm Animal Production in America, was released in the spring of 2008. She is the author of A World Guide to Infections: Diseases, Distribution, Diagnosis (Oxford University Press, 1991); senior editor, with Richard Levins and Andrew Spielman, of Disease in Evolution: Global Changes and Emergence of Infectious Diseases (NY Academy of Sciences, 1994); editor of New and Emerging Infectious Diseases (Medical Clinics of North America, 2008); author of Antibiotics: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford University Press, 2019); and is one of the medical editors for CDC’s Health Information for International Travel (Yellow Book). She has served as an advisor to the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network and is a contributing editor for NEJM Journal Watch Infectious Diseases. She served on the Board of Trustees for icddr,b in Bangladesh for 6 years, is a member of the Advisory Board for the Fogarty International Center at NIH, and on the Board of Directors for the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics, and Policy.
Qijng Zhang
Dr. Qijing Zhang is Clarence Hartley Covault Distinguished Professor and Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies in College of Veterinary Medicine at Iowa State University. Dr. Zhang received his PhD degree in immunobiology from Iowa State University and postdoctoral training in molecular microbiology from University of Missouri. Dr. Zhang worked as an Assistant Professor at the Ohio State University prior to returning to Iowa State University. For the past 20 years, Dr. Zhang’s research has focused on antimicrobial resistance (AMR) at the interface of human and animal medicine. His research has discovered emerging AMR threats, novel antibiotic resistance mechanisms, and co-evolution of bacterial virulence along with AMR in zoonotic and foodborne pathogens. His work has also provided key insights into the fitness, persistence, and transmission of AMR pathogens in the food chain, facilitating mitigation of AMR at the animal-human interface. In addition to AMR research, Dr. Zhang has broad perspectives on AMR surveillance, mitigation, and stewardship. Dr. Zhang is a fellow of American Academy of Microbiology and American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is also an honorary diplomate of American College of Veterinary Microbiologists.
Gillian Buckley - (Staff Officer)

Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest

The conflict of interest policy of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (http://www.nationalacademies.org/coi) prohibits the appointment of an individual to a committee authoring a Consensus Study Report if the individual has a conflict of interest that is relevant to the task to be performed. An exception to this prohibition is permitted if the National Academies determines that the conflict is unavoidable and the conflict is publicly disclosed. A determination of a conflict of interest for an individual is not an assessment of that individual’s actual behavior or character or ability to act objectively despite the conflicting interest.

Jennifer Dien Bard has a conflict of interest in relation to her service on the Committee on the Committee on Examining the Long-term Health and Economic Effects of Antimicrobial Resistance in the United States because of research support provided to Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) by diagnostic companies: Luminex Corporation, BioFire Diagnostics, and Qiagen.

The National Academies has concluded that for this committee to accomplish the tasks for which it was established its membership must include at least one person who has current experience with microbiological surveillance for resistance, understanding the challenges of diagnosing resistance and managing surveillance in a hospital microbiology lab. As described in her biographical summary, Dr. Dien Bard has extensive experience as the director of clinical microbiology and virology at CHLA in rapid laboratory diagnostics and their relationship to antimicrobial stewardship and the development of rapid tests for detecting resistant microorganisms.

The National Academies has determined that the experience and expertise of Dr. Dien Bard is needed for the committee to accomplish the task for which it has been established. The National Academies could not find another available individual with the equivalent experience and expertise who does not have a conflict of interest. Therefore, the National Academies has concluded that the conflict is unavoidable.

The National Academies believes that Dr. Dien Bard can serve effectively as a member of the committee, and the committee can produce an objective report, taking into account the composition of the committee, the work to be performed, and the procedures to be followed in completing the study.

Events


Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

November 9,10,and 11, 2020 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM ET - Open to the public

At this meeting speakers will discuss factors influencing antimicrobial resistance both in the United States and globally. This will include monitoring of antibacterial residuals in water and antibiotic use in food-producing and companion animals. Speakers will present on the challenges of global surveillance for resistance, and on various national strategies for combatting resistance. Discussion will give some attention to tools for prevention and response to resistance, especially ones that can be employed in low- and middle-income countries.

November 13, 2020 11:00 AM - 1:30 PM ET - Closed session

Committee will debrief on presentations, discuss next steps, and consider possible key problems and solutions in the field.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://nasem-hmd-antimicrobial-resistance-mtg-2.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Leila Meymand
Contact Email:  lmeymand@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

September 23 and 24, 2020 11:00 AM - 1:30 PM ET - Open to the public

In these meetings representatives from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases oriented the committee members to the charge and answered questions. Next, representatives of different government agencies involved in the national strategy for combatting antimicrobial resistant bacteria presented on their work in the field and answered the committee's questions. 

 

September 22 and 25, 2020 11:00 AM - 1:30 PM ET - Closed sessions

During these meetings, the committee reviewed the National Academies bias and conflict of interest procedure, discussed their charge, questions for the study sponsor, and a strategy for answering the charge. 


Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://nasem-hmd-antimicrobial-resistance-mtg-1.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Crysti Park
Contact Email:  ypark@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Andy Stergachis
Aylin Sertkaya
Cesar de la Fuente
Eleftherios Mylonakis
Emmanuel Okello
Guillaume Lhermie
Guy Palmer
Iruka Okeke
Jennifer Dien Bard
Marta Gomez-Chiarri
Mary Wilson
Michael Baym
Michelle Soupir
Preeti Malani
Qijing Zhang

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The committee reviewed the National Academies bias and conflict of interest procedure, discussed their charge, questions for the study sponsor, and a strategy for answering the charge.

The committee also discussed topics to address for the next meeting.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 28, 2020
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.