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Project Information

Project Information


Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences Research in Space 2023-2032


Project Scope:

Statement of Task

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will appoint a decadal survey committee to carry out a decadal survey of biological and physical sciences research in space.  The study will generate consensus recommendations to implement a comprehensive strategy and vision for a decade of transformative science at the frontiers of biological and physical sciences research in space.  The results of the study will assist NASA in defining and aligning biological and physical sciences research to uniquely advance scientific knowledge, meet the needs of human and robotic exploration missions, and provide terrestrial benefits.

The committee, with input from study panels covering the breadth of biological and physical sciences in space, will carry out the following tasks:

1. Conduct a review of the current state of knowledge in the major and emerging areas of space-related biological and physical sciences research;

2. Identify the most compelling science challenges and frontiers to be pursued utilizing spaceflight environments and analogues of spaceflight conditions that will enable scientific discovery, address the needs of space exploration, and/or result in applications on Earth;

3. Develop a comprehensive research strategy to advance the frontiers of biological and physical sciences research in space that will include identifying, recommending, and ranking the highest priority research activities — taking into account for each activity the scientific case, international and commercial activities, and opportunities for partnerships. Where feasible and useful, such factors as timing, cost category and cost risk, technical readiness, and technical risk, will also be considered. The strategy should:
a)    Recommend approaches to facilitate the development of a robust, resilient and appropriately balanced program of biological and physical science space research that will enable scientific discovery, address the scientific and technological needs of space exploration and/or result in applications on Earth;
b)    Identify facility and platform capabilities and environmental requirements for each of the recommended research activities as appropriate, including facilities or capabilities not currently available but which could be developed in the future;
c)     Assemble notional proof-of-concept research campaigns, where appropriate synergies may be achieved, that address identified prioritized research activities as part of complex or multi-disciplinary missions or mission sets including those that make use of cost-effective ground analogues and sub-orbital flights.
d)    Utilize the Technical Risk and Cost Evaluation (TRACE) process on large recommended spaceflight projects (those costing more than $100M) and on any other projects selected by the Committee.
e)    Organize the recommended research activities, associated facilities and platforms, and proof-of-concept research campaigns into broad cost categories in order to assist NASA's understanding of the top-level scientific performance and resource options.  

4. Recommend broad decision rules, where appropriate, so that NASA can consider accommodating significant deviations in the projected budget or changes in priorities precipitated by new discoveries or new commercial achievements. 

As part of its review the committee will consider and address relevant cross-cutting research needs and key aspects of the infrastructure--including NASA, commercial, and international programs and plans--that may affect the conduct of research. Potential infrastructure topics that will be considered include: 

  • Where NASA capabilities or ability to assume high risk enable it to uniquely support the research enterprise, and where support roles might feasibly be transitioned to commercial providers,
  • Roles played by NASA's biological and physical sciences program in supporting the conduct of space research, particularly in light of the mission and capabilities of the International Space Station (ISS) National Laboratory, limited lifetime of the ISS, and the prospect of commercial platform(s) in low Earth orbit (LEO),
  • Existing and potential new research synergies between NASA and other U.S. government agencies, opportunities for collaborative research that are relevant to science priorities between Science Mission Directorate’s science divisions, as well as with commercial entities and international partners; and
  • The current position and expected evolution of the U.S. relative to other countries in the areas covered by the study, including the uniqueness (or lack thereof) of U.S. efforts.
Considerations

In considering the emerging availability of commercial platforms, facilities and services for research in LEO and beyond, the committee should include an awareness of the space-related programs within other agencies and non-government organizations.  While the focus of the committee will be on the next decade, the committee may also identify potential research objectives that extend beyond that timeframe.  This study should build upon the findings and recommendations of previous National Academies' studies. As part of its work, the committee will also:
  •  Describe how the identified research objectives could produce knowledge, enable exploration activities, or provide benefits to terrestrial and other applications;
  •  Recommend criteria for identifying and updating a high value research portfolio that is enabled by exploration and/or enables exploration;
  • Apply these criteria to recommend a high value research portfolio that is enabled by exploration and/or enables exploration.
Scope

When selecting biological and physical science disciplines that will be reviewed in this report, the committee will generally consider discipline areas covered in the previous decadal report, as well as emerging areas of interest.   However, the committee will not review the discipline areas of NASA's program of risk identification and mitigation for astronauts except to the extent that biological research in microbiology, animal biology or plant biology could inform that program. Translational research, innovative methods and procedures, and pre-clinical studies (particularly those involving  understanding biological processes, normal or pathophysiological adaptation to microgravity, and mechanisms of action) may be included. 

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-SSB-20-01

Project Duration (months): 36 month(s)

RSO: Graham, Sandra

Topic(s):

Biology and Life Sciences
Engineering and Technology
Health and Medicine
Math, Chemistry, and Physics
Space and Aeronautics


Parent Project(s): N/A


Child Project(s): N/A



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 08/13/2021

Robert J. Ferl - (Co-Chair)
ROBERT J. FERL is professor at the University of Florida (UF). Dr. Ferl’s research agenda includes analysis of the fundamental biological processes involved in plant adaptations to environments, with an emphasis on the particular environments and opportunities presented by the space exploration life sciences. He is an expert in the area of plant gene responses and adaptations to environmental stresses and the signal transduction processes that control environmental responses. The fundamental issues driving his research program include the recognition of environmental stress, the signal-transduction mechanisms that convert the recognition of stress into biochemical activity, and the gene activation that ultimately leads to response and adaptation to environmental stress. Dr. Ferl served as the developer and director of the virtual center for Exploration Life Sciences, a joint academic research and education venture between UF/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), and the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). He has served on the National Academies Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space: Plant and Microbial Biology Panel (2009-2011) and as co-chair of the Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.
Krystyn J. Van Vliet - (Co-Chair)
KRYSTYN J. VAN VLIET is the Koerner Professor of materials science & engineering and biological engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Her research focuses on material chemomechanics: the material behavior at the interface of mechanics, chemistry, physics, and biology, and in particular, thermodynamically metastable surfaces and interfaces. Dr. Van Vliet joined the faculty of the MIT Department of Materials Science & Engineering in 2004, and leads the Laboratory for Material Chemomechanics. She also serves MIT as Associate Provost, overseeing campus space management, technology licensing, and corporate relations. She directed the DMSE Nanomechanical Technology Laboratory, a multiuser research facility that includes training of student and staff researchers with approximately 60 new users each year, and co-directs the MIT Biomedical Engineering Minor Program. Dr. Van Vliet also conducts research in Singapore, where her interdisciplinary team invents and develops new technology platforms for diagnostics and treatment of cell & tissue disease, as well as cell therapy manufacturing solutions.
Adam P. Arkin
Adam Arkin (Ph.D., 1992) is the Dean A. Richard Newton Memorial Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley and a senior faculty scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Arkin is the director of the Center for Utilization of Biological Engineering in Space. The center seeks microbial and plant-based biological solutions for in situ resource utilization that reduce the launch mass and improves reliability and quality of food, pharmaceuticals, fuels, and materials for astronauts on a mission to Mars. Arkin’s laboratory for systems and synthetic biology seeks to uncover the evolutionary design principles of cellular networks and populations and to exploit them for applications in the areas of systems and synthetic biology, environmental microbiology of bacteria and viruses, bioenergy, biomedicine, and bioremediation. Arkin earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Susan M. Bailey
Susan M. Bailey (Ph.D., 2000) is a professor and radiation cancer biologist in the Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences at Colorado State University. Bailey’s research covers systems and synthetic biology, environmental microbiology of bacteria and viruses, bioenergy, biomedicine, and bioremediation. Part of Bailey’s current research program includes being one of ten investigations selected for the NASA Twins Study, an integrated effort to launch human space life science research into a new era of molecular or "omics" based studies. Bailey and the team are assessing changes in telomere length and telomerase activity in the space- and earth-bound twins, as well as in a cohort of unrelated astronauts. Bailey serves on the editorial board of two scientific journals, is an author on over 50 peer-reviewed publications, three book chapters, and is an inventor on one patent application. Bailey received a Ph.D. in biomedical sciences from the University of New Mexico, School of Medicine.
Debjyoti Banerjee
Debjyoti Banerjee (Ph.D., 1999) is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and a Faculty Fellow at the Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center at Texas A&M University. Previously, Banerjee was the manager of the Fluidics and Device Engineering Group in the Advanced Research and Technology (ART) division at Applied Biosystems Inc./Applera Corporation (currently called Life Technologies). Research interests involve thermal-fluids sciences with emphasis on multi-phase flows (boiling, condensation), microelectromechanical systems (MEMS, includingradio-frequency-MEMS, optical-MEMS, and bio-MEMS), micro/nano-fluidics, bio-nanotechnology (Dip-Pen Nanolithography, nanofabrication, nanosynthesis, explosives sensing for detection improvised explosive device using nano-calorimetry) and renewable energy technologies (using nanofluids for solar thermal energy storage and power conversion). Banerjee earned a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles.
Paul M. Chaikin
Paul Chaikin is a Silver Professor of physics at New York University. He joined the physics faculty at the University of California, Los Angeles in 1972 and studied thermopower, density waves, and high field phenomena mostly in organic superconductors. The lure of actually seeing the microscopics of a system led him to soft matter. He helped develop techniques to measure elasticity and motion and understand colloidal interactions. Hard and soft matter interests continued after joining the faculty at UPenn (1983), the staff at Exxon Research (1983) and the faculty at Princeton University (1988). His interests in geometry/topology led to his founding contributions to diblock copolymer nanolithography, and studies of defects, annealing, and pattern formation. He helped demonstrate and explain why ellipsoids pack more densely than spheres. In 2005 he helped found the Center for Soft Matter Research at New York University. His more recent research centers on artificial self-replication, self-assembly, active matter, DNA nanotechnology, topological defects on curved surfaces, and quantifying order far from equilibrium.
Kathleen E. Cullen
Kathleen Cullen (Ph.D., 1991) is a professor in the Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Neuroscience, and Otolaryngology, and the co-director of the Center for Hearing and Balance at Johns Hopkins University. Cullen founded and directs Johns Hopkins’ Systems Neuroscience and Neuroengineering Laboratory which spans the interdisciplinary fields of neural engineering and neuroscience harnessing the power of innovative computational and neurophysiological methodologies. In addition to those research activities, Cullen currently serves as the program chair and vice president of the Society for the Neural Control of Movement. Cullen has long been committed to improving diversity in science, including the promotion, visibility, and representation of women and underrepresented minorities. Cullen has been an active member of the scientific advisory board of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, which works with NASA to identify health risks in extended space flight. Cullen earned a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from the University of Chicago.
Daniel H. Geschwind
Daniel Geschwind, NAM, (Ph.D., 1991) is the Gordon and Virginia MacDonald Distinguished Professor of Human Genetics, Neurology and Psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and lead of the Geschwind Laboratory. Geschwind is also founder, senior associate dean, and associate vice chancellor of the Institute for Precision Health at UCLA. Geschwind is a pioneer in the transcriptomic and functional genomic analyses of the healthy nervous system and the application of systems biology methods in brain disease. Geschwind defined the molecular pathology of autism and several other major psychiatric disorders and has made major contributions to discover new pathways involved in neurodegeneration and to facilitate neural regeneration. Geschwind has received several awards for his laboratory’s work, including the Gold Medal from the Society of Biological Psychiatry, the Ruane Prize, and is an elected member of the American Association of Physicians and the National Academy of Medicine. Geschwind earned an M.D. and a Ph.D. in neurobiology from Yale University School of Medicine.


Robert W. Hyers
Robert W. Hyers (Ph.D., 1998) is a professor of mechanical and industrial engineering at the University of Massachusetts and a principal scientist and owner of RHA Materials, LLC, which offers contract research and consulting on materials processing and properties to the government and academic institutions as well as private businesses. Previously, Hyers was president and chief technology officer of the Boston Electrometallurgical Corporation and a staff scientist at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center/Electrostatic Levitation Lab. Hyers’ research includes high-temperature materials, condition monitoring and prognosis of structures, and physics-based modeling of materials processing and failure. Hyers holds a patent for Porous Hydroxyapatite Networks for Synthetic Bone Material. Hyers earned a Ph.D. in materials engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Yiguang Ju
Yiguang Ju (Ph.D., 1994) is the Robert Porter Patterson Professor in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and serves as the director of the sustainable energy program at Princeton University. Ju’s research interests include combustion, fuels, and low carbon energy conversion in the areas of near limit and supercritical combustion, plasma-assisted combustion and chemical manufacturing, alternative fuels, chemical kinetics, and energy materials. Ju is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, a founding fellow of the Combustion Institute, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Combustion Institute and the Institute for Dynamics of Explosions and Reactive Systems. Awards include the Distinguished Paper Award from the International Symposium on Combustion, the NASA Director’s Certificate of Appreciation award , the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the International Prize from the Japanese Combustion Society, and the Propellants and Combustion Award from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics . Ju earned a Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Tohoku University.
Christopher E. Mason
Christopher Mason (Ph.D., 2006) is professor at Weill Cornell Medicine, with appointments at the Tri-Institutional Program in Computational Biology and Medicine, the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center, and the Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute. Mason’s lab utilizes computational and experimental methodologies to identify and characterize the essential genetic elements that guide the function of the human genome, with a particular emphasis on the elements that orchestrate the development of the human brain. The lab creates detailed cell-specific molecular maps of genetic, epigenetic, transcriptional, and translational activity, creating a draft of the molecular recipe for the creation of the brain. They aim to understand the functional elements of the human genome well enough to enable the ability to repair, re-engineer, or fortify these genetic networks within human cells, and lay the foundation to enable long-term human spaceflight. Mason completed a Ph.D. in genetics at Yale University.
Michael J. Pecaut
Michael Pecaut (Ph.D., 1998) is a research professor and vice chair in the Division of Biomedical Engineering Sciences at Loma Linda University. In the last fifteen years, Pecaut has focused on the gravitational and radiation components of the spaceflight environment. In addition to actual space flight opportunities involving rodent models (STS-77, -108, -118, -135), flight conditions have been modeled using a variety of forcing functions including anti-orthostatic tail suspension, centrifugation, and low dose/low dose rate radiation. Further research has focused on immune function. Pecaut received the Thora W. Halstead Young Investigator Award from the American Society for Space and Gravitational Biology. Pecaut earned a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder.
Elba E. Serrano
Elba Serrano (Ph.D., 1983) is a Regents Professor of Biology at New Mexico State University. Serrano’s research focuses on the sensory systems for hearing and balance, neurogenetics, and glial neurobiology. An advocate for interdisciplinary research and education, Serrano is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the recipient of a Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM). Serrano serves as NMSU lead PI for the NSF HSI National STEM Resource Hub, a capacity-building and faculty development initiative that aspires to increase STEM student success at over 550 Hispanic Serving Institutions across all 50 states and the US territories. Her honors include being named one of 100 inspiring Hispanic/Latinx scientists in America. Serrano received a Ph.D. in biological sciences from Stanford University with an emphasis in neuroscience and biophysics.
Peter Vorobieff
Peter Vorobieff (Ph.D., 1996) is a professor and assistant chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of New Mexico. Before joining the ranks of the academia, Vorobieff worked in a variety of places including the Russian Association of Space Explorers and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Primary research interests lie in the area of fundamental hydrodynamic instability studies. Distinctions include being named the Halliburton Professor at University of New Mexico School of Engineering, and 2015 Professor of the Year by Pi Tau Sigma International Mechanical Engineering Honor Society. Vorobieff earned a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and applied mathematics from Lehigh University.
Ronald L. Walsworth
Ronald L. Walsworth (Ph.D., 1991) is the Minta Martin Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and founding director of the Quantum Technology Center at the University of Maryland, College Park. Walsworth leads an interdisciplinary research group with a focus on developing precision measurement tools and then applying them to problems in both the physical and life sciences. Multiple start-up companies have spun out of the Walsworth Group, with others being planned. Honors include the Francis Pipkin Award in Precision Measurements, American Physical Society; a Distinguished Traveling Lecturer, American Physical Society; and a fellow of the American Physical Society. Walsworth earned a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University.
Sarah Wyatt
Sarah Wyatt (Ph.D., 1995) is a professor and the director of Molecular and Cellular Biology at Ohio University. Wyatt’s research interests include transition of floral dimorphisms; plant signaling, especially as it relates to the response to gravity; and the use of genetic, genomic, proteomic, and bioinformatics strategies to identify novel signaling components. The Wyatt Lab uses molecular, genetic, and genomic tools to study plant growth and development and in 2014-15 ran an experiment aboard the International Space Station. Wyatt earned a Ph.D. in plant physiology/molecular biology from Purdue University.
Luis Zea
Luis Zea (Ph.D., 2015) is an assistant research professor of aerospace engineering sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Zea’s research involves space microbiology, space biofilms, and space biomining within the BioServe Space Technologies Center. Since its inception, BioServe has designed, built, and flown hundreds of microgravity life science research experiments and hardware on over 75 spaceflight missions. Distinctions include the Thora Halstead Young Investigator Award, American Society for Gravitational and Space Research; International Space Station (ISS) Young Professionals Plenary, ISS R&D Conference; and Emerging Space Leader Award, International Astronautical Federation. Zea earned a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering sciences, bioastronautics, from the University of Colorado at Boulder.
Zhoumin Zhang
Zhuomin Zhang (Ph.D., 1992) is the J. Erskine Love, Jr. Professor of Heat Transfer, Combustion, and Energy Systems at Georgia Institute of Technology. Zhang engages in a broad spectrum of research in heat transfer and thermophysical engineering, including measurements of the radiative properties and optical response of high-temperature superconducting thin-film materials and devices; thermal modeling of absolute cryogenic radiometers, space-based solar radiometers, and pulsed-laser calorimeters; radiation temperature measurement for rapid thermal processing (RTP) and heat transfer modeling of RTP systems; and investigation of the bidirectional reflectance of rough silicon wafers. Zhang is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow. Zhang received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.



Committee Membership Roster Comments

Note 1: 4/20/21 Committee chairs posted. Note 2: 8/11/21 Committee members posted. Note 3: 8/13/21 Posted one additional member (Chaikin).

Events


Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

This virtual meeting will be closed in its entirety.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
N/A

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Krystyn J. Van Vliet
Co-Chair
Robert J. Ferl
Co-Chair
Adam P. Arkin
Susan M. Bailey
Debjyoti Banerjee
Paul M. Chaikin
Kathleen E. Cullen
Daniel H. Geschwind
Robert W. Hyers
Yiguang Ju
Christopher E. Mason
Michael J. Pecaut
Elba E. Serrano
Ronald L. Walsworth
Sarah Wyatt
Luis Zea

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

-Goals for the meeting
-TRACE activities planning.
-Outreach activities planning.
-Preliminary White Paper discussion.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

No outside materials were distributed to the committee.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
November 16, 2021
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

This virtual meeting will be closed in its entirety.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
N/A

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Krystyn Van Vliet
Co-Chair
Robert Ferl
Co-Chair
Adam Arkin
Debjyoti Banerjee
Paul Chaikin
Kathleen Cullen
Daniel Geschwind
Robert Hyers
Yijuang Ju
Christopher Mason
Michael Pecaut
Elba Serrano
Peter Vorobieff
Sarah Wyatt
Zhuomin Zhang

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

-Planning for the panels.
-Preparing for the white papers.
-Homework assignments.
-Planning for the next meeting.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

No outside materials were distributed to the committee.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
October 22, 2021
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
TeleConference

Description :   

This meeting will be closed in its entirety.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
N/A

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Robert Ferl
Co-Chair
Krystyn Van Vliet
Co-Chair
Susan Bailey
Debjyoti Banerjee
Paul Chaikin
Kathleen Cullen
Daniel Geschwind
Robert Hyers
Christopher Mason
Michael Pecaut
Elba Serrano
Peter Vorobieff
Ronald Walsworth
Sarah Wyatt
Luis Zea

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

-Deep dive into the committee's statement of task.
-Initial discussion of panel charges.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

No outside materials were distributed to the committee.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 21, 2021
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

This meeting will have both closed and open virtual sessions. 

The agenda is subject to change. Please continue to visit the website for updates.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
N/A

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Robert Ferl
Co-Chair
Krystyn Van Vliet
Co-Chair
Adam Arkin
Debjyoti Banerjee
Susan Bailey
Paul Chaikin
Kathleen Cullen
Robert Hyers
Yiguang Ju
Christopher Mason
Michael Pecaut
Elba Serrano
Peter Vorobieff
Ronald Walsworth
Sarah Wyatt
Luis Zea
Zhuomin Zhang

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

-Committee Introductions and Orientation
-Committee Reflections on Presentations
-Committee Bias and Conflict of Interest Discussion
-Future Plans for the Panels and Upcoming Meetings

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

No outside materials were distributed to the committee.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
August 24, 2021
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.