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Project Information

Project Information


Planetary Science and Astrobiology Decadal Survey 2023-2032


Project Scope:

Statement of Task

The Space Studies Board shall establish a survey committee (the “committee”) to develop a comprehensive science and mission strategy for planetary science that updates and extends the Board’s current solar system exploration decadal survey, Vision and Voyages for Planetary Science in the Decade 2013-2022 (2011).

The new decadal survey shall broadly canvas the field of space- and ground-based planetary science to determine the current state of knowledge and to identify the most important scientific questions to be addressed during the interval 2023-2032. For the first time, this decadal survey will also study aspects of planetary defense, now that this activity is fully incorporated as an element of NASA’s planetary science endeavors. The survey will also take into account planned human space exploration activities. In addition, the survey and report shall address relevant programmatic and implementation issues of interest to NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Since the content and structure of the program portfolios of the two agencies are distinct from one another, implementation and investment recommendations specific to each agency should be elaborated in separate sections of the final report. This will ensure that the report’s investment guidance will be clearly addressed to the appropriate agency.

It is critically important that the recommendations of the Committee be achievable within the boundaries of anticipated funding. NASA and NSF will provide an up-to-date understanding of these limitations to the committee at the time of survey initiation.

The report should provide a clear exposition of the following:

1.  An overview of planetary science, astrobiology, and planetary defense—what they are, why they are compelling undertakings, and the relationship between space- and ground- based research;

2.  A broad survey of the current state of knowledge of the solar system;

3.  The most compelling science questions, goals and challenges which should motivate future strategy in planetary science, astrobiology, and planetary defense;

4.  A coherent and consistent traceability of recommended research and missions to objectives and goals;

5.  A comprehensive research strategy to advance the frontiers of planetary science, astrobiology and planetary defense during the period 2023-2032 that will include identifying, recommending, and ranking the highest priority research activities (research activities include any project, facility, experiment, mission, or research program of sufficient scope to be identified separately in the final report).For each activity, consideration should be given to the scientific case, international and private landscape, timing, cost category and cost risk, as well as technical readiness, technical risk, lifetime, and opportunities for partnerships. The strategy should be balanced, by considering large, medium, and small research activities for both ground and space;

6.  Recommendations for decision rules, where appropriate, for the comprehensive research strategy that can accommodate significant but reasonable deviations in the projected budget or changes in urgency precipitated by new discoveries or technological developments;

7.  An awareness of the science and space mission plans and priorities of NASA human space exploration programs and potential foreign and U.S. agency partners reflected in the comprehensive research strategy and identification of opportunities for cooperation, as appropriate;

8.  The opportunities for collaborative research that are relevant to science priorities between SMD’s four science divisions (for example, comparative planetology approaches to exoplanet or astrobiology research); between NASA SMD and the other NASA mission directorates; between NASA and the NSF; between NASA and other US government entities; between NASA and private sector organizations; between NASA and its international partners; and

9.  The state of the profession including issues of diversity, inclusion, equity, and accessibility, the creation of safe workspaces, and recommended policies and practices to improve the state of the profession. Where possible, provide specific, actionable and practical recommendations to the agencies and community to address these areas.



Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-SSB-19-17

Project Duration (months): 36 month(s)

RSO: Smith, David

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Space Studies Board

Topic(s):

Space and Aeronautics
Policy for Science and Technology



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 09/14/2020

Robin M. Canup - (Co-Chair)
ROBIN M. CANUP (NAS) is assistant vice president of the Planetary Sciences Directorate at Southwest Research Institute. Dr. Canup is a theoretician that utilizes numerical simulations and analytical methods to study the formation and early evolution of planets and their moons. She has modeled many aspects of the formation of the Moon, including hydrodynamical simulations of lunar-forming impacts, the accumulation of the Moon and its initial composition and orbital evolution, and how bombardment may have affected Earth-Moon isotopic compositions. Her models for the origin of the large satellites of the gas giant planets have emphasized the potential early loss of satellites due to gas-driven orbital decay, and how this process may both select for the similar observed ratios between the current satellite system masses and their host planets and provide a potential mechanism to produce icy rings at Saturn. Dr. Canup has also developed models for an impact origin of the satellite systems of Pluto and Mars. She was the recipient of the 2003 Urey Prize of the Division of Planetary Sciences and the 2004 Macelwane Medal of the American Geophysical Union, and was elected to NAS in 2012 and to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2017. She earned her Ph.D. and M.S. in astrophysics and planetary sciences from the University of Colorado, Boulder. She served on the Academies’ 2015 and 2018 J. Lawrence Smith Medal Selection Committees, and the 2014 and 2017-2019 NAS Class I Membership Committees
Philip R. Christensen - (Co-Chair)
PHILIP R. CHRISTENSEN is a Regents Professor and the Ed and Helen Korrick Professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University. His research interests focus on the composition, processes, and physical properties of Mars, Earth, asteroids, Europa, and other planetary surfaces. Dr. Christensen uses spectroscopy, radiometry, field observations, and numerical modeling to study the geology and history of planets and moons. A major facet of his research is the development of spacecraft instruments, and he has built six science instruments that have flown on NASA’s Mars Observer, Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Odyssey, Mars Exploration Rovers, and OSIRIS-REx missions. He is currently developing infrared instruments for the UAE’s Hope Mars mission and NASA’s Europa Clipper and Lucy Discovery missions. Over the past 20 years he has developed an extensive K-12 education and outreach program to bring the excitement of science and exploration into the classroom. Dr. Christensen is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the Geological Society of America and received the AGU’s Whipple Award in 2018, the GSA’s G.K. Gilbert Award in 2008, NASA’s Public Service Medal in 2005, and NASA’s Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal in 2003. He received his Ph.D. in geophysics and space physics from the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Christensen has previously served as a member of the NRC Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration, served as chair of the Mars Panel of the NRC Planetary Science Decadal Survey in 2010-2011 and was Co-Chair of the NRC’s Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Science from 2012-2015.
Mahzarin R. Banaji
MAHZARIN R. BANAJI (NAS) is the Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics at Harvard University. She is an experimental psychologist known for her research on implicit social cognition with applications to improving decision making by individuals and organizations. Previously, Banaji was the George A. and Helen Dunham Cowan Chair in Human Social Dynamics at the Santa Fe Institute, the Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and the Ruben Post Halleck Professor of Psychology at Yale University. She was elected fellow of the American Philosophical Society, Society for Experimental Psychologists, Society for Experimental Social Psychology, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, named Herbert A. Simon Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and named William James Fellow “for a lifetime of significant intellectual contributions to the basic science of psychology” by the Association of Psychology Science, an organization of which she also served as president. She has also received the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award. In addition, she has received the Carol and Ed Diener Award for Outstanding Contributions to Social Psychology. Banaji is the co-author of Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People, a popular book focusing on how social groups, e.g., age, gender, ethnicity, race, religion, social class, sexuality nationality and disability status, influence evaluations of individuals, without conscious awareness. She received a Ph.D. in psychology from the Ohio State University and was nominated to the National Academy of Sciences in 2018. Banaji has not previously served on a National Academies committee.
Steven J. Battel
STEVEN J. BATTEL (NAE) is president of Battel Engineering, providing engineering, technology development, and review services to NASA, the Department of Defense, as well as university and industry clients. He is also an adjunct clinical professor of Engineering at the University of Michigan. Prior to starting Battel Engineering, he worked as an engineer, researcher, and manager at the University of Michigan, the Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley, and the University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. Over the past 43 years he has developed scientific instruments and electronic systems for over 30 NASA and ESA missions including Gravity Probe-B, Mars-Curiosity, Mars-Phoenix, Cassini, Huygens, HST, LADEE, MAVEN, ExoMars, and Mars 2020. Battel is a fellow of the AIAA and AAAS, a senior member of IEEE, and a member of Sigma Xi. He is a current member of the discipline Committee on Solar and Space Physics and a former member of the Space Studies Board, the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, the AURA Space Telescope Institute Council, and the AURA Solar Observatory Council. He has served on multiple previous National Academies committees including the NASA Astrophysics Performance Assessment, the Committee on Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope, and three Decadal Survey committees: Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), Solar and Space Physics (Heliophysics; 2012), and Earth Science and Applications from Space (2017). He received his B.S. in engineering from the University of Michigan.
Lars E. Borg
LARS E. BORG is a staff scientist and chemist within the Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. His research interests include geochronology and geochemistry of samples from asteroids, the Moon, and Mars to constrain the nature and timing of processes occurring in the proto-planetary disk and planetary bodies early in the history of the solar system. He has served on numerous NASA subcommittees including the NASA Advisory Council’s Planetary Sciences Subcommittee, the Curation and Analysis Planning Team for Extraterrestrial Materials, and the Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group. He received his Ph.D. in isotope geochemistry from the University of Texas at Austin.
Athena Coustenis
ATHENA COUSTENIS is director of research with the National Centre for Scientific Research of France and is currently based at Paris Observatory in Meudon. She earned her Ph.D. in astrophysics and space techniques and her Habilitation to Direct Research from the University of Paris. Coustenis works in the field of planetology and her research focuses on the use of ground- and space-based observatories and space missions to study solar system bodies. Her current interests include planetary atmospheres and surfaces, with particular emphasis on the satellites of the giant planets. Coustenis is also interested in the characterization of the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. In recent years, she has been leading efforts to define and select future space missions to be undertaken by the European Space Agency (ESA) and its international partners. She is the chair of the European Science Foundation’s European Space Science Committee—the nearest equivalent to the SSB in Europe. In addition, Coustenis is the chair of the ESA Human Spaceflight and Exploration Science Advisory Committee; chair of the COSPAR Panel on Planetary Protection and Chair of the CERES Advisory Committee of the French National Center for Space Studies . She has also chaired and served on numerous ESA and NASA advisory groups and international associations like AAS/DPS, IUGG/IAMAS and EGU. Coustenis previously served as a member of the National Academies’ Committee on Survey of Surveys: Lessons Learned from the Decadal Survey Process and the Committee on Planetary Protection Requirements for Sample-Return Missions from Martian Moons.
James H. Crocker
JAMES H. CROCKER (NAE) is vice president and general manager, retired, of Space Systems at Lockheed Martin Corporation. The focus of his career has been the design, construction, and management of very large, complex systems and instruments for astrophysics and space exploration both in the U.S. and internationally. These include space missions both human and robotic such as Apollo 17, Skylab, Orion; missions to Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, asteroids, the moon, comets, the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope and the James Webb Space Telescope. In ground-based astronomy, Crocker was program manager for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and head of the Program Office for the European VLT, an array of optically phased 8-meter telescope in the Atacama Desert in Chile. He is a current board member of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy. Crocker is a past board chair of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science and a past board chair of the Universities Space Research Association. Crocker is a fellow of the AIAA and fellow of the AAS, and a full member of the International Academy of Astronautics. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Crocker earned a B.E.E. from the Georgia Institute of Technology, an M.S. in engineering from University of Alabama in Huntsville and a M.S. in engineering management from the Johns Hopkins University.
Brett W. Denevi
BRETT W. DENEVI is a planetary scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, the deputy principal investigator of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, and science lead of NASA’s Lunar Exploration Analysis Group. She also served as the deputy instrument scientist for the Mercury Dual Imaging System on board the MESSENGER spacecraft at Mercury, and as a participating scientist on the Dawn mission at asteroid Vesta. Her research focuses on the origin and evolution of planetary surfaces, particularly the history of volcanism, the effects of impact cratering, and space weathering. Brett is the recipient of the 2015 Maryland Academy of Science Outstanding Young Scientist Award, a NASA Early Career Fellowship, seven NASA group achievement awards, and asteroid 9026 Denevi was named in her honor. She received her Ph.D. in geology and geophysics from the University of Hawaii.
Bethany L. Ehlmann
BETHANY L. EHLMANN is a professor of planetary science at the California Institute of Technology. Ehlmann’s research interests include planetary surface processes, infrared spectroscopy, the evolution of Mars, and water-rock interactions throughout the solar system. Previously, she was a European Union Marie Curie Fellow and a collaborator on the Mars Exploration Rovers during their primary and first extended missions and an affiliate of the Dawn science team for its Ceres phase. Ehlmann is co-investigator and a deputy principal investigator for the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, participating scientist on the Mars Science Laboratory mission, co-investigator for the Mars-2020 rover's Mastcam-Z and SHERLOC instruments, and principal investigator of Lunar Trailblazer. She is a recipient of the Division for Planetary Sciences Urey Prize, the American Geophysical Union’s Macelwane medal, the Committee on Space Research’s Zeldovich medal, National Geographic's Emerging Explorer award, the Mineralogical Society of America Distinguished Lecturer award as well as NASA Group Achievement awards. Ehlmann earned a Ph.D. in geological sciences from Brown University. She has served on the National Academies Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Science.
Larry W. Esposito
LARRY W. ESPOSITO is a professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder and at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. He is the principal investigator of the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph experiment on the Cassini space mission to Saturn. Esposito was chair of the Voyager Rings Working Group and, as a member of the Pioneer Saturn Imaging Team, he discovered Saturn’s F ring. His research focuses on the nature and history of planetary rings. Esposito has been a participant in numerous U.S., Russian, and European space missions and used the Hubble Space Telescope for its first observations of Venus. Esposito was awarded the Harold C. Urey Prize from the American Astronomical Society, the Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement from NASA, and the Richtmyer Lecture Award from the American Association of Physics Teachers and the American Physical Society. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Esposito has extensive experience with National Academies’ activities, including chairing the Task Group on the Forward Contamination of Europa and the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration.
Orlando Figueroa
ORLANDO FIGUEROA is the president of Orlando Leadership Enterprise, LLC, which focuses on providing expert advice in: space mission systems and technology, organization and enterprise/program management, strategic planning, and team and leadership development. Prior to starting his current role, Figueroa retired from NASA as a senior executive with 33 years of experience in the management, planning and development of scientific space programs, missions, and related technologies. Figueroa is versed in interacting with national and international government and non-government organizations. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the 2016 National Space Society Pioneer Award, the 2010 NASA Distinguished Service Medal, the Senior Executive Service Presidential Rank awards, the 2008 Smithsonian Latino Center Legacy award for contributions to American Culture in Science, and the 2005 Service to America Medal Federal Employee of the Year. Figueroa received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Puerto Rico.
John M. Grunsfeld
JOHN M. GRUNSFELD is the president and chief executive officer of the Endless Frontier Associates, LLC. Grunsfeld holds over 30 years of experience in program management and research. Prior to starting his current role, he was the former associate administrator for the Science Mission Directorate at NASA, where he managed the portfolio of the agency’s space and Earth science programs and joint agency programs. In addition, he served in numerous positions including NASA chief scientist, deputy director of the Space Telescope Science Institute, a professor at the Johns Hopkins University, NASA astronaut, and a senior research fellow at the California Institute of Technology. Grunsfeld is a veteran of five Space Shuttle missions including: STS 67, STS-81, STS-103, STS-109, and STS-125. He is the recipient of multiple awards including the NASA Space Flight Medals, the NASA Exceptional Service Medals, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, and a NASA Constellation Award. Grunsfeld earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago.
Krishan Khurana
KRISHAN KHURANA is a senior research geophysicist at the Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics and the Department of Earth and Space Sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has worked on many theoretical and empirical investigations relating to the magnetospheres of Venus, Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn and is currently a co-investigator on the magnetometer experiments onboard Cluster, THEMIS, JUICE and Europa Clipper missions. Khurana’s recent research has covered studies of subsurface oceans in Europa, Ganymede and Callisto, ULF waves in outer magnetospheres, the structure and composition of the jovian plasma sheet, and the maintenance of corotation in the jovian magnetosphere. He was elected as a fellow to the American Geophysical Union in 2011. Khurana received his Ph.D. in the field of magnetohydrodynamic waves in rotating fluids from Durham University. He previously served on the National Academies’ Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration, the Committee on Solar and Space Physics, and the Committee on Heliophysics Performance Assessment.
William B. McKinnon
WILLIAM B. MCKINNON is professor of Earth and planetary sciences at Washington University in Saint Louis. He also serves as a fellow of the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences. McKinnon’s research interests include the structure, origin, evolution, geology, and bombardment history of outer planet satellites and dwarf planets; and impact mechanics on rocky and icy bodies. He is a distinguished visiting scientist at the California Institute of Technology’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and an editor of Earth and Planetary Science Letters. McKinnon has received three group achievement awards from NASA, has asteroid 9526 Billmckinnon named after him, and in 2014 he received the G.K. Gilbert Award from the Planetary Geology Division of the Geological Society of America. He earned his Ph.D. in planetary science and geophysics from the California Institute of Technology. McKinnon has served as a member of the National Academies Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Science, the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration, and the Committee on Priorities for Space Science Enabled by Nuclear Power and Propulsion: A Vision for Beyond 2015.
Francis Nimmo
FRANCIS NIMMO (NAS) is a professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research interests cover Mars, Venus, Europa, Ganymede, Mercury, the Moon, and Pluto (as well as other icy satellites). Nimmo’s research accomplishments include showing that a giant impact could have generated the martian hemispheric dichotomy; identifying shear-heating as an important process on Enceladus, Europa, and Triton; proposing true polar wander as an important process on Enceladus and Pluto; and explaining the link between plate tectonics and dynamo activity on Mars and Venus. He is the recipient of the 2007 Macelwane medal and Urey prize, the 2018 Farinella Prize and the 2019 Jeffreys lectureship. He received his Ph.D. in volcanism and tectonics on Venus from Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. Nimmo previously served on the National Academies Committee for the Review of the Next Decadal Mars Architecture, the Satellites Panel for the Visions and Voyages Decadal Survey, and the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2020.
Carol Raymond
CAROL RAYMOND is a principal scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and serves as the program scientist for both the Mission Formulation and the Small Bodies and Planetary Defense Offices within JPL’s Planetary Science Directorate. Her current research focuses on the geophysical evolution of small solar system bodies and icy moons, including Vesta, Ceres, Psyche, and Europa, and what they reveal about the early evolution of the solar system. In addition, planetary magnetic fields have been a long-term research interest. She led the NASA Dawn Mission as deputy principal investigator and assumed the principal investigator role in the extended mission phase. Raymond has held various positions at JPL since 1990, and was a visiting associate in the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences at the California Institute of Technology, and an adjunct associate research scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. She is the recipient of three NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals, the Antarctic Service Medal, the Shoemaker Award of the American Geophysical Union, and is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America. She received her Ph.D. in geological sciences from Columbia University.
Barbara Sherwood Lollar
BARBARA SHERWOOD LOLLAR, Companion of the Order of Canada, FRS, FRSC, FRCGS, is a university professor in Earth sciences at the University of Toronto. She is a Canada Research Chair in Isotopes of the Earth and Environment, and Dr. Norman Keevil Chair. She is past-president of the Geochemical Society and co-director of the CIFAR program Earth 4D – Subsurface Science and Exploration. In 2015 she was named a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union and in 2019, a Fellow of the Geochemical Society and European Association of Geochemistry. Sherwood Lollar has published on stable isotope geochemistry and hydrogeology, the fate of carbon-bearing fluids and gases such as CO2, CH4 and H2 in ancient fracture waters in the Earth’s crust, deep subsurface microbiology, and the remediation of surface drinking water supplies. She has been a recipient of many academic awards including the 2012 Eni Award for Protection of the Environment, 2012 Geological Society of America Geomicrobiology and Geobiology Prize, 2014 International Helmholtz Fellowship, the 2016 NSERC John Polanyi Award, 2016 Bancroft Award for the Royal Society of Canada, 2018 Logan Medal of the Geological Association of Canada, the 2019 Herzberg Gold Medal for Canada, the 2019 C.C. Patterson Award in environmental geochemistry, and the Canada Council for the Arts 2020 Killam Prize in Natural Sciences. She received her Ph.D. in Earth sciences from the University of Waterloo. Sherwood Lollar has served on a member of many National Academies’ activities, including the Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Sciences, the Committee on the Origin and Evolution of Life, and Space Studies Board. In addition, she chaired the committee that authored the National Academies’ Astrobiology Strategy for the Search for Life in the Universe.
Amy Simon
AMY SIMON is the senior scientist for Planetary Atmospheres Research in the Solar System Exploration Division at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Her scientific research involves the study of the composition, dynamics, and cloud structure in jovian planet atmospheres, primarily from spacecraft observations. She is also involved in multiple robotic flight missions, as well as future mission concept development. Simon was a co-investigator on the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer and is the deputy instrument scientist for the OSIRIS-REx Visible and near-IR Spectrometer), as well as the Landsat 9 TIRS2 instrument, and the Lucy L'Ralph instrument deputy principal investigator. She is principal investigator of the Hubble Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy program. She earned her Ph.D. in astronomy from the New Mexico State University, Las Cruces. Simon was a member of the last planetary decadal survey steering committee and vice chair of the decadal’s giant planets panel.
David H. Smith - (Staff Officer)

Committee Membership Roster Comments

Note 1: Co-Chairs posted 5/18/20 Note 2: 16 Members posted 9/14/20.

Events


Event Type :  
TeleConference

Description :   

The sixth meeting of the steering group will last 1 day.  Agendas and call-in details will be posted at a later date.  THis meeting will likely be closed


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  PlanetaryDecadal@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
TeleConference

Description :   

The fifth meeting of the steering group will last 2 days.  Agendas and call-in information will be posted at a later date.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  PlanetaryDecadal@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
TeleConference

Description :   

The fourth meeting of the steering group will contain no open sessions.  Agendas and call in details will be posted at a later date


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  PlanetaryDecadal@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
TeleConference

Description :   

Third meeting of the decadal survey's steering group



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Megan Chamberlain
Contact Email:  mchamberlain@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

All committee members present

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

1. Template for mission study requests
2. Adding a short closed meeting on 30 October
3. Whitepaper reading assignments

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

1. Compendium of reports about planetary defense

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
October 19, 2020
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
TeleConference

Description :   

Second meeting of the decadal survey's steering group


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Megan Chamberlain
Contact Email:  mchamberlain@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

All committee members except for Steven Battel
the chairs of the supporting panels (Paul Byrne
Jonathan Lunine
Alexander Hayes
Nancy Chabot)
Victoria Hamilton (consultant) and Timothy Grove (consultant) present during session two and three

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

1. Addressing the state of the profession aspect of the statement of task
2. Adding an additional astrobiologist to the steering group
3. Whitepaper reading assignments

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

1. Recent planetary science and astrobiology review reports made available by the International Space Science Institute

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
October 19, 2020
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
TeleConference

Description :   

First meeting of the decadal survey's steering group


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Megan Chamberlain
Contact Email:  mchamberlain@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

All committee members present during session one
All committee members
the chairs of the supporting panels (Paul Byrne
Jonathan Lunine
Alexander Hayes
Nancy Chabot)
Victoria Hamilton (consultant) and Timothy Grove (consultant) present during session two and three

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

1. Composition and balance discussion
2. The statement of task for the study and related guidance
3. Schedule for the completion of the study
4. Near-term deadline for extra mission study requests
5. Initial plans for writing groups
6. Crosscutting themes and key science questions
7. Whitepaper reading assignments

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

1. Complete set of whitepapers received
2. PMCS study reports and science definition team reports
3. Recent National Academies' reports referenced in the statement of task and related guidance documents

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
October 19, 2020
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
-

Description :   

Watch the Webinar Recording Online

 

Current and past Chairs will come together to discuss perspectives and lessons learned on decadal surveys in space science. The discussion will focus on questions such as – How are decadal surveys used? How do individuals get involved in the decadal survey process? What lessons learned can be drawn from these surveys? Participants will have an opportunity to ask the panelists questions.

 

Welcome and Introductions from the National Academies

Colleen Hartman, Director of the Space and Studies Board, National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Moderators (Co-Chairs for the current Decadal Survey in Planetary Science and Astrobiology):

                Robin Canup, Southwest Research Institute

                Phil Christensen,  Arizona State University

Panelists (listed by speaker order):

Chair of the past Decadal Survey in Planetary Science

                Steve Squyres, Blue Origin

Chair of the past Decadal Survey in Solar and Space Physics

                Dan Baker, University of Colorado

Co-Chairs for the past Decadal Survey in Earth Science and Applications from Space:

                Waleed Abdalati, University of Colorado

                William Gail, Global Weather Corporation

Question and Answer session with the panelists will follow.

 



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mia Brown
Contact Email:  mbrown@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

Watch the Webinar Recording Online

The Decadal Survey on Planetary Science and Astrobiology will assess key scientific questions in planetary science and astrobiology, identify priority medium- and large-class missions and other initiatives, and present a comprehensive research strategy for the 2023-2032 timeframe. Community participation is critical for the success of the survey, and we invite early career professionals to join us for a webinar on how to write and submit white papers to the decadal survey on May 7, 2020 from 1:30-3:00pm ET (10:30am-12:00pm PT).

 

Agenda

Introduction

Colleen Hartman – National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Keynote: Writing and Submitting a White Paper to the Planetary Decadal Survey

Phil Christensen – Arizona State University

Panel: Perspective on Writing and Reviewing White Papers

Amy Simon – NASA GSFC

Bruce Jakosky – University of Colorado at Boulder

Linda Spilker – Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Carlé Pieters – Brown University

Question and Answer Session

 


Registration for Online Attendance :   
http://planetarydecadal.eventbrite.com

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mia Brown
Contact Email:  mbrown@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
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Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
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Description :   

Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group
Status Report on Planning for the Decadal Survey in Astrobiology and Planetary Science 2023-2032
April 16, 2020


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NA

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NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  PlanetaryDecadal@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

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No

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Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The Decadal Survey on Planetary Science and Astrobiology will assess key scientific questions in planetary science and astrobiology, identify priority medium- and large-class missions and other initiatives, and present a comprehensive research strategy for the 2023-2032 timeframe.  Community participation is critical for the success of the survey, and we invite early career professionals to join us for a decadal kick-off webinar on March 27, 2020 from 2-4 pm ET hosted by the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI).

Watch the webinar video

**Please note this meeting was originally scheduled as an in-person event at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.  Special thanks to LPI for helping us reschedule it as an online event. 

AGENDA

Welcome and Introductions. About the decadal surveys in space science; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; and how to get involved.

  • Speaker: Colleen Hartman, Director of Space & Aeronautics, National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Overview and Updates of the Planetary Science Division at NASA

  • Speaker: Lori Glaze, Director of Planetary Science, NASA

Panel discussion: seasoned veterans discuss how to be involved in a decadal, the process itself, advice and recommendations, and their own personal early career experiences. Moderator: Colleen Hartman 

    • Panelist: Bethany Ehlmann, Professor, California Institute of Technology
    • Panelist: Lori Glaze, Director of Planetary Science, NASA 
    • Panelist: Louise Prockter, Director, Lunar and Planetary Institute 
    • Panelist: William McKinnon, Professor, Washington University

Closing Remarks 

Q&A from audience 

All questions for the panelists should be sent to mbrown@nas.edu



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mia Brown
Contact Email:  mbrown@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

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Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

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Event Type :  
-

Description :   

Lunar and Planetary Science Conference Virtual Town Hall Meetings

Update on Planning for the National Academies' Decadal Survey in Planetary Science and Astrobiology

View the webinar


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NA

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Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

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Event Type :  
-

Description :   

Lunar and Planetary Institute
The Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) Meeting
Status Report on Planning for the Decadal Survey in Astrobiology and Planetary Science 2023-2032

February 3, 2020


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NA

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NA


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-

Description :   

American Geophysical Union
Status Report on Planning for the Decadal Survey in Astrobiology and Planetary Science 2023-2032
December 16, 2020
San Francisco, CA


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NA

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NA


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No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

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-

Description :   

European Planetary Science Congress-Division on Planetary Sciences
Status Report on Planning for the Planetary Science Decadal Survey

September 16, 2019
Geneva, Switzerland


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NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

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Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

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Publications

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Publications

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