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Project Information

Project Information


Exploring the Opportunity Gap for Young Children From Birth to Age Eight


Project Scope:

An ad hoc committee will conduct a consensus study on the causes and consequences of the opportunity gap for young children from birth to age eight. The committee will:

 
• Identify and describe the opportunity gap (the potential causes--societal conditions that preclude equal access to high-quality educational opportunities) and its relationship, if any,  with the achievement gap (the effect--subgroups of children who demonstrate lower performance than others and subgroups of children who do not achieve at a recognized level of performance).
• Review available research on the effects of the opportunity gap on children from birth to age eight and its relationship to demographic characteristics and institutional racism and discrimination.
• Review available evidence on family and community factors, and pre-K to grade 3 school factors, that promote, mitigate, or diminish opportunities and achievement for children.
• Discuss the economic costs posed by the opportunity gap and the potential economic benefits of investing in strategies, interventions, and policies to address opportunity gap concerns for children from birth to age eight.
• Review evidence on promising federal and state government policy and program interventions that have addressed opportunity gap concerns for children from birth to age eight.
· Develop recommendations for education policy, practice, and research to better understand the opportunity gap and promote success for all students pre-K to grade 3.
· Identify the potential roles, actions and supports appropriate for philanthropy to assist in addressing the opportunity gap for young children from birth to age eight.

The committee will produce a consensus report that synthesizes the information gathered on the relationship between the opportunity and achievement gaps for young children from birth to age eight, and make recommendations on how to improve conditions and promote success for children--at home, in communities, and in schools.

Status: Current

PIN: DBASSE-BCYF-19-04

Project Duration (months): 27 month(s)

RSO: Hutton, Rebekah

Topic(s):

Behavioral and Social Sciences
Education



Geographic Focus:
North America

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 01/05/2021

LaRue Allen - (Chair)
LaRue Allen is the Raymond and Rosalee Weiss professor of Applied Psychology and vice dean for Faculty Affairs at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. She also directs the Child and Family Policy Center (CFPC), which focuses on bringing social science knowledge to policymakers and practitioners concerned with young children and their families. As part of her work at CFPC, Dr. Allen has partnered with the agencies that oversee the publicly-funded early care and education system in New York City and state on research initiatives such as authentic assessment in preschool settings, and Family Child Care Workforce Development. Dr. Allen was chair of the Committee on the Science of Children Birth to Age 8: Deepening and Broadening the Foundation for Success, which was convened by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. In April 2015, the Committee released its report entitled Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation http://iom.nationalacademies.org/Reports/2015/Birth-To-Eight.aspx. A follow-up committee, which she also chaired, focused on “how to fund early care and education for children from birth to kindergarten entry that is accessible, affordable to families, and of high quality, including a well-qualified and adequately supported workforce consistent with the vision outlined in the report, Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8”. Its report, Transforming the Financing of Early Care and Education https://doi.org/10.17226/24984, was released in February 2018. Dr. Allen received her doctorate in clinical/community/ developmental psychology from Yale University.

Randall Akee
Randall Akee is an associate professor in the Department of Public Policy and American Indian Studies at UCLA. Previously, he served as a David M. Rubenstein fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution. Dr. Akee completed his doctorate at Harvard University in June 2006. Dr. Akee is an applied microeconomist and has published research on childhood interventions on child health and educational outcomes. He has examined the impact of school quality and access to child outcomes for Indigenous peoples in the U.S. Previously, he served on the National Advisory Council on Race, Ethnic, and Other Populations at the US Census Bureau. Dr. Akee co-wrote a National Academies of Sciences commissioned paper on Poverty and American Indian Children in 2017. In 2019, he participated in an NAS research conference focusing on the U.S. Census and Differential Privacy. He is a research fellow at the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research.
Alfredo Artiles
Alfredo J. Artiles is Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education at Stanford University. He is the director of the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education. Dr. Artiles’ research aims to understand how responses to disability intersections with race, social class, gender and language advance or hinder educational opportunities for disparate student groups. He has published extensively on the cultural-historical dimensions of disability and inclusive education, including the book series Disability, Culture, & Equity. He has co-led federally funded technical assistance projects including the National Center for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems and the Region IX Equity Assistance Center. Dr. Artiles is an elected member of the National Academy of Education, a fellow of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and was a CASBS resident fellow. He was elected AERA Vice-President to lead its Social Context of Education Division. Dr. Artiles received the 2012 Palmer O. Johnson Award for best article and the 2017 AERA Review of Research Award. He served on the consensus study panel on English learners and was a member of the White House Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics. He holds a Ph.D. (special education) from the University of Virginia.
Renee Boynton-Jarrett
Renée Boynton-Jarrett is an associate professor at Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine. A pediatrician and social epidemiologist, she is the founding director of the Vital Village Network. Vital Village uses a trauma-informed lens to improve community capacity to promote child wellbeing in Boston and support coalitions nationally through the NOW Forum. Her scholarship has focused on early-life adversities as life course social determinants of health. She has a specific concentration on psychosocial stress and neuroendocrine and reproductive health outcomes, including obesity, puberty, and fertility. She is nationally recognized for work on the intersection of community violence, intimate partner violence, and child abuse and neglect and neighborhood characteristics that influence these patterns. Through dedicated community partnerships her current work is developing community-based strategies to promote child wellbeing and prevent childhood adversities.
Kenneth A. Dodge
Kenneth A. Dodge is the William McDougall Distinguished professor of Public Policy and professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke University. He is a leading scholar in the development and prevention of aggressive and violent behaviors. His work provides a framework for understanding how current public policies perpetuate opportunity gaps in the first several years of life but could be reshaped to reduce gaps and support success for all children. Dr. Dodge has published more than 500 scientific articles which have been cited more than 125,000 times. He was elected into the National Academy of Medicine in 2015. He is president of the Society for Research in Child Development (2019-2021) and has been awarded the Distinguished Scientific Award from the American Psychological Association. He earned his Ph.D. in psychology (clinical) from Duke University in 1978.
Brenda P. Jones Harden
Brenda P. Jones Harden is the Alison Richman professor of Children and Families at the University of Maryland School of Social Work. She directs the Prevention and Early Adversity Research Laboratory, where she and her research team examine the developmental and mental health needs of young children from low-income backgrounds, who have experienced early adversity such as maltreatment. A particular focus is preventing maladaptive outcomes in these populations through early childhood programs, including home visitation, parenting interventions, early care and education, and early childhood mental health programs. She has numerous publications in the early childhood and early adversity arenas, including the sole-authored book Infants in the Child Welfare System. She has been a Society for Research in Child Development Policy Fellow, in which she worked on early childhood program evaluations and research on children in the child welfare system. She is currently the vice president of the Board of Zero to Three and on the Board of the Lourie Center, a local program focused on the development and mental health of young children. Dr. Jones Harden received a Ph.D. in psychology from Yale University (1996) and a Master's in social work from New York University (1980).
Pamela K. Joshi
Pamela K. Joshi is a senior scientist and the associate director of the Institute for Child, Youth and Family Policy at the Heller School of Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. Joshi's research investigates how social policies (e.g., early childhood education, paid family and medical leave, anti-poverty programs) influence children's developmental trajectories and evaluates their effectiveness in reducing racial/ethnic inequities in access to opportunities. She is trained in Cochrane systematic review and equity methods and has been funded to undertake comprehensive policy reviews including, most recently, children in immigrant families' access to the social safety net. She serves on several expert panels including the US Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Research and Planning Evaluation's Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Human Services Project. In 2015, Dr. Joshi and colleagues received the Lawrence R. Klein Award from the US Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics for their research documenting differential job quality of working parents by race, ethnicity and nativity. In 2019, she helped organize the NASEM Panel, “A Dialogue on Racial/Ethnic Equity and Policy Proposals to Reduce Child Poverty” and currently is serving on the planning committee for a follow up panel in 2021. Dr. Joshi received her Ph.D. in social policy from Brandeis University in 2001 and a Master of Public Policy from the University of Michigan in 1993.
Shantel E. Meek
Shantel E. Meek is a professor of practice and the founding director of the Children's Equity Project (CEP) at Arizona State University. She manages a budget of over a million dollars, strategic partnerships with CEP partners at 17 universities and non-profit organizations, policy makers, and national organizations, and sets the strategic direction of the CEP. Dr. Meek previously served as a consultant in early childhood policy and strategy at the Bipartisan Policy Center in Washington D.C. where she advised senior staff on a range of federal and state equity and early childhood policy issues. Previously, Dr. Meek served in the Obama Administration as a Senior Policy Advisor for Early Childhood Development at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and as a Senior Policy Advisor for Education in the Domestic Policy Council at the White House. During her time in the Obama Administration, Dr. Meek advised senior officials at HHS and at The White House on a wide array of policy issues including Head Start, child care, public Pre-K expansion, and promoting equity and reducing disparities across the early care and education system. She also worked on drafting official guidance related to Head Start and the Child Care and Development Block Grant and worked closely with states, communities, and stakeholders on implementation.
Bela Mote
Bela Moté is chief executive officer of the Carole Robertson Center for Learning, is an experienced non-profit executive and early childhood professional who has spent her career supporting early childhood and youth development at the local, national and international levels. She is committed to providing high-quality, deeply impactful programs for children, youth, and families. Prior to being named chief executive officer of the center, Ms. Moté served as vice president, Evidence-Based Youth Development for the YMCA of the USA. She has also held leadership positions with the YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago, the Ounce of Prevention Fund, Teaching Strategies, Inc., and the Robert R. McCormick Foundation. She began her career in early childhood as a Montessori preschool teacher and considers that experience to be her North Star. Ms. Moté earned a master's degree in education from Erikson Institute in 1999, is a member of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, and participates on many councils and committees at the state and city levels. Ms. Moté was a Chicago Foundation for Women's Breaking Barriers 2011 honoree.
Milagros Nores
Milagros Nores is co-director for research, and associate research professor at NIEER. Her expertise is in early childhood attainment, the economics of education, poverty, and international and comparative education. Dr. Nores has recently concluded an early childhood study in Colombia and a study on parental-child educational practices for minority children in the U.S, an evaluation of the Seattle preschool program, and is currently the lead in evaluations of the Philadelphia and West Virginia's preschools programs. Dr. Nores previously worked as a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Taubman Center in Public Policy, Brown University. Dr. Nores also consults for various organizations in education projects in Latin America and Asia. She has been involved in sponsored research amounting to $14 million. Dr. Nores has a strong emphasis in moving beyond descriptive analysis to making inferences about programs and policies, examining long-term benefits of pre-K, such as decreased welfare dependency, understanding the determinants of preschool access and participation for different types of households, and assessing the impacts of access (or lack thereof) to pre-K on later academic achievement. She is bilingual in Spanish and English. She has a Ph.D. in Education and Economics from Columbia University and an Ed.M. in Educational Administration and Social Policy from Harvard University.
Cynthia Osborne
Cynthia Osborne is the founder and director of the Child and Family Research Partnership (CFRP) and leads its national Prenatal-to-3 Policy Impact Center, home of the Prenatal-to-3 State Policy Roadmap (2020) for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. She is also Associate Dean for Academic Strategies and Director of the Center for Health and Social Policy at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Osborne was an appointed member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Mathematics (NASEM) Committee to Reduce Child Poverty by Half in Ten Years. She also serves as the Chair of the Responsible Fatherhood working group for the Fatherhood Research and Practice Network (FRPN), a long-term project of the federal Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. She is an elected member of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Policy Council, the leadership team responsible for setting policy and strategy for the association. She also directs The University of Texas at Austin’s institutional membership of SRCD’s University-Based Child Family Policy Consortium. Dr. Osborne’s teaching and research interests are in the areas of social policy, poverty and inequality, family and child wellbeing, and family demography. She has extensive experience leading long-term evaluations of state and national programs, with the aim of helping organizations understand what works, and how to ensure sustainable implementation of effective policies. Her work includes evaluations of one of the largest home visiting programs in the country (Texas) and many critical state-level child welfare and child support programs. Previously, Dr. Osborne taught middle school in a low-income community in California. Dr. Osborne holds a Ph.D. in Demography and Public Affairs from Princeton University, a Master in Public Policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and a Master of Arts in Education from Claremont Graduate University.
Albert Wat
Albert Wat is a senior policy director at the Alliance for Early Success, where he supports the organization’s strategy and goals for early education, including increasing access to high-quality pre-k, improving the early learning workforce, and enhancing alignment with K-12 policies. Mr. Wat has served on two National Academies committees: Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation; and, Vibrant and Healthy Kids: Aligning Science, Practice, and Policy to Advance Health Equity. He also serves on the board of the Council for Professional Recognition. Mr. Wat holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology and a master’s degree in education from Stanford University and a master’s in education policy from George Washington University.
Rebekah Hutton - (Staff Officer)
Rebekah Hutton is a program officer for the National Academies. She is currently the study director of the Committee on Exploring the Opportunity Gap for Young Children from Birth to Age Eight. Prior to that, she was study director of the Committee on Summertime Experiences and Child and Adolescent Education, Health, and Safety. Prior to the Academies, she was an education management and information technology consultant working on projects in the United States as well as Haiti, Equatorial Guinea, and Djibouti. She has also worked as a program manager and researcher at the National Center on Performance Incentives at Vanderbilt University, studying whether teacher pay for performance has measurable impact on student outcomes, and as an English language lecturer in Tourcoing, France. During her time with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families, she has worked on projects focused on fostering the educational success of children and youth learning English, reducing child poverty, and promoting the mental, emotional and behavioral health of children and youths. She received her M.Ed. degree from Vanderbilt University in international education policy and management and a B.A. degree from the University of Tennessee in French language and literature.





Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest

None expected

Events


Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Fully virtual via Zoom. Open Session to the public is Friday, February 5, 2021, 1:30 pm to 3:30 pm.  MUST REGISTER here.

Agenda:

1:30 – 1:45 p.m.           Welcome to Sponsor Representatives

                LaRue Allen, Chair

                Mary Ellen O’Connell, DBASSE Executive Director

1:45 – 2:55 p.m.           Sponsor Presentations

2:55 – 3:30 p.m.           Committee and Sponsor Discussion

                                    Full Committee

 3:30 p.m.                      Adjourn Open Session

 



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Pamella Atayi
Contact Email:  patayi@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1996

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Randall Akee
LaRue Allen
Alfredo Artiles
Renee Boynton Jarrett
Kenneth Dodge
Brenda Jones-Harden
Pamela Joshi
Shantel Meek
Bela Mote
Milagros Nores
Cynthia Osborne
Albert Wat

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Discussed statement of work.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Agenda

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
February 23, 2021
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
-

Description :   

Closed meeting.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Pamella Atayi
Contact Email:  patayi@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1996

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Randall Akee
LaRue Allen
Alfredo Artiles
Renee Boynton Jarrett
Kenneth Dodge
Brenda Jones-Harden
Pamela Joshi
Shantel Meek
Bela Mote
Milagros Nores
Cynthia Osborne
Albert Wat

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Statement of work
Bias and Conflict of Interest

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Agenda and related background documents

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
February 02, 2021
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.