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Project Information

Project Information


Astro2020: Panel on Radio, Millimeter and Submillimeter Observations from the Ground


Project Scope:

Panel Description:
The Panel on Radio, Millimeter and Submillimeter (RMS) Observations from the Ground will identify and suggest to the decadal survey committee a prioritized program of federal investment in ground-based research activities that primarily operate in the radio, millimeter, and submillimeter portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The RMS panel will also consider technology development needs to support the prioritized program. In formulating its conclusions, the RMS panel will draw on several sources of information: (1) the science forefronts identified by the Astro2020 science panels, (2) input from the proponents of research activities, and (3) independent cost, risk, and technical readiness evaluations. The RMS panel's suggestions will be integrated into a program for all of astronomy and astrophysics by the Committee on Astro2020.

Overall Project Statement of Task:
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine shall convene an ad hoc survey committee and supporting study panels to carry out a decadal survey in astronomy and astrophysics. The study will generate consensus recommendations to implement a comprehensive strategy and vision for a decade of transformative science at the frontiers of astronomy and astrophysics. The committee, with inputs from study panels covering the breadth of astronomy and astrophysics, will carry out the following tasks:

  1. Provide an overview of the current state of astronomy and astrophysics science, and technology research in support of that science, with connections to other scientific areas where appropriate;
  2. Identify the most compelling science challenges and frontiers in astronomy and astrophysics, which shall motivate the committee’s strategy for the future;
  3. Develop a comprehensive research strategy to advance the frontiers of astronomy and astrophysics for the period 2022-2032 that will include identifying, recommending, and ranking the highest priority research activities — taking into account for each activity the scientific case, international and private landscape, timing, cost category and cost risk, as well as technical readiness, technical risk, and opportunities for partnerships.  The strategy should be balanced, by considering large, medium, and small activities for both ground and space. (Activities include any project, telescope, facility, experiment, mission, or research program of sufficient scope to be identified separately in the final report.) For each recommended activity the committee will lay out the principal science objectives and activity capabilities, including assumed or recommended activity lifetime, where possible;
  4. Utilize and recommend decision rules, where appropriate, for the comprehensive research strategy that can accommodate significant but reasonable deviations in the projected budget or changes in urgency precipitated by new discoveries or unanticipated competitive activities;
  5.  Assess the state of the profession, using information available externally and, if necessary, data gathered by the study itself, including workforce and demographic issues in the field. Identify areas of concern and importance to the community raised by this assessment in service of the future vitality and capability of the astronomy and astrophysics work force. Where possible, provide specific, actionable and practical recommendations to the agencies and community to address these areas. This report shall be made available following the completion of the study.

 

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-SSB-19-10

Project Duration (months): 24 month(s)

RSO: Charo, Art

Topic(s):

Engineering and Technology
Math, Chemistry, and Physics
Space and Aeronautics
Policy for Science and Technology



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 10/10/2019

Andrew J. Baker - (Chair)
ANDREW J. BAKER is a Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. His research interests focus on the use of radio, millimeter, and submillimeter wavelength observations of interstellar matter to probe galaxy evolution in the nearby and distant universe. Prior to joining Rutgers, he worked at the University of Maryland as a National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Jansky Fellow and at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik as a postdoctoral researcher with the infrared/submillimeter astronomy group. Baker is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a former Fulbright Scholar, a former Defense Science Study Group member, and a recipient of the Warren I. Susman Award for Excellence in Teaching. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from the California Institute of Technology. Baker previously served on the Academies' Astro2010 Panel on Galaxies across Cosmic Time.

Hector Arce
HÉCTOR G. ARCE is an associate professor of astronomy at Yale University. His research interest include star formation; feedback from young stellar objects, molecular clouds and cores; and the physical and chemical processes in the interstellar medium. To conduct his research he mostly uses radio, millimeter and sub-millimeter telescopes. Prior to joining Yale University, he was an NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics postdoctoral fellow at the American Museum of Natural History in New York, and a postdoctoral researcher in the Owens Valley Radio Observatory millimeter array group at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, CA. He has served in several radio/millimeter/sub-millimeter proposal review committees and in the Arecibo Observatory users and scientific advisory committee. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University. He has previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Ravinder Bhatia
RAVINDER S. BHATIA is associate project manager for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). He has worked on international collaborations in technology development for over twenty-five years, in astronomy, Earth observation, and oceanography. Previously, he was project systems engineer for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile. As senior thermal/cryogenics engineer at the European Space Agency, he supported the development of the Planck Space Telescope and the MIRI camera for the James Webb Space Telescope, as well as serving as technical officer for technology research and development contracts with industry, government research facilities, and academia. He was visiting research fellow at the UK National Oceanography Centre. As senior postdoctoral scholar at Caltech’s Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, his research focused on developing instruments to measure the Cosmic Microwave Background. He worked in industry as an Aeronautical Engineer for Lucas Aerospace. He is a senior member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Ravinder Bhatia received his Ph.D. in experimental astrophysics and aerospace Engineering from Queen Mary College. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Tracy Clarke
TRACY E. CLARKE is research astronomer at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in the Remote Sensing Division. She has contributed extensively to understanding the large scale diffuse emissions in clusters of galaxies, and their relations to the mergers of clusters of galaxies and to the injections of energy by the huge relativistic jets produced episodically by the supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies. She uses both X-ray and radio astronomy in her research. Recognized widely for her scientific contributions, she also has made important contributions in the development of radio astronomy hardware. As the current VLA Low-band Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) Project Scientist and the System Scientist for the Long Wavelength Array from 2011-2017, she has a prominent role in advancing the state of the art in synthesis imaging and instrumentation at the lower radio frequencies. Clarke is a former Jansky Fellow at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. Clarke is a member of the American Astronomical Society, the International Union of Radio Science, the International Astronomical Union, and the Science and Engineering Advisory Committee for the Square Kilometre Array. She holds a Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Toronto. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee
Matt Dobbs
MATT A. DOBBS is a professor at McGill University (Canada) in the Department of Physics. He is also an associate member of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He is a senior fellow in the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Gravity and the Extreme Universe program, and a member of the Royal Society of Canada College of New Scholars. His research group at McGill specializes in the development of novel instrumentation and experiments to explore the universe with millimeter wavelength observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation and radio observations of 21 cm hydrogen emission and fast radio transients. He is the recipient of the 2019 Killam Research Fellowship in Natural Sciences for his project, titled “Unveiling the Cosmos with a New Paradigm Digital Radio Telescope,” involving the recently developed Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, (CHIME). He was awarded the inaugural Owen Chamberlain Fellowship at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (USA) and earned a Sloan Fellowship. He was named Canada Research Chair (T2) in Astro-particle Physics for two terms from 2006-2015. He was awarded the inaugural Dunlap Award for Innovation in Astronomical Research Tools and the Canadian Association of Physicists Herzberg Medal. He earned his Ph.D. in experimental particle physics from the University of Victoria (Canada). He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee
Jacqueline N. Hewitt
JACQUELINE N. HEWITT (vice-chair) is professor of physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Hewitt’s research interests are in the application of techniques of radio astronomy and signal processing to problems in astrophysics. She was one of the pioneers of wide-area radio surveys with the Very Large Array radio telescope, work that led to the discovery of the first Einstein ring gravitational lens. Her current topics of interest include low-frequency radio studies of the Epoch of Reionization and the Dark Ages, and surveys of transient astronomical radio emission. She was a founding collaborator in the Murchison Widefield Array project, a low-frequency radio telescope in Western Australia designed to study the Epoch of Reionization and is the lead investigator on a grant from the Moore Foundation to expand the HERA (Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array) telescope in South Africa. Previously, she was director of MIT’s Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research. She is the recipient of the Booker Prize from the International Union of Radio Science, the Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award from the American Physical Society (APS), and the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation. In 2012, Time magazine named her one of the 25 most influential people in space. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a fellow of the American Physical Society, a former David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellow, and a former Alfred P. Sloan Fellow. Dr. Hewitt received her Ph.D. in physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has previously served on an Academies’ committee.
David L. Kaplan
DAVID L. KAPLAN is an associate professor of physics at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. His primary research interests as a multi-wavelength astronomer include compact objects (white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes), as well as multi-wavelength and multi-messenger transients. Prior to joining the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, he was a Hubble Fellow at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Pappalardo Fellow and Hubble Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is co-PI of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) Variables and Slow Transients (VAST) Survey Project, and is a member of the American Astronomical Society, the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav), the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), and the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) collaborations. He received his Ph.D. for astrophysics from California Institute of Technology. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Daniel P. Marrone
DANIEL P. MARRONE is an associate professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona. He is also an associate astronomer at Steward Observatory. He was previously a Hubble Fellow and a Jansky Fellow at the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago. His research addresses a number of topics, including the physics of black holes, the formation of early galaxies, and cosmology. His work often relies on the construction of new instruments, primarily at centimeter to submillimeter wavelengths. He is a member of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration science council and the South Pole Telescope collaboration. He serves on the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Science Advisory Committee and is the current chair of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) Users Committee. He is the recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER Award and, as a member of the EHT collaboration, the NSF Diamond Achievement Award. Marrone earned a Ph.D. in astronomy from Harvard University. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee
Lynn Matthews
LYNN D. MATTHEWS is a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Haystack Observatory. She specializes in radio wavelength studies of evolved stars and on the deployment of new technologies for observational radio astronomy. She is part of the Event Horizon Telescope team that used the technique of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) to achieve the first ever image of a supermassive black hole. She served as commissioning scientist for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Phasing Project that brought millimeter VLBI capabilities to ALMA, and is currently principal investigator of the ALMA Phasing Project Phase 2. Previously, she held appointments as a Jansky Fellow at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and as a Clay Fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Matthews is a member of the American Astronomical Society and the International Astronomical Union. She received a Ph.D. in astronomy from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Joan Najita
JOAN R. NAJITA is an astronomer and chief scientist at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, where she has been a scientific staff member for the past 21 years. As chief scientist she is responsible for science planning, science communications, and the health of the scientific environment at the Observatory. Her research interests include star and planet formation; low mass stars and brown dwarfs; the Milky Way; infrared spectroscopy; massively multiplexed wide-field spectroscopy; and science sociology and resource allocation practices in astronomy. She is also interested in the future of science publications, communicating science to the public, and the role of science in society. A recipient of the Annie Jump Cannon Award in Astronomy, Najita is a member of the Aspen Center for Physics, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Astronomical Society. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Richard Plambeck
RICHARD L. PLAMBECK is a research astronomer at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on the development of instrumentation for millimeter wavelength astronomy, and on high-resolution observations of star-forming regions. He helped construct the receivers used on the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Array (BIMA) and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA). The success of those telescopes led ultimately to the construction of ALMA, the world's premier telescope at mm wavelengths. Dr. Plambeck served on numerous ALMA design reviews and on the ALMA Science Advisory Committee. He received a Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Jean L. Turner
JEAN L. TURNER is a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Her research interests include studying gaseous environments of young super star clusters in local galaxies. Prior to joining UCLA, she worked at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and was a visiting scientist at the California Institute of Technology, the Space Telescope Science Institute, and the Joint ALMA Observatory. Turner is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She received her Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of California at Berkeley. She has previously served on an Academies’ committee.


Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Astro2020: Panel on Radio, Millimeter and Submillimeter Observations from the Ground Meeting One


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Linda Walker
Contact Email:  lwalker@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3477

Supporting File(s)
Kathy Turner

Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

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Publications

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Publications

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