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Project Information

Project Information


Astro2020: Panel on Galaxies


Project Scope:

Panel Description:
The Panel on Galaxies will identify and articulate the scientific themes that will define the frontier in galaxy research in the 2022-2032
 decade. Its scope will include observations, theory, and simulations of galaxy formation and evolution, galactic structure and dynamics, galaxy clusters, stellar populations in galaxies, the intergalactic medium, chemical evolution of galaxies, gravitational lensing as applied to galaxy structure, supermassive black holes, relevant aspects of Milky Way science, and related phenomena associated with active galactic nuclei.

Overall Project Statement of Task:
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine shall convene an ad hoc survey committee and supporting study panels to carry out a decadal survey in astronomy and astrophysics. The study will generate consensus recommendations to implement a comprehensive strategy and vision for a decade of transformative science at the frontiers of astronomy and astrophysics. The committee, with inputs from study panels covering the breadth of astronomy and astrophysics, will carry out the following tasks:

  1. Provide an overview of the current state of astronomy and astrophysics science, and technology research in support of that science, with connections to other scientific areas where appropriate;
  2. Identify the most compelling science challenges and frontiers in astronomy and astrophysics, which shall motivate the committee’s strategy for the future;
  3. Develop a comprehensive research strategy to advance the frontiers of astronomy and astrophysics for the period 2022-2032 that will include identifying, recommending, and ranking the highest priority research activities — taking into account for each activity the scientific case, international and private landscape, timing, cost category and cost risk, as well as technical readiness, technical risk, and opportunities for partnerships.  The strategy should be balanced, by considering large, medium, and small activities for both ground and space. (Activities include any project, telescope, facility, experiment, mission, or research program of sufficient scope to be identified separately in the final report.) For each recommended activity the committee will lay out the principal science objectives and activity capabilities, including assumed or recommended activity lifetime, where possible;
  4. Utilize and recommend decision rules, where appropriate, for the comprehensive research strategy that can accommodate significant but reasonable deviations in the projected budget or changes in urgency precipitated by new discoveries or unanticipated competitive activities;
  5.  Assess the state of the profession, using information available externally and, if necessary, data gathered by the study itself, including workforce and demographic issues in the field. Identify areas of concern and importance to the community raised by this assessment in service of the future vitality and capability of the astronomy and astrophysics work force. Where possible, provide specific, actionable and practical recommendations to the agencies and community to address these areas. This report shall be made available following the completion of the study.

 

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-SSB-19-06

Project Duration (months): 24 month(s)

RSO: Svedberg, Erik

Topic(s):

Engineering and Technology
Math, Chemistry, and Physics
Space and Aeronautics
Policy for Science and Technology



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 08/27/2019

Daniela Calzetti - (Chair)
DANIELA CALZETTI is a professor and head of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Massachusetts – Amherst. Her research interests include understanding star formation on the scales of galaxies, using information provided by a variety of both space-borne (Hubble, Spitzer, Herschel, etc.) and ground-based telescopes, at wavelengths that range from the ultraviolet to the radio. Prior to joining the University of Massachusetts – Amherst, she held various positions at the Space Telescope Science Institute, including – E.S.A. Fellow, postdoctoral researcher, assistant astronomer, and associate astronomer. Calzetti is a member of the American Astronomical Society and the International Astronomical Union. In addition, she is a member of the ERC Panel, Max Planck Society (ad-hoc appointment for the Chemistry, Physics and Technology Section), NASA STDT for the LUVOIR Surveyor Mission Concept Study, AURA Space Telescope Science Institute Council (STIC), and the EUCLID Science Consortium/Co-I of Euclid Science Program: Precision Studies of Galaxy Growth and Cosmology. Calzetti has received numerous awards including the Award for Outstanding Accomplishments in Research at the University of Massachusetts and the Clarivate-Reuters Worlds Most Cited Researchers. She received her Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Rome. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Michael Boylan-Kolchin
MICHAEL BOYLAN-KOLCHIN is an assistant professor of astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin. His research focuses on theoretical astrophysics, including numerical simulations of the formation and evolution of cosmological structure, galaxies, and globular clusters; galaxy dynamics; the nature of dark matter; the epoch of reionization; and near-field cosmology. For this panel, he brings expertise with all associated wavelengths. Prior to joining the University of Texas, he was a faculty member at the University of Maryland and a postdoctoral scientist at the University of California, Irvine, and the Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik. He is the recipient of a National Science Foundation CAREER Award. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Hsiao-Wen Chen
HSIAO-WEN CHEN is a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the University of Chicago. Her research interests include the formation and evolution of galaxies across cosmic time, chemical enrichment in the intergalactic medium (IGM), and transient phenomena. Prior to joining the University of Chicago, Chen held a postdoctoral position at Carnegie Observatories and a Hubble Fellowship at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has served as the vice president of the International Astronomical Union IGM Commission, chair of the Adler Planetarium Visiting Committee, and chair of the Space Telescope Users’ Committee. Her work is related to absorption-line spectroscopy of distant light sources (quasars/gamma-ray burst afterglows) to probe diffuse gas around galaxies, and in combining absorption-line observations with galaxy survey data to understand the recycling of baryonic matter between star-forming regions and dark intergalactic medium. For this panel, she brings expertise with ultraviolet wavelengths and spectroscopy. She received her Ph.D. for astronomy from State University of New York at Stony Brook. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Ann E. Hornschemeier
ANN E. HORNSCHEMEIER is the chief of the X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. She specializes in studies of X-ray emission from accreting black hole and neutron star binary populations, both in the local universe and at cosmologically interesting distances. She chairs the NuSTAR Starburst and Local Group science working group, carrying out observations on nearby galaxies and coordinating observations with Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift. Dr. Hornschemeier is also involved in future missions, serving as the only U.S. science co-investigator on the Wide Field Imager on Athena and as a member of the international consortium for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna mission. For this panel, she brings expertise with X-ray wavelengths. She won the American Astronomical Society's Annie Jump Cannon Award and NASA awarded her an Early Career Achievement Medal. She was awarded the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada Helen Sawyer Hogg lectureship for her studies of X-ray emission from galaxies. She received her Ph.D. for astronomy and astrophysics from Pennsylvania State University. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Susan A. Kassin
SUSAN A. KASSIN is an AURA Associate Astronomer with tenure at the Space Telescope Science Institute. She is also an associate research scientist at the Johns Hopkins University Department of Physics and Astronomy. Previous positions include NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center as a NASA Postdoctoral Program and JWST Fellow. Her work is related to observations of galaxy formation and evolution including dust gradients in high-redshift galaxies and theory and simulations of galaxy formation and evolution including the build-up of galaxy bulges and the field of using mock observations of numerical simulations of galaxies to inform how we interpret observations. As an astronomer, Dr. Kassin generally studies how galaxies form and evolve using observations with ground and space-based telescopes and simulations. For this panel, she brings expertise with optical and near-infrared wavelengths. She received her Ph.D. for astronomy and astrophysics from the Ohio State University. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Amanda A. Kepley
AMANDA A. KEPLEY is an assistant scientist with the North American ALMA Science Center at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). Dr. Kepley previously held postdoctoral positions at NRAO and at the University of Virginia. Her research focuses on investigating the role that gas, dust, and magnetic fields within galaxies play in their evolution, primarily using radio telescopes like Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the Very Large Array (VLA), and the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). She also develops and tests heuristics for automated data reduction pipelines, both for ALMA and her own research. For this panel, she brings expertise with infrared and radio wavelengths. She was the recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. She received her Ph.D. for astronomy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Charles C. Steidel
CHARLES C. STEIDEL (NAS) is the Lee A. DuBridge Professor of Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology. His previous positions include assistant professor of physics at MIT and Hubble Fellow at U.C. Berkeley. He is a world leader in observational cosmology. He defined the state and chemical composition of the intergalactic medium in the early universe. He discovered normal star-forming galaxies at high redshift. With co-workers, he measured the clustering of these galaxies, thus placing serious constraints on cosmological models. His expertise is related to the processes of galaxy formation and the nature of the intergalactic medium. He has received the Gruber Cosmology Prize from The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation in recognition of his revolutionary studies of the most distant galaxies in the universe. He received his Ph.D. in astronomy from California Institute of Technology. He has previously served on several Academies’ committees, including the Panel on Optical and Infrared Astronomy from the Ground.
Daniel K. Stern
DANIEL STERN is a NuSTAR project scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. His prior work is related to implementing optical and infrared imaging and spectroscopy (Lick Observatory, Keck Observatory, HST, and IRTF), emphasizing observational cosmology and the distant universe and work on theoretical cosmology research considering microwave background fluctuations in a topologically closed universe. His current research interests are related to observational cosmology; identifying and studying galaxies and galaxy clusters at high redshift and active galaxies; and understanding the cosmic history of black hole formation and activity. For this panel, he brings expertise with X-ray, ultraviolet, and infrared wavelengths. Some of his recent awards are the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, the NASA Group Achievement Award to the NuSTAR Science Team, and the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal. He received his Ph.D. for astrophysics from University of California Berkeley. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Tommaso Treu
TOMMASO TREU is a professor at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in the Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics. Previous positions include Distinguished Visitor at the Space Telescope Science Institute and professor at University of California, Santa Barbara. His research interests and expertise includes galaxy formation and evolution. In particular he is interested in early-type galaxies, galaxies in clusters; high redshift galaxies; the co-evolution of spheroids and black-holes; gravitational lensing and dark matter in galaxies; and clusters of galaxies, cosmography from gravitational time delays, and galaxies in the epoch of reionization. For this panel, he brings expertise with ultraviolet and optical wavelengths. He is a recent recipient of the American Astronomical Society Newton Lacy Pierce Prize, the UCSB H.J. Plous Memorial Award, and the David and Lucille Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering. He received his Ph.D. for physics from Scuola Normale Superiore. He has previously served on the Academies’ Astro2010 Panel on Galaxies Across Cosmic Time.
Pieter van Dokkum
PIETER VAN DOKKUM is the Sol Goldman professor of astronomy and the divisional director of the Physical Sciences and Engineering at Yale University. His research interests include stars and stellar populations of the most distant galaxies, along with astronomical instrumentation and telescopes. Prior to joining Yale University, Dr. van Dokkum was a Spitzer Fellow and Hubble Fellow at the California Institute of Technology. He has received numerous awards, including the Marc Aaronson Memorial Prize, the National Science Foundation CAREER award, and the Pastoor Schmeitz prize. He received his Ph.D. for astronomy from the University of Groningen. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
David H. Weinberg
DAVID H. WEINBERG is a Distinguished University Professor and chair of the Department of Astronomy at the Ohio State University. Dr. Weinberg studies the large scale structure of the universe, dark energy and dark matter, the formation and evolution of galaxies and quasars, and the intergalactic medium (IGM). He is well-known for his development of “halo occupation” methods to connect observed galaxy clustering to underlying dark matter structure, for theoretical modeling and cosmological applications of the Lyman-alpha forest, and for numerical simulation studies of the mechanisms of galaxy growth. For this panel, he brings expertise with all associated wavelengths. He has received the University Distinguished Scholar award and the Lancelot M. Berkeley New York Community Trust Prize for Meritorious Work in Astronomy by the American Astronomical Society. He received his Ph.D. for astrophysical sciences from Princeton University. He has previously served on the Academies’ Committee on the Review of Progress Toward the Decadal Survey Vision in New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Astro2010 Panel on Cosmology and Fundamental Physics.

Events



Location:

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

This meeting is closed in its entirety.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Erik Svedberg
Contact Email:  esvedberg@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2308

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Daniela Calzetti
Panel Chair
Michael Boylan-Kolchin
Hsiao-Wen Chen
Ann Hornschemeier
Susan Kassin
Amanda Kepley
Charles Steidel
Daniel Stern
Tommaso Treu
Pieter van Dokkum
SC Liaison (remote)
David Weinberg

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The panel deliberated on the four questions and one discovery area, deliberating on the report draft, and wrote.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

No outside materials were distributed to the committee.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
October 16, 2019
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
TeleConference

Description :   

Fully Closed


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Daniela Calzetti - (Chair)
Hsiao-Wen Chen
Amanda A. Kepley
Daniel K. Stern
Tommaso Treu
Pieter van Dokkum
David H. Weinberg

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The Statement of Task

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 16, 2019
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
TeleConference

Description :   

Planning call, fully Closed.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Daniela Calzetti - (Chair)
Hsiao-Wen Chen
Ann E. Hornschemeier
Susan A. Kassin
Amanda A. Kepley
Charles C. Steidel
Daniel K. Stern
Tommaso Treu
Pieter van Dokkum
David H. Weinberg
Miguel Morales
Marc Kamionkowski

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The Statement of Task

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

none

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 12, 2019
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Astro2020: Panel on Galaxies Meeting One

Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics 2020 (ASTRO2020)

This meeting will be closed in its entirety.

The panel will review Astro2020 Science white paper submissions.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Shanae Bradley
Contact Email:  sbradley@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3477

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Daniela Calzetti
University of Massachusetts
Amherst
Chair
Michael Boylan-Kolchin
The University of Texas at Austin
Hsiao-Wen Chen
The University of Chicago
Ann E. Hornschemeier
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Susan A. Kassin
Space Telescope Science Institute
Amanda A. Kepley
National Radio Astronomy Observatory
Charles C. Steidel
California Institute of Technology (on phone)
Daniel Stern
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Tommaso Treu
University of California
Los Angeles (on phone)
Pieter van Dokkum
Yale University
David H. Weinberg
Ohio State University

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The White Papers

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

none

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
August 30, 2019
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.