Public Access Records Office
The National Academies
500 5th Street NW
Room KECK 219
Washington, DC 20001
Tel: (202) 334-3543
Email: paro@nas.edu
Project Information

Project Information


Astro2020: Panel on Cosmology


Project Scope:

Panel Description:
The Panel on Cosmology will identify and articulate the scientific themes that will define the frontier in cosmology research in the 2022-2032 decade. Its scope will include the early universe, the cosmic microwave background, the epoch of reionization, large scale structure, dark energy, dark matter (excluding direct detection), and gravitational lensing and microlensing as applied to cosmology, as well as astrophysical tests of fundamental physics.


Overall Project Statement of Task:
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine shall convene an ad hoc survey committee and supporting study panels to carry out a decadal survey in astronomy and astrophysics. The study will generate consensus recommendations to implement a comprehensive strategy and vision for a decade of transformative science at the frontiers of astronomy and astrophysics. The committee, with inputs from study panels covering the breadth of astronomy and astrophysics, will carry out the following tasks:

  1. Provide an overview of the current state of astronomy and astrophysics science, and technology research in support of that science, with connections to other scientific areas where appropriate;
  2. Identify the most compelling science challenges and frontiers in astronomy and astrophysics, which shall motivate the committee’s strategy for the future;
  3. Develop a comprehensive research strategy to advance the frontiers of astronomy and astrophysics for the period 2022-2032 that will include identifying, recommending, and ranking the highest priority research activities — taking into account for each activity the scientific case, international and private landscape, timing, cost category and cost risk, as well as technical readiness, technical risk, and opportunities for partnerships.  The strategy should be balanced, by considering large, medium, and small activities for both ground and space. (Activities include any project, telescope, facility, experiment, mission, or research program of sufficient scope to be identified separately in the final report.) For each recommended activity the committee will lay out the principal science objectives and activity capabilities, including assumed or recommended activity lifetime, where possible;
  4. Utilize and recommend decision rules, where appropriate, for the comprehensive research strategy that can accommodate significant but reasonable deviations in the projected budget or changes in urgency precipitated by new discoveries or unanticipated competitive activities;
  5.  Assess the state of the profession, using information available externally and, if necessary, data gathered by the study itself, including workforce and demographic issues in the field. Identify areas of concern and importance to the community raised by this assessment in service of the future vitality and capability of the astronomy and astrophysics work force. Where possible, provide specific, actionable and practical recommendations to the agencies and community to address these areas. This report shall be made available following the completion of the study.

 

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-SSB-19-04

Project Duration (months): 24 month(s)

RSO: Sheffer, Abigail

Topic(s):

Engineering and Technology
Math, Chemistry, and Physics
Space and Aeronautics
Policy for Science and Technology



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 07/30/2019

Daniel Eisenstein - (Chair)
DANIEL EISENSTEIN (NAS) is a professor of Astronomy at Harvard University and the director of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. His research interests include cosmology and extragalactic astronomy with a mix of theoretical and observational methods. His dominant focus over the last decade has been on the development of the baryon acoustic oscillation method to measure the cosmic distance scale and study dark energy. Prior to joining Harvard University, he was an astronomy faculty member at the University of Arizona and held postdoctoral positions at the Institute for Advanced Study and the University of Chicago. Eisenstein has been active in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey since 1998 and served as the Director of SDSS-III. He is currently the co-spokesperson of the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument collaboration. He is a member of the JWST Near-Infrared Camera instrument team, the SDSS-IV consortium, and the Euclid consortium. He has served as chair of the National Science Foundation Astronomy Portfolio Review committee. He has been a member of numerous other scientific collaborations and national committees. He has received the Shaw Prize in Astronomy and was named a Simons Investigator. Eisenstein received his Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University. He has served on the Academies’ Astro2010 Panel on Optical and Infrared Astronomy from the Ground.
Lindsey E. Bleem
LINDSEY E. BLEEM is an assistant physicist at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). She was previously a scholar at ANL. Her research interests include using clusters of galaxies to constrain cosmological models. She is currently constructing and exploring the properties of new samples of clusters selected via the Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect using data from the South Pole Telescope, Dark Energy Survey, and Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. Beyond this work she is engaged in efforts to better connect simulations and observations of clusters to prepare for the next generation optical Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and cosmic microwave background surveys. Bleem received the Maria Goeppert Fellowship and Sachs Fellowship from theUniversity of Chicago, and the Director’s Fellowship from ANL. Bleem earned her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Marc P. Kamionkowski
MARC P. KAMIONKOWSKI (NAS) is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University. He was previously the the Robinson Professor of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics at the California Institute of Technology. He is a theoretical physicist who specializes in cosmology, with contributions in dark matter, dark energy, the cosmic microwave background, the early Universe, physical cosmology, along with other areas of astrophysics. Kamionkowski is also the chief editor, Astrophysics, and Cosmology editor for Physics Reports. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the International Society for General Relativity and Gravitation, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Kamionkowski has received numerous awards and honors, including the Helen B. Warner Prize, the E. O. Lawrence Award for Physics, a Simons Investigator Award, and the Dannie Heineman Prize for Astrophysics. He earned a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago. Kamionkowski has previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Rachel Mandelbaum
RACHEL MANDELBAUM is a professor at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). She was previously an associate research scholar and visiting associate research scholar for the Department of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton University, and a Hubble Fellow for astrophysics at the Institute for Advanced Study. She has received the AAS Annie Jump Cannon Prize, the Department of Energy Early Career Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, and was the Falco-DeBenedetti Career Development Professor in Physics at CMU. Her research interests are predominantly in the areas of observational cosmology and galaxy studies. This work includes the use of weak gravitational lensing and other analysis techniques, with projects that range from development of improved data analysis methods, to actual application of such methods to existing data. Mandelbaum is focusing on data from the Hyper-SuprimeCam (HSC), and is working on upcoming surveys including LSST, Euclid, and Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). She is currently serving a two-year term as spokesperson of the LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration (DESC). Mandelbaum earned her Ph. D. in physics from Princeton University. Mandelbaum has not previously served on an Academies' committee.
Miguel Morales
MIGUEL F. MORALES is an associate professor at the University of Washington in the department of physics. He was also a research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Kavli Institute. He is an observational cosmologist and works primarily on measurements of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) as the universe's first stars and galaxies burned away the primordial neutral hydrogen fog approximately 13 billion years ago. His radio cosmology group is recognized as an international leader in developing the bespoke instruments and precision data analysis techniques required to reveal the faint cosmological radio signal. This group are builders of the Murchison Widefield Array in western Australia and the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array in South Africa, and has developed one of the four major EoR analysis pipelines. Dr. Morales received the National Science Foundation’s CAREER Award and was included in Scientists Like Me: Faces of Discovery an as an emerging scholar in Diversity Magazine. Dr. Morales earned a Ph.D. in physics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He has previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Daniel M. Scolnic
DANIEL M. SCOLNIC is an Assistant Professor of Physics at Duke University. He was previously a KICP Fellow and a Hubble Fellow at The University of Chicago. He was selected by the Space Studies Board to participate in the National Academy of Sciences and Chinese Academy of Sciences 7th and 8th Forum for New Leaders in Space Science. He received a Hubble Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, a Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics Fellowship, and was a national finalist for the NASA Famelab Competition. He leads dark energy and Hubble constant cosmological analyses using supernovae for the Pan- Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (STARRS); the Dark Energy Survey; the LSST; the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS); Foundation; Supernovae, H0, for the Equation of State (SH0ES); and WFIRST. He is also participating in the design of future missions to find the optical counterparts of gravitational waves. Scolnic earned his Ph.D. in astronomy from Johns Hopkins University. Scolnic has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Matias Zaldarriaga
MATIAS ZALDARRIAGA (NAS) is a professor of astrophysics at the Institute for Advanced Study. He was previously a professor of astronomy and physics at Harvard University. Zaldarriaga’s research interests include understanding the earliest instants in the history of the Universe and in developing the necessary tools to interpret observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and of the distribution of matter across cosmic history. He developed new statistical probes to infer fundamental properties of the universe from the CMB and radio observations of cosmic reionization. The current generation of CMB experiments is testing models of inflation and gravity using his seminal work. His work on the physics of non-Gaussianity and inflation provides a framework for studying the early universe. Zaldarriaaga has received a Hubble Fellowship, a David and Lucile Packard Fellowship, the Helen B. Warner Prize from the American Astronomical Society, a Sloan Fellowship, the Gribov Medal from the European Physical Society, and a MacArthur Fellowship. He earned a Ph.D. in physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Zaldarriaga has not previously served on an Academies' committee.
Kathryn M. Zurek
KATHRYN M. ZUREK is a professor of theoretical physics in the Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology. She was previously a senior scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a David Schramm Fellow at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, and a member of the Institute for Advanced Study. She has a wide range of research interests, mostly focused at the boundary of particle physics with astrophysics and cosmology. Her work spans both studies of new physics signatures at colliders, as well as astrophysical searches for dark matter and physics beyond the Standard Model in the neutrino sector. She has recently been active in the study of dark matter, working on theories of dark matter and ways to detect it in the lab by dark matter-nucleus interactions, at colliders through high-energy collisions, and in the galaxy by dark matter self-annihilations. Recently, she has been focused on proposing new ideas to detect hidden sector dark matter in the laboratory. Zurek earned a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Washington. Zurek has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.

Comment on Provisional Committee Appointments


Viewers may communicate with the National Academies at any time over the project's duration. In addition, formal comments on the provisional appointments to a committee of the National Academies are solicited during the 20-calendar day period following the posting of the membership and, as described below, these comments will be considered before committee membership is finalized. We welcome your comments (Use the Feedback link below).

Please note that the appointments made to this committee are provisional, and changes may be made. No appointment shall be considered final until we have evaluated relevant information bearing on the committee's composition and balance. This information will include the confidential written disclosures to The National Academies by each member-designate concerning potential sources of bias and conflict of interest pertaining to his or her service on the committee; information from discussion of the committee's composition and balance that is conducted in closed session at its first event and again whenever its membership changes; and any public comments that we have received on the membership during the 20-calendar day formal public comment period. If additional members are appointed to this committee, an additional 20-calendar day formal public comment period will be allowed. It is through this process that we determine whether the committee contains the requisite expertise to address its task and whether the points of views of individual members are adequately balanced such that the committee as a whole can address its charge objectively.


Last day remaining to provide comments during the formal comment period.


Events



Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

During this meeting, the panel will gather any last information it needs, finalize its deliberations, and develop its work product. This meeting item will be updated after the first meeting and we develop the plan for this meeting.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Linda Walker
Contact Email:  lwalker@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1311

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Astro2020: Panel on Cosmology Meeting One

Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics 2020 (ASTRO2020)

This meeting will be closed in its entirety.

The panel will review Astro2020 Science white paper submissions.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Linda Walker
Contact Email:  lwalker@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1311

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
TeleConference

Description :   

This will be a panel working teleconference to answer members' questions about the panel's tasks and plan for the first panel meeting.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Linda Walker
Contact Email:  lwalker@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1311

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.