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Project Information

Project Information


America’s Geoheritage II: A Workshop


Project Scope:

An ad hoc committee will organize a workshop to explore possible approaches to systematically identify, standardize, coordinate, and promote geoheritage sites across America. The goals of the workshop are to:

  1. share current strategies and approaches to identify, inventory, and characterize geoheritage sites;

  2. discuss possible protocols, common terminology, and “best practices” for documenting and developing these sites;

  3. consider suggestions for future work to encourage the development of geoheritage sites as appropriate in diverse local and state settings;

  4. create a community of geoscientists and collaborators from the public and private sectors dedicated to identifying and preserving geoheritage sites; and

  5. explore ways to encourage geoscientists, educators, and the general public to use geoheritage sites in their scientific, educational, informational, and leisure activities.

    A proceedings-in-brief of the event will be issued.

Status: Current

PIN: PGA-NETWORKS-19-04

RSO: Sztein, Ester

Topic(s):

Earth Sciences
Education
Environment and Environmental Studies



Geographic Focus:
North America

Committee Membership


David Mogk - (Chair)
Research Professor and Assistant Director, Imaging and Chemical Analysis Laboratory
Department of Geology, Montana State University
Marjorie A. Chan
Distinguished Professor
Department of Geology & Geophysics, University of Utah



Timothy B. Connors
Geologist
National Park Service

Nelia W. Dunbar
Director and State Geologist
New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources

Daniel Tormey
President
Catalyst Environmental Solutions

Cathy L. Whitlock
Professor of Earth Sciences
Montana State University

Ester Sztein - (Staff Officer)
Assistant Director, BISO
National Academy of Sciences

Events


Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

"Geoheritage and Research Initiatives" is the eighth webinar of the America's Geoheritage Workshop II Fall Distinguished Speakers Program.

 

Speaker and Sub-topic Information

Donna Whitney, Professor at the University of Minnesota, will be speaking on "A Vision for NSF Earth Sciences 2020-2030: Earth in Time." Dr. Whitney will be presenting key points from the recent NASEM report produced as part of a decadal survey of NSF-EAR.

Donna L. Whitney is a Distinguished McKnight University Professor and Head of the N.H. Winchell School of Earth & Environmental Sciences at the University of Minnesota. She received an A.B. in geology at Smith College and a Ph.D. in geological sciences at the University of Washington. Her research focuses on the chemical and physical processes of metamorphism in the deep crust using observations from the scale of mineral grains to mountain systems. She is a fellow of the Mineralogical Society of America and the Geological Society of America, and has been an editor of the Journal of Metamorphic Geology since 2005.

Watch this space for registration information as the webinar date approaches, and for a recording of the webinar afterward.



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ester Sztein
Contact Email:  esztein@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

"Geoheritage and Geoscience Education (K-12, undergraduate, informal)" is the seventh webinar of the America's Geoheritage Workshop II Fall Distinguished Speakers Program.

 

Speaker: Michael Wysession

Title: Geoheritage and the Future of K-12 Geoscience Education

Description: The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) have revolutionized K-12 science education as a whole and geoscience education in particular. The focus on phenomenon-based learning, building student comprehension through storylines provide a great opportunity for America’s Geoheritage sites to serve as anchors for the teaching of science. The inclusion of a year’s worth of geoscience standards at a high school level provide a motivation for building this curriculum. Many opportunities for collaboration exist among geoscientists, geoeducators, and K-12 curriculum builders to bring our rich Geoheritage into the classroom.

Bio Sketch: Michael Wysession, a Professor of Geophysics at Washington University in St. Louis, is a leader in the areas of seismology research and geoscience education. He has authored or co-authored over 100 papers and reports in geophysics and science education, and over 35 textbooks ranging from grade school to graduate school. Wysession was Chair of the NSF’s Earth Science Literacy Initiative, Chair of Earth and Space Science for the National Academy of Science report A Framework for K-12 Science Education, and one of the lead architects of the new national K-12 Next Generation Science Standards. His awards include the Packard Foundation’s Science and Engineering Fellowship, the National Science Foundation Presidential Faculty Fellowship, the Innovation Award from the St. Louis Science Academy, the inaugural Ambassador Award from the American Geophysical Union, for which he is a Fellow, and the Frank Press Award from the Seismological Society of America. He is the author of four video lecture courses with the Teaching Company’s Great Courses series, watched by millions of people: How the Earth Works, The World’s Greatest Geologic Wonders, National Geographic’s Polar Explorations, and The Science of Energy: Resources and Power Explained. Wysession is also Executive Director of Washington University’s Center for Teaching and Learning, coordinating educational professional development for its faculty.

 

Speaker: David Mogk

Title: Geoheritage in Support of Undergraduate and Graduate Geoscience Education

Description: Geoheritage sites can support undergraduate and graduate geoscience education programs by engaging students in course field trips and class projects, extended field camps, Research Experiences for Undergraduates, and in independent study and thesis research projects. Sites that are repeatedly visited for educational purposes can develop on-line resources that include fundamental scientific information, field guides and instructional activities for use by all.

Bio Sketch: David W. Mogk is a Professor of Geology at Montana State University.  He is a metamorphic petrologist by training, with research interests in the genesis and evolution of Precambrian continental crust and mid-crustal petrogenetic processes. He has worked for 25 years to promote excellence in STEM education having served as program officer in the NSF Division of Undergraduate Education, co-PI of the On the Cutting Edge program for geoscience faculty development, and served on NRC panels on Promising Practices in Undergraduate STEM Education and Discipline-Based Education Research.  He is currently Chair of the U.S. National Committee for Geosciences.

 

Speakers: John Scannella / Patrick Leiggi / Angela Weikert

Title: The Role of Museums in Preserving and Presenting Geoheritage

Description: Museums play a critical role in preserving our geoheritage. Through active exploration and research, carefully preparing fossils, and curation and care for natural history specimens, museums expand our knowledge of the past and permit for continued study and new discoveries. Museums also work to engage the public, including students, in the wonders of the natural world, thus inspiring future generations to explore, seek to understand, and care for our geoheritage.

Bio Sketches:

John Scannella is the John R. Horner Curator of Paleontology at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana. He received a B.S. in Geology from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. in Earth Sciences from Montana State University. John has conducted paleontological field work throughout Montana, with a research focus on exploring prehistoric ecosystems and deciphering the evolution and growth of dinosaurs.

Patrick Leiggi is the Director of Paleontology, Exhibits, and MOR Exhibitions at the Museum of the Rockies, Montana State University. He started his career in paleontology more than 40 years ago as Assistant Curator of Paleontology at Princeton University and arrived at the Museum of the Rockies in 1985, where he worked with dinosaur paleontologist Jack Horner in developing one of the world’s most recognized paleo-research programs.

Angela Weikert is Director of Operations, Education, & Public Programs at Museum of the Rockies. She has a Master of Science in Science Education and is a Ph.D. candidate in Education at Montana State University. During her twelve years at MOR, Ms. Weikert has increased the museum’s commitment to quality school group field trips and teacher resources through grants, research, and new materials.

Watch this space for a recording of the webinar afterward.



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ester Sztein
Contact Email:  esztein@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

"Geoheritage, Economic Development, Geotourism" is the sixth webinar of the America's Geoheritage Workshop II Fall Distinguished Speakers Program.

 

 

Speaker: Conrad Anker

Title: Himalayan Glaciers and Eco-Geotourism in the Khumbu Himal

Description: An overview of glaciers in the Mount Everest region and their effect on local agriculture and tourism economies

Bio Sketch: Conrad Anker is an American rock climber, mountaineer, and author. He was the team leader of The North Face climbing team for 26 years until 2018. In 1999, he located George Mallory's body on Everest as a member of a search team looking for the remains of the British climber. He has summited Everest 3 times, once without supplemental oxygen.

 

Speaker: Dr. Robert C. Burns

Title: Taking the Long View: Developing the Appalachian Geopark, West Virginia (USA)

Description: The Appalachian Geopark Project is situated in three southern West Virginia counties: Fayette, Greenbrier and Raleigh. They include the components of rivers, caves and coal; and transportation modes, including rail, and country roads. Perhaps most importantly, the Appalachian Geopark Project includes the heritage of the people living in the Appalachians.  As the United States is no longer a member of UNESCO (and cannot have a Global Geopark), the discussion will focus on potential funding mechanisms and changes in focus, in preparation for a future in which US Geoparks are once again a possibility.

Bio Sketch: Dr. Robert C. Burns is Director of the Division of Forestry and Natural Resources, Professor of Recreation, Parks and Tourism Resources, and a former career military officer.  His research scholarship involves collecting and using data to support decision-making for public lands planning and management. With Dr. Moreira, he is sponsoring all support for the Appalachian Geopark Project, an aspiring member of the Global Geopark Network.   He has secured over $9 million in external research funding (as a Primary Investigator) from various federal agencies over the past two decades, domestically and internationally. Within Appalachia, he is PI of an innovative land reclamation education methodology, involving WVU, Hocking College (Ohio) and Allegheny College (Maryland). He is co-primary investigator for a five-year effort to improve the state’s water quality, working collaboratively with WVU’s Institute for Water Safety and Security, and focuses on user perceptions of lands harvested for bio-materials.

 

Speaker: Jasmine Cardozo Moreira

Bio Sketch: Jasmine Cardozo Moreira is Professor at Ponta Grossa State University, in Brazil. She is head of LABTAN, an University laboratory that focuses on tourism, outdoor recreation and public use in protected areas.  Her expertise is on human dimensions of tourism planning in Brazil National Parks and Geoparks.  She is also an adjunct faculty member at West Virginia University’s Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Resources Program, and a member of TAPAS Group (The Tourism and Protected Areas Specialist Group),  and Geoheritage group from IUCN. Since 2007, she is researching about geotourism and Geoparks, developing the Fernando de Noronha Geopark proposal and working in carrying capacity projects for Azores Geopark, in Portugal.

 

Speaker: Erika Vye

Title: Building Community-based Geotourism Opportunities in the Keweenaw Peninsula

Description: Jutting out into the vast expanse of Lake Superior’s pristine waters, Michigan’s Keweenaw Peninsula hosts a wealth of geologic and cultural resources affording outstanding opportunities to advance geoheritage and geotourism. This work has initially been driven by a robust and prolific education and outreach campaign that has since galvanized the local community to explore and develop sustainable economic opportunities rooted in our rich geologic underpinnings. This presentation shares the ways geoheritage shapes and influences a range of tourism and conservation initiatives within the Keweenaw community.

Bio Sketch: Erika Vye is a geologist and geoheritage specialist with expertise in formal and informal place-based education initiatives that broaden community Earth science and Great Lakes literacy. As the co-founder of Keweenaw Geoheritage and Keweenaw Geotours, she is active in the development of sustainable economic opportunities and enriched connections with the natural environment centered on significant geologic features and our relationship with them. She works with many dedicated community partners on conservation efforts and is working toward Global Geopark and National Marine Sanctuary designations rooted in the region’s rich geoheritage.

 

Speaker: Bill Rose

Bio Sketch: Bill Rose is a volcanologist who has supervised 57 MS and 23 PhD students in geology at Michigan Tech over 45 years, many of whom are now leaders in the field of volcanology. His research brought him to active volcanoes around the world, most frequently those in Central America, and focused on how volcanoes work, volcanic gases, and volcanic ash. A particular focus was ash clouds, a hazard to jet aircraft. He worked with many students to demonstrate how remote sensing tools can be used to map the dispersal of ash clouds and how resultant data can mitigate aircraft encounters. This work was supported by the US National Science Foundation, NASA and the US Geological Survey. He helped develop a unique Geological Hazards Peace Corps program and two foreign exchange programs, one of which enabled students to obtain dual international graduate geological degrees, the first of its kind in the US. He also helped develop MTU’s atmospheric science program. Recently, he has been active in varied geoheritage initiatives in the Keweenaw and continues to advance the designation of a Keweenaw Global Geopark.

Watch this space for registration information as the webinar date approaches.



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ester Sztein
Contact Email:  esztein@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

"Geoheritage and Cultural Heritage" is the fifth webinar of the America's Geoheritage Workshop II Fall Distinguished Speakers Program.  To watch the recorded video of this webinar, please visit https://vimeo.com/470639004

 

Speaker: Steven Semken

Title: Sense of Place: Connecting People to Geoheritage and Cultural Heritage

Description: Sense of place makes human connections to natural and cultural landscapes—geoheritage and cultural heritage—tangible and teachable. Place-based education and interpretation in, leveraging the sense of place, can motivate diverse stakeholders to better explore, learn about, care for, and protect geoheritage places, while also increasing their Earth-system literacy.

Bio Sketch: Steven Semken is professor of geology and education in the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University. He is an ethnogeologist and geoscience education researcher whose work integrates geology, geography, ethnography, education, and technology. He investigates the influences of sense of place, of culture, and of affect on modes of teaching, learning, and doing research in the Earth sciences in the real and virtual realms. Before joining ASU, he taught at the Tribal College of the Diné (Navajo) Nation. Semken and his students work in the geologically and culturally diverse places of the American Southwest, Latin America, and the Caribbean, focusing on Indigenous and Hispanic/Latinx communities. Their goal is to apply place-based geoscience teaching for equity in the geoscience community, environmental and cultural sustainability in underserved regions, and greater public Earth-science literacy. Semken is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America and a Past-President of the National Association of Geoscience Teachers. He has a Ph.D. (1989) and S.B. (1980) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.S. (1984) from the University of California, Los Angeles, and has received several awards for excellence in teaching.

 

Speaker: Ken Ridgway

Title: Geoheritage Connections to Indigenous Communities and Landscapes

Description: There has traditionally been a disconnect between geoscience and indigenous communities. This disconnect has been part of the reason for geoscience being the least diverse of the STEM fields (e.g., Bernard and Cooperdock, 2018).  I will discuss how at Purdue University we are building connections between geoscience and indigenous communities.  The strongest connections are developed when indigenous students do geo-research on issues that are directly relevant to their tribal lands and communities.  A geoscience understanding of landscapes that respects indigenous cultures will be critical for preservation of both geoheritage sites, and all cultures that have deep connections to these landscapes.

Bio Sketch: Ken Ridgway has been a faculty member in the Deptartment of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at Purdue University since 1992. Much of his research is related to understanding the tectonic and sedimentary processes that occur along convergent plate boundaries.  Ridgway is the co-leader of the Sloan Indigenous Program at Purdue University.  He was awarded the 2012 GSA Bromery Award.  This award is given to those "who have made significant contributions to research in the geological sciences, or those who have been instrumental in opening the geoscience field to other minorities." Ridgway was also the recipient of the 2012 Purdue Dreamer Award.  This award is given annually to an individual or organization within the Purdue community whose contributions embody Dr. Martin Luther King's vision of service to others and furthers the university's commitment to diversity.

 

Speaker: Carol J. Pride

Title: Connecting HBCU Students and Coastal Communities to Georgia’s Barrier Islands

Description: Carol Pride’s presentation will describe a 2004-05 initiative to train HBCU students to run a marine science camp for children of the Hog Hammock Gullah Geechee community of Sapelo Island, GA and subsequent efforts at Savannah State University to engage K-12 and college students in study of the Georgia coast.

Bio Sketch: Carol Pride joined the faculty of Savannah State University in 2002 and now serves as chair of SSU’s Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences.  Her background is in paleoceanography including doctoral research in the Gulf of California with Bob Thunell and postdoctoral research on the Southern Ocean with Mark Brzezinski and Mic Deniro.  She currently mentors undergraduate and graduate students in research on temporal variability of our estuarine and barrier island ecosystems, with focus on the imprint of climatic and anthropogenic pressures on these systems. In her teaching, she engages students in collaborative research at local sites and in community outreach.  Her engagement of HBCU students in K-12 geoscience outreach sprouted from a Sapelo Island Sea Camp and Natural History Interpretation Training Program, which was the brain child of the late Margaret Olsen. Subsequent NSF and NOAA funded programs at SSU have inspired many to broaden their geoscience education, to become science educators, and to serve as stewards of our coastal environment.

 

Speaker: Joshua Villalobos

Title: Moving The Needle Forward: Observations and Experiences in Mentoring Minorities in the Geosciences

Description: This talk will discuss the efforts, successes, and challenges in engaging minority students within a community college setting. The presentation will also highlight the programs that have been implemented to ensure students make the successful transistion to the university to complete their higher degree(s).

Bio Sketch: Joshua Villalobos is  an Instructional Campus Dean supervising multiple instructional programs included Geological Sciences and other STEM disciplines at the Mission del Paso campus at El Paso Community College (EPCC). During his time as a faculty member at EPCC he helped initiate several NSF funded programs targeting minority students at EPCC to get engaged within the geological sciences. His focus has also encompassed innovative pedagogy in the classroom and has co-authored a SERC InTeGraTe Module introducing the concept of Environmental Justice into introductory geoscience classes. He is also currently serving as a SERC Traveling Workshop Facilitator and has given several workshops at several institutions on engaging minorities in the geosciences. In 2016 he was awarded Geological Society of America’s  Geoscience Education Division's Biggs Award for Excellence in Earth Science Teaching. Joshua also received the 2018 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Math and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM) from the National Science Foundation and the White House for engaging minority students in the geosciences at the community college level.

We encourage all participants to complete our survey following the webinar here: https://survey.alchemer.com/s3/5958421/Geoheritage-and-Cultural-Heritage-October-20



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ester Sztein
Contact Email:  esztein@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

"Geoheritage and State Geological Surveys (AASG)" is the fourth webinar of the America's Geoheritage Workshop II Fall Distinguished Speakers Program.  To watch the recorded video of this webinar, please visit https://vimeo.com/465848309

Speaker: Nelia W. Dunbar

Title: Revealing New Mexico’s Hidden Gems: Geology of Parks, Monuments and Public Lands

Description: In New Mexico, geology and human activity, past and present, are closely intertwined. The Jemez Mountain Volcanic Field hosts soft ignimbrite rock that provided dwellings for pre-Puebloan peoples, and pumice from explosive volcanism made local soil farmable.  The geology of these public lands, along with those in many other parts of New Mexico, are made accessible through two books, prepared by specialists, but geared towards interpreting these geological gems for non-geologists.

Bio Sketch: With a background in geochemistry, Nelia has served as director of the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources since 2016. She completed a B.A. degree, summa cum laude, in geology at Mount Holyoke College (1983) and then went on to a Ph.D. in geochemistry at New Mexico Tech (1989). She has worked for the Bureau since 1992, focusing on geochemistry of volcanic rocks, particularly volcanic ashes and other explosive eruptions, mainly in New Mexico and Antarctica. She received funding from NSF for an electron microprobe in 1996, and, until recently, managed that laboratory. Her professional interests include research on a wide range of topics broadly focused on volcanic and igneous processes, in New Mexico and elsewhere.  In addition to research, Dunbar is an adjunct faculty member at the department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, taught a graduate class on electron microprobe analysis, advised graduate students and served on student committees, and is involved in outreach activities for New Mexico teachers and students.

Speaker: William Haneberg

Title: Interactive Geoheritage Maps from the Kentucky Geological Survey

Description: The Kentucky Geological Survey uses story maps and interactive map services to provide easily accessible information on geoheritage related topics such as the general geology of Kentucky, geologic tours of parks and historical sites, natural arches, sample locations, and the KGS meteorite collection.

Bio Sketch: William Haneberg is Kentucky’s state geologist, director of the Kentucky Geological Survey, and a research professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, all at the University of Kentucky. He previously spent 17 years as a consultant specializing in engineering geology and geologic hazard assessment, and before that was a senior engineering geologist and assistant director of the New Mexico Bureau of Mines & Mineral Resources. His research and professional practice have included projects around the world ranging from deepwater seafloor and subsurface geohazard assessments to investigations of Himalayan landslides and geomorphology.

Speaker: Gale C. Blackmer

Title: Geoheritage Initiatives in Pennsylvania

Description: Pennsylvania encompasses most of the Appalachian geologic provinces, giving it diverse and interesting geologic features. The Survey’s position alongside the Bureau of State Parks in the Deptartment of Conservation and Natural Resources (DNCR) ties us closely to nature tourism and environmental education. DCNR also hosts the Conservation Landscape Initiative, a program that focuses on resource conservation and community revitalization through locally driven planning and civic engagement, similar to the Geoheritage movement. This talk illustrates some of our methods of spreading the word about Pennsylvania’s geological heritage.

Bio Sketch: Gale has been a geologist at heart since she was a child. She made it formal with a B.A. in Geology from the University of Pennsylvania, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Geology from Penn State. At various points in her career, she worked for a geotechnical drilling contractor, a small environmental firm in Philadelphia, and a hydrogeological firm in State College. She also served on the faculty at West Chester University, Bloomsburg University, and Dickinson College. She started at the Pennsylvania Geological Survey in 1999, where her focus was on bedrock mapping in southeastern Pennsylvania. Starting at entry level, she worked her way up to Manager of the Mapping Division before being name Bureau Director and State Geologist in 2015. Gale continues to flex her teaching muscle by instructing the geology module of the Pennsylvania Master Naturalist Program, doing the occasional public outreach program, and taking every opportunity to educate her fellow conservation leaders on the fundamental importance of geology to shaping the landscape, culture, and history of Pennsylvania.

Speaker: R. William (Bill) Keach II

Title: Utah’s Geoheritage—From the Iconic to the Unsung

Description: Utah is an amazing geologic canvas with a wide range of geologic landforms. Individually and collectively they tell unique stories. Home to five national parks, eight national monuments, and 43 state parks, most of which have geology as their centerpiece attraction. Millions of visitors from around the world come each year to behold their beauty. This talk will focus on some of our many geoheritage features and sights, and efforts to educate the public about them.

Bio Sketch: Bill is a scientist and educator with a 30+ year background in industry, academia and state government. He is currently the State Geologist for Utah and Director of the Utah Geological Survey. Following degrees in geology (BYU) and geophysics (Cornell) he explored for hydrocarbons with SOHIO/BP in California and offshore Gulf of Mexico. He spent 17 years with Landmark Graphics/Halliburton, traveling the world leading the effort to develop and encourage adoption of 3D visualization technology. In 2006 he came back to Utah, joining the Energy and Geoscience Institute (Univ of Utah) and BYU doing research and teaching courses on seismic interpretation and reservoir modeling, and leading field courses for students and professionals throughout Utah to see its many wonders. In addition to his role as State Geologist, Bill continues to hold adjunct appointments with University of Utah (Chem Eng) and BYU to satisfy his passion for teaching. In his off-time Bill enjoys sports, ATV riding and spending time outdoors near his home in central Utah. Bill and his wife have four children and five grandchilden.

We encourage all participants to complete our survey following the webinar here: https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/5912148/Geoheritage-and-State-Geological-Surveys-AASG-October-6



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ester Sztein
Contact Email:  esztein@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

"Geoheritage Management on Federal Lands" is the third webinar of the America's Geoheritage Workshop II Fall Distinguished Speakers Program. To watch the recorded video of this webinar, please visit https://vimeo.com/463060795.

 

Speaker: Timothy B. Connors

Title: US National Park Service Initiatives to Promote Geologic Heritage and Geodiversity in 2020

Description: Numerous National Park Service Conservation Assistance Programs (National Heritage Areas (NHAs), National Natural Landmarks (NNLs), National Register of Historic Places and World Heritage Site programs can help promote Geoheritage and Geodiversity initiatives. Preservation partnerships are likely to be successful when a bottom-up approach is used and grassroots organizations are the major proponents of promoting a specific geoheritage area. This presentation will discuss these mechanisms, supply URLs and NPS contacts and bring awareness to these initiatives.

Bio Sketch: Timothy B. Connors is a Geologist with the U.S. National Park Service, Natural Resource Science and Stewardship Directorate, Geologic Resources Division in Lakewood, Colorado and has been with them since 1998. His main duties have involved developing digital GIS-based geologic maps of US National Park areas, as well as supporting databases on the unique geologic features, issues and processes of these park areas. He is very active in promoting the concept of Geologic Heritage Conservation and promoting areas rich in geologic features. He has worked in park areas in Alaska, Hawaii, Virgin Islands, and the whole lower 48 states, allowing him to become quite familiar with numerous geologic terranes, processes and features of this planet. He served on the Board of Directors for “The Friends of Dinosaur Ridge” in Morrison, Colorado, a local non-profit that supports the Morrison-Golden Fossil Areas National Natural Landmark from 1999-2014. He has taught geology courses at the University of Colorado (Denver) and Red Rocks Community College (Lakewood, Colorado). He earned both Bachelor of Science (1991) and Master of Science (1996) degrees in Geology from the University of Toledo (Ohio).

Speaker: Vincent L. Santucci

Title: Preserving America’s Paleontological Heritage within the U.S. National Park System

Description: The U.S. National Park System of parks, monuments, landmarks, and other affiliated sites collectively preserve America’s rich paleontological heritage. The history and science of paleontology associated with the national parks has been augmented by evolving resource stewardship strategies and management practices tailored for non-renewable fossils. Inventory, monitoring, research, curation, interpretation, and education are the foundation of the National Park Service Paleontology Program’s mission to protect America’s past record of life for the benefit of future generations.

Bio Sketch: Vincent L. Santucci is the Senior Paleontologist and Paleontology Program Coordinator for the U.S. National Park Service (NPS). Beginning in 1985, Vince has held assignments at Badlands, Petrified Forest, Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, Fossil Butte, Tule Springs Fossil Beds and other national parks, as well as supported geology and paleontology projects in over 200 national park areas. Vince has been a leader for paleontological resource management, protection, education, stewardship and science in the U.S. and has published more than 200 articles and reports related to NPS paleontology. Vince was instrumental in establishing “National Fossil Day” in 2009 and is the recipient of various honors and awards including the Brunton Compass, George Wright Natural Resource and George Hartzog Stewardship awards. Recently Vince was recognized as a “Public Lands Hero” by Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics. Vince completed his B.S. and M.S. in geology and paleontology at the University of Pittsburgh and is currently completing a Ph.D. at Penn State University involving research on the human dimensions of paleontological resources.

Speaker: Tim Stroope

Title: Stories in Stone: Geologic Features of our National Forests and Grasslands

Description: The United States Department of Agriculture’s Forest Service manages over 1000 features wholly or in part for their geologic significance. At nearly 193 million acres, America’s national forests and grasslands contain many more significant geologic features. Stories in Stone, a story map highlighting select geologic features on National Forest System (NFS) lands was launched in 2018. Stories in Stone is a first step in (re)introducing the public and the Agency to the diverse and spectacular geology on NFS lands.

Bio Sketch: Tim Stroope is a hydrogeologist with the USDA Forest Service’s National Groundwater Program where he provides project level assistance, outreach and training for all things groundwater related. Before that he was a Presidential Management Fellow and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Coordinator for the Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and Gunnison National Forests in western Colorado. Prior to joining the Forest Service Tim was a hydrologic technician for the USGS and a research associate with IIHR-Hydroscience and Engineering. His graduate and postgraduate research studied the effects of forest disturbance on watershed sediment production. He holds a BS and PhD in Geoscience from the University of Iowa.

Speaker: Greg McDonald

Title: Geoheritage on Bureau of Land Management Lands

Description: While the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) does not have a formal Geoheritage program to protect significant geological features on the land it manages, it does have many unique geological features it protects and makes accessible to the public.  Programs that protect Geoheritage sites on BLM land include the National Conservation Lands Program which oversees national monuments, National Natural Landmarks and as well as  smaller individual interpreted sites identified as significant by the field offices.  The BLM’s mission is to keep public landscapes healthy and productive for multiple use as well as protecting for future generations the country’s cultural and natural heritage.

Bio Sketch: Greg McDonald is a vertebrate paleontologist who currently serves as a regional paleontologist for the Bureau of Land Management.  Prior to the BLM he served in multiple positions in the National Park Service as the Senior Curator of Natural History, Paleontology Program Coordinator, and as paleontologist at Hagerman Fossil Beds National Monument.  While with the National Park Service, he served on the Special Resource Study team that resulted in the establishment of the Waco Mammoth National Monument.  Along with his research publications focusing on Plio-Pleistocene mammals of North and South America, he is a co-author of the book; The White River Badlands; Geology and Paleontology.

We encourage all participants to complete our survey following the webinar here: https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/5848448/Geoheritage-Management-on-Federal-Lands-September-22-Webinar



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ester Sztein
Contact Email:  esztein@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

"A Survey of Geoheritage Initiatives in the U.S." is the second webinar of the America's Geoheritage Workshop II Fall Distinguished Speakers Program.  To watch the recorded video of this webinar, please visit https://vimeo.com/459107323

Speaker: Thomas Casadevall

Title: Geoheritage in the United States

Description: With the designation of the world’s first national park at Yellowstone in 1872, the United States has had a long history of preserving sites of geological significance. America’s geoheritage continues to be protected at a variety of management levels.  In 2016 the U.S. National Academies of Science established the U.S. Advisory Group on Geoheritage and Geoparks, which advises the U.S. National Committee to the IUGS on matters related to America’s geoheritage.  The Advisory Group works with States, universities, and interested communities to promote and develop geoheritage projects and products and to represent U.S. interests on the global geoheritage stage.

Bio Sketch: Thomas Casadevall’s scientific interests focus on mineral resources related to volcanic environments; on active volcanism and the related hazards to people and aviation operations; and on geologic heritage with an emphasis on protected volcanic landscapes.  He currently leads the U.S. Geoheritage and Geoparks Advisory Group and recently completed the report “World Heritage Volcanoes” for the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).   Tom is a member of the IUCN's World Commission on Protected Areas and its Geoheritage Specialist Group.

Speaker: Timothy B. Connors

Title: America’s Geologic Heritage: An Invitation to Leadership (revisiting the 2015 joint National Park Service-American Geosciences Institute publication)

Description: This presentation will focus on summarizing a joint effort of the US National Park Service (Geologic Resources Division) and American Geosciences Institute published in 2015 that presented “Five Big Ideas” on America’s geologic heritage, with definitions of geologic heritage, geodiversity and geoconservation.

Bio Sketch: Timothy B. Connors is a Geologist with the U.S. National Park Service, Natural Resource Science and Stewardship Directorate, Geologic Resources Division in Lakewood, Colorado and has been with them since 1998. His main duties have involved developing digital GIS-based geologic maps of US National Park areas, as well as supporting databases on the unique geologic features, issues and processes of these park areas. He is very active in promoting the concept of Geologic Heritage Conservation and promoting areas rich in geologic features. He has worked in park areas in Alaska, Hawaii, Virgin Islands, and the whole lower 48 states, allowing him to become quite familiar with numerous geologic terranes, processes and features of this planet. He served on the Board of Directors for “The Friends of Dinosaur Ridge” in Morrison, Colorado, a local non-profit that supports the Morrison-Golden Fossil Areas National Natural Landmark from 1999-2014. He has taught geology courses at the University of Colorado (Denver) and Red Rocks Community College (Lakewood, Colorado). He earned both Bachelor of Science (1991) and Master of Science (1996) degrees in Geology from the University of Toledo (Ohio).

Speaker: Asier Hilario

Title: Geoheritage and UNESCO Global Geoparks: International Cooperation and Initiatives

Description: Our geological heritage contains the memory of the Earth that we must look after and preserve. UNESCO Global Geoparks have also demonstrated worldwide that geoheritage can be also a real tool for sustainable development based on local communities. Working together Geoheritage is a great opportunity for the visibility of the geological community.

Bio Sketch: Asier Hilario is a PhD geologist. He has been working on geoconservation, communication and geoparks since 2005, mainly as the scientific coordinator of the Basque Coast UNESCO Global Geopark and an active and renowned member of the Global Geoparks Network. He is a senior evaluator of the UNESCO Global Geoparks Program and belongs to several geoconservation associations. Since 2020 he has been in charge of chairing the new Commission of Geoheritage of the International Union of Geological Sciences, which aims to set global standard for the management of Geological heritage at international level.

We encourage all participants to complete our survey following the webinar here: https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/5832740/A-Survey-of-Geoheritage-Initiatives-in-the-U-S-September-15-Webinar



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ester Sztein
Contact Email:  esztein@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

"Celebrating America's Geoheritage" is the first webinar of the America's Geoheritage Workshop II Fall Distinguished Speakers Program. To watch the recorded video of this webinar, please visit https://vimeo.com/456320066.

Speaker: Tim Badman

Title: Geodiversity and Nature Conservation: an International Perspective

Description: A perspective on how geodiversity and geoheritage are being considered in the international nature conservation movement, including the opportunities, challenges and the possible place of American leadership in future prospects.

Bio Sketch: Tim Badman is the Director of International Union for Conservation of Nature’s (IUCN) newly established Nature-Culture Initiative, on sabbatical from his role as Director of IUCN's World Heritage Programme. He has been senior IUCN spokesperson on World Heritage, chair of the IUCN World Heritage Panel and Head of IUCN’s delegation at World Heritage Committee meetings since 2007. Tim speaks for IUCN on the special challenges of conserving geological sites and is IUCN’s representative on the Council of the UNESCO Global Geoparks Programme. Tim joined IUCN having worked as team leader of the Dorset and East Devon Coast World Heritage Site, UK. This role culminated in inscription of the site on the World Heritage List in 2001, and the subsequent development of the World Heritage programme on-site.

Speaker: Patty Limerick

Title: America’s Geoheritage:  A Legacy of a Conservation Ethic

Description: Dr. Limerick will present on the long legacy of the conservation movement in the United States. The current Geoheritage initiative is a natural continuation of this earlier work.  A particular focus of this presentation will be on personal and societal relations with the landscapes where we live, the value of natural spaces to society, and how natural and cultural heritage are necessarily connected.

Bio Sketch: Patty Limerick is the Faculty Director and Chair of the Board of the Center of the American West at the University of Colorado Boulder, where she is also a professor of environmental studies and history. In addition, Patty served as the Colorado State Historian and served on the National Endowment for the Humanities advisory board, The National Council on the Humanities. She is the author of Desert Passages, The Legacy of Conquest, Something in the Soil, and A Ditch in Time. A frequent public speaker and a columnist for The Denver Post, Limerick has dedicated her career to bridging the gap between academics and the general public, to demonstrating the benefits of applying historical perspective to contemporary dilemmas and conflicts, and to making the case for humor as an essential asset of the humanities. A recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship and the Hazel Barnes Prize (the University of Colorado’s highest award for teaching and research), she has served as president of the American Studies Association, the Western History Association, the Society of American Historians, and the Organization of American Historians, as well as the vice president for teaching of the American Historical Association. She received her B.A. from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and her Ph.D. from Yale University.

We encourage all participants to complete our survey following the webinar here: https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/5820115/Celebrating-America-s-Geoheritage-Webinar-Survey-September-8



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ester Sztein
Contact Email:  esztein@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

Publications

No data present.