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Project Information

Project Information


Sustaining Ocean Observations Phase 2: Workshop


Project Scope:

Phase 1

Maintaining long-term, continuous, ocean-data records for understanding, monitoring changes in, and modeling climate changes are essential, yet, challenging. An ad hoc committee will consider processes for identifying and characterizing the most critical, long-term ocean observations (including arrays of distributed platforms) and identify limitations of the current approaches.

When considering the various processes for selecting and characterizing high-priority, long-term ocean observations, the committee will discuss potential factors such as:

  • Accuracy, precision, frequency, and spatial resolution of observations;
  • Duration of observations (e.g., what criteria would be used to determine when observations should be sustained at high priority, are no longer needed for a given parameter or when an observation would be superseded by a different type of observation, for example through a new/different technology);
  • Inherent value and/or tradeoffs of increasing multidisciplinary observations across a limited number of networks/platforms vs initiating additional observing systems;
  • Complementarity of an observation to another set of observations (or network); and
  • Current or near-future technology that could be used to develop a more cost-effective observational system.

The committee's report will identify challenges to maintaining long-term observations and suggest avenues for potential improvement. During the study, the committee will convene a workshop to gather expert opinions on the process for prioritizing long-term, ocean climate observations and discuss international approaches to selecting and sustaining ocean observations, as well as other topics important for the design of sustainable, long-term ocean observing systems.

Phase 2 Workshop:
Based on the outcome of Phase 1, a separate ad hoc steering committee (with some overlap in membership with the Phase 1 committee) will be appointed to organize a workshop to discuss potential options for aligning resources to ensure continuity and quality of critical ocean observations over the long term. This Phase 2 committee will structure the workshop to cover a range of options for expanding support, such as public-private partnerships with industry and philanthropy. Other topics could include scientific oversight, coordination of U.S. and international observing initiatives, and diversification of funding. A summary of the presentations and discussions at the workshop will be prepared by a designated rapporteur in accordance with institutional guidelines.

Status: Current

PIN: DELS-OSB-19-01

RSO: Twigg, Emily

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Ocean Studies Board

Topic(s):

Earth Sciences



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership


Eric Lindstrom - (Co-Chair)
Eric Lindstrom is the Chief Scientist at Saildrone and oversees the organization’s new Ocean Observing Network. Previously, Dr. Lindstrom was the Physical Oceanography Program Scientist in the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C. Over the course of his 22 years with NASA, he worked with the QuikSCAT, Jason-2, Jason-3, SWOT and Aquarius satellite missions and was the leader for the Earth Science Division Climate Focus Area. He has degrees in Earth and Planetary Sciences from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1977) and Physical Oceanography from University of Washington (1983). His scientific interests include the circulation of the ocean and air-sea exchange processes and include extensive experience in both sea-going oceanography and remote sensing. He recently served as Co-chair of the international Global Ocean Observing System Steering Committee and Co-chair of the US Interagency Ocean Observations Committee. Recently, as Chair of the Ocean Observation Panel for Climate he helped establish a web site of ocean climate indices (http://ioc-goos-oopc.org/state_of_the_ocean/) and as co-chair of the Task Team for an Integrated Framework for Sustained Ocean Observations completed guidelines for system development entitled “The Framework for Ocean Observing” (http://www.oceanobs09.net/foo/). Eric Lindstrom is recipient of the 2013 American Geophysical Union Ocean Sciences Award for leadership and service to the ocean science community.
Robert A. Weller - (Co-Chair)
Robert Weller is a Senior Scientist with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where he formerly served as director of the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Climate and Ocean Research and past Chair of the Physical Oceanography Department. His research focuses on atmospheric forcing, surface waves on the upper ocean, prediction of upper ocean variability, and the ocean's role in climate. Dr. Weller has been a pioneer in developing tools and technologies that enable scientists to investigate upper ocean processes on scales from meters to tens of kilometers and with accuracy never before available. Dr. Weller has been on multiple mooring deployment cruises and has practical experience with ocean observation instruments. He served as co-chair of the U.S. Climate Variability and Change (CLIVAR) Scientific Steering Group and a member of the international CLIVAR Scientific Steering Group. He serves on the WMO/IOC international Ocean Observing Panel for Climate and the NOAA Climate Observing System Council and in the past on the Climate Working Group. He co-chaired OceanSITES, an action group under the international Joint Commission on Oceanography and Marine Meteorology, that works to advocate and coordinate sustained time series observations in the global ocean. He has served on several National Academies committees, including the Committee on Implementation of a Seafloor Observatory Network for Oceanographic Research, the Committee for Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan, and the Committee on Utilization of Environmental Satellite Data. He has also co-chaired the Committee on Sustaining Ocean Observations to Understand Future Changes in Earth's Climate and chaired the Committee on Assessment of lntraseasonal to lnterannual Climate Prediction and Predictability. Dr. Weller received his A.B. in Engineering and Applied Physics from Harvard University and Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
Molly McCammon
Molly McCammon is the Executive Director of the Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS), the Alaska regional component of the national Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) based in Anchorage. She is currently treasurer of the IOOS Association, a Consortium for Ocean Leadership trustee, and member of the national Ocean Research Advisory Panel. She is a past member of the National Academies' Polar Research Board and served on the Committee on Designing an Arctic Observing Network.She also served on the initial Advisory Group for the National Academies' Gulf Research Program. In Alaska, Ms. McCammon serves as the Municipality of Anchorage representative to the Cook Inlet Citizens Advisory Council and member of the Alaska Sea Grant Advisory Committee and Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy Steering Committee. Prior to her position at AOOS, she served for 10 years as the Executive Director of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council, managing the restoration program following the 1989 oil spill. McCammon moved to Alaska in 1973 after graduating from the University of California, Berkeley with a B.A. in Journalism.
David Millar
David Millar is Fugro’s Government Accounts Director for the Americas region. Based in the Washington, DC area, Mr. Millar serves as Fugro’s key account manager for the United States government, other national governments within the Americas Region, the United Nations, the World Bank and other Multilateral Development Banks. In this capacity, he is the primary interface between Fugro’s government customers and all of Fugro’s site characterization and asset integrity service offerings, across both the Land and Marine Divisions. He is responsible for overseeing the development and execution of Fugro’s long term strategic business development with public sector clients within the Americas Region and overseeing Fugro’s collaborative science (with government, academia and NGOs) activities within the Americas Region. Mr. Millar also leads Fugro’s global support of and participation in Seabed 2030 and the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development. In this capacity, he directs all of Fugro activities related to both Seabed 2030 and The Decade and serves as Fugro’s primary interface to the Nippon Foundation, the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans, the International Hydrographic Organization, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, and the United Nations. Mr. Millar is also a former Board Member of The Maritime Alliance and bears more than 30 years of ocean mapping, marine geophysical and hydrographic survey experience. He holds a B.Sc. in Math and Physics from Mount Allison University (1988) and a B.Sc.E. in Survey Engineering from the University of New Brunswick (1991).
Jan Newton
Jan Newton is a biological oceanographer at the University of Washington, whose primary research interests are productivity and fluxes within estuarine and coastal ocean systems, including how water column structure, climate variation and human-mediated activity affect the resulting ecosystem. She is also the director of the Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems, a position through which she seeks to bring knowledge of ocean conditions to stakeholders for their use in decision making in myriad contexts, safeguarding public economy, health, and safety. Dr. Newton continues to study multidisciplinary dynamics of Puget Sound and coastal Washington waters with an emphasis now on understanding effects from ocean acidification, marine heat waves, hypoxia, and harmful algal blooms. As an appointee to the Washington Blue Ribbon Panel on Ocean Acidification and the West Coast Panel on Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia, she is now co-Director of the Washington Ocean Acidification Center at the University of Washington and is researching ocean acidification and its effects in local waters. She is currently Senior Principal Oceanographer at the University of Washington’s Applied Physics Laboratory, and she received her MS and Ph.D. (both in Oceanography) from the same institution in 1984 and 1989, respectively.
Julie Pullen
Julie Pullen is Director of Product at Jupiter Intelligence, a start-up producing high-resolution projections of weather, water and climate impacts using cloud computing. She is also an adjunct research scientist at Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Previously Dr. Pullen was Associate Professor in Civil, Environmental, and Ocean Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology where she led the DHS- funded National Center for Maritime Security and held a joint appointment with the Environmental & Climate Sciences Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory. Her expertise spans climate, weather, hydroscience and air-sea interaction with a particular focus on high resolution coastal urban prediction for flooding, heatwaves and other perils. Dr. Pullen was part of the National Academies committee that reviewed the Fourth National Climate Assessment: Impacts, and was a member of the 2014-2016 National Academies committee on Earth System Prediction. She currently serves on the Steering Committee of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Commission on the Weather, Water, and Climate Enterprise and was recently elected to the AMS Council. Previously, she was the elected physical oceanography councilor for The Oceanography Society (2015-2018). Dr. Pullen is a board member of the Waterfront Alliance, a civic organization representing over 1000 groups with a stake in the NY/NJ waterfront, and is co-chair of the policy committee. She was a chapter co-author of the 2015 New York City Panel on Climate Change report. Dr. Pullen holds a master’s degree in applied mathematics from the University of Arizona (1993), a Ph.D. in physical oceanography from Oregon State University (2000), and conducted postdoctoral work in meteorology at the Naval Research Laboratory.
Raymond W. Schmitt
Raymond Schmitt is an Emeritus Research Scholar in Physical Oceanography at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where he was employed for over 40 years. His final positon was as a Senior Scientist where he held the Van Allen Clark Chair for Excellence in Oceanography. His research interests include the global water cycle, ocean mixing and observations as well as technology development. He holds a BS degree in Physics from Carnegie Mellon University (1972) and a PhD in Physical Oceanography from the University of Rhode Island (1978). He has published over one hundred papers which have received over 10,000 citations. He frequently advocates for improving and sustaining a global ocean observing system. He has served on the Ocean Studies Board of the National Academies and participated in the panel on America’s Climate Choices and was a member of the Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Assessment Committee. He has served on numerous advisory boards, currently including the Earth Science Advisory Committee of NASA. He recently led a father and son’s team to win a substantial cash prize in a year-long rainfall forecasting contest for the US West. This has led to the formation of a new company, Salient Predictions, Inc. that relies on ocean data and Machine Learning to make improved sub-seasonal to seasonal rainfall forecasts on land.
Mark Tercek
Mark Tercek served as the Chief Executive Officer of The Nature Conservancy from July 2008 to June 2019. Prior to that, he was managing director and partner for Goldman Sachs, where he spent 24 years. Currently he is an independent consultant advising companies, investors, and NGOs on environmental strategies. In 2012, Mr. Tercek was appointed by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo to serve on the New York State 2100 Commission, which was created in the wake of Superstorm Sandy to advise the governor and the state on how to make the state's infrastructure more resilient to future storms. He is currently a member of several boards and councils, including the President's Advisory Council for Resources for the Future, the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, Harvard Business School's Social Enterprise Initiative, the China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development, the Rockefeller Foundation Economic Council on Planetary Health, Acumen, AXA Stakeholders Advisory Panel, and the Ecosperity Advisory Group. He serves on the Williams College Board of Trustees and was on the finance faculty of New York University's Stern School of Business until 2008. Mr. Tercek also regularly writes and speaks at conferences on environmental topics. He is a champion of the idea of natural capital — valuing nature for its own sake as well as for the services it provides for people, such as clean air and water, productive soils and a stable climate. He is the author of the Washington Post and Publisher's Weekly bestselling book Nature's Fortune: How Business and Society Thrive by Investing in Nature. Mr. Tercek earned an M.B.A. from Harvard in 1984 and a B.A. from Williams College in 1979.

Events



Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-




If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Emily Twigg
Contact Email:  etwigg@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2351

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
TeleConference

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Emily Twigg
Contact Email:  etwigg@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2351

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Robert A. Weller
Eric Lindstrom
Raymond Schmitt
Julie Pullen
Jan Newton
David Millar
Mark Tercek
Molly McCammon

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Planning for the Jan. 21-22 Scoping Meeting

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
January 16, 2020
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
TeleConference

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Emily Twigg
Contact Email:  etwigg@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2351

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Robert Weller
Eric Lindstrom
Raymond Schmitt
Julie Pullen
Jan Newton
David Millar
Mark Tercek
Molly McCammon

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

NASEM Background Info
Project Team Members (Planning Committee + Staff)
Project Team Roles
Role of the Sponsor
Summary of the purpose of SOO Phase 1
Committee Composition and Balance Discussion
Phase 2 Statement of Task
Timeline
Related Events

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

"SOO2 First Committee Call" slides
"Workshop Committee Composition and Balance" slides

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
December 20, 2019
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

Publications

No data present.