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Project Information

Project Information


Panel on Review of In-house Laboratory Independent Research in Mechanical Sciences at the Army's Research, Development, and Engineering Centers


Project Scope:

Under the oversight of the Board on Army Research and Development (BOARD), a committee to be named the Research Program Review and Analysis Committee (RPAC) will review a subset of the Army's research programs.  This continual review will include research activities at all RDECs (Army Research, Development and Engineering Centers), ERDC (Army Engineer Research and Development Center), MRMC (Medical Research and Materiel Command), ARI (Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences), and SMDTC (Space and Missile Defense Technical Center); but not PEOs (Program Executive Offices).  Currently, some reviews of this nature exist (examples being the National Academies reviews of the Army Research Laboratory and programs that are not in a Science & Technology Objective (STO) or Army Capability Enabler [ACE]), and this is not to be a duplication of what exists.

 

At the completion of each program review (each program review is anticipated to be completed within a year) the RPAC will deliver a program review report summarizing the findings of its review.  Each program review report will be prepared by the RPAC on the basis of inputs received from its review subcommittees.  

 

For the first year of the RPACs reviews, the following eight panels will be appointed, each of which will review one of eight areas of research conducted at the RDECs:

Panel on Review of In-house Laboratory Independent Research in Chemistry at the Army’s Research, Development, and Engineering Centers

  • Panel on Review of In-house Laboratory Independent Research in Computational Sciences at the Army’s Research, Development, and Engineering Centers
  • Panel on Review of In-house Laboratory Independent Research in Electronics at the Army’s Research, Development, and Engineering Centers
  • Panel on Review of In-house Laboratory Independent Research in Life Sciences at the Army’s Research, Development, and Engineering Centers
  • Panel on Review of In-house Laboratory Independent Research in Materials Sciences at the Army’s Research, Development, and Engineering Centers
  • Panel on Review of In-house Laboratory Independent Research in Mechanical Sciences at the Army’s Research, Development, and Engineering Centers
  • Panel on Review of In-house Laboratory Independent Research in Network Sciences at the Army’s Research, Development, and Engineering Centers
  • Panel on Review of In-house Laboratory Independent Research in Physics at the Army’s Research, Development, and Engineering Centers
    •  The current description is for the Panel on Review of In-house Laboratory Independent Research in Mechanical Sciences at the Army’s Research, Development, and Engineering Centers

      These first-year reviews will not require access to classified or otherwise restricted information.

       

      Status: Current

      PIN: DEPS-BOARD-18-01

      Project Duration (months): 12 month(s)

      RSO: McGee, Jim

      Topic(s):

      Computers and Information Technology
      Engineering and Technology
      Health and Medicine
      Math, Chemistry, and Physics



      Geographic Focus:

      Committee Membership

      Committee Post Date: 10/22/2018

      William A. Sirignano - (Chair)
      WILLIAM A. SIRIGNANO (NAE) is Henry Samueli Endowed Chair of Engineering at the University of California, Irvine. His research and teaching interests have covered the topics of spray and droplet science and technology, combustion, aerospace propulsion, combustion instability, noise suppression and applied mathematics. His research accomplishments include analyzing and predicting periodic nonlinear oscillations with shockwaves in an unstable combustor; analysis of driving mechanisms for combustion instability in rockets and ramjets; explanation of the nonlinear fluid dynamics associated with Helmholtz resonators; determination of admittance for oscillatory, three-dimensional nozzle flows; theory for flame spread above liquid and solid fuels; theory for ignition of combustible gas by a hot projectile; resolution of turbulent flame and propagation in reciprocating and rotary internal combustion engines; theory of droplet vaporization and convective heating with internal circulation; computational methods for spray flows; theory of droplet interactions in a dense spray; liquid atomization theory; and miniature combustor technology. Dr. Sirignano earned a B.S. in aerospace engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and an M.A. and Ph.D. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University.
      Carlos E. Cesnik
      CARLOS E.S. CESNIK is professor of aerospace engineering and director of the Active Aeroelasticity and Structures Research Laboratory at the University of Michigan. He also directs the Airbus-Michigan Center for Aero-Servo-Elasticity of Very Flexible Aircraft. His research focuses on computational and experimental aeroelasticity of very flexible wings, coupled nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamic response in hypersonic vehicles and high-altitude long-endurance aircraft, and aeromechanics and active vibration and noise reductions in helicopters. Dr. Cesnik is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and is the current director for AIAA’s Aerospace Design and Structures Group. He earned a Ph.D. from Georgia Institute of Technology in aeromechanics.
      Inderjit Chopra
      INDERJIT CHOPRA is the Alfred Gessow professor in aerospace engineering and director of the Alfred Gessow Rotorcraft Center at the University of Maryland, where he acted as department chair from 1988-1990, and was the Minta Martin Research professor from 1996-2000. He has been working on various fundamental problems related to the aeromechanics of helicopters including: aeromechanical stability, active vibration control, modeling of composite blades, rotor head health monitoring, aeroelastic optimization, smart structures, micro air vehicles; and comprehensive aeromechanics analyses of bearingless, tilt-rotor, servo-flap, compound, teetering and circulation control rotors. He has been the principal investigator of four major Army research programs: a University Research Initiative (URI) on Smart-Structures Technology, a Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) on Innovative Smart Technologies for Actively Controlled Jet-Smooth Rotorcraft, the Rotary-Wing Center of Excellence (co-sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA]) and a MURI on Micro Hovering Air Vehicles. An author of 150 archival journal papers and 234 conference proceedings papers, Dr. Chopra has been an associate editor of the Journal of the American Helicopter Society, AIAA Journal of Aircraft and Journal of Intelligent Materials and Systems and has served on the editorial advisory boards of VERTICA, Smart Materials and Structures, SADHANA and the Journal of Aircraft. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the American Helicopter Society (AHS), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the Aeronautical Society of India (ASI) and of the National Institute of Aerospace (NIA). He received his Sc.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in aero and astromechanics.
      Pino Martin
      PINO MARTIN is associate professor at CRoCCo Laboratory and Director of the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland. Her research interests are in computational fluid dynamics; numerical simulation of turbulent flows; direct numerical and large eddy simulation; numerical models for large eddy simulations and Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes calculations; numerical methods for compressible turbulence, physics of compressible turbulence; shock waves and turbulence interaction; turbulence and finite-rate chemistry interaction; and surface reactions and fluid interactions. She earned a B. Eng. in aerospace engineering at Boston University, and M.S. and Ph.D. in aerospace engineering at University of Minnesota.
      Parviz Moin
      PARVIZ MOIN (NAS/NAE) is the Franklin P. and Caroline M. Johnson professor of engineering at Stanford University. He founded the Center for Turbulence Research (CTR), widely recognized as the international focal point for turbulence research. He also founded the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering at Stanford. He is a co-editor of the Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics, and associate editor of the Journal of Computational Physics, and the Physics of Fluids. Dr. Moin pioneered the use of direct and large eddy simulation techniques for the study of turbulence physics, as well as control and modeling concepts, and has written widely on the structure of turbulent shear flows. His research interests include: aerodynamic noise and hydro-acoustics, flow control and optimization, large eddy simulation, turbulent combustion, aero-optics, parallel computing and numerical methods. Dr. Moin is a member of National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts and Science. He is a fellow of American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the American Physical Society (APS). Dr. Moin received his Ph.D. in mathematics and mechanical engineering from Stanford University.
      Kenneth M. Rosen
      KENNETH M. ROSEN (NAE) is President of Aero-Science Technology Associates, LLC (ASTA) organized in 2002. ASTA is an engineering and business development consulting firm established to service both government and industry customers. his recent list of clients includes many major aerospace, renewable energy, turbo machinery, and telecommunications companies as well as government agencies. He has over fifty years of experience in the aerospace, propulsion, turbo machinery, manufacturing and systems engineering community much of which has been at the leadership level. His professional expertise includes: helicopter; ducted fan; and UAV V/STOL design; systems engineering and avionics integration; advanced propulsion systems; product and business development; wind turbine design and economics; program management; network centric warfare; engine installation design; turbo-machinery; low observable technology; transmission and rotor design; pneumodynamics; icing; and aerothermodynamics and renewable energy. He has frequently served the Department of Defense (the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s [DARPA’s] Tactical Technology Office [TTO]) as a senior advisor supporting such advanced aerospace research programs as University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Heliplane, and the Heavy Lift Helicopter. He helped prepare the Future of Vertical Lift Aviation study for the U.S. Army and DARPA. He is an elected member of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering, and is a fellow of in the following societies: the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the Royal Aeronautical Society, the Society of Automotive Engineers, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the American Helicopter Society. He holds five U.S. patents and has written numerous papers in the fields of helicopter design, tilt rotor optimization, product development, propulsion, aero-thermodynamics, icing, and systems engineering. Dr. Rosen earned a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
      Alexander J. Smits
      ALEXANDER SMITS (NAE) is the Eugene Higgins professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering emeritus at Princeton University. His principal scholarly interests are in fundamental, experimental research in turbulence and fluid mechanics. He is interested in the behavior of low and high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers at subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic speeds; shock-wave and turbulent boundary layer interactions; the effects of roughness on wall-bounded turbulent flows; flow control; Taylor-Couette flows; biomimetic flows; sports ball aerodynamics, and the development of new and improved measurement techniques. His work has application to the design of more efficient vehicles, improving the prediction of turbulent flows in pipes, channels and boundary layers, including heat, mass and momentum transport in atmospheric surface flows, and high-speed flows over supersonic and hypersonic vehicles. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Australasian Fluid Mechanics Society. In 2015 he became the editor-in-chief of the AIAA Journal. He has authored or co-authored 3 books and more than 400 journal and conference papers. Dr. Smits earned a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Melbourne University in Australia.

      Events


      Event Type :  
      Meeting

      Description :   

      Meeting of the Panel on Review of In-house Laboratory Independent Research in Mechanical Sciences at the Army's Research, Development, and Engineering Centers.


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      Supporting File(s)
      -
      Is it a Closed Session Event?
      Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

      Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

      The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

      William A. Sirignano
      Carlos E.S. Cesnik
      Pino Martin
      Parviz Moin
      Kenneth M. Rosen
      Alexander J. Smits

      The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

      Panel discussed the assessment process.

      The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

      None.

      Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
      January 02, 2019
      Publication(s) resulting from the event:

      -

      Publications

      • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
      Publications

      No data present.