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Project Information

Project Information


Contingent Work and Alternate Work Arrangements


Project Scope:

The Statement of Task was revised on 6/25/2019:
The Committee on National Statistics of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will appoint an expert panel to review the Contingent Worker Supplement (CWS) of the Current Population Survey (CPS) for the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) in the U.S. Department of Labor. The CWS provides key measures of temporary (contingent) work, alternative work arrangements, and the “gig” economy. Disagreements, however, exist among researchers, policy makers, and other stakeholders about the definitions and measures of these concepts and priorities for future data collection. 

The expert panel’s work and consensus recommendations will be guided by the current research and policy questions that need to be answered. Many of these questions arise from concerns about the economic and health impacts of modern work arrangements on the population, which are rapidly evolving in response to emerging technologies, the changing sectoral composition of the economy, and the shifting boundaries of where, how, and by whom work is performed. 

The expert panel will carefully review measures of employment, earnings, and worker wellbeing in temporary and alternative work arrangements that can be estimated using household survey data, such as those generated by the CWS, as well as measures that can be produced using administrative, commercial, and combined data sources.  The comparative advantages and complementarities of different data sources will be assessed. In addition, the expert panel will review methodological issues underpinning BLS’s measurement objectives.  As part of its information-gathering activities, the panel will conduct a workshop to hear the perspectives of data users, stakeholders, and both survey and non-survey data experts. 
The panel will produce a consensus report, which will include rapporteur-authored proceedings of the workshop along with conclusions and recommendations for BLS to guide continued improvement of the CWS.


Status: Current

PIN: DBASSE-CNSTAT-18-07

Project Duration (months): 18 month(s)

RSO: Harris-Kojetin, Brian

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Committee on National Statistics

Topic(s):

Behavioral and Social Sciences
Surveys and Statistics



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 02/21/2019

Susan N. Houseman - (Chair)
Is vice president and director of research at the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. She also serves as research fellow at the Institute of Labor Economics (IZA) and as a member of the National Bureau of Economic Research, Conference on Research in Income and Wealth. Dr. Houseman is chair of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Technical Advisory Committee, member of the American Economic Association Committee on Government Relations, and co-director of the Institute of Labor Economics (Program on Labor Statistics). She is an expert on temporary help employment, outsourcing, and nonstandard work arrangements, and her research has examined trends in employers’ use of these arrangements and their implications for workers’ wages, benefits, and employment stability. Dr. Houseman’s research also includes outsourcing and offshoring and older workers and retirement issues and comparative labor market policies. She has written extensively on such topics as employment, worker compensation, and offshoring. She has a B.A. degree in economics from the University of Virginia, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Harvard University.
Katharine G. Abraham
Is professor of economics and survey methodology at the University of Maryland, College Park. She formerly served as chair of the Commission on Evidence-based Policymaking, as a member of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, and as commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. She is also president-elect of the Society of Labor Economists, chair of the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth, and coordinator of the Program on Labor Market Statistics at IZA. Professor Abraham serves as a member of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago academic advisory committee, the Congressional Budget Office panel of economic advisors, and the Bureau of Economic Analysis advisory committee. She is also on the editorial board of the ILR Review. As a labor economist, Professor Abraham’s work has focused on the effects of labor market institutions on firms and workers, labor market adjustment over the business cycle, and the measurement of economic activity. She has a B.S. degree in economics from Iowa State University, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.
Annette Bernhardt
Is director of the Low-wage Work Program at the UC Berkeley Labor Center, and senior researcher at the UC Berkeley Institute for Research on Labor and Employment. She sits on numerous advisory committees and boards for non-profits, research projects, and foundation initiatives. Professor Bernhardt was one of the principal investigators of the landmark study Broken Laws, Unprotected Workers, which documented high rates of minimum wage, overtime, and other workplace violations in the low-wage labor market. Her current research focuses on domestic outsourcing, the gig economy, and the impact of new technologies on low-wage work. She is widely published with her work appearing in such journals as the American Journal of Sociology; American Sociological Review; and Journal of Labor Economics. Professor Bernhardt has a B.A. degree in sociology from Columbia University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Chicago.
Jennifer Dykema
Is distinguished scientist/survey methodologist at the University of Wisconsin Survey Center (UWSC). She serves as associate editor of BMC Medical Research Methodology and as ad hoc reviewer for such publications as Annals of Applied Statistics, Demography, Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Social Science Research, and Field Methods. Professor Dykema is on the AAPOR advisory committee of Public Opinion Quarterly and holds membership to the American Sociological Association, American Association for Public Opinion Research, Center for Demography and Ecology, and Midwest Association for Public Opinion Research. Her research and teaching interests include survey research methods, questionnaire design, quantitative methods, social demography, family, social psychology, and emotion and cognition. Professor Dykema has a B.A. degree in sociology and psychology from the University of Michigan, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Diana Farrell
Is founding president and chief executive officer of the JPMorgan Chase Institute. Prior to this, she was senior partner at McKinsey & Company where she was global head of the McKinsey Center for Government and the McKinsey Global Institute. Ms. Farrell served in the White House as deputy director of the National Economic Council and as deputy assistant to the President on Economic Policy (2009-2011). During her tenure, she led interagency processes and stakeholder management on a broad portfolio of economic initiatives, including financial reform, housing, and innovation. Ms. Farrell currently serves on the board of directors for eBay, The Urban Institute, and the National Bureau of Economic Research. In addition, she is trustee emeritus of Wesleyan University, trustee of the Trilateral Commission, and served as a co-chair of the World Economic Forum’s Council on Economic Progress. She holds membership to the Council on Foreign Relations, Economic Club of New York, Bretton Woods Committee, the Aspen Strategy Group, and the Bretton Woods Committee. Currently, she serves as a member of the Committee on National Statistics at NASEM. Ms. Farrell has a B.A. degree in economics from Wesleyan University, and an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School.
Arne L. Kalleberg
Is Kenan distinguished professor of sociology, adjunct professor of public policy, adjunct professor of global studies, and adjunct professor of management, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Professor Kalleberg also serves as distinguished research fellow in the Center for Strategy and Leadership at the Foundation for Research in Economics and Business Administration in Bergen, Norway. His research interests focus on the sociology of work, the economy and society, social stratification, and quantitative methods. Currently, he serves as editor-in-chief of Social Forces, an international journal of social research, and on the editorial board of numerous publications including Research in the Sociology of Work, Behavioral Science and Policy, and Management Revue. Professor Kalleberg holds membership of many professional organizations, including: American Sociological Association; Sociological Research Association; Academy of Management; Association for Psychological Science; and Population Association of America. He served as president of the American Sociological Association from 2007 to 2008. Professor Kalleberg has a B.A. degree in sociology from the Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Kristen M. Olson
Is Leland J. and Dorothy H. Olson professor in sociology, and associate professor and vice chair in the Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Professor Olson’s research includes examining interviewer effects, paradata, the intersection of nonresponse and measurement errors (within-household selection in self-administered surveys), and questionnaire design. Her work has appeared in numerous journals, including: Public Opinion Quarterly; Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series A, Sociological Methods and Research; Social Science Research; Journal of Survey Statistics and Methodology; Journal of Official Statistics; and Field Methods. Professor Olson serves on the editorial board of several publications including Sociological Methodology, and The Sociological Quarterly, and holds membership to organizations such as the American Sociological Association, and American Association for Public Opinion Research. She is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association. She has a B.A. degree in mathematical methods in the social sciences and sociology from Northwestern University, an M.S. degree in survey methodology from the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland, College Park, and a Ph.D. in survey methodology from the University of Michigan.
Barbara J. Robles
Is principal economist in the Consumer and Community Research Unit for the Federal Reserve Board in Washington, DC. Her research interests include monetary policy and community economic development and Internet research and regional economic development. Her professional affiliations include the American Economic Association, American Statistical Association, Urban Economics Association, and American Association for Public Opinion Researchers (AAPOP). Dr. Robles has served as referee for numerous publications, including: American Economic Review; Journal of Family and Economic Issues; Journal of Consumer Education; Sociological Quarterly; International Migration Review; and Journal of Consumer Affairs. She has written and presented extensively on such topics as Latino employment and entrepreneurship, the Gig economy, and low-income communities. Dr. Robles has a B.A. degree in humanities from the University of Texas at Austin, and a Ph.D in economics from the University of Maryland, College Park.
Michael R. Strain
Is John G. Searle scholar and director of economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) in Washington, DC. He oversees the Institute’s work in economic policy, financial markets, poverty studies, technology policy, energy economics, health care policy, and related areas. Dr. Strain also serves as a research fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), research affiliate at the Economic Self-sufficiency Policy Research Institute, and member of the Poverty, Employment, and Economic Self-sufficiency Policy Research Institute at the University of California, Irvine. His research focuses on labor economics, public finance, and social policy, and his papers have been published in peer-reviewed academic journals and policy journals such as Tax Notes and National Affairs. He is editor of The U.S. Labor Market: Questions and Challenges for Public Policy and coeditor of Economic Freedom and Human Flourishing: Perspectives from Political Philosophy. Dr. Strain writes frequently for popular audiences, and his essays and op-eds have been published by The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, National Review, and The Weekly Standard. He is a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion. He has a B.A. degree from Marquette University, an M.A. degree from New York University, and a Ph.D. in economics from Cornell University.
David Weil
Is dean and professor at The Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. Prior to joining the Heller School, he served as administrator of the Wage and Hour Division at the United States Department of Labor. He is an internationally recognized expert in employment and labor market policy along with regulation, transparency policy and digital empowerment, and the impacts of industry restructuring on employment and work outcomes and business performance. Professor Weil co-founded and co-directed the Transparency Policy Project at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and has advised international organizations as well as government agencies at the state and federal levels. He is the author of more than 100 articles and five books. Recently, Professor Weil was awarded the Father Edward F. Boyle Award, Cushing-Gavin Award of the Labor Guild, Archdiocese of Boston. He has B.A. degree from Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations, an M.A. degree in public policy from the Kennedy School, and a Ph.D. in public policy from Harvard.

Events



Location:


Federal Reserve Bank
230 S. LaSalle St.
Chicago, IL, 60604
USA

Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Anthony Mann
Contact Email:  amann@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3266

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Katharine Abraham
Annette Bernhardt (by phone)
Jennifer Dykema
Susan Houseman (Chair)
Arne Kalleberg
Kristen Olson
David Weil

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Report chapters' outlines

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 10, 2019
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Anthony Mann
Contact Email:  amann@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3266

Agenda
CW Agenda

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Abraham
Katharine
Bernhardt
Annette
Dykema
Jennifer
Houseman
Susan (chair)
Kalleberg
Arne
Olson
Kristen
Robles
Barbara
Weil
David

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Reflections on previous day's presentations
Report structure and writing plan
Future meetings and project timeline

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
June 11, 2019
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Description :   

During the public session, BLS leadership will outline their goals for the study and their motivation for commissioning it. Presentations by BLS experts describing the history, measurement objectives, and past performance of the Contingent Worker Supplement (CWS) of the Current Population Survey (CPS) will follow. Strengths and weaknesses of household surveys, and the CPS in particular, for the purpose of measuring contingent work will be identified. Committee members will offer brief statements highlighting their interests in and work on the topic and preliminary assessments of what the key issues are for advancing measurement of alternative work generally, and improving the BLS programs specifically. Time will also be allocated for a discussion among panel members and sponsor representatives to sharpen the project statement of task and to discuss content of the meeting #2 workshop. The final portion of the meeting will take place in closed session to complete institutional requirements (specifically, the bias and conflict of interest discussion) and revisit issues raised in open session.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Anthony Mann
Contact Email:  amann@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3266

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Katharine Abraham
Annette Bernhardt
Jennifer Dykema
Diana Farrell
Susan Houseman
Kristen Olson
Barbara Robles
David Weil

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Overview of the National Academies Study Process
Panel Member Bias and Conflict of Interest Discussion
Reflect on the Scope of the Study, and Amend Panel Charge As Needed
Next Steps: Plans for the Workshop, Study Timeline, and Future Meeting Dates

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
April 03, 2019
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.