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Project Information

Project Information


Consideration of Generational Issues in Workforce Management and Employment Practices


Project Scope:

An ad hoc committee will gather, review, and discuss the business management and the behavioral science literature on generational attitudes and behaviors in workforce management and employment practices.  The committee will:

1.    Evaluate theory, data and statistical methods used in order to make determinations on the rigor of the empirical work in this literature.

2.    Assess whether generational categories (e.g., “boomers,” “millennials”) are meaningful distinctions vis a vis the workforce and its practices.  Included issues will be: recruitment, selection, assignment, training, learning, performance management, length of tenure in a job, and retention. 

3.    Provide conclusions and recommendations in terms of proposing a possible science agenda and/or changes that are warranted to better recruit and retain the best employees.

 

A consensus report will be produced and disseminated.

Status: Current

PIN: DBASSE-BBCSS-18-06

Project Duration (months): 24 month(s)

RSO: Schuck, Julie

Topic(s):

Behavioral and Social Sciences



Geographic Focus:
North America

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 04/09/2019

Nancy T. Tippins - (Chair)
Nancy T. Tippins is a principal at The Nancy T. Tippins Group, LLC. She has more than 30 years of experience as an industrial and organizational psychologist, both as an internal consultant and external consultant to a variety of industries. Her work has encompassed the study of employment practices, including executive coaching, job analysis, competency development, selection, training, manager and executive assessment, employee and management development, succession planning, compensation, complaint procedures, and other EEO-related policies and procedures. She has a longstanding involvement with the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, including past president. In addition, she served on the ad hoc committee on the revision of the Principles for the Validation and Use of Personnel Selection Procedures and co-chaired the committee for the last revision of the Principles. She was one of the U.S. representatives on the ISO 9000 committee to establish international testing standards. She also served on the joint committee to revise the Standards for Educational and Psychological Tests. She received a B.A. in history from Agnes Scott College, an M.Ed. in counseling and psychological services from Georgia State University, and a M.S. and Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Eric M. Anderman
Eric M. Anderman is professor at The Ohio State University, with appointments in educational psychology and the quantitative research, evaluation, and measurement program. Previously, he held faculty and administrator positions at the University of Kentucky. His research over the past 25 years has focused on learning and motivation. While much of his research has focused on student motivation, he is also interested in how learning progresses in work contexts. In his role chair of The Department of Educational Studies at Ohio State, he administered 13 graduate programs, including a highly ranked online degree program. He has also participated in and chaired a coalition of psychologists working to translate psychological science and solve problems associated with schools and education. In addition, he has been tapped for his expertise by the Institute for Education Sciences, the American Psychological Association, and the American Educational Research Association, on problems of motivation and optimal contexts for social and behavioral research. He received his Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Michigan.
John Baugh
John Baugh is the Margaret Bush Wilson Professor in Arts and Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, where he holds academic appointments in psychological and brain sciences, anthropology, linguistics, education, English, African and African American Studies, American culture studies, philosophy-neuroscience-psychology, and urban studies. His previous academic appointments were at Swarthmore College, The University of Texas at Austin, and Stanford University where he is professor emeritus of education and linguistics. His research evaluates the social stratification of linguistic diversity in advanced industrial societies with relevance to matters of policy in education, medicine, and law. He is best known for advancing studies of linguistic profiling and various forms of linguistic discrimination. He received a B.A. in speech and communication at Temple University, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania.
Margaret E. Beier
Margaret E. Beier is an associate professor in the department of psychological sciences at Rice University. Her research interests lie at the intersection of aging, lifelong learning and development, and work. In particular, she examines the motivation and ability determinants of performance at different stages of the work lifespan (from school to work and work to retirement). Her work examines the effectiveness of various educational interventions and the interaction of individual factors and these interventions on learning and noncognitive outcomes such as self-efficacy, self-concept, and interests. She is a member of the American Educational Research Association, a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, and a fellow of Division 14 of the American Psychological Association (Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychologists). She received her M.S. and Ph.D. in psychology from the Georgia Institute of Technology.


Dana H. Born
Dana H. Born is a retired Brigadier General with 30 years of service in the United States Air Force, is currently a lecturer in public policy at Harvard Kennedy School of Government. She is also co-director of the Center for Public Leadership and faculty chair of the Senior Executive Fellows Program. Prior to coming to Harvard, she served two terms as the presidentially appointed Dean of the Faculty at the United States Air Force Academy where she was also a professor and the head of the behavioral sciences and leadership department. Previously, she served as an exchange officer with the Royal Australian Air Force; assistant director for recruiting research and analysis for the Assistant Secretary of Defense; deputy chief of the Personnel Issues Team for the Department of the Air Force; aide and speech writer to the Secretary of the Air Force; squadron commander for 11th Mission Support Squadron at Bolling Air Force Base; and in Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. She received her B.S. in behavioral sciences and M.S. in experimental psychology from Trinity University, M.A. in research psychology from University of Melbourne, and Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from Penn State University.
Chandra Childers
Chandra Childers is a study director at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, an organization that advances women’s status through research, policy analysis, and public education. She conducts original research using both qualitative and quantitative methods. Her research uses an intersectional lens to examine women’s and men’s employment, earnings, and job quality; the impacts of technology (automation/AI/digitalization) on labor market experiences now and in the future; and issues and concerns for women and girls of color. This includes a study of unemployment during and after the recession for millennial women and the impact of automation on the future of work for older women. Previously, she was a pre-doctoral lecturer at the University of Washington where she taught a range of courses including the research practicum and provided research support for projects that included employment discrimination cases. She has a M.S. in human development from Texas Tech University and received her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Washington—Seattle.
Brent Donnellan
Brent Donnellan is a professor of psychology at Michigan State University and serves as the department chairperson. Before returning to Michigan State in 2018, he was a professor of psychology at Texas A&M University. His research investigates questions at the intersections of developmental psychology, personality psychology, and psychological assessment. He is also interested in methodological reform in psychological science. He has published several papers about the size and strength of the evidence for generational shifts in individual characteristics including personality, self-esteem, and other attitudes. He is currently a co-lead on a study investigating how experiences in the workplace are associated with personality trait development. He is also the senior editor for the personality section for Collabra: Psychology. He received his Ph.D. in human development from the University of California, Davis.


Armando X. Estrada
Armando X. Estrada is an assistant professor in the department of policy, organizational and leadership studies at Temple University. His research expertise centers on the assessment of job attitudes and behaviors; training development and evaluation; and strategic planning and assessment. His research examines (1) factors influencing the diversity, inclusion and engagement with particular focus on women and minorities in civilian and military organizations; and (2) factors influencing leadership, teamwork and performance with particular focus on cohesion, readiness, resilience and effectiveness of collectives in civilian and military organizations. He previously served as a program manager and senior research psychologist with the Foundational Science Research Unit of the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences. Before his government service, he spent much of his career in academia as a tenured professor within several institutions including Washington State University; U.S. Naval Postgraduate School; Industrial College of the Armed Forces; and National Defense University. He earned a B.S. and M.S. in psychology from the California State University at Los Angeles and received his Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology at the University of Texas at El Paso.
Brian Hoffman
Brian Hoffman is a professor in the department of psychology and the chair of the industrial-organizational psychology program at the University of Georgia. His research and publications cover a range of topics,
including the changing nature of work and workers, the assessment and prediction of effective leadership, and the application of management principles to sports settings. His primary research interest revolves
around the measurement and prediction of human performance, with a specific emphasis on evaluating the skills and behaviors associated with effective leadership. His work focuses on measuring visionary leadership,
managerial skills, and altruism at work. He is a fellow of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology and currently serves as an associate editor of the Journal of Management. He received his Ph.D.
in industrial and organizational psychology from the University of Tennessee.

Arne L. Kalleberg
Arne L. Kalleberg is the Kenan Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was previously a professor of sociology at Indiana University. His research focuses on understanding how work structures and institutions shape individual work lives, rewards, and experiences. He is the author of numerous publications on topics related to the sociology of work, organizations, occupations and industries, labor markets, and social stratification. He is an active member of the American Sociological Association, including past president and secretary. He is currently the editor of Social Forces, an international journal of social research. He has served on several National Academies committees related to the changing nature of work and future skill demands. He received his B.A. from Brooklyn College and his M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.
Ruth Kanfer
Ruth Kanfer is professor of psychology in the school of psychology at Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research, which focuses on the influence of motivation, personality, and emotion in workplace behavior, job performance, and worker well-being, has examined the impact of these people factors and situational constraints as they affect skill training, job search, teamwork, job performance, and the development of workplace competencies. Recent projects have focused on adult development and workforce gaining, job search–employment relations, motivation in and of teams, and person determinants of cross-cultural effectiveness. She is director of the Work Science Center and codirector of the Kanfer-Ackerman laboratory, which conducts longitudinal and large-scale laboratory and field collaborative projects on topics such as workforce aging, work adjustment, cognitive fatigue, skill acquisition, adult development and career trajectories, and self-regulated learning. She received her Ph.D. in psychology from Arizona State University.
Maria Lytell
Maria Lytell is a senior behavioral scientist and an associate director of the Personnel, Training, and Health Program in the RAND Arroyo Center at the RAND Corporation in Arlington, Virginia. She leads and contributes to RAND projects related to workforce issues, with recent topics including diversity in the U.S. military, physical ability requirements for U.S. Air Force personnel, and proficiency of U.S. Army enlisted intelligence analysts. She served on the research staff of the Military Leadership Diversity Commission, a large commission mandated by the U.S. Congress to recommend how the U.S. military can increase diversity in its top ranks. Previously, she studied sexual harassment and organizational climate, particularly in the U.S. military. She also completed two internships as a graduate student, one for a private firm designing
personnel selection systems and the other for a U.S. state-level government office refining civil service job classification series. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. in industrial-organizational psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Michael North
Michael S. North is an assistant professor of management and organizations at New York University Stern School of Business. His research focuses primarily on age, ageism, generational issues, and related management and policy applications. He is the founding director of the Accommodating Generations in Employment (AGE) Initiative that conducts research pertaining to the increasingly older and intergenerational workplace and workforce. His work is aimed at identifying strategies for businesses, policy, and society to adapt to multigenerational workforce trends. He was recently designated a Rising Star by the Association for Psychological Science. He received his B.A. in psychology from the University of Michigan and his Ph.D. in psychology and social policy from Princeton University.
Joanne Spetz
Joanne Spetz is a professor at the Institute for Health Policy Studies, Department of Family and Community Medicine, and School of Nursing at the University of California, San Francisco. She is the associate director for research at the Healthforce Center at UCSF and the director of the UCSF Health Workforce Research Center for Long-Term Care. Her fields of specialty are economics of the health care workforce, shortages and supply of registered nurses, organization and quality of the hospital industry, impact of health information technology, effect of medical marijuana policy on youth substance use, and the treatment of substance use disorder. She was a member of the Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Credentialing Research in Nursing and a consultant to the Institute of Medicine Committee on the Future of Nursing. After studying economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, she received her Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University.
Mo Wang
Mo Wang is the Lanzillotti-McKethan Eminent Scholar Chair in the Warrington College of Business at the University of Florida. He specializes in research areas of retirement and older worker employment, occupational health psychology, and advanced quantitative methodologies. He is also the director of the Human Resource Research Center. The center contributes to both the science and the profession of human resource management by supporting educational programs and research that focus on factors that affect human performance in work settings. He was the editor of the Oxford Handbook of Retirement and currently serves as the editor-in-chief for Work, Aging and Retirement. Previously, he served as president of the Society for Occupational Health Psychology and director for the Science of Organizations Program at the National Science Foundation. He received his Ph.D. in industrial-organizational psychology and developmental psychology from Bowling Green State University.

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

On July 30 and 31, 2019, the Committee on the Consideration of Generational Issues in Workplace Management and Employment Practices will hold its third meeting and continue its information gathering and deliberations. This consensus study will assess the theoretical approaches and empirical science on generational differences as espoused in the popular literature. This meeting will include a public session with webcast on July 30 where invited presenters from sociology, economics, and business management will examine the evidence for changes in the workplace and the resulting challenges and opportunities for workforce management.  





If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

On May 29 and 30, 2019, the Committee on the Consideration of Generational Issues in Workplace Management and Employment Practices will hold its second meeting and continue its information gathering and deliberations. This consensus study will assess the theoretical approaches and empirical science on generational differences as espoused in the popular literature. This meeting will include a public workshop and webcast on May 29 where invited presenters will provide their perspectives on societal and demographic trends affecting workforce management and on any evidence for and literature on generational differences.  





If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Thelma Cox
Contact Email:  tcox@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1734

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

In Person:
Nancy Tippins
Eric M. Anderman
Margaret E. Beier
Dana H. Born
Chandra Childers
Brent Donnellan
Armando X. Estrada
Brian Hoffman
Arne L. Kalleberg
Maria Lytell
Michael S. North

By phone/Zoom:
John Baugh
Ruth Kanfer
Joanne Spetz
Mo Wang

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

• Discussed statement of task and project timeline
• Discussed what they learned from workshop
• Planned for third and fourth meetings and next public sessions
• Discussed topics for the committee's report

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

• Agenda, committee/staff roster, and travel information
• Statement of task and timeline
• Minutes of first meeting
• Draft introduction for report

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 31, 2019
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

 On April 23 and 24, 2019, the Committee on the Consideration of Generational Issues in Workplace Management and Employment Practices will hold its first meeting and begin its deliberations. This consensus study will assess the theoretical approaches and empirical science on generational differences as espoused in the popular literature, to include both an assessment of the research and statistical methods employed as well as conclusions drawn given the nature of the data analyzed. It will examine the conceptual basis for generations generally, as well as the specific generational definitions used in the management and behavioral science literature. There will be a short session open to the public on Tuesday afternoon April 23, 2019 where invited presenters will provide their perspective on the study and the relevant scientific literature.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Thelma Cox
Contact Email:  tcox@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
Agenda

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

In Person:
Nancy Tippins
Eric M. Anderman
John Baugh
Margaret E. Beier
Dana H. Born
Chandra Childers
Brent Donnellan
Armando X. Estrada
Brian Hoffman
Arne L. Kalleberg
Ruth Kanfer
Maria Lytell
Michael S. North
Joanne Spetz
Mo Wang

By phone/Zoom:
Arne Kalleberg

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

• Orientation on the National Academies consensus study process
• Committee conflict of interest and bias discussion
• Discussed statement of task and project timeline
• Planned for second meeting and first public workshop

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

• Agenda, committee/staff roster, member bios, and travel information
• Statement of task and timeline
• Summary of past Academies reports relevant to task
• Summary of Academies' communications mechanisms and potential list of conferences for dissemination of committee's report

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 07, 2019
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.