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Project Information

Project Information


Leveraging Insights and Approaches from Social and Affective Neuroscience to Promote Adaptive Aging: A Workshop


Project Scope:

A planning committee will organize an open, two-day workshop to identify: 1) gaps in our understanding of age-related changes in social and emotional processes and 2) opportunities to leverage insights from the fields of social and affective neuroscience to support research on intervention development to promote healthy aging.  The workshop discussion will generate ideas for future research that might be of interest to the NIH in preparation of possible RFPs for a future research agenda.  The workshop planning committee will define the specific topics to be addressed, develop the agenda and select and invite speakers and other participants.  

Status: Current

PIN: DBASSE-BBCSS-18-05

RSO: Bhatt, Sujeeta

Topic(s):

Behavioral and Social Sciences



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership


Mara Mather - (Chair)
Mara Mather is a professor of gerontology and psychology and the assistant dean of faculty and academic affairs at the University of Southern California. Her research focuses on how emotion and stress affect memory and decisions and how such influences differ depending on one’s age and gender. Her research elucidating the interaction of emotion, cognition, and aging has been recognized with the American Psychological Association Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology and the Springer Early Career Achievement Award in Research on Adult Development and Aging. She also received a National Institutes of Health K02 Career Development award and the Richard Kalish Innovative Publication Award from the Gerontological Society of America. She holds a B.A. in psychology from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Princeton University.
James Coan
James Coan is an associate professor of clinical psychology and director of the Virginia Affective Neuroscience Laboratory the University of Virginia. His research focuses on the neuroscience of emotional expression and individual emotion-regulation capabilities, as well as the social regulation of neural processes underlying emotional responses. Because these areas are multidisciplinary, he utilizes a multimodal approach to his research, including the use of observational behavior coding to electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). He is also interested in research methodology (particularly with regard to laboratory emotion elicitation) and behavior genetics. He holds a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Arizona.
Natalie Ebner
Natalie Ebner is an associate professor in in the Department of Psychology in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and holds an adjunct faculty position in the Department of Aging & Geriatric Research in the College of Medicine at University of Florida. She is affiliated with the Institute on Aging, the McKnight Brain Institute, and the Florida Institute for Cybersecurity Research. Her research combines experimental behavioral aging research coupled with affective, social, and cognitive neuroscience to develop a comprehensive view of brain-behavior relationships in the study of healthy aging. She uses a multi-methods approach in her research that combines convergent measures, including self-report, cognitive-behavioral measures, eye tracking, structural and functional neuroimaging (fMRI, ERP), pharmacological (oxytocin administration), neurofeedback training (real-time fMRI), and applied (cybersecurity related) interventional approaches, with the aim to integrate introspective, behavioral, and neurobiological data. She holds a Ph.D. in psychology from the Free University of Berlin.
Derek Isaacowitz
Derek M. Isaacowitz is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Lifespan Emotional Development Lab at Northeastern University. He was an undergraduate student at Stanford University and received his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania. His research on emotion regulation and social perception in the context of adult development and aging is funded by the National Institute on Aging, National Institute of Mental Health, and Velux Stiftung. This research has appeared in journals such as Psychological Science, Social and Psychological and Personality Science, Emotion, and Psychology and Aging. He is currently editor-in-chief of the Journals of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences and chair of the Social Psychology, Personality and Interpersonal Processes study section at NIH. He has been the recipient of the Springer Early Career Achievement Award from Division 20 (Adult Development and Aging) of the American Psychological Association, the Margret M. and Paul B. Baltes Foundation Award in Behavioral and Social Gerontology, for Outstanding Early Career Contributions, from the Gerontological Society of America, as well as teaching and mentoring awards. He holds a B.A. in psychology from Stanford and an M. A. and Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.
Beatriz Luna
Beatriz Luna is the Staunton professor of psychiatry and pediatrics and professor of psychology at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the founder and director of the Laboratory for Neurocognitive Development, and the founder and president of the Flux Society for Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience. Her research focuses on brain mechanisms that support the transition to adult-level cognitive control of behavior, linking cognitive development and brain maturation. She is also interested in characterizing developmental changes in reward processing, the emergence of functional networks, and the effects of affect on cognitive development. In order to address these questions, she uses multimodal neuroimaging methods including: functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), Magnetoencephalography (MEG), Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI). Her findings have led to influential developmental models emphasizing the implications of specialization of different brain systems with regards to cognitive development. She received a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of Pittsburgh.
Marc Schultz
Marc Schultz is chair of the Department of Psychology, director of the graduate program in clinical developmental psychology, and professsor of psychology at Bryn Mawr College. His research focuses on emotion and relationship dynamics in the context of adult development. He has pursued these interests through a program of research focused in three complementary areas: (1) the implications for health and well-being of the strategies that individuals use to regulate their emotions; (2) the determinants and sequelae of close relationship functioning; and (3) understanding inter-generational influences on health and behavior. He is the associate director of the Harvard Study of Adult Development, an 8-decade old longitudinal study of individuals and families. He serves as a scientific advisor to the Lifespan Research Foundation. He holds a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of California, Berkley.

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