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Project Information

Project Information


Incorporating the Experimental Medicine Approach in the Development of Primary Prevention Trials for Alzheimer's Disease: A Workshop


Project Scope:

A planning committee will organize an open, two-day workshop to discuss ways to incorporate the experimental medicine approach to behavior change research. The workshop will focus on questions related to long-term adherence to behavioral prevention strategies where it is anticipated that prevention efforts must be initiated and behaviors maintained decades prior to disease onset.  The workshop will generate ideas for future research that might be of interest to the NIH in preparation of possible RFPs for a future research agenda.  The workshop committee will define the specific topics to be addressed, develop the agenda, and select and invite speakers and other participants.  

Status: Current

PIN: DBASSE-BBCSS-18-03

RSO: Bhatt, Sujeeta

Topic(s):

Behavioral and Social Sciences
Health and Medicine



Geographic Focus:
North America

Committee Membership


Michael W. Otto - (Chair)
Michael W. Otto (Chair) is a professor of psychology at Boston University. His work focuses on developing and validating new psychosocial treatments for anxiety, mood, psychotic, and substance use disorders, with a particular focus on treatment refractory populations. This includes a translational research agenda investigating brain-behavior relationships in therapeutic learning. His focus on hard-to-treat conditions and principles underlying behavior-change failures led him to an additional focus on health behavior promotion, including investigations of addictive behaviors, medication adherence, sleep, and exercise. Across these health behaviors, he has been concerned with cognitive, attention, and affective factors that derail adaptive behaviors, and the factors that can rescue these processes. He also investigates exercise as an intervention for affective and addictive disorders, as well as for cognitive enhancement. He has over 400 publications spanning his research interests, and was identified as a “top producer” in the clinical empirical literature, and an ISI Highly Cited Researcher. He is a Past President and Fellow of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, is currently President and Fellow of Division 12 of the American Psychological Association, and is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science. He received his Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico.
Michelle C. Carlson
Michelle C. Carlson is an associate professor in the Department of Mental Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and an associate director at the Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health. She is a faculty associate in the Hopkins Center for Population Aging and Health and holds joint appointments in the JHSPH Department of Epidemiology and the School of Nursing. She has more than 70 publications and serves on the editorial boards of premier aging and neuropsychology journals. She leads investigations to evaluate both environmental and pharmacological modifiers of cognitive and dementia risk through both observational research, in studies such as the Women’s Health and Aging Study (WHAS) II, and intervention research. She has served as principal investigator at the Johns Hopkins site of the Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory (GEMS) randomized, controlled trial, and as project leader in the Baltimore Experience Corps Trial (BECT) to evaluate program impact on older adults’ cognitive and independent functions. She has over 82 peer-reviewed publications and 4 first-authored chapters. She serves on the editorial board of leading neuropsychological and gerontologic journals. She received her Ph.D. from Duke University.
Kirk Erickson
Kirk Erickson is a professor of psychology and geriatric medicine at the University of Pittsburgh, working in the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition within the Center for Neuroscience. His research examines cognitive and brain changes that occur as a function of physical health and aging, and he develops training, physical activity, and exercise trials and he investigates the effects of obesity and physical activity on brain health in elderly with mild cognitive impairment and Parkinson’s disease. He is the recipient of the 2015 Chancellor’s Distinguished Research Award from the University of Pittsburgh and he currently serves on several editorial boards, external advisory boards, and the Pitt Senate on Research Activities. He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Illinois.
Richard Mayeux
Richard Mayeux (NAM) is the Gertrude H. Sergievsky Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry and Epidemiology, chair of the Department of Neurology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and Neurologist-in-Chief at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center. Dr. Mayeux is also director of the Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, a center devoted to the epidemiologic investigation of neurological diseases, and co-director of the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain at Columbia University Medical Center. He has led a multidisciplinary, population-based investigation of Alzheimer's disease and related disorders known as the Washington Heights-Inwood Community Aging Project (WHICAP) since 1989. Utilizing this WHICAP population, he and his colleagues were among the first to integrate genetic risk factors and epidemiological principles in an attempt to identify biological markers of susceptibility to degenerative diseases of the aging nervous system. Dr. Mayeux is a fellow of the American Academy of Neurology and the New York Academy of Science, a member of the American Neurological Association and the Association of American Physicians. He is also a member of the Association for Research in Nervous and Mental Disease, the Society for Epidemiologic Research, and the Society for Neuroscience. He has served as a member of the Aging Review and the Epidemiology of Chronic Disorders Committees for the National Institutes of Health and the Medical and Scientific Advisory Board for the Alzheimer's Association. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and received the Potamkin Prize from the American Academy of Neurology, the John Stearns Award for Lifetime Achievement in Medicine from the New York Academy of Medicine, and the Henry Wisniewski Lifetime Achievement Award in Alzheimer's Disease Research from the Alzheimer's Association. He received his M.D. from the University of Oklahoma School of Health Sciences.
Judy Pa
Judy Pa is an assistant professor at the Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics in the Keck School of Medicine and the department of Neurology. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Alzheimer’s disease at UC San Francisco and then served five years as a faculty member. Her research is focused on identifying individuals at risk for Alzheimer’s disease, understanding how Alzheimer’s pathology impacts brain function in the living brain, and developing ways to remediate cognitive and brain dysfunction. The research is supported by two early career awards from the National Institutes of Health and the Alzheimer’s Association. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Irvine.
Kristine Yaffe
Kristine Yaffe is a professor of psychiatry, neurology and epidemiology, the Roay and Arie Scola Endowed Chair and Vice Chair of Research in Psychiatry at UCSF. She is an internationally recognized expert in the field of cognitive aging and dementia. She is the Scola Endowed Chair and Vice Chair, Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology and Epidemiology and the Director of the Center for Population Brain Health at the University of California, San Francisco. Her research has focused on the predictors and outcomes of cognitive decline and dementia in older adults. She is particularly interested in identifying novel risk factors for cognitive impairment that may lead to strategies to prevent cognitive decline. Dr. Yaffe is the principal investigator of 8 NIH grants as well as several other grants, and she has published over 450 peer-reviewed articles (H-index=118) in numerous prestigious journals including the Lancet, BMJ, JAMA, and NEJM. She also edited a book published by Oxford Press, “Chronic Medical Disease and Cognitive Aging: Toward a Healthy Body and Brain.” In 2014, she was recognized as one of Thomas Reuters World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds and honored by the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry with the Distinguished Scientist Award, and was recently awarded the prestigious Potamkin Prize by the American Academy of Neurology. She is dually trained in neurology and psychiatry and completed postdoctoral training in epidemiology and geriatric psychiatry at UCSF.
She received a B.S. in Biology-Psychology from Yale University and her M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.

Events


Events

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Publications

Publications

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