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Project Information

Project Information


Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space


Project Scope:

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will appoint the Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space (CBPSS) to operate as an ad-hoc committee. The overarching purpose of the committee is to support scientific progress in space research in the biological, medical, and physical sciences and assist the federal government in integrating and planning programs in these fields. The scope for CBPSS spans plant and microbial biology, animal and human physiology, and basic and applied physical sciences, in the context of understanding the role of gravity in living and physical systems in order to develop capabilities required for space exploration, and using the space environment as a tool of science to advance knowledge. The CBPSS provides an independent, authoritative forum for identifying and discussing issues in space life and physical sciences between the research community, the federal government, and the interested public.

The CBPSS will also monitor the progress in implementation of the recommendations of the Recapturing a Future for Space Exploration: Life and Physical Sciences Research for a New Era (RFSE) decadal survey--building on the survey that was tasked with establishing priorities for an integrated portfolio of biological and physical sciences research in the decade of 2010-2020. The CBPSS may issue reports that will provide guidance to NASA related to its implementation of the decadal survey or the mid-decadal review.

The committee will carry out its charge by undertaking the following tasks:
1. At each of its in-person meetings, as appropriate, the committee may prepare concise assessments of progress on the implementation of the decadal survey's recommended scientific and technical activities. The assessments will be based on evidence gathered by the committee at its in-person and virtual meetings. The committee's assessment reports may include findings and conclusions on key strategies being pursued by the agencies and the status of agency actions that relate to the state of implementation. The reports may also highlight scientific discoveries and engineering and technical advances relevant to progress on the science objectives identified in the decadal survey or mid-decadal review, as appropriate, and in addition will focus on one or more of the following types of issues:
• The scientific quality and the potential for discovery in the field;
• The impact of scientific advances on the implementation of the decadal survey recommended activities and the translation of scientific knowledge to human exploration missions;
• The impact of changing budget priorities, especially those that challenge the fundamental assumptions of RFSE, on the implementation of decadal survey priorities and on the balance between exploration-focused and basic scientific research more broadly; and
• The potential impact on a recommended course of action at a decision point described in the decadal survey.
2. At an in-person meeting, the committee may prepare a concise report with advice on the preparation for future decadal and mid-decadal studies. These reports will be based on evidence gathered by the committee at its in-person and virtual meetings. Future decadal and mid-decadal studies will be carried out by an ad hoc committee appointed by the Academies under a separate task.
3. For advisory activities assessed to require a more in-depth review than is possible through the normal operation of the CBPSS, the committee will assist the Academies in formulating the task and committee membership for such studies which will be designed as separate tasks.



Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-SSB-18-02

Project Duration (months): 36 month(s)

RSO: Graham, Sandra

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Space Studies Board

Topic(s):

Behavioral and Social Sciences
Biology and Life Sciences
Engineering and Technology
Health and Medicine
Math, Chemistry, and Physics
Space and Aeronautics



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 04/08/2019

Robert J. Ferl - (Co-Chair)
ROBERT J. FERL is professor and director of the Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research at the University of Florida (UF). Dr. Ferl’s research agenda includes analysis of the fundamental biological processes involved in plant adaptations to environments, with an emphasis on the particular environments and opportunities presented by the space exploration life sciences. He is an expert in the area of plant gene responses and adaptations to environmental stresses and the signal transduction processes that control environmental responses. The fundamental issues driving his research program include the recognition of environmental stress, the signal-transduction mechanisms that convert the recognition of stress into biochemical activity, and the gene activation that ultimately leads to response and adaptation to environmental stress. Dr. Ferl has recently served as the developer and director of the Virtual Center for Exploration Life Sciences, a joint academic research and education venture between UF/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), and the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). In that role, he has been responsible for research and academic program development at KSC, and he has facilitated the recruitment of faculty and research programs from UF/IFAS to be located at KSC. He served on the Science Council of the Division of Space Life Sciences of Universities Space Research Association. In 2016, he received the AIAA 2016 Jeffries Aerospace Medicine and Life Sciences Research Award and the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal. He has served on the Academies Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space: Plant and Microbial Biology Panel and is the past co-chair of the standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.
Dava J. Newman - (Co-Chair)
DAVA J. NEWMAN is the Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. She is also a Harvard–MIT Health, Sciences, and Technology faculty member. Dr. Newman’s research expertise is in multidisciplinary aerospace biomedical engineering investigating human performance across the spectrum of gravity. She is a leader in advanced space suit design, dynamics and control of astronaut motion, leadership development, innovation and space policy. Dr. Newman was the principal investigator on four experiments that flew on spaceflight missions. Dr. Newman was a co-investigator on the Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) that flew to space on STS-42 to measure astronaut mental workload and fine motor control in microgravity. She also developed the MICR0-G space flight experiment to provide a novel smart sensor suite and study human adaptation in extreme environments. She is the MIT Principal Investgator on the Gravity Loading Countermeasure Suit, or Skinsuit, onboard the International Space Station as an ESA technology demonstration 2015-2017. Best known for her second skin BioSuit™ planetary EVA system, her advanced spacesuits inventions are now being applied to “soft suits/exoskeletons” to study and enhance locomotion on Earth. Recent research focuses on Earth systems, namely ocean through near-space subsystems to accelerate solutions for climate and oceans by curating near-space satellite data to make the world work for 100% of humanity. Dr. Newman is the author of Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design, has published more than 250 papers in journals and refereed conferences, and holds numerous compression technology patents. She previously served as NASA Deputy Administrator, and along with the NASA Administrator was responsible for articulating the agency's vision, providing leadership and policy direction, and representing NASA to the White House, Congress, international space agencies, and industry. Dr. Newman was the first female engineer and scientist to serve in this role and was awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal. Recent honors include: Lowell Thomas Award, Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar, AIAA Fellow, AIAA Jeffries Aerospace Medicine and Life Sciences Research Award, and Women in Aerospace Leadership Award. She holds a Ph.D. in aerospace biomedical engineering from MIT, an M.S. in aerospace engineering and technology and policy from MIT, and a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Notre Dame. Her previous Academies service includes membership on the Space Studies Board, the Aeronautics Space and Engineering Board, the Committee on Human Spaceflight Technical Panel, and the Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space: Translation to Space Exploration Systems Panel.
Mary L. Bouxsein
MARY L. BOUXSEIN is the director of the Center for Advanced Orthopaedic Studies, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. She currently holds joint appointments as a professor of orthopedic surgery at Harvard Medical School, adjunct assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Boston University, and is also a faculty member in the MIT-Bioastronautics Program. Her research focuses on understanding skeletal fragility from a biomechanics viewpoint and includes studies using animal models and human cadaveric tissue, as well as clinical investigations. She also has a strong interest in the use of novel non-invasive imaging techniques to predict fracture risk and monitor response to osteoporosis therapies. Dr. Bouxsein serves on the committee of scientific advisors for the International Osteoporosis Foundation and is a board member of the International Bone and Mineral Society. Dr. Bouxsein received her B.S. in General Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Stanford University. She has not previously served on an Academies Committee.
Marianne Bronner
MARIANNE BRONNER (NAS) is the Albert Billings Ruddock Professor of Biology and Biomedical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). She has broad expertise in many aspects of developmental biology, from classical experimental embryology to cutting-edge molecular applications. Her research focus has been on development of the neural crest, an embryonic cell type that forms most of the peripheral nervous system and contributes to the craniofacial skeleton and elements of the heart. Her laboratory studies the gene regulatory events underlying formation, cell lineage decisions, and migration of neural crest cells during vertebrate development. She joined the faculty as a professor at University of California, Irvine and subsequently moved to Caltech over a decade later. She is a former President of the Society for Developmental Biology, on the Board of Directors of the International Society for Stem Cell Research, and Scientific Advisory Board of the Sontag and Curci Foundations. Her editorial responsibilities include being Editor-in-Chief of the journal Developmental Biology, Senior Editor for eLife, and monitoring editor for Journal of Cell Biology, Molecular Biology of the Cell, and PLoS Biology. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2009 and, in 2015, to the National Academy of Sciences. She received her Sc.B. from Brown University and her Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in biophysics. She has previously served on the Committee on a New Biology for the 21st Century: Ensuring that the United States Leads the Coming Biology Revolution and the standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.
Steven H. Collicott
STEVEN H. COLLICOTT is associate head for engagement and a professor in the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Purdue University. His research interests are dominated by low-gravity fluid dynamics experiments and modeling. Dr. Collicott has substantial experiences with microgravity physics experimentation including a variety of interactions with players in the commercial flight services field. His experiments have flown on the International Space Station, commercial sub-orbital vendors, and commercial parabolic flight plus he has launch agreements and experiments nearing completion to fly with most commercial sub-orbital companies. He is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Dr. Collicott received a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University. Dr. Collicott has served as a member of the National Academies’ standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.
Vijay K. Dhir
VIJAY DHIR (NAE) is Distinguished Professor Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Previously, he served as dean of UCLA’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science for over a decade. He was previously the chair of the UCLA Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. His research focuses on two-phase heat transfer, boiling and condensation, thermal and hyrodynamic stability, thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactors, microgravity heat transfer, and soil remediation. In addition to his work at UCLA, for the past 30 years Dr. Dhir has been a consultant for numerous organizations, including General Electric Corporation, Rockwell International, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. His work on boiling heat transfer and nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics and safety were the impetus for his being elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Dhir is also a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the American Nuclear Society, a recipient of ASME’s Heat Transfer Memorial Award, and the senior technical editor for ASME’s Journal of Heat Transfer. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has honored him with the Heat Transfer Memorial Award and the Robert Henry Thurston Lecture Award. The American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) honored him with the Donald Q. Kern award and the Max Jakob Memorial Award (awarded jointly with ASME). He is recipient of the Technical Achievement Award of the Thermal Hydraulics Division of the American Nuclear Society. Most recently, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award at ICCES (the International Conference on Computational & Experimental Engineering and Sciences). Dr. Dhir has more than 300 publications in archival journals and proceedings of conferences. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Punjab University in India, his M. Tech. in mechanical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, and his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Kentucky. He has served on the Academies Committee on Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants, the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, and the Committee on Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space and the standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.
Alain Karma
ALAIN KARMA is a professor of physics, an Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professor in the Department of Physics and Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems at Northeastern University. His primary research lies in theoretical understanding of the emergence of nonequilibrium patterns in nonlinear systems with applications to diverse problems in materials science and biology. In material science, his research focuses on the development and application of phase-field methods to a wide range of interface dynamics, with projects in microstructural pattern formation in alloys, stress-driven grain boundary motion, semiconductor nanowire growth, and fracture phenomena and crack propagation in brittle materials. In biology, his research focuses on understanding basic mechanisms of irregular heart rhythms. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California Santa Barbara. Dr. Karma has no prior Academies experience.
Mohammad Kassemi
MOHAMMAD KASSEMI is a research professor at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) in the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering. He is also the NASA Advanced Research Technology Support (ARTS) project director at CWRU. Prior to this, he was the chief scientist at the National Center for Microgravity Research at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio supporting fluids and combustion science research aboard the International Space Station (ISS). During his 28 years tenure at NASA GRC and 18 years at CWRU he has applied his expertise to a diverse set of multidisciplinary research problems in multiphase flow and transport, materials processing, microgravity fluid and thermal management, radiation heat transfer in semitransparent materials, capillary and interfacial phenomena, and microfluidics and physiological flows in biomedicine. He has also been principal investigator on nine fluids and materials NRA awards involving microgravity bubble dynamics, solidification and crystal growth from melt and vapor, and interaction of radiation with natural convection in materials processing. In the last ten years, Dr. Kassemi has developed integrated multi-scale fluid-structural-Interaction (FSI) models investigating the impact of weightlessness on the performance of human cardiovascular, vestibular and renal systems in support of the Digital Astronaut and Exploration Medical Capability projects within the NASA Human Research Program. Dr. Kassemi is the recipient of the 2015 NASA Exceptional Public Achievement Award for his contributions on the effects of long-term microgravity on human health and on performance of cryogenic propellant systems and materials processing in Space. He earned a B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Kassemi earned his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Akron. Dr. Kassemi has previously served as a member of the Academies’ standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.
Douglas M. Matson
DOUGLAS M. MATSON is an associate professor of mechanical engineering at Tufts University. His research specializes in solidification processes, thermal manufacturing, and microgravity materials science. Previously, he was a lecturer in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a principal investigator and lead materials engineer for Aerojet Propulsion Division at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. He has served as the president-elect for the American Society for Gravitational and Space Research and principal investigator for two ISS projects. He earned a Ph.D. in materials engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, his M.S. in materials science from the University of California, Davis, a B.S. in mechanical engineering from California State University, and a B.S. in chemical engineering from Cornell University. Dr. Matson has not previously served on an Academies committee.
Wayne L. Nicholson
WAYNE L. NICHOLSON is a professor in the Department of Microbiology and Cell Science at the University of Florida, located at the Space Life Sciences Laboratory next to NASA Kennedy Space Center. In his laboratory, Dr. Nicholson studies the changes in cell physiology and transcription caused by the extremes of the space environment. His interests include the mechanisms of bacterial spore resistance and longevity, the survival and proliferation of microorganisms in extreme extraterrestrial environments, and microbial evolution in novel environments including human space habitats. Dr. Nicholson earned his Ph.D. for genetics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has served as a member of the Academies’ standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.
James A. Pawelczyk
JAMES A. PAWELCZYK is an associate professor of physiology and kinesiology at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Pawelczyk served as a payload specialist on STS-90 Neurolab. During the 16-day Spacelab flight, the seven-person crew aboard NASA space shuttle Columbia served as both experiment subjects and operators for 26 individual life sciences experiments focusing on the effects of microgravity on the brain and nervous system. Dr. Pawelczyk’s primary research interests include the neural control of circulation, particularly skeletal muscle blood flow, as it is affected by exercise or spaceflight. Dr. Pawelczyk is a member of the American Heart Association, the American Physiological Society, the American College of Sports Medicine, and the Society for Neuroscience. He has won numerous awards, including the Young Investigator Award from the Life Sciences Project Division of the NASA Office of Life and Microgravity Science Applications and the NASA Space Flight Medal. He earned a B.A. in both biology and psychology, from the University of Rochester, an M.S. in physiology from Pennsylvania State University, and a Ph.D. in biology (physiology) from the University of North Texas. Dr. Pawelczyk has previously served on many Academies committees including as a member of the Committee to Review NASA’s Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks and on the Committee on A Midterm Assessment of Implementation of the Decadal Survey on Life and Physical Sciences Research at NASA. He has also served as a member of the National Academies’ standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.
Marylyn D. Ritchie
MARYLYN D. RITCHIE is director of the Center for Translational Bioinformatics at the Institute for Bioinformatics (IBI), associate director for Bioinformatics at IBI, and associate director for the Center for Precision Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Previously, Dr. Ritchie was professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, and the director of the Center for Systems Genomics at Pennsylvania State (Penn State) University. Before joining Penn State she was an associate professor in the Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics and the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Vanderbilt University. At Vanderbilt, Dr. Ritchie also served as an investigator in the Center for Human Genetics Research, where she directed the Computational Genomics Core and the Program in Computational Genomics. She has published numerous papers in peer-reviewed journals such as American Journal of Human Genetics, the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Human Molecular Genetics, Bioinformatics, and Plos Genetics. Dr. Ritchie is a member of several professional organizations including the American Society of Human Genetics and the American Statistical Association. She has received many honors throughout her career, including the Kavli Fellow from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation fellowship. She earned a B.S. in biology from the University of Pittsburg-Johnstown, a M.S. applied statistics, and a Ph.D. in human genetics from Vanderbilt University. She has served as a member of the Academies’ standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.

Jessica Scott
JESSICA SCOTT is an assistant professor at Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) Cancer Center. She is also an assistant professor at Weill Cornell Medical College. At MSK, her research is focused on characterizing multisystem toxicity using exercise testing, imaging, biomarker techniques, and the efficacy of exercise training to prevent and reverse toxicity. She joined MSK after five years as a senior scientist in the Exercise Physiology and Countermeasures Laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, where she also completed her post-doctoral fellowship. Dr. Scott is the recipient of NASA’s Human Research Program Peer Award, NASA’s Innovation Achievement Award for the design and implementation of a novel ultrasound technique to measure muscle mass during spaceflight and of NASA’s Group Achievement Award as a member of the one-year mission operations team. She received her M.Sc. and Ph.D. in exercise cardiovascular physiology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Pol D. Spanos
POL D. SPANOS (NAE) holds the L.B. Ryon Endowed Chair in Engineering at Rice University. His interests are in the area of dynamical systems, with emphasis on probabilistic (risk and reliability), non-linear, and signal-processing aspects and with applications to aerospace engineering and several other engineering disciplines. His research findings have been disseminated in more than 350 papers in archival journals, technical conferences, and industrial reports. Dr. Spanos is editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Non-Linear Mechanics and of the Journal of Probabilistic Engineering Mechanics. He is a Distinguished Member both of ASCE, and ASME. He is a fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Association of America, and a corresponding/foreign member of NA/NAE of Hellas, India, Europe, and Russia. He is a registered professional engineer in Texas. His work has been supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, AFOSR, NASA, and by many industrial consortia. He has received several awards from NSF, the American Society of Civil Engineers, ASME, and Rice University. He has served, worldwide, as a consultant to many governmental organizations and industrial entities. Dr. Spanos received an M.S. in structural dynamics and a Ph.D. in applied mechanics and with minors in applied mathematics and in business economics from the California Institute of Technology. He has previously served as a member of the Academies’ Committee for the Reusable Booster System: Review and Assessment; and the Panel on Armor and Armaments, the standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space and the Committee on Strategic Long-Term DOD Manufacturing Innovation Institutes.
Jana Stoudemire
JANA STOUDEMIRE is chief commercialization officer at Space Tango where she leads the creation of commercial markets in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) for biomedical and technology research and manufacturing applications. She identifies biomedical research projects that will fly on future missions to the International Space Station (ISS) focused on advancing understanding disease processes and treatments for significant global health burdens including cancer, neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and metabolic disease, along with regenerative medicine initiatives to help end the organ shortage. Before transitioning to the Space industry, she worked for over two decades with leading biotechnology, pharmaceutical and medical device companies. She has a strong understanding of the needs and challenges faced by companies working within a regulated industry, and experience working in both emerging and established global markets spanning a variety of healthcare indications. She has an in-depth understanding of what drives innovation and establishes new industries from her long history as part of the San Diego biotechnology community and with major pharmaceutical and device companies across the globe. In addition to a strong technical background, she has a career history marked by successful identification of new business opportunities for private and public healthcare companies, along with product development and global commercialization of some of the most innovative healthcare technologies. Prior to joining Space Tango to focus on building emerging markets on orbit to expand the Space economy, Ms. Stoudemire was responsible for life science research in microgravity as part of the team managing the International Space Station U.S. National Laboratory (ISS-NL). She received her B.S. in biology and physics from Wells College, and her M.S. in biology from Harvard University. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
James T'ien
JAMES T’IEN is the Leonard Case Jr. Professor of Engineering Emeritus at Case Western Reserve University in the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering. Dr. T’ien’s research interests are in the areas of combustion, propulsion, fire research and chemically reacting flows. He has received numerous awards, including a Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Fellowship in Jet Propulsion, Public Service Medal from NASA and Space Processing Award from the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. In addition, he is a fellow of the Combustion Institute and an Honorable Member of the Combustion Institute’s Chinese Taipei Section. Dr. T’ien earned his Ph.D. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University. He served as a member of the Applied Physical Sciences Panel of the 2011 Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space, the National Academies Committee to Identify Innovative Research Needs to Foster Improved Fire Safety in the United States, the Committee on A Midterm Assessment of Implementation of the Decadal Survey on Life and Physical Sciences Research at NASA and the standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.
Krystyn J. Van Vliet
KRYSTYN J. VAN VLIET is the associate provost and professor of materials science and engineering and biological engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Her research focuses on material chemomechanics: the material behavior at the interface of mechanics, chemistry, physics, and biology, and in particular, thermodynamically metastable surfaces and interfaces. As faculty of the MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering, she leads the Laboratory for Material Chemomechanics. As associate provost, she is responsible for overseeing campus space management, technology licensing, and corporate relations. She directed the DMSE Nanomechanical Technology Laboratory, a multiuser research facility that includes training of student and staff researchers with approximately 60 new users each year, and co-directs the MIT Biomedical Engineering Minor Program. Dr. Van Vliet also conducts research in Singapore, where her interdisciplinary team invents and develops new technology platforms for diagnostics and treatment of cell & tissue disease, as well as cell therapy manufacturing solutions. Within five years, this team of engineers, biologists, and clinicians has contributed several key breakthroughs and inventions to cell imaging, drug screening, and optical imaging; this includes several start-up companies and several devices now involved in international clinical trials. Dr. Van Vliet earned her Sc.B. from Brown University and her Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Van Vliet has served as a member of the Academies’ standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.
Hai Wang
HAI WANG is a professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University. His research interests are in combustion, molecular transport theories, nanomaterials for renewable energy conversion, hybrid propulsion systems, and nanocatalysis. He has served as the editor-in-chief of Progress in Energy and Combustion Science. He is a fellow of ASME and the Combustion Institute. Dr. Wang received the AIAA Propellants and Combustion Award, the Senior Research Award from Viterbi School of Engineering at USC, the Combustion and Flame Most Cited Author 2005-2008 recognition from Elsevier, and the Distinguished Paper Awards from the Thirty-First and Thirty-Fifth International Symposia on Combustion. He earned his Ph.D. in fuel science from Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Wang has served as a member of the National Academies’ standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.
David A. Weitz
DAVID A. WEITZ (NAS/NAE) is the Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Harvard University in the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS). He is also the director of the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC), the co-director of the BASF Advanced Research Initiative, a core faculty member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, and a member of the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology. At Harvard University, Dr. Weitz’s research interests are the physics of soft condensed matter, specifically their structural and mechanical properties, the properties of colloidal suspensions, the mechanical properties of biomaterials, and microfluidics for making emulsions using multiphase flow. He also works closely with industry, having served on the board of directors for several start-ups including microfluidics-driven startups GnuBIO and Raindance. He has served as associate editor and member on the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences editorial board, was a member of the Academies Panel on Review of the Physical Measurement Laboratory at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and was a chair on the Condensed Matter and Materials Research Committee. Dr. Weitz earned his Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University. Dr. Weitz has served as a member of the Academies’ standing Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space.

Events



Location:

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617
Event Type :  
-

Description :   

Committee on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space Fall Meeting 2019

Please see the Agenda (click on it and the PDF will open).  The agenda is subject to change.

October 29-31, 2019

This meeting will have both open and closed sessions.

Walk ins are welcome. This meeeting does not have a public teleconference number for the open sessions.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
https://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4808628/Space-Science-Week-2019


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Robert J. Ferl
Co-Chiar
Steven H. Collicott
Mohammad Kassemi
Douglas M. Matson
Wayne L. Nicholson
James A. Pawelczyk
Marylyn D. Ritchie (via Zoom)
Jessica Scott
Pol D. Spanos
Jana Stoudemire
James T'ien
Krystyn J. Van Vliet
David Weitz

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

-The presentations from the meeting and symposium.
-Bias and Conflict discussion.
-Plans for the Microgravity decadal.
-Plans for the fall meeting.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

No outside materials were made available to the committee in the closed sessions.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
April 09, 2019
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dionna Wise
Contact Email:  dwise@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2447

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.