Public Access Records Office
The National Academies
500 5th Street NW
Room KECK 219
Washington, DC 20001
Tel: (202) 334-3543
Email: paro@nas.edu
Project Information

Project Information


Supporting the Whole Student: Mental Health, Substance Use, and Wellbeing in Higher Education


Project Scope:

An ad hoc committee under the auspices of BHEW and in collaboration with HMD, will conduct a study of the ways in which colleges and universities provide treatment and support for the mental health and well-being of undergraduate and graduate students, with a focus on STEMM students to the extent fields of study are available. The committee will:
• Review data and analyze research on mental health services and the students who seek mental health and well-being services on campuses over the last decade;
• Identify and review programs, practices, resources, and policies that institutions of higher education have developed to treat mental health issues and to support well-being on campuses;
• Analyze the challenges institutions face--including financial, cultural, and human resource obstacles and methods to address these challenges;
• Investigate factors related to mental health services and support for student well-being, such as student academic performance, and campus climate;
• Examine, to the extent possible, the relationship between student mental health and well-being, and rates of alcohol and drug abuse, and recommend ways in which institutions can address substance abuse and its effects on campus climate.

The committee will produce a consensus report with recommendations, as well as derivative products that will be broadly distributed on campuses, at professional society meetings, and in other venues.

Status: Completed

PIN: PGA-BHEW-18-01

Project Duration (months): 24 month(s)

RSO: Scherer, Layne

Topic(s):

Education
Health and Medicine
Policy for Science and Technology


Parent Project(s): N/A


Child Project(s): N/A



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 09/23/2019

Alan I. Leshner - (Chair)
Alan I. Leshner is Chief Executive Officer Emeritus of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and former Executive Publisher of its journal, Science, as well as Science Translational Medicine and Science Signaling. Previously, Dr. Leshner had been Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and Deputy Director and Acting Director of the National Institute of Mental Health. Before that, he held a variety of senior positions at the National Science Foundation. Dr. Leshner began his career at Bucknell University, where he was Professor of Psychology. Dr. Leshner is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, and a fellow of AAAS, the National Academy of Public Administration, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was appointed by the U.S. President to the National Science Board in 2004. He received an A.B. in Psychology from Franklin and Marshall College and M.S. and Ph.D. in Physiological Psychology from Rutgers University. Dr. Leshner has been awarded six honorary Doctor of Science degrees.
Chris Brownson
Chris Brownson, a licensed psychologist, is Associate Vice President for Student Affairs, Director of the Counseling and Mental Health Center, and a Clinical Associate Professor in the Counseling Psychology Program at The University of Texas at Austin. His portfolio also includes oversight of University Health Services, the Longhorn Wellness Center, and the Center for Students in Recovery. He is a faculty fellow of the Institute of Urban Policy and Research Analysis. Dr. Brownson is the director of the National Research Consortium of Counseling Centers in Higher Education, and his research interests include college student suicide prevention, collaborative care models in primary care, and the intersection of mental health and academic success. As a consultant, he is regularly involved in program reviews and evaluations of college and university counseling centers and health centers. He is a past president of the Texas University and College Counseling Center Director’s Association. He is past chair of the Higher Education Mental Health Alliance, the Section on College and University Counseling Centers of the American Psychological Association’s Division of Counseling Psychology, and the Mental Health Section of the American College Health Association. He is a past member of the Board of Directors of the American College Health Association. He co-developed the Integrated Health Program at UT, which utilizes behavioral medicine and mindfulness-based interventions in a primary care environment, promoting collaboration between medical and mental health providers. In 2014, Dr. Brownson was appointed as a Chancellor’s Health Fellow at The University of Texas System and he currently leads a $6 million project implementing various mental health, student safety, and alcohol-related initiatives at the 14 academic and health institutions of the UT System. In 2016, he received the Texas Impact Award from Mental Health America Texas. Dr. Brownson has given over ninety invited addresses or professional conference presentations on topics such as behavioral health and primary care, smoking cessation, the roles of professional organizations within college mental health, collegiate recovery, college student mental health, college student suicide and suicide prevention, and the intersection of well-being and academic success. He has published over thirty articles, book chapters, and opinion pieces on the role of research in college counseling centers, integration of mental health and primary care, group counseling, fatherhood, college student suicide prevention, the intersection of identity and suicidal behavior, and academic success. Dr. Brownson has his Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology and Quantitative Methods, with a Specialization in Psychometrics, from The University of Texas at Austin, where he also received his M.A. and his B.A.
Gerard Clancy
Gerard Clancy serves as the Senior Associate Dean for External Affairs and Clinical Professor of Psychiatry in the University of Iowa’s Carver College of Medicine. He is a graduate of the University of Iowa with degrees in Biochemistry, and Medicine, with Alpha Omega Alpha Honors, an American Heart Association Molecular Biology Research Fellowship and Residency Training as a Psychiatrist, with service as the Chief Resident. He served as a Flight Surgeon in the United States Air Force with specialty training in Aerospace Medicine, Survival Medicine and Hostage Negotiations. He is also a graduate of Harvard University programs in Health Policy and Management and Non-Profit Financial Stewardship. Dr. Clancy has published peer reviewed manuscripts and presented across the world on molecular biology, addiction, chronic mental illness, health disparities and health systems transformation. He has received numerous teaching awards including the 2016 Crimson Apple Award for Teaching Excellence and the 2018 Outstanding Teacher Award in the University of Oklahoma – University of Tulsa School of Community Medicine. In 2017, he received the National Brodie Medical Education Scholar Award. Dr. Clancy has been a founding Dean of a College twice. In 2008, he led the establishment of the University of Oklahoma – University of Tulsa School of Community Medicine. In 2015, he led the establishment of the University of Tulsa’s Oxley College of Health Sciences. He led the creation of numerous clinical and education programs including outreach mental health services for the homeless, school-based clinics, the Bedlam Evening Clinics for the uninsured, the Wayman Tisdale Clinic in North Tulsa and Tulsa’s Albert Schweitzer Fellowship. Dr. Clancy was been deeply involved in the Tulsa Community. He was the team leader for the Lewin Study which discovered the 14-year difference in life expectancy between north and south Tulsa. He was again the team leader in discovering a 27-year difference in life expectancy for those with chronic mental illness in the Tulsa region. In 2011 he was the Chairman of the Board of the Tulsa Regional Chamber of Commerce. In 2015, he was the Chairman of the Board of the Tulsa Area United Way. Over his 12 years as a university president at the University of Tulsa and the University of Oklahoma, Tulsa, Dr. Clancy has raised more than $510,000,000 in support of student scholarships, 72 endowed chairs, 250,000 sq. ft. of new facilities and a host of new education programs. Dr. Clancy has received the Distinguished Alumni Award for Early Achievement from the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and the Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of Iowa. He was Tulsa People magazine’s 2009 Tulsan of the Year and in 2016, received the Heart of Henry Zarrow Humanitarian Award. The National Alliance on Mental Illness presented Dr. Clancy with the Exemplary Psychiatrist Award and twice their Public Service Award. In January, Dr. Clancy received the 2020 National University President of the Year Award at the Student Veterans of America National Conference in Los Angeles for his work on student veteran well-being and academic success.
Bonnie Duran
Bonnie Duran is a Professor in the Schools of Social Work and Public Health at the University of Washington (UW), in Seattle. After completing her doctoral degree at the UC Berkeley, she has worked in public health and social care research, education and practice with a focus on Native Americans/Indigenous peoples and other communities of color for over 35 years. Dr. Duran has conducted primary and secondary data analysis studies of mental disorder prevalence, risk and protective factors, victimization, and treatment seeking/ barriers to care among people attending Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities and probability samples from the largest rural Tribal Nations in the U.S. In partnership with communities, she has adapted and developed Indigenous interventions for system level, community and individual health and wellbeing. Another aspect of Dr. Duran’s empirical work is the development of indigenous theory and Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) methods. She has pioneered the development and application of CBPR and other forms of Community-Engaged Research (CEnR) and has helped to articulate and disseminate the theory of “Historical Trauma”. For the past 12 years, she has worked in close partnership with the American Indian Higher Education Consortium and Tribal College faculty, staff and students to conduct Indigenous culture-centered epidemiology and interventions research to enhance college success. Dr. Duran is currently co-chair of the Coronavirus Prevention Network Indigenous Expert Panel and is on a UW COVID-19 Vaccine Trial research team. The overall goals of Bonnie’s research and practice are to work in partnership with communities to design treatment and prevention efforts that are effective, empowering, sustainable, and that have maximum public health impact. Dr. Duran is also a Buddhist Mindfulness practitioner and teacher. She teaches long and short retreats and advanced programs at the Insight Meditation Society (IMS) in Massachusetts, and Spirit Rock Meditation Center (SRMC) in California and is on the SRMC Guiding Teachers Council.
Daniel Eisenberg
Daniel Eisenberg serves as a Professor of Health Policy and Management in the Fielding School of Public Health at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously he was a faculty member at University of Michigan from 2004-2020. His training is in economics (BA and PhD, Stanford University) and mental health services research (NIMH postdoc, UC Berkeley). His broad research goal is to improve understanding of how to invest effectively in the mental health of young people. He directs the Healthy Minds Network (HMN) for Research on Adolescent and Young Adult Mental Health (www.healthymindsnetwork.org). This research network administers the Healthy Minds Study, a national survey study of student mental health and related factors, and facilitates the development, testing, and dissemination of innovative programs and interventions for student mental health. He is currently writing a book about investments in children’s mental health, in collaboration with Ramesh Raghavan.
Raynard S. Kington
Raynard S. Kington, is Head of School, Phillips Academy, Andover. Dr. Raynard S. Kington began his work as Head of School at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, in July 2020. Prior to coming to Andover, he served for ten years as President of Grinnell College (2010-2020) and previously in a range of positions at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including NIH Principal Deputy Director and NIH Acting Director, NIH Associate Director for Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, and Acting Director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Before NIH he was a division director at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and served as Director of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). He has also been a Senior Scientist at the RAND Corporation and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at UCLA. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine (now, the National Academy of Medicine – NAM) in 2006. Dr. Kington attended the University of Michigan, where he received both his B.S. with distinction and his M.D. and completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Michael Reese Medical Center in Chicago. He was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania where he completed his M.B.A. with distinction and his Ph.D. with a concentration in Health Policy and Economics at the Wharton School and was awarded a Fontaine Fellowship. He received his board certification in Internal Medicine, Public Health and Preventive Medicine, and Geriatric Medicine. His research has focused on the social determinants of health and more recently on diversity in the scientific workforce. Dr. Kington is married to Dr. Peter Daniolos, an adolescent psychiatrist. They have two sons.
Amy Lenhart
Amy Lenhart is a licensed professional mental health counselor supervisor in the state of Texas (LPC-S) and also is a Nationally Certified Counselor (NCC). Amy has worked providing mental health counseling to students in the community college setting for over twenty years. Amy is currently serving community college students in her twentieth year as a mental health counselor for Collin College, and has previous work experience in a domestic violence agency. Amy holds a Master of Arts in Counseling and Psychology in Education graduating with honors. A strong believer in advocacy for students and college counseling, Amy has worked to promote awareness in her state and national leadership roles. She is a past- president of the American College Counseling Association (ACCA) becoming the first president elected from a community college. Amy has also served as a member at large for ACCA. Amy was elected president of the Texas College Counseling Association (TCCA) having previously held the positions of senator and treasurer. She also chaired an ex officio committee for TCCA that resulted in changes by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools in regards to specific language concerning college counseling standards. Awards and honors include a leadership award from ACCA, the Texas College Counseling Association (TCCA) award for Outstanding College Counselor, as well as a merit award from the Texas Career Development Association. Amy has presented internationally, nationally, and in her state on college counseling and mental health topics. She has been quoted by The Straits Times, The Chronicle of Higher Education and Insight into Diversity, for her expertise regarding mental health issues in the college setting. She is also the co-author of a national research survey on college counseling.
Frances Leslie
Frances Leslie, Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of California Irvine (UCI), is a neuropharmacologist with a primary interest in the effects of drugs of abuse on the developing brain.
She received her Ph.D. from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, where she participated in landmark studies on the identification and mechanism of action of enkephalin, the first endorphin discovered. She has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health and the UC Tobacco Related Disease Research Program since establishing her laboratory in 1981. At UCI, she has also served as Associate Vice Chancellor for Research from 1995-98, and Director of an NIH-funded Transdisciplinary Tobacco Use Center from 1999-2005. With a strong commitment to graduate education, Dr. Leslie served as Dean of UCI Graduate Division from 2008-2019. In this capacity, she focused on building resources to attract and retain the best and brightest graduate students, and to prepare them for future leadership positions. She created the Diverse Educational Community and Doctoral Experience (DECADE) program, with initial support from a Department of Education FIPSE grant, to establish a diverse student learning community on the UCI campus. This program was subsequently institutionalized and expanded with a Department of Education Title III award to establish a model of graduate student mentoring of undergraduate students.

Ben Locke
Benjamin Locke is the Senior Director at Pennsylvania State University’s Center for Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), and the Founder and Executive Director of the Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH) – a practice/research network of over 380 counseling centers, and an affiliate faculty member in Counseling and Clinical Psychology departments at Penn State. Dr. Locke presents and consults widely about college student mental health in higher education and has published dozens of peer reviewed articles on the topic. Dr. Locke has over 19 years of clinical experience in a wide variety of mental health settings including wilderness therapy, psychiatric hospitals, group homes, community mental health, and college counseling centers.
Gail A. Mattox
Gail A. Mattox currently serves as Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Morehouse School of Medicine. She was appointed Department Chair in 2000. Dr. Mattox received a BS degree with honors from Elmhurst College in Elmhurst, Illinois, a MD degree with honors from Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee. She completed a pediatric residency at Hubbard Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee. This was followed by a child and adolescent psychiatry and adult psychiatry training at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Mattox has been practicing psychiatry for over 30 years. Her clinical work has included a variety of clinical settings; outpatient, inpatient, partial hospitalization, residential and consultation to numerous agencies such as schools, colleges, social service agencies and juvenile justice centers. Her leadership roles have included serving as Medical Director, and Chief Medical Officer for several programs. She has been instrumental in developing training programs, policies, and procedures to improve quality of care and access to care especially for underserved communities. In addition to administration, teaching and patient care, Dr. Mattox was successful in obtaining competitive cooperative agreement grant funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), to establish the first National Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Resource Center for Substance Abuse and Mental Health in 2005 at Morehouse School of Medicine. The project evolved to become the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Center for Excellence in Behavioral Health, referred to as the HBCU-CFE. The goals of the HBCU-CFE included promoting student behavior health to expand access to care and recognition of psychological distress, to expand campus service capacity including access to culturally appropriate behavioral health resources, to facilitate best practices dissemination and to foster student leadership and behavioral health workforce development and diversity. Dr. Mattox served as Project Director from 2005-2018. As Project Director, she also developed a sub-award program for the HBUCs. This allowed individual HBCUs to apply to the HBCU-CFE for funding for campus specific initiatives such as the expansion of screening and referral for behavioral health disorders, support for student internships and the education and training of peers, faculty and staff across the spectrum. The project also supported the first HBCU Peer Educators in Behavioral Health Summit followed by other national training events in behavioral health. Dr. Mattox is a Diplomate of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology with sub-specialty Board Certification in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. She is a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and a Distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association. She has received numerous awards for teaching, leadership, and service such as the Dean’s Leadership Award, the Senior Scholar of Distinction Award from the National Medical Association, the Psychiatrist of the Year award from the Georgia Psychiatric Physicians Association, and the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award. She is a longstanding member of Alpha Omega Alpha National Medical Honor Society and remains committed to promoting health equity and addressing behavioral health disparities.
Maria A. Oquendo
Maria A. Oquendo is the Ruth Meltzer Professor and Chairman of Psychiatry at University of Pennsylvania and Psychiatrist-in-Chief at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She is a graduate of Tufts University and attended Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University. She completed residency at Payne Whitney Clinic, New York Hospital, Weil-Cornell. Until 2016, she was Professor of Psychiatry and Vice Chairman for Education at Columbia. In 2017, she was elected to the National Academy of Medicine, one of the highest honors in medicine. Dr. Oquendo has used Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging to map brain abnormalities in mood disorders and suicidal behavior. Her expertise ranges from psychopharmacology to Global Mental Health. She has over 400 peer-reviewed publications and an h-factor of 76 with over 17,000 citations. Dr. Oquendo is Past President of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and the International Academy of Suicide Research. She is President of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) and of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s Board of Directors and has served on the National Institute of Mental Health’s Advisory Council. She is a Fellow of the ACNP, APA and American College of Psychiatrists (ACP). Dr. Oquendo is a member of Tufts University’s Board of Trustees, serves on its Executive Committee and chairs Tufts’ Academic Affairs Committee. A recipient of multiple awards in the US, Europe and South America, most recently, she was honored with the Virginia Kneeland Award for Distinguished Women in Medicine (Columbia University 2016), the Award for Mood Disorders Research (ACP 2017), the Alexandra Symonds Award (APA 2017), the APA’s Research Award (2018) and the Dolores Shockley Award (ACNP 2018).
Stephanie Pinder-Amaker
Stephanie Pinder-Amaker is Chief Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Officer at McLean Hospital and Director of the College Mental Health Program. Dr. Pinder-Amaker is Assistant Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Pinder-Amaker has over 25 years of experience in college student mental health treatment, administration, and policy. She is the founding director of McLean Hospital’s College Mental Health Program, a unique initiative serving students from over 200 institutions of higher education, providing student-focused treatment; consultation to students, parents, and college professionals, and nonprofits; and related research. Dr. Pinder-Amaker lectures and conducts workshops throughout the country on strengthening continuity of care, and on how to bolster communication between campus- and community-based systems, eliminate barriers to mental health treatment, and better support marginalized students. She is a member of the WHO World Mental Health International College Student Initiative, and has published on the prevalence and distribution of mental disorders among college students and the integration of student concerns into traditional models of care.
Julie Posselt
Julie Posselt is an Associate Professor of higher education in the USC Rossier School of Education and was a 2015-2017 National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation postdoctoral research fellow. Rooted in sociological and organizational theory, her research program uses mixed methods to examine institutionalized inequalities in higher education and organizational efforts aimed at reducing inequities and encouraging diversity. She focuses on selective sectors of higher education— graduate education, STEM fields, and elite undergraduate institutions—where longstanding practices and cultural norms are being negotiated to better identify talent and educate students in a changing society. She was the recipient of the 2018 American Educational Research Association’s Early Career Award and the 2017 Association for the Study of Higher Education’s Early Career/ Promising Scholar Award. Her book, Inside Graduate Admissions: Merit, Diversity, and Faculty Gatekeeping (2016, Harvard University Press), was based on an award-winning ethnographic study of faculty judgment in 10 highly ranked doctoral programs in three universities. This work has led to thriving research-practice partnerships with universities, disciplinary societies, graduate schools & programs, and other associations that are re-examining how we evaluate students and scholars for key academic opportunities— and support those who are in the system. Partners include the University of California, American Physics Society, and the Council of Graduate Schools. Her current scholarship, funded by three grants from the National Science Foundation and one from the Mellon Foundation, examines movements for equity and inclusion in graduate education and the humanistic and physical science disciplines. Posselt recently completed a National Academy of Education postdoctoral fellowship for the first national study of graduate student mental health. This concurrent mixed methods project identified factors associated with depression and anxiety; investigated the roles of discrimination, competitiveness, and faculty support in graduate student wellbeing; and measures disparities within and across academic disciplines. She has published research in the American Educational Research Journal, Annual Review of Sociology, Research in Higher Education, Journal of Higher Education, Teachers College Record, Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research, and the Chronicle of Higher Education, among others. Her work has been highlighted in Science, The Atlantic, New York Times, Slate, Times Higher Education (UK), Insider Higher Ed, among others. She is a member of the Journal of Higher Education’s and Journal of Diversity in Higher Education's editorial review boards, and is program chair for the 2019 Sociology of Education Association meeting. Posselt earned her PhD from the University of Michigan.
Claire E. Sterk
Claire E. Sterk is the Charles Howard Candler Professor at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. A pioneering public health scholar, Sterk has served for the past two decades as a social scientist, academic leader, and administrator at Emory, most recently as University President and Provost/Executive Vice President of Academic Affairs. Sterk is a globally renowned thought leader who has deepened our understanding of social and health disparities; addiction and infectious diseases, specifically HIV/AIDS; community engagement; and the importance of mentoring and empowering women leaders. She has held numerous leadership positions in professional organizations. Her academic publications include three books and more than 125 peer-reviewed articles. Her work is widely cited and has received $30 million in external research funding. She has lectured widely on key topics in public health and in higher education, including the student experience and student health and wellbeing. She is a strong advocate for collaboration and innovation and a champion for global engagement. Sterk also is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine. A native of the Netherlands, Sterk earned her Ph.D. in sociology from Erasmus University (Rotterdam, the Netherlands), a doctorandus degree in medical anthropology (University of Utrecht, the Netherlands), and an undergraduate degree from the Free University in Amsterdam.
Jeanie Tietjen
Jeanie Tietjen is an Associate Professor of English at MassBay Community College and Director of the Institute for Trauma, Adversity, and Resilience in Higher Education. MassBay’s Institute for Trauma, Adversity, and Resilience in Higher Education formalizes an ongoing recognition of complex interrelationships between trauma and learning in post-secondary education. The Institute for Trauma, Adversity, and Resilience in Higher Education believes that every encounter area of the educational community—from pedagogy to campus safety, advising to financial aid, facilities to college policies and administration--- can be informed by understanding: basics of the learning brain, the prevalence of trauma, adversity, and toxic stress, how resilience as skill can be encouraged through best practices and meaningful supports, evidence that just one relationship can powerfully bolster productive and resilient behaviors. Jeanie received her Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), in English Language and Literature/Letters from Brandeis University, her M.F.A. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and her B.A. from the University of Washington.
Layne Scherer - (Staff Officer)

Events


Event Type :  
Webcast

Description :   

On January 13, 2021, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will release the consensus report Mental Health, Substance Use, and Wellbeing in Higher Education: Supporting the Whole Student. The report includes the most current research and reviews how institutions of higher education, including community colleges, provide treatment and support for the mental health and wellbeing of undergraduate and graduate students in all fields of study.

Please join the following members of the Committee on Supporting the Whole Student: Mental Health, Substance Use, and Wellbeing in Higher Education and National Academies Staff on January 13, 2021 at 1PM EST:

  • Dr. Alan Leshner (chair), CEO Emeritus of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
  • Dr. Daniel Eisenberg, Professor of Health Policy and Management, University of California at Los Angeles; Director, Healthy Minds Network
  • Dr. Raynard Kington, Head of School, Phillips Academy, Andover; President Emeritus, Grinnell College
  • Dr. Jeanie Tietjen, Director, Institute for Trauma, Adversity, and Resilience in Higher Education; Professor of English, MassBay Community College

 



Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Layne Scherer
Contact Email:  LScherer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2833

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

This event is a closed event with only committee members and National Academies staff participating. 


Registration for Online Attendance :   
N/A

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Layne Scherer
Contact Email:  LScherer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2833

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Meeting Objectives

  • March 11: Public Workshop (open to guests)
  • March 12: Committee Meeting (closed to external guests)

Registration for Online Attendance :   
N/A

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Layne Scherer
Contact Email:  LScherer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2833

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Meeting Objectives

  • Discuss working group activities and begin to identify key themes for the report
  • Receive external presentations and deliberate findings
  • Identify remaining constituents to be invited to future open sessions
  • Determine work plan in advance of meeting 3
  • Complete committee introductions, including bias and conflict of interest discussion for members not present at the first meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
N/A

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Layne Scherer
Contact Email:  LScherer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2833

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Meeting Objectives

  • Analyze the study charge, approach, and committee expectations
  • Complete committee introductions, including bias and conflict of interest discussion
  • Discuss potential audiences and identify topics to address in our report
  • Identify key constituents to be invited to future open sessions
  • Form working groups and assign work to do before meeting #2


Registration for in Person Attendance :   
N/A


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Layne Scherer
Contact Email:  LScherer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2833

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office