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Project Information

Project Information


Board on Army Research and Development (BOARD)


Project Scope:

The Board on Army Research and Development will serve as the convening authority to conduct, facilitate, and manage periodic discussions, workshops, and studies on science and technical topics of interest to the U.S. Army, as determined by the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Science and Technology (DASA(RT)).   Under its auspices, the BOARD will establish the Research Program Review and Analysis Committee (RPAC) which will review the Army research programs that are not in a Science & Technology Objective (STO) or Army Capability Enabler (ACE) but are initially research in nature.  The board will also work with the sponsor to identify scientific and technology enablers that merit additional study and at the request of the sponsor, will oversee the execution of studies, workshops, and roundtables.

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-DEPS-17-02

RSO: Millonig, William

Topic(s):

Conflict and Security Issues



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership


Katharina G. McFarland - (Chair)
Hon. Katharina McFarland (r), Co-chair retired in January 2017 as Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics & Technology) following designation by President Barack Obama on February 1, 2016. As Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics & Technology) and Army Acquisition Executive, Mrs. McFarland oversaw the execution of the Army’s acquisition function, including life cycle management and sustainment of Army weapons systems and research and development programs, and managed the Army Acquisition Corps and greater Army Acquisition Workforce. Mrs. McFarland also served as the science advisor to the Secretary of the Army and as the Army’s senior research and development official and senior procurement executive. In addition, Mrs. McFarland held principal responsibility for all Department of the Army matters related to logistics. Prior to joining the Department of the Army, Mrs. McFarland served as the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Acquisition). In this role, she was the principal adviser to the Secretary of Defense and the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology & Logistics on matters related to acquisition. Previously, she served as the president of the Defense Acquisition University (DAU). Under her leadership, DAU provided practitioner training, career management, and services to enable the acquisition, technology, logistics, and requirements community to make smart business decisions and deliver timely and affordable capabilities to the Warfighter. Prior to joining DAU, Mrs. McFarland was the Director for Acquisition for the Missile Defense Agency (MDA)—a position she held since May, 2006. As MDA’s principal acquisition executive, Mrs. McFarland advised the Director of MDA on all acquisition, contracting and small business decisions. Other core responsibilities included the development of process activities and program policy associated with the execution of the single integrated Ballistic Missile Defense System research, development and test program, and establishment of the Baseline Execution Review to ensure an integrated program execution of the BMDS occurred across the baselines of schedule, cost, performance, contracting, test and operational delivery. Mrs. McFarland began her civil service career in 1986 as a general engineer at Headquarters Marine Corps where she was accredited as a materials, mechanical, civil, and electronics engineer. She has received an Honorary Doctoral of Engineering from the University of Cranfield, United Kingdom; the Presidential Meritorious Executive Rank Award, the Secretary of Defense Medal for Meritorious Civilian Service Award, the Department of the Navy Civilian Tester of the Year Award, and the Navy and United States Marine Corps Commendation Medal for Meritorious Civilian Service. She is DAWIA Level-III-certified in program management, engineering, and testing as well as having a professional engineer license and having attained her Project Management Professional (PMP) certification.
Michael Bear - (Vice Chair)
Dr. Michael Bear is a technical director in BAE Systems’ Electronics System Sector with over 30 years of experience migrating advanced technologies to national air and space systems. He is currently a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and led, or played major roles, in studies on mitigating cyber vulnerabilities in air and space embedded systems, data analytics for operational decision making, and improving the cyber hardness and reliability of the upcoming nuclear modernization platforms. He has co-authored a national space development standard for mission-critical electronics, and guidelines addressing cyber and physical threats to microelectronics throughout the supply chain. In addition to BAE Systems, Dr. Bear has worked at IBM, Loral and Lockheed Martin addressing all elements of microelectronics and electronic development from the underlying Physics of Failure to System-on-Chip (SoC) development through payload design, manufacturing and qualification. Additionally, Dr. Bear has taught seminars on the secure methods to develop microelectronics for mission-critical applications. He has led the development of many complex SoCs, including a multi-core Digital Signal Processor for space applications. He has been instrumental in creating programs to bring advanced analytics and machine learning to C4ISR platforms. Dr. Bear has worked on multiple DARPA programs, including thermal imaging and microelectronic reliability. He has authored multi-scale physical simulations to explore material processing techniques needed to produce advanced electronics and sensors. Dr. Bear is a standing member in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), American Physical Society and IEEE, where he is a member of the IEEE Cyber-Physical Systems and Human-Systems Integration Technical Committees. He is a leader in the reliability and resilience of complex systems through cyber hardening and systems engineering with a range of publications and patents. He is an active member of National Academy of Science, Engineering, and Medicines’ Intelligence Science & Technology Expert Group (ISTEG). He received two BAE Systems Chairman’s Awards for work in microelectronics and systems development. Dr. Bear received his Ph.D. in Computational Physics and M.S in Applied Physics from George Mason University and a B.S. in Applied Physics from Purdue University, where he became a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
Andrew G. Alleyne
Dr. Andrew Alleyne is the Ralph and Catherine Fisher Professor of Engineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His research interests encompass the modeling, simulation, and implementation of control systems for complex systems and nonlinear systems. His current focus is on the optimization of energy and power systems using model-based approaches. He has developed simulations tools for understanding and prediction the behavior of complex thermal systems and transitioned that to implementations of control systems for dynamic thermal management. In particular, he works at the interface of electrical and thermal power for mobile systems since many of the thermal management challenges arise from electrical power usage. He established the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Power Optimization of Eletro-Thermal Systems (POETS). Additional areas of interest include Manufacturing Systems where he has investigated high precision motion control technologies for on- and off-highway vehicles. His academic record includes supervision of over 80 M.S. and Ph.D. students and over 400 conference and journal publications. Dr. Allyene is the recipient of a CAREER award by the National Science Foundation, has been Distinguished Lecturer of the Institute for Electronic and Electrical Engineers (IEEE), and a National Research Council associate. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and had received the Gustus Larson Award, the Charles Stark Draper Award for innovative Practice, and the Henry Paynter Outstanding Investigator Award. He was a Fulbright fellow to the Netherlands and has held visiting Professorships at TU Delft, University of Colorado, ETH Zurich, and Johannes Kepler University. He is also a recipient of the AACC Control Engineering Practice Award. Dr. Alleyne has held leadership positions for ASME, IEEE, and the International Federation of Automatic Control and been active in external advisory and review boards for universities, industry and government including the Scientific Advisory Board for the U.S. Air Force. His record of campus service includes Associate Dean for Research in the College of Engineering and the Associate Head for Undergraduate Programs in Mechanical Science and Engineering. Dr. Alleyne received his B.S. in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.
David W. Aucsmith
Mr. David Aucsmith is senior principle research scientist at the Applied Phycis Lab at the Unviersity of Washington. He is a technology leader with over thirty years of experience in industry, government, and academia. He has worked in a variety of security technology areas including secure computer systems, secure communications systems, security architecture, random number generation, cryptography and cryptographic systems, steganography and network intrusion detection. Aucsmith is a former officer in the U.S. Navy and has written extensively on cybercrime, cyber espionage, and cyber warfare. He has been a representative to numerous international, government, and academic organizations including the National Academies review panels for the Army Research Laboratory and the Advisory Council for the National Security Directorate of Pacific Northwest National Labs. He is co-chairman of the FBI's Information Technology Study Group, a member of the President's Task Force on National Defense and Computer Technology and a member of the Department of Defense's Global Information Grid Senior Industry Review Group. Aucsmith was also U.S. industry representative to the G8 Committee on Organized, Transnational, and Technological Crime where he participated directly in the G8 summits in Paris, Berlin and Tokyo. Aucsmith holds 33 patents for digital security and is a member of the advisory board for the College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in biochemistry from the University of Georgia and Master of Science degrees in physics from the Naval Postgraduate School and in information and computer sciences from the Georgia Institute of Technology respectively. Additionally, he has a Certificate in Fine Arts Photography from the University of Washington. He is the author of numerous papers and currently lectures at the Naval Postgraduate School, the Naval War College, and the Air Command and Staff College
James P. Bagian
Dr. James Bagian (NAE/NAM) is a physician and engineer who currently serves as the director of the Center for Healthcare Engineering and Patient Safety at the University of Michigan and focuses on creating solutions that will make healthcare safe, as well as more effective and efficient, for patients. Previously, he served as the first Chief Patient Safety Officer and founding director of the National Center for Patient Safety (NCPS) at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). He has also held positions as a NASA physician and astronaut; U.S. Air Force flight surgeon; and engineer at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, U.S. Navy, and Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Bagian was selected in 1998 by the VA to establish NCPS and became its first director. He developed and implemented an innovative national program aimed at protecting patients from hospital-based harm, which the VA has implemented at all 173 VA hospitals. Moreover, this program served as the benchmark for patient safety in hospitals worldwide and earned the Innovations in American government Award in 2001 from the John F. Kennedy school of Government at Harvard University. During his 15-year tenure with NASA, Dr. Bagian flew on two Space Shuttle missions. He led the development of a high-altitude pressure suit for crew escape as well as other crew survival equipment. In addition, he was the first physician to successfully treat space motion sickness, and his approach has been the standard of care for astronauts since that time. He also served as an investigator in the inquiry following the 1986 Challenger accident and was appointed as Medical Consultant and Chief Flight Surgeon for the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) in 2003. Dr. Bagian’s contributions to military service include advancing new methods of military aircraft ejection seat design and serving as a colonel in the U.S. Air Force Reserve. As the Special Consultant for Combat Search and Rescue to the Air Combat Command, he was a leader in standardizing pre-hospital combat rescue medical care across all Air Force major commands and is one of the founding members of the Department of Defense’s Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care, whose work in pre-hospital trauma care has substantially reduced mortality of service members who suffer battlefield wounds. Dr. Bagian was elected as a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 2000 and as a member of the National Academy of Medicine in 2003. He received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Drexel University in 1973 and earned an M.D. from Thomas Jefferson University in 1977.
Joan Bienvenue
Dr. Joan Bienvenue is senior executive director of the Applied Research Institute at the University of Virginia. Dr. Beinvenue received a B.S. in chemistry from Rivier University, an M.S. in forensic science at the University of New Haven, a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Virginia, and an M.B.A. from the University of Mary Washington. She was a National Institute of Justice Research Fellow while at UVA, where her work focused on the development of microfluidic systems. This work was summarized in over fifteen peer-reviewed papers and book chapters and presented at many conferences; she is an inventor on five U.S. patents. In addition to this academic work, she is creator and conference chair for the annual Commonwealth Conference on National Defense and Intelligence, now entering its sixth year, and co-creator and Inaugural Chair of the Gordon Research Conference on Forensic Analysis of Human DNA. After completion of her graduate studies, Dr. Bienvenue was an ORISE Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the FBI. Following this appointment, she joined the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL), as the Validation and Quality Control Supervisor where she managed a team that provided quality control and oversaw the evaluation, validation, and implementation of new technology for DNA casework analysis in support of remains identification. She joined Lockheed Martin in 2008 and most recently served as chief scientist and program manager, in support of the development of rapid microfluidic DNA analysis systems. In June of 2013, she returned to the UVA as director of the Applied Research Institute (ARI) and was promoted to senior executive director in 2017. ARI serves the university and the defense and intelligence communities as a conduit to facilitate collaboration and innovation between the academia and government. ARI leverages UVA’s human and capital assets to support research, education, and training, with a focus on homeland security, national intelligence, and defense missions. Dr. Bienvenue is a fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. She is nominated because of her industry experience developing technologies for DNA analysis as well as her current expertise leading the Applied Research Institute at the University of Virginia.
John V. Farr
Dr. John Farr is a professor emeritus of engineering management at the United States Military Academy (USMA) at West Point and was a professor and the founding director of the Center for Nation Reconstruction and Capacity Development from 2010 until 2017. He currently works as an adjunct for Clarkson University and the University of Central Florida, and is a principal subject matter expert for Applied Research Associates. He was a professor of systems engineering and engineering management, founding director of the Department of Systems Engineering and Engineering Management, and the associate dean for academics in the School of Systems and Enterprises at Stevens Institute of Technology. Before coming to Stevens in 2000, he was a professor of engineering management at the USMA where he was the first permanent civilian professor in engineering and director of their engineering management program. He has authored or edited over 200 technical publications to include five textbooks, seven book chapters, and over 90-refereed publications mainly on cost and risk analysis, infrastructure, weapons of mass destruction, engineering education, and systems engineering. Dr. Farr earned his undergraduate degree from Mississippi State University and Masters and Ph.D. in civil engineering from Purdue and the University of Michigan, respectively. He is also a registered civil engineer in Florida and Mississippi and a certified project management professional. Dr. Farr has served on numerous defense national and academic advisory boards to include membership on the Army Science Board (ASB) and the Air Force Studies Board (AFSB). He has served as a consultant to numerous companies and government agencies and worked in Afghanistan, Africa, Vietnam, and the Marshall Islands. He taught at the University of Technical Education, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam in 2013 as a Fulbright Specialist.
George (Rusty) T. Gray, III
Dr. George T. (Rusty) Gray III (NAE) is a Laboratory Fellow and staff member in the dynamic properties and constitutive modeling team within the Materials Science Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). He came to LANL following a three-year visiting scholar position at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg in Hamburg, Germany. As a staff member (1985-1987) and later team leader (1987-2003) in the Dynamic Materials Properties and Constitutive Modeling Section within the Structure / Property Relations Group (MST-8) at LANL, he has directed a research team working on investigations of the dynamic response of materials. He conducts fundamental, applied, and focused programmatic research on materials and structures, in particular in response to high-strain-rate and shock deformation. His research is focused on experimental and modeling studies of substructure evolution and mechanical response of materials. These constitutive and damage models are utilized in engineering computer codes to support large-scale finite element modeling simulations of structures ranging from national defense (DOE, DoD, DARPA), industry (GM, Ford, Chrysler, and Bettis), foreign object damage, and manufacturing. He is a Life Member of Clare Hall, University of Cambridge in the UK where he was on sabbatical in the summer of 1998. He co-chaired the Physical Metallurgy Gordon Conference in 2000. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society(APS), a Fellow of ASM International(ASM), and a Fellow of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society(TMS). He is a member of APS, ASM, TMS, and serves on the International Scientific Advisory Board of the European DYMAT Association. In 2010, he served as the president of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society. Starting in 2012 he became the chair of the Acta Materialia Board of Governors that oversees the publication of the journals Acta Materialia, Scripta Materialia, Acta Biomaterialia, and Materialia. He has authored or co-authored over 435 technical publications. In 2017, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in materials science in 1981 from Carnegie-Mellon University.
William C. Hix
Maj. Gen. William Hix recently completed a 37-year career in the US Army dedicated to our Nation’s security. He has more than 20 years of experience in strategic leadership, forecasting, development, and execution of innovative strategies to solve complex and adaptive problems. Earlier in his career, Bill served as an Infantry and Special Forces officer, with assignments in Asia and the Middle East, saw service in 3 wars, and participated in multiple peace keeping missions. His last assignment was as Deputy, Army Futures Command Task Force. This Task Force led development of the most significant organizational change to the Army’s modernization system since 1973, with the requirement to radically improve the Army’s ability to keep pace with rapid changes in technology, our adversaries, and the geo-strategic landscape. In this capacity, Bill organized and led diverse teams to understand the implications of these changes and the detailed processes and performance of the Army’s entire strategic forecasting and modernization enterprise, comprising 90,000 personnel and some $30 billion in resources. Deliverables included recommendations to restructure that enterprise and make it more agile and innovative to ensure the Army is best postured for the 21st century. Previously, as the Army’s Chief Strategy Officer, Bill led a wide range of multi-disciplined teams charged with enabling the Army to anticipate, prepare for and effectively navigate current and emerging institutional, operational, international, and strategic challenges to fulfill national security requirements. In this capacity, Bill was responsible for assisting in and advising on the assessment of geo-strategic, threat, and technological trends, determination of strategic, military and program risk, and development of national, defense and Army strategies, plans and programs. These efforts shaped the US Army, an organization with more than 1 million employees, a budget exceeding $125 billion, and a strategic horizon that extends 2 decades. Previous strategy and planning assignments include: as Deputy and Chief of Staff and Director, Concept Development, at the Army Capabilities Integration Center, to drive Army intellectual and technological innovation; as Director for Operational Plans and Joint Force Development, the Joint Staff, advising the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff on warplans across the globe, joint force readiness and joint force innovation; as Strategy Division Chief, the Joint Staff, developing military strategy and assessing risk for the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff; and, in the 1990s, as Chief of Military Art and Concepts, the Army After Next Project forecasting the implications of geo-political and technological trends out to 2025 and developing options for the Army. Bill saw wartime service as Chief of Staff of a 2-star command with country wide responsibility, a Brigade Commander, and Future Operations Director for a 3-star command in Afghanistan; as the Chief Strategy Officer for a 4-star command in Baghdad, Iraq; as a Company Commander in Desert Storm; and conducted peace keeping missions in the Western Sahara and the Sinai. Born in Washington, D.C., Bill holds a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Military Art and Science, was a National Security Affairs Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and is a member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies. A published author, his most recent work is a book chapter in “Assessing War, The Challenge of Measuring Success and Failure” published by Georgetown University Press. A frequent public speaker, he was recently featured at IBM’s ThinkGov conference in May and Defense One’s Tech Summit in June 2018.
Sean Kirkpatrick
Dr. Sean Kirkpatrick is on the visiting faculty at the National Intelligence University. Prior to this, he was appointed Director, National Security Strategy, National Security Council, in June 2017. He brings a significant depth of expertise in scientific and technical intelligence (S&TI) policy, research and development, acquisitions, and operations, specializing in space/counter-space mission areas. After receiving his Ph.D. in physics in 1995, where he focused his research on nonlinear and nonequilibrium phonon dynamics of rare-earth-doped fluoride crystals, he took a postdoctoral position at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, investigating laser-induced molecular vibrations of high explosives under an AFOSR program. In 1996, he was offered a National Research Council Fellowship at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in Washington D.C. investigating novel solid-state lasers for the Department of the Navy. In 1997, he was recruited by the Air Force Research Laboratory to build an Ultrafast Laser Physics Lab to investigate nonlinear optics, novel ultrafast spectroscopic methods, ultrafast phenomena, and nonlinear micro/nano-fabrication techniques for the Air Force. In 2003 he was offered the position of program manager of the Advanced Technologies program for the National Reconnaissance Office. Dr. Kirkpatrick transferred from the Air Force to the CIA in 2005 where he served as a staff scientist for the Directorate of Science and Technology. In 2007, he was assigned as Chief Technology Officer in a joint CIA-DIA program office, within the Advanced Systems Division, where he later became division chief as a DIA officer. In 2010 he was asked to serve as the space control portfolio manager for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense, Space and Intelligence, Office of the Secretary of Defense. From 2012 to 2016, Dr. Kirkpatrick served as the Defense Intelligence Officer for Scientific and Technical Intelligence for DIA. As the DIO/S&TI, he worked as a senior advisor to the Director and Deputy Director of DIA on the full spectrum of intelligence matters related to scientific and technical intelligence topics to include analysis, collection, counterintelligence, international engagement, intelligence policy, and outreach. Dr. Kirkpatrick served as the Department of Defense’s counterpart to the National Intelligence Manager for Science and Technology. Towards the end of his tenure as DIO/S&TI, Dr. Kirkpatrick served on special assignment to the Principal Deputy Director National Intelligence leading the Intelligence Community’s support to the Joint Interagency Combined Space Operations Center (JICSpOC). From 2016 to 2017, Dr. Kirkpatrick was appointed Deputy Director of Intelligence, US Strategic Command. As the DJ2, he supported the Director of Intelligence in delivering global awareness to the Commander USSTRATCOM, enabling the Command’s UCP assigned strategic missions. Dr. Kirkpatrick is the recipient of several scientific and intelligence awards. These include the National Intelligence Exceptional Achievement Medal, four National Intelligence Collaboration medallions, the NRO Innovation and Achievement Award, the Cleary Award for Scientific Excellence, and the DIA Director’s Award for Excellence. Dr. Kirkpatrick holds two open patents and has contributed to several scientific books on nonlinear phenomena and written multiple S&TI strategies for the National and Defense Intelligence Communities.
Vijay Kumar
Dr. Vijay Kumar is the Nemirovsky Family Dean of Penn Engineering with appointments in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Computer and Information Science, and Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. Since 1987, he has served Penn Engineering in many capacities, including Deputy Dean for Research, Deputy Dean for Education, Chairman of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics and Director of the GRASP Laboratory, a multidisciplinary robotics and perception laboratory. Dr. Kumar has served as the assistant director of robotics and cyber physical systems at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (2012 –2013). He received his Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology,Kanpur and his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 1987.
Duncan McGill
Dr. Duncan McGill is currently dean of Ridge College of Intelligence Studies and Applied Sciences at Mercyhurt University in Erie, Pennsylvania. Formerly, he was associate dean of the National Intelligence University, College of Strategic Intelligence, in Washington, D.C., Duncan E. McGill was charged with overseeing the Master of Science program in Strategic Intelligence and the Bachelor of Science program in Intelligence, along with seven graduate certificate programs. He managed the academic, personnel, financial and administrative affairs of the college while communicating its vision and goals to the intelligence community, U.S. Department of Defense and the academic community. His research focuses on science and technology issues affecting U.S. national security, among them cyber, weapons of mass destruction, emerging and disruptive technologies, and the IED capabilities in Iraq. McGill is a retired U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel, serving as a Nuclear and Counter proliferation Officer. He also held joint duty assignments outside the Army at the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Defense Intelligence Agency. Over the years, his deployment and operations travel have taken him to more than two dozen countries, among them Israel, Iraq, Kuwait, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Turkey, Japan, Germany, the UK and Egypt. McGill earned his doctorate in Biological Defense from George Mason University, his Master of Science in National Resource Strategy from the National Defense University, a Master of Arts in Procurement Management from Webster University, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Missouri.
Christina E. Murata
Dr. Christina Murata is senior director at RTI International. She is an expert in national security specializing in chemical and biological defense. She is responsible for the strategic direction and growth of RTI’s program in air quality and exposure. Before joining RTI in 2016, Dr. Murata, a member of the Senior Executive Service, spent 13 years with the federal government, including the Department of Defense and the State Department. In her last federal posting, she led the development of an innovation and advanced technology portfolio for U.S. Customs and Border Protection at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). She also served as Chief of Staff for the DHS Science and Technology Directorate, which works with industry, government, and academia to expand the department’s technological capabilities. Dr. Murata has led a variety of security-related projects in domestic and international settings. At the Department of Defense, she built an autonomous system to protect the Pentagon from chemical or biological attack. As an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) diplomacy fellow at the State Department, she launched a trans-Atlantic conference series on emerging science and technology policy issues and worked to secure dangerous pathogens and weapons expertise in the former Soviet Union.
Albert A. Sciarretta
Mr. Al Sciarretta is president of CNS Technologies, Inc., a company that consults on research and development, experimentation, modeling and simulation, management, and assessment of advanced information, sensor, and test technologies. He is also a consultant and the primary support to the Program Manager (PM), Test and Evaluation/Science and Technology (T&E/S&T) in the office of the Secretary of Defense; and an on-call subject matter expert (SME) for serving on an Independent Review Team (IRT) for assessing Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology technology programs. Mr. Sciarretta is also a retired Army officer. Mr. Sciarretta has a B.S. degree in general engineering from the U.S. Military Academy, and dual M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering and operations research from Stanford University. He has previously served as a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Committees on Army Science and Technology for Homeland Defense: C4ISR; Review of the Department of Defense Air and Space Systems Science and Technology Program; Army Unmanned Ground Vehicle Technologies; and Making the Soldier Decisive on the Future Battlefields.
Geoffrey D. Thome
Mr. Geoff Thome is Senior Program Manager at SAIC. He has been an IT program manager for 28 years of experience supporting the Marine Corps; 23 years in active duty USMC positions, and five years in the defense IT industry. He is particularly skilled in using innovative IT solutions to meet ground Command and Control (C2) challenges for deployed military forces. Relevant experience includes serving three years as an active duty Marine with First Marine Expeditionary Force (I MEF) in Operation Iraqi Freedom. In this position, he developed the Blue Force architecture and managed all Blue Force tracking systems for the 60,000-strong force, including attached British forces. He also managed the deployment, displacement and emplacement of the I MEF Combat Operations Center, a critical mobile C2 facility. As the Senior Information Management (IM) officer, Mr. Thome assumed advocacy responsibilities for Marine Corps IM. During the five years he was in this position, he ensured IM plans, policies, and activities supported world-wide Marine Corps C2 operations. He published updated IM doctrine, and standardized tactical collaboration tools to enhance combat efficiency. Mr. Thome’s current position is as an IT program manager for a major defense contractor. He has managed DOD data center design and build contracts with up to $75 million budgets and more than 50 personnel. He has participated in other cloud and deployment support proposals and contracts valued up to $250 million. Mr. Thome has an M.S. in IT management and an M.S. in software engineering from the Naval Post Graduate School, Monterey, CA. He has a B.S. in computer science applications from the University of Colorado, Boulder, and possess several relevant certifications including PMP.
James E. Thomsen
Mr. James Thomsen is President of Seaborne Defense, LLC. He is the the former Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Research, Development, & Acquisition (ASN(RD&A)). As the Principal Deputy ASN(RD&A), Mr. Thomsen assisted in the oversight and policy for Navy and Marine Corps research, development, and acquisition programs for Shipbuilding, Aviation, Space, and Weapons Systems. Mr. Thomsen has spent more than 35 years supporting the Department of Defense community with engineering design, systems engineering, complex systems program management, enterprise and organizational leadership, and large-scale defense acquisitions. He received a B.S. in Ocean Engineering from Florida Atlantic University, and a M.S. in Management from Florida State University.
Josep Torrellas
Dr. Josep Torrellas is the Saburo Muroga Professor of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). He is the director of the Center for Programmable Extreme Scale Computing, and past director of the Illinois-Intel Parallelism Center (I2PC). He is a fellow of IEEE (2004), ACM (2010), and AAAS (2016). He received the IEEE Computer Society 2015 Technical Achievement Award, for "Pioneering contributions to shared-memory multiprocessor architectures and thread-level speculation", and the 2017 UIUC Campus Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Mentoring. He is a member of the Computing Research Association (CRA) Board of Directors. He has served as the chair of the IEEE Technical Committee on Computer Architecture (TCCA) (2005-2010) and as a council member of CRA’s Computing Community Consortium (CCC) (2011-2014). He was a Willett Faculty Scholar at UIUC (2002-2009). As of 2016, he has graduated 36 Ph.D. students, who are now leaders in academia and industry. He received a Ph.D. from Stanford University.

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001

Zoom
Washington, DC, USA

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The DASA(R&T) requested the Board on Army Research and Development (BOARD) to examine how Machine Learning (ML) and emerging High Performance Computing (HPC) technologies can contribute to improving Soldier lethality and survivability in Multi-Domain Operations (MDO) by reducing uncertainty and increasing information fusion ability, thereby improving situational awareness and reducing decision cycle time for the lowest echelon forces (a.k.a. the edge of the modern battlefield).  The BOARD will conduct an August 2020 forum and possible follow-on efforts to examine these opportunities.

 

The committee will examine two major aspects of ML and HPC technologies for MDO for mounted and dismounted soldiers up to the battalion echelon: 1) What soldier considerations (e.g.,  soldier-machine interfaces; space, weight, and power (SWaP) issues for dismounted soldiers; information and decision making needs in lower echelon units; impact on DOTMLPF-P for lower echelon forces, etc.) will enable Army R&D efforts to improve human performance considerations and accelerate the eventual adoption of ML emerging HPC technologies to benefit the Soldier in MDO and 2) Recommendations that will speed discovery of promising ML and HPC technical solutions to address the challenges of MDO up to the battalion echelon.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Cameron Malcom
Contact Email:  cmalcom@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The Board on Army Research and Development (BOARD) will convene a forum to explore how the Army can prevent strategic surprise through improved use of Intelligence forecasting tools, improved adaptation of machine learning (ML) algorithms and other relevant practices. The forum will look at how to best leverage machine learning and related tools and practices both to improve support for R&D and acquisition and provide strategic policy makers with foresight to improve effective decision making and extend associated decision time horizons. The forum will also examine and identify areas of promising research and areas for future research.

 

The forum will examine how intelligence and S&T forecasting informs scientific, intelligence assessments, and programming decisions by related decision makers and policy makers’ timely anticipation of strategic threats, issues, and crises to enable anticipation and preclusive actions.

 

The forum will:

  1. Understand current forecasting practices, models and other tools and their strengths and limitations across academia, industry, and government.
  2. Uncover practical adaptations for the Army as to how ML can be used to expose telltale behaviors, determine intent and mitigate strategic surprise to inform S&T and military policy decisions.
  3. Explore areas of promising research and areas for future research to further improve foresight in both areas, as well as challenging areas such as emulation of human behavior, accounting for the element of culture.
  4. Discuss the Joint Staff’s cognitive computing initiative to understand strategic leader requirements and its implication for Army S&T and senior leaders.

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Aanika Senn
Contact Email:  asenn@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3947

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

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Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The DASA(R&T) requested the Board on Army Research and Development (BOARD) to examine how Machine Learning (ML) and emerging High Performance Computing (HPC) technologies can contribute to improving Soldier lethality and survivability in Multi-Domain Operations (MDO) by reducing uncertainty and increasing information fusion ability, thereby improving situational awareness and reducing decision cycle time for the lowest echelon forces (a.k.a. the edge of the modern battlefield).  The BOARD will conduct an August 2020 forum and possible follow-on efforts to examine these opportunities.

 

The committee will examine two major aspects of ML and HPC technologies for MDO for mounted and dismounted soldiers up to the battalion echelon: 1) What soldier considerations (e.g.,  soldier-machine interfaces; space, weight, and power (SWaP) issues for dismounted soldiers; information and decision making needs in lower echelon units; impact on DOTMLPF-P for lower echelon forces, etc.) will enable Army R&D efforts to improve human performance considerations and accelerate the eventual adoption of ML emerging HPC technologies to benefit the Soldier in MDO and 2) Recommendations that will speed discovery of promising ML and HPC technical solutions to address the challenges of MDO up to the battalion echelon.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Aanika Senn
Contact Email:  asenn@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3947

Agenda
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Supporting File(s)
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Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

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Publications

Publications

No data present.