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Project Information

Project Information


Standing Committee on Advancing Science Communication Research and Practice


Project Scope:

The proposed standing committee will build capacity for science communication research, strengthen connections between science communication research and practice, and sustain and expand networks of science communication practitioners and researchers that have emerged as a result of the Arthur M. Sackler Colloquia series and related activities.  Specifically, the committee will: (1) award research grants to encourage researcher-practitioner partnerships (see separate GBEC item),  (2) develop and convene workshops for awardees and the broader scientific and practitioner community on topics critical to advancing research and practice, and (3) develop mechanisms for systematic gathering of information about issues of greatest concern to science communication practitioners that research can address to inform its activities and dissemination of messages from synthesized science communication research.

Committee members will plan workshops, augmented with outside expertise.  Separate GBEC approvals will be sought for each of the workshops.  The committee will not itself produce reports.






Status: Current

PIN: DBASSE-Ad Hoc-17-04

RSO: Rhodes, Holly

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Ad Hoc Activity

Topic(s):

Behavioral and Social Sciences



Geographic Focus:
North America

Committee Membership


Ann M. Bartuska - (Co-Chair)
Ann Bartuska (Co-Chair) is vice president for the Land, Water, and Nature Program at Resources for the Future. She previously served as the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) deputy under secretary for Research, Education, and Economics as well as chief scientist. Prior to that position, she was deputy chief for research and development in the USDA Forest Service, a position she held since January 2004. She recently served as acting USDA deputy undersecretary for natural resources and environment from, and was the executive director of the Invasive Species Initiative in the Nature Conservancy. Prior to this, she was the director of the Forest and Range-lands staff in the Forest Service in Washington, DC. She co-chaired the National Academies’ Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability and the Ecological Systems subcommittee of the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources of the White House National Science and Technology Council. She has served on the board of the Council of Science Society Presidents and is a member of AAAS and of the Society of American Foresters. She is an ecosystem ecologist with a Ph.D. from West Virginia University.
Dietram A. Scheufele - (Co-Chair)
Dietram Scheufele (Co-Chair) is the John E. Ross professor in science communication in the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and in the Morgridge Institute for Research. Dr. Scheufele is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the International Communication Association, and the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters, and a member of the German National Academy of Science and Engineering. He has been a tenured faculty member at Cornell University, a Shorenstein fellow at Harvard University, and a visiting scholar at the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Scheufele has served on several committees of the National Academies, including as the vice chair of the National Academies Committee on the Science of Science Communication and the Roundtable on the Public Interfaces of Life Sciences Roundtable. Dr. Scheufele is currently a member of the Board on Health Policy, the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE) Advisory Committee, the Division on Earth and Life Studies (DELS) Advisory Committee, and the Committee on Reproducibility and Replicability in Science. He received a Ph.D. in mass communications with a minor in political science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Angela Bednarek
Angela Bednarek is project director in environmental science at the Pew Charitable Trust. She develops strategy for Pew’s environmental science initiatives, which develop, support, and communicate scientific research and technical analyses to explain emerging issues, inform policy, and advance solutions to conservation problems. She focuses on assessing and enhancing the policy relevance of Pew’s research investments and brings scholars and practitioners together to improve the connections between science and policy. Before joining Pew, Bednarek was a foreign affairs officer and the American Association for the Advancement of Science diplomacy fellow in the U.S. State Department’s Office of Environmental Policy, where she coordinated and negotiated U.S. positions on the Global Environment Facility, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and the environmental impacts of World Bank projects. Dr. Bednarek holds a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Pennsylvania.
Georges C. Benjamin
Georges Benjamin (NAM) has served as the executive director of the American Public Health Association, the nation’s oldest and largest organization of public health professionals, since December 2002. Well known as a health leader, practitioner, and administrator, he is a former secretary of health for the State of Maryland. He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine.He is board certified in internal medicine, a master of the American College of Physicians, a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, and a fellow emeritus of the American College of Emergency Physicians. He serves on several nonprofit boards, including for Research!America, the Truth Initiative and the Reagan–Udall Foundation. Dr. Benjamin received his M.D. from the University of Illinois College of Medicine.
Cynthia Coburn
Cynthia E. Coburn is a professor at the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. Coburn’s research has examined the use of research in practice and policy in school settings. She has also examined research-practice partnerships in educational contexts. She helps to lead a National Center for Research in Policy and Practice, funded by the Institute on Education Sciences, which focuses on measuring use of research, understanding use of research in decisionmaking, and use of research in research-practice partnerships, among other topics. She also studies the relationship between instructional policy and teachers' classroom practices in urban schools. To date, Coburn has investigated this issue in a series of studies that tackle critical issues facing public schools: the relationship between reading policy and teachers' classroom practice, the scale-up of innovative mathematics curricula, data use at the district level, and the relationship between research and practice for school improvement. In 2011, Coburn was awarded the Early Career Award from the American Educational Research Association in recognition of her contributions to the field of educational research in the first decade of her career. Dr, Coburn has a Ph.D. in education from Stanford University.
James Druckman
James Druckman is the Payson S. Wild professor of political science and faculty fellow at the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University. He is also an honorary professor of political science at Aarhus University in Denmark. His research focuses on political preference formation and communication. His recent work examines how citizens make political, economic, and social decisions in various contexts (e.g., settings with multiple competing messages, online information, deliberation). He also researches the relationship between citizens' preferences and public policy, and how political elites make decisions under varying institutional conditions. Druckman has published roughly 100 articles and book chapters in political science, communication, economic, science, and psychology journals. He has served as editor of the journals Political Psychology and Public Opinion Quarterly as well as the University of Chicago Press's series in American Politics. He also sits on numerous advisory boards, organizing committees, prize committees, and editorial boards. Druckman's work has been recognized with numerous awards including over 15 best paper/book awards. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, San Diego.
Kirsten Ellenbogen
Kirsten Ellenbogen is the president and chief executive officer of the Great Lakes Science Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Currently, she is co-principal investigator of the Center for Advancement of Informal Science Education that works in collaboration with the National Science Foundation to strengthen and advance the field of informal STEM education and its infrastructure by providing resources and building community. Previously, Dr. Ellenbogen has worked at five museums during the past two decades and consulted for more than 30. She was appointed to the National Academy of Sciences' committee that produced the volume, Learning Science in Informal Environments. In 2007, she was elected president of the Visitor Studies Association, a national association dedicated to understanding and enhancing learning experiences in informal settings through research, evaluation and dialogue. Dr. Ellenbogen's learning research has focused on measuring the community impact of science centers, documenting the role of museums in family life, designing informal learning experiences to encourage science conversations, and the identifying of how scientific visualization technologies can be used to engage the public in exploring scientific data and understanding complex phenomena. She earned a Ph.D. in science education from Vanderbilt University.
John Gastil
John Gastil is professor of communication arts and sciences and political science and a senior scholar at the McCourtney Institute for Democracy at Pennsylvania State University. He studies political deliberation and group decision making across a range of contexts. His work on the Citizens’ Initiative Review has helped evaluate a new form of public deliberation to improve elections. The Jury and Democracy Project investigated the jury system as a valuable civic educational institution. He assisted with the Cultural Cognition Project in demonstrating the ways in which values bias how we learn about issues and form opinions. His ideas have been shared in two books: Political Communication and Deliberation and The Group in Society. He earned his Ph.D. in communication arts from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.
William K. Hallman
William Hallman is professor and chair of the department of human ecology, a member of the graduate faculty of the department of nutritional sciences, and of the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, as well as a Distinguished Research Fellow of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania. His research examines public perceptions of controversial issues concerning food, health, technology, and the environment. Dr. Hallman is also a member of the National Academies’ Climate Communications Initiative Advisory Committee and has served as chair of the Risk Communication Advisory Committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and as Director of the Food Policy Institute at Rutgers. Dr. Hallman is a graduate of Juniata College in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, and received an M.A. and Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of South Carolina.
Laura Helmuth
Laura Helmuth is the editor of the Washington Post’s national health, science and environment team and the immediate past president of the National Association of Science Writers. She has previously been an editor for National Geographic, Slate, Smithsonian and Science magazines. She serves on the advisory boards of High Country News, Spectrum, and Knowable magazines and the Geological Society of Washington. She holds a Ph.D. in cognitive neuroscience from the University of California at Berkeley.


Ellen Konar
Ellen Konar is an expert on marketing strategy and research. Konar has developed and overseen marketing and research teams at Google and Intel. As director of Customer Labs at Google she developed innovations in acquiring and using data to understand and improve communications and relationships with consumers. She currently serves as consulting scholar to the Stanford University’s Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. She also is advisor to Lean In, a global community dedicated to helping women achieve their ambitions, and to Qualtrics, a privately held experience management company. She serves on the board of Mindset Works which provides training based on the pioneering mindset research of Carol Dweck, and is founder of the Mindset Works Scholars Network. Early in her career Konar was managed communications research at IBM. Konar has held teaching and researching appointments at Stanford University’s School of Business, University of California Berkley and University of Western Ontario. Dr. Konar received her Ph.D. in social organizational psychology from SUNY at Buffalo.
David Lazer
David Lazer is a distinguished professor of political science and computer and information science at Northeastern University, and co-director for the NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks. Prior to joining Northeastern University, he was on the faculty at the Harvard Kennedy School. His research focuses on the nexus of network science, computational social science, and collaborative intelligence. He is the founder of the citizen science website Volunteer Science and the political visualization website VisPolics. His research has been published in such journals as Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, the American Political Science Review, and the Administrative Science Quarterly, and has received extensive coverage in the media, including the New York Times, NPR, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and CBS Evening News. Lazer serves in multiple leadership and editorial positions, and was a founder of the Political Networks Section, as well as a founder and founding host of the Political Networks conference. Dr. Lazer earned a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Michigan.
Elizabeth F. Loftus
Elizabeth Loftus (NAS) is distinguished professor and a professor of law at the University of California, Irvine. She holds positions in the department of psychological science, and the department of criminology, law and society. She alsobhas a faculty appointment in the department of cognitive sciences, is a fellow of the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, and was the founding director of the Center for Psychology and Law. Formerly, she was professor of psychology and adjunct professor of law at the University of Washington, Seattle, where she taught for 29 years. Loftus's research has focused on human memory, eyewitness testimony and also on courtroom procedure. She has published 23 books and over 600 scientific articles. Her 4th book, Eyewitness Testimony, won a National Media Award (Distinguished Contribution) from the American Psychological Foundation. She has also served as an expert witness or consultant in hundreds of well-known court cases. Loftus is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and has earned numerous awards for her scholarship and contributions to the field of psychology. She earned her Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University.
Amelie G. Ramirez
Amelie Ramirez (NAM) is director of Salud America! and a professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, where she also is founding director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research and associate director of cancer prevention and health disparities at the Mays Cancer Center, an NCI-designated cancer center. Over the past 30 years, Ramirez has conducted communications research and behavioral interventions that have made tremendous strides to reduce cancer and chronic disease, increase screening rates and clinical trial accrual, and improve healthy lifestyles among U.S. Latinos. Ramirez currently directs the Salud America! national multimedia program to empower its vast network of 200,000 community leaders to drive healthy policy and system changes to promote health equity and support for Latino families (www.salud-america.org and @SaludAmerica on social media). Dr. Ramirez also directs Quitxt, a bilingual tobacco-cessation service for young Latino adults using mobile-phone text messages; the service yielded a strong 21% quit rate among enrollees at follow-up. She also has trained/mentored 250+ Latinos in health fields, and leads the Éxito! training program to help master’s-level students and professionals pursue a doctoral degree and cancer research career.. She has been recognized for her work to improve Latino health and advance Latinos in health, including: 2018 Icons in Healthcare Award from CentroMed; 2014 APHA Everett M. Rogers Public Health Communication Award; 2014 Making a Difference Award from Latinas Contra Cancer; 2011 White House “Champion of Change”; and 2007 election to the National Academy of Medicine. Ramirez also is a 2018 Susan G. Komen Scholar and a member of the scientific advisory board of LIVESTRONG. She is a member of the San Antonio Mayor’s Fitness Council, which has overseen implementation of healthy lifestyle programs that have lowered local obesity rates. She also serves on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Roundtable on Obesity Solutions. Ramirez, a native of Laredo, Texas, earned MPH and DrPH degrees from UT Health Science Center at the Houston School of Public Health.
Kasisomayajula Viswanath
Kasisomayajula “Vish” Viswanath is Lee Kum Kee Professor of Health Communication in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health (HSPH) and in the McGraw-Patterson Center for Population Sciences at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI). He is also the Faculty Director of the Health Communication Core of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC). Other additional administrative and scientific leadership positions held by Dr. Viswanath include: Director of the Center for Translational Communication Science, DFCI/Harvard Chan; Co-Director, Lee Kum Sheung Center for Health and Happiness, Harvard Chan; and, Director, Harvard Chan, India Research Center. He is the founding Director of DF/HCC’s Enhancing Communications for Health Outcomes (ECHO) Laboratory. Dr. Viswanath’s work, drawing from literatures in communication science, social epidemiology, and social and health behavior sciences, focuses on translational communication science to influence public health policy and practice. His primary research is in documenting the relationship between communication inequalities, poverty and health disparities, and knowledge translation to address health disparities. He has written more than 240 journal articles and book chapters concerning communication inequalities and health disparities, knowledge translation, public health communication campaigns, e-health and digital divide, public health preparedness and the delivery of health communication interventions to underserved populations. He is the co-editor of four books and monographs: Mass Media, Social Control and Social Change (Iowa State University Press, 1999), Health Behavior and Health Education: Theory, Research & Practice (Jossey Bass, 2015), The Role of Media in Promoting and Reducing Tobacco Use (National Cancer Institute, 2008) and A Socioecological Approach to Addressing Tobacco-Related Health Disparities (National Cancer Institute, 2017). He was also the Editor of the Social and Behavioral Research section of the 12-volume International Encyclopedia of Communication (Blackwell Publishing, 2008). Dr. Viswanath received his Ph.D. in mass communication from the University of Minnesota.
Itzhak Yanovitzky
Itzhak Yanovitzky is associate professor of communication at Rutgers,The State University of New Jersey. He is an expert in the areas of behavior change communication, social norms, public policy, translational research, and program evaluation. He has extensive experience working across disciplines as well as with individuals and communities to build capacity around health and wellness issues, including most recently community organizing efforts to address the opioid and heroin epidemic. His current research also explore strategies for improving use of research evidence in policy and practice. He published a chapter in the Sage Handbook of Mass Media Effects on quantitative methods and causal inference in media effects research. Dr. Yanovitzky is regularly called upon to provide expert scientific advice and services to national and international health agencies and serves on the editorial board of several leading journals. He earned his Ph.D. in communication from the University of Pennsylvania.
Holly Rhodes - (Staff Officer)

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Leticia Garcilazo Green
Contact Email:  lgreen@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3212

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Leticia Garcilazo Green
Contact Email:  lgreen@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3212

Agenda
-
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Conflict and Bias Discussion
Roles, Goals, and Priorities of Committee
Brainstorming Sessions on Building Networks and Knowledge Base

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

N/A

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
June 13, 2019
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

Publications

No data present.