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Project Information

Project Information


Depicting Innovation in Information Technology


Project Scope:

An Academies committee will update the “tire tracks” figure published in CSTB’s 2012 report Continuing Innovation in Information Technology. Drawing on a literature review, input from experts, and suggestions solicited from the relevant communities, it will identify emerging research areas and significant new industries, products, and firms. Using a graphical approach similar to that used in 2012, it will depict the interconnections across research areas and with the creation and evolution of IT industry sectors. It will illustrate the roles of industry, academia, and government in computing innovation and the development of IT products, services, and industries and consider if and how these roles may have evolved since the last report. In addition to presenting established computing research areas and industry sectors, it will also consider emerging candidates in both categories.

A panel focused on the subfield of artificial intelligence (AI) will prepare an approximately 5 page report that will include: (1) A short narrative description of the subfield, its accomplishments, and likely future research directions; (2) Key examples of developments, research outcomes, the flow of people and ideas, and associated sources of (federal) research funding; and (3) A visualization of key developments and funding sources in the subfield following the framework and visual presentation used in the main report.

An Academies report will be prepared containing the figure together with a review of lessons learned about the structure and nature of information technology research and its impacts. The material prepared by the AI panel will be included as an appendix to the main report and cited or integrated in the main report as deemed appropriate by the study committee. Two derivative products will be prepared: (1) a brochure containing the figure and a summary of the report’s analysis and (2) a Web interactive infographic that links the figure to more detail on selected topics and connections drawn from earlier Academies work and other sources.

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-CSTB-17-01

Project Duration (months): 16 month(s)

RSO: Eisenberg, Jon

Topic(s):

Computers and Information Technology
Policy for Science and Technology



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 05/13/2019

Elizabeth Mynatt - (Chair)
Elizabeth Mynatt is distinguished professor in the College of Computing and the Executive Director of Georgia Tech’s Institute for People and Technology. There she investigates the design and evaluation of health information technologies including creating personalized mobile technology for supporting breast cancer patients during their cancer journey, evaluating mobile sensing and mHealth engagement for pediatric epilepsy patients and their caregivers, and investigating the positive and negative influence of social media on self-harm behaviors such as eating disorders. She is also one of the principal researchers in the Aware Home Research Initiative; investigating the design of future home technologies, especially those that enable older adults to continue living independently as opposed to moving to an institutional care setting. Mynatt is an internationally recognized expert in the areas of ubiquitous computing and assistive technologies. Her research contributes to ongoing work in personal health informatics, computer-supported collaborative work and human-computer interface design. Mynatt is also past chair of the Computing Community Consortium, an NSF-sponsored effort to engage the computing research community in envisioning more audacious research challenges. She serves as member of the National Academies Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, the NSF CISE Advisory Board, and as an ACM Council Member at Large. She has been recognized as an ACM Fellow, a member of the SIGCHI Academy, and a Sloan and Kavli Research fellow. She has published more than 100 scientific papers and chaired the CHI 2010 conference, the premier international conference in human-computer interaction. Prior to joining the Georgia Tech faculty in 1998, Mynatt was a member of the research staff at Xerox PARC. Mynatt earned her Bachelor of Science summa cum laude in computer science from North Carolina State University and her Master of Science and Ph.D. in computer science from Georgia Tech.
David E. Culler
David Culler (NAE) is a professor at the University of California, Berkeley. He joined the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science faculty in 1989; is the founding director of Intel Research, UC Berkeley; and was associate chair of the EECS Department, 2010-2012 and chair from 2012 through June 30, 2014. He won the Okawa Prize in 2013. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, an ACM Fellow, and an IEEE Fellow. He has been named one of Scientific American's Top 50 Researchers and is the creator of one of MIT's Technology Review's 10 Technologies that Will Change the World. He was awarded the NSF Presidential Young Investigator and the Presidential Faculty Fellowship. His research addresses networks of small embedded wireless devices, planetary-scale internet services, parallel computer architecture, parallel programming languages, and high-performance communication. It includes TinyOS, Berkeley Motes, PlanetLab, Networks of Workstations (NOW), Internet services, Active Messages, Split-C, and the Threaded Abstract Machine (TAM). He received his B.A. from UC Berkeley in 1980, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from MIT in 1985 and 1989, respectively.
Odest C. Jenkins
Odest Chadwicke (Chad) Jenkins is an associate professor of Computer Science and Engineering and a member of the Robotics Institute at the University of Michigan. He previously served on the faculty of Brown University in Computer Science (2004-15). His research addresses problems in interactive robotics and human-robot interaction, primarily focused on mobile manipulation, robot perception, and robot learning from demonstration. His research often intersects topics in computer vision, machine learning, and computer animation. Prof. Jenkins has been recognized as a Sloan Research Fellow and is a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). His work has also been supported by Young Investigator awards from the Office of Naval Research (ONR), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Prof. Jenkins is currently serving as editor-in-chief for the ACM Transactions on Human-Robot Interaction. He is a senior member of the Association for Computing Machinery and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He is currently a member of the Defense Science Study Group (2018-2019). Prof. Jenkins earned his B.S. in computer science and mathematics at Alma College (1996), M.S. in computer science at Georgia Tech (1998), and Ph.D. in computer science at the University of Southern California (2003).
Tom M. Mitchell
Tom Mitchell (NAE) is the E. Fredkin University Professor at Carnegie Mellon University, where he founded the world's first Machine Learning Department. Mitchell's research lies in machine learning, artificial intelligence, and cognitive neuroscience. His current research includes developing machine learning approaches to natural language understanding by computers, as well as brain imaging studies of natural language understanding by humans. Mitchell is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, the American Association of Arts and Sciences, and is past president of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence. In 2015 he was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Laws Degree from Dalhousie University for his contributions to machine learning and cognitive neuroscience, and in 2017 he received the 10-Year Outstanding Research Contributions Award from the Brain Informatics Conference for his research studying language processing in the human brain.
J. Greg Morrisett
Greg Morrisett is dean of Computing and Information Sciences (CIS) at Cornell University, which houses the departments of Computer Science, Information Science, and Statistical Sciences. Previously, he held the Allen B. Cutting Chair in Computer Science at Harvard University from 2004-2015. At Harvard, he also served as the associate dean for Computer Science and Electrical Engineering and as the director of the Center for Research on Computation and Society. Before Harvard, Morrisett spent eight years on the faculty of Cornell's Computer Science Department. Professor Morrisett's research focuses on the application of programming language technology for building secure, reliable, and high-performance software systems. A common theme is the focus on systems-level languages and tools that can help detect or prevent common vulnerabilities in software. Past examples include typed assembly language, proof-carrying code, software fault isolation, and control-flow isolation. Recently, his research focuses on building provably correct and secure software, including a focus on cryptographic schemes, machine learning, and compilers. Morrisett is a fellow of the ACM and has received a number of awards for his research on programming languages, type systems, and software security, including a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, an IBM Faculty Fellowship, an NSF Career Award, and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship. He served as chief editor for the Journal of Functional Programming and as an associate editor for ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems, Information Processing Letters, and The Journal of the ACM. He currently serves as co-editor-in-chief for the Research Highlights column of Communications of the ACM. In addition, Morrisett has served on the DARPA Information Science and Technology Study (ISAT) Group, the NSF Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) Advisory Council, The Max Planck Institute for Software Systems Advisory Board, the Computing Research Association Board, Microsoft Research's Technical Advisory Board, Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing Academic Advisory Board, and the Fortify Technical Advisory Board. He received his bachelor's degree from the University of Richmond and both his master's and doctorate degrees from Carnegie Mellon University.
Shwetak N. Patel
Shwetak N. Patel is the Washington Research Foundation Entrepreneurship Endowed Professor in the Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering and the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Washington, where he directs his research group, the Ubicomp Lab. His research interests are in the areas of human-computer interaction, ubiquitous computing, sensor-enabled embedded systems, and user interface software and technology. His work includes developing new sensing systems, energy and water sensing, mobile health, and developing new interaction technologies. Dr. Patel was a founder of Zensi, Inc., a residential energy monitoring company (acquired by Belkin, Inc., in 2010), a co-founder of a low-power wireless sensor platform company called SNUPI Technologies and a consumer home sensing product called WallyHome (acquired by Sears in 2015), and a founder of mobile health company called Senosis Health (acquired by Google in 2018). Dr. Patel is a recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship (2011), the ACM Prize in Computing (2018), Microsoft Research Faculty Fellowship (2011), Sloan Fellowship (2012), MIT TR-35 Award (2009), World Economic Forum Young Global Scientist Award (2013), NSF Career Award (2013), and the Presidential PECASE Award (2016). He is also an ACM fellow. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2008, and B.S. in computer science in 2003.


Margo I. Seltzer
Margo Seltzer (NAE) is a Canada 150 Research Chair at the University of British Columbia and was the Herchel Smith Professor of Computer Science until 2018. Her research interests are in systems, construed quite broadly: systems for capturing and accessing data provenance, file systems, databases, transaction processing systems, storage and analysis of graph-structured data, new architectures for parallelizing execution, and systems that apply technology to problems in healthcare. She is the author of several widely-used software packages including database and transaction libraries and the 4.4BSD log-structured file system. Dr. Seltzer was a founder and CTO of Sleepycat Software, the makers of Berkeley DB and is now an architect for Oracle Corporation. She is the USENIX representative to the Computing Research Association Board of Directors, a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies, and a past president of the USENIX Association. She is a Sloan Foundation Fellow in Computer Science, an ACM Fellow, a Bunting Fellow, and was the recipient of the 1996 Radcliffe Junior Faculty Fellowship, and the University of California Microelectronics Scholarship. She is recognized as an outstanding teacher and won the Phi Beta Kappa teaching award in 1996, and the Abrahmson Teaching Award in 1999. Seltzer received an A.B. degree in applied mathematics from Harvard/Radcliffe College in 1983 and a Ph. D. in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1992.


Robert F. Sproull
Robert F. Sproull (NAE) recently retired as vice president and director of Oracle Labs, an applied research group that originated at Sun Microsystems. Since undergraduate days, he has been building hardware and software for computer graphics: clipping hardware, an early device-independent graphics package, page description languages, laser printing software, and window systems. He has also been involved in VLSI design, especially of asynchronous circuits and systems. Before joining Sun Microsystems in 1990 (acquired by Oracle in 2010), he was a principal with Sutherland, Sproull and Associates, an associate professor at Carnegie Mellon University and a member of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. He is a coauthor with William Newman of the early text, Principles of Interactive Computer Graphics. He is also an author of the book Logical Effort, which deals with designing fast CMOS circuits. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has served on the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and as a technology partner of Advanced Technology Ventures. He is currently a co-chair of the National Research Council's Report Review Committee, a member of the NRC Committee on Science, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Policy (COSEMPUP), and an adjunct professor of computer science at University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Shenae Bradley
Contact Email:  sbradley@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2605

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
TeleConference

Description :   

6:00 - 6:30 pm Jim Kurose, National Science Foundation Assistant Director for Computer & Information Science & Enginereing


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Katiria Ortiz
Contact Email:  kortiz@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2224

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.