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Project Information

Project Information


Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine


Project Scope:

The scientific, engineering, and medical communities have been working towards improved representation of women in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) for decades. While progress has been made, women (particularly women of color) remain underrepresented in many scientific, engineering, and medical fields, and at many levels in education and career stages. This study will seek to understand institutional barriers to implementing practices for improving the representation of women in STEMM, so that those barriers can be removed or overcome. Importantly, the study will not put the onus on women, but instead will focus on helping institutions understand how to remove the barriers that exist because of outmoded institutional structures. Considerable energy will be invested in examining the evidence behind the most successful policies, practices, and strategies that have demonstrated effectiveness in opening doors to women’s participation and success in STEMM fields.

An ad hoc committee will undertake the following activities:

• A comparative examination of research on why women are more underrepresented in some STEMM disciplines than others, with a particular focus on computer science, engineering, physics, mathematics, medicine, chemistry, and biology;

• A review, analysis, and synthesis of existing research on the policies, practices, programs, and other interventions for improving the recruitment, retention, and sustained advancement into leadership roles of women in these disciplines and at different stages in career trajectories;

• An exploration of why effective interventions have not been scaled up or adopted by more institutions; and

• The development of recommendations for implementing promising policies and practices to improve both the representation and leadership of women within specific STEMM disciplines.

The study will also place a strong emphasis on the intersection of race and gender by considering the accumulated research on specific barriers faced by women of color in STEMM in addition to the research on policies and practices that have had an impact on their representation.

The committee will produce a consensus report with findings and recommendations. It may also convene a workshop to gather information and another to disseminate the report’s findings, each of which may result in a rapporteur-authored workshop proceedings in brief.

Status: Current

PIN: PGA-BHEW-17-01

Project Duration (months): 18 month(s)

RSO: Bear, Ashley

Topic(s):

Education
Policy for Science and Technology



Geographic Focus:
North America

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 11/15/2018

Mae C. Jemison - (Chair)
Mae Jemison, M.D., is president of the BioSentient Corporation and the first African American woman to go into space. She is also principal of 100 Year Starship, a collaborative effort to make human travel beyond the solar system a reality within the next 100 years. Prior to becoming an astronaut, Dr. Jemison practiced medicine in Los Angeles and was the Area Peace Corps medical officer for Sierra Leone and Liberia in West Africa. Dr. Jemison served six years as a NASA astronaut, and in 1992 served as a mission specialist on STS-47 aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. After retiring from NASA in 1993, Dr. Jemison founded the Jemison Group, Inc., a private company that aims to research, develop, and implmenet advanced technologies suited to the social, political, and cultural contexts of the developing world. She also founded the non-profit Dorothy Jemison Foundation for Excellence, which hosts an annual international science camp for teenagers. From 1995 to 2002, Dr. Jemison taught environmental studies at Dartmouth College and was an A.D. White Professor-at-large at Cornell University. Dr. Jemison was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2001, and served on the Committee on the Space Station (1995-1997), the Committee for Technological Literacy (1999-2002), and the Committee on Aerospace Medicine and Medicine of Extreme Environments (2014-2017). Dr. Jemison received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University and her medical degree from Cornell University.
Diana Bilmoria
Diana Bilimoria, Ph.D., is the KeyBank Professor and Chair of the Department of Organizational Behavior at the Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Bilimoria's research focuses on gender diversity in governance and leadership, and organizational transformation. Her research has been used to facilitate the institutional transformation of research universities to become more inclusive of the success and contributions of women faculty. As a scholar, coach, educator, and consultant, Dr. Bilimoria helps individuals and organizations enhance their leadership contributions and impact to create positive benefits for the betterment of society. Dr. Bilimoria received her PhD in 1990 from the University of Michigan and an MMS from University of Bombay.
John C. Boothroyd
John Boothroyd, Ph.D., (NAS) is the Burt and Marion Avery Professor of Immunology in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University School of Medicine where he studies the pathogenesis of parasitic infections, most notably Toxoplasma gondii. In addition to his research, he is also heavily committed to undergraduate, graduate and post-doctoral training, including trainee professional development. Dr. Boothroyd received his undergraduate degree in Cell, Molecular, and Developmental Biology from McGill University in Montreal, Canada, and his PhD in Molecular Biology from Edinburgh University in Scotland.
Phyllis L. Carr
Phyllis L. Carr, M.D., is Associate Dean of Students at the Boston University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts, and Associate Professor of Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. She was formerly the Director of the Women’s Health Elective at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Dr. Carr previously served as the curriculum coordinator for the Primary Care Training Program at Boston City Hospital. She has a long-standing interest in Women in Academic Medicine, with publications in journals such as JAMA, the Annals of Internal Medicine, the Journal of General Medicine and Clinical Journal of Women’s Health. Dr. Carr is a frequent reviewer of articles on women in academic medicine for JAMA, the Annals of Internal Medicine, the Journal of General Internal Medicine and the Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Her ongoing research includes a study of gender differences in the rewards of academic medicine, issues of gender and power for advancement of women in medicine. Dr. Carr was the principal investigator on a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Grant completed in 1995 on the Advancement of Women, Minorities and Generalists in Academic Medicine, and was selected by Dr. Matina Horner to Co-Chair a Task Force on the Advancement and Support of Women in Academic Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr. Carr received her M.D. (1978) in Internal Medicine from Harvard Medial School.
Sapna Cheryan
Sapna Cheryan, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Social Psychology at the University of Washington. Her research investigates the role of cultural stereotypes in causing and perpetuating racial and gender disparities in U.S. society. In 2009, Dr. Cheryan received the National Science Foundation CAREER Award. In 2012-2013, she was a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation in New York City, and in 2016-2017, was a Lenore Annenberg and Wallis Annenberg Fellow in Communication at Stanford University’s CASBS. Dr. Cheryan currently serves on the Social Science Advisory Board of the National Center of Women in Information Technology and on Mattel’s Global Advisory Council. She earned her PhD in Pysychology from Stanford University in 2007.
Jamie L. Curtis-Fisk
Jaime Curtis-Fisk, Ph.D., is a STEM program leader and an R&D scientist for the Dow Chemical Company. Her primary focus area is leading the Dow STEM Ambassadors, the employee engagement program that focuses on unique approaches to connect the passion of STEM professionals to opportunities for impact in their local communities and through partner universities. Her technical expertise focuses on polymer chemistry and utilizing material science to develop new delivery systems for active ingredients. Dr. Curtis-Fisk is also very passionate about building the pipeline of future women scientists. She is involved with several initiatives that support the role of women in STEM, including serving on the American Chemical Society’s Women Chemist Committee. Dr. Curtis-Fisk is a member of the Board on Higher Education and Workforce. She received her PhD in Chemistry with certification in College Teaching from Michigan State University in 2008.
Irene Fonseca
Irene Fonseca, Ph.D., is Professor of Mathematics in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University. She is an internationally respected educator and researcher in applied mathematics. Dr. Fonseca is the director of Carnegie Mellon's Center for Nonlinear Analysis (CNA). The CNA is one of the few centers in the United States that receives significant federal funding for research in applied mathematics. For her teaching and research contributions to Carnegie Mellon University, Fonseca was honored with the Mellon College of Science endowed chair in 2003 and named a University Professor in 2014. In 2012, Dr. Fonseca she was elected President of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), one of the largest organizations dedicated to mathematics and computational science in the world." She earned a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Minnesota in 1985.
Elena Fuentes-Afflick
Elena Fuentes-Afflick, M.D., (NAM) is is Professor and Vice Chair of Pediatrics, Chief of Pediatrics at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, and Vice Dean for Academic Affairs in the School of Medicine, University of California San Francisco. Dr. Fuentes-Afflick's research focuses on health disparities in perinatal and pediatric health outcomes. The majority of her research has focused on the surprisingly favorable perinatal outcomes among immigrant Latina women, an "epidemiologic paradox." She has also investigated the role of acculturation and immigration status on access to care and perinatal outcomes and the effect of acculturation on body mass outcomes in Latinos. Recent areas of investigation include professionalism, faculty misconduct, and academic affairs. Since 2012, Dr. Fuentes-Afflick has been responsible for overseeing all academic affairs in the School of Medicine, including the recruitment, development and advancement of a diversified academic workforce. She is also responsible for overseeing innovative programs for faculty orientation, career development, and leadership training. Dr. Fuentes-Afflick was elected to the National Academy of Medicine in 2010, and has extensive committee service on several NRC committees continously since 2011. She received her medical degree from the University of Michigan, her master’s in public health from the University of California, Berkeley, and her bachelor’s degree in biomedical science from the University of Michigan.
Ann Q. Gates
Ann Q. Gates, Ph.D., is Professor and Chair of the Computer Science Department at the University of Texas at El Paso. Her areas of research are in software engineering and cyberinfrastructure with an emphasis on workflows, ontologies, and formal software specification. Dr. Gates directs the NSF-funded Cyber-ShARE Center that focuses on developing and sharing resources through cyber-infrastructure to advance research and education in science. She was a founding member of the NSF Advisory Committee for Cyber-infrastructure. Dr. Gates leads the Computing Alliance for Hispanic-Serving Institutions (CAHSI) and is a founding member of the National Center for Women in Information Technology (NCWIT). She received her Ph.D. in computer science from New Mexico State University.Dr. Gates is currently serving on the Roundtable on Systematic Change in Undergraduate STEM Education, and previously served on the Committee on the Growth of Computer Science Undergraduate Enrollments (2016-2018) and the Committee on Engineering Education (2002-2005).
Kelly M. Mack
Kelly Mack, Ph.D., is the Vice President for Undergraduate STEM Education and Executive Director of Project Kaleidoscope, a non-profit organization focusing on undergraduate STEM education reform, at the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). Prior to joining AAC&U, Dr. Mack was the Senior Program Director for the National Science Foundation (NSF) ADVANCE Program while on loan from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore where, as a Professor of Biology, she taught courses in Physiology and Endocrinology for 17 years. During her tenure at NSF, Dr. Mack managed an annual budget of approximately $17 million, facilitated the inclusion of issues targeting women of color into the national discourse on gender equity in the STEM disciplines and significantly increased the participation of predominantly undergraduate institutions, community colleges and minority serving institutions in the ADVANCE portfolio. Dr. Mack earned her BS degree in Biology from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and a PhD degree in Physiology from Howard University.
Ronke Olabisi
Ronke Olabisi, Ph.D., is an associate professor of biomedical engineering at Rutgers University. She earned a Bachelors of Science in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1993. She received Masters of Science in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1994 and in aeronautical engineering in 1999. She received a PhD. in biomedical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2005. Her research is based in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to repair or rebuild tissue for treating defects due to injury, disease, age, etc.
Patricia Rankin
Patricia Rankin Ph.D., is Professor of Physics at the University of Colorado, Boulder. In 1988 she became an Assistant Professor of Physics at the University of Colorado and the only women on the Physics faculty at the time. Her research interests have shifted over the years from experimental particle physics (including precision measurements as tests of the Standard Model and studies of heavy quark physics with a focus on understanding the symmetries of nature) to ways to address the lack of representation of women in STEM fields and especially in leadership positions. She was PI of the CU Boulder NSF ADVANCE Institutional Transformation Grant and has studied how participation in networks affects success in academia. She is also interested in effective decision making and how best to spread scientific literacy.She is the 2017 Chair of the APS Committee on the Status of Women in Physics. Dr. Rankin received her PhD in Physics from the Imperial College of London.
Denise Sekaquaptewa
Denise Sekaquaptewa, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and she is the Robert K. and Dale J. Weary Chair in Social Psychology. Dr. Sekaquaptewa also serves as Director of the Honors Program in Psychology and Brain, Behavior and Cognitive Science. Her research in experimental social psychology focuses on stereotyping and intergroup dynamics, in particular how being in the numerical minority in terms of gender or race influences academic outcomes and experiences. The consequences of unintended stereotyping for intergroup behavior and individual performance in stereotyped domains are also a focus of her work. Dr. Sekaquaptewa received her undergraduate degree in psychology from Arizona State University, and her master's and doctoral degrees from the Ohio State University.
Sonya Smith
Sonya Smith, Ph.D., is professor of mechanical engineering at Howard University, being the first tenured female faculty member and the first woman promoted to the highest academic rank of Professor (full) in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Howard University. Since joining the faculty in 1995, Dr. Smith has established an interdisciplinary theoretical and computational fluid dynamics research program. She has received research grants from NASA, DOD, and industry to conduct research on topics in Atmospheric Turbulence, Aeroacoustics, Vortex-Wake Aircraft Encounters, Simulation of Wake Vortex Dynamics, and Rotorcraft Icing Severity and Detection. Dr Smith also conducts research in computational neuroscience. For over four years she has collaborated with the National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). She is an active member of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology(ARO) and has presented at each of its meeting since becoming a member. She is also a member of the Member of the Diversity in Acoustics Committee of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA). Dr. Smith received her Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering from the University of Virginia.
Steven J. Spencer
Steven Spencer, Ph.D., is the Robert K. and Dale J. Weary Chair in Social Psychology at The Ohio State University. After brief stints at the State University of New York at Buffalo and Hope College as an Assistant Professor, he was at the University of Waterloo for 19 years. Dr. Spencer does research on motivation and the self, particularly on how these factors affect stereotyping and prejudice. In examining motivation and the self, he also examines how implicit processes that are outside of people's awareness affect people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. In examining stereotyping and prejudice, he studies how threats to the self-concept can lead to stereotyping and prejudice, and how this stereotyping and prejudice affects subsequent feelings about the self. Dr. Spencer completed his undergraduate degree at Hope College in Holland, Michigan and his PhD in Social Psychology from the University of Michigan.
Keivan Stassun
Keivan G. Stassun, Ph.D., is the Stevenson Endowed Professor of Physics & Astronomy at Vanderbilt
University. He also serves as the founding director of the Vanderbilt Initiative in Data-intensive Astrophysics (VIDA), a $4M pilot program in astro-informatics to enable "big data" science from major astronomical surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, for which he serves as chair of the exoplanet science team. Dr. Stassun served as a member of the National Research Council's 2010 Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics, as a member of the congressionally mandated Astronomy & Astrophysics Advisory Committee, and for eight years served as chair of the American Astronomical Society's Committee on the Status of Minorities. He currently serves as General Councilor of the American Physical Society. Professor Stassun has a profile that [includes] leadership and distinction both as a scientist and as an innovator in the critical area of broadening participation of underrepresented minorities in STEM fields. He earned a PhD (2000) in Astronomy from the University of Wisconsin—Madison.

Abigail J. Stewart
Abigail J. Stewart, Ph.D., is the Sandra Schwartz Tangri Distinguished University Professor of Psychology and Women's Studies; and Dean of the Rackham Graduate School at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. Dr. Stewart is also the founder and director of the University of Michigan ADVANCE program and Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Her current research, which combines qualitative and quantitative methods, includes comparative analyses of longitudinal studies of educated women’s lives and personalities; a collaborative study of race, gender and generation in the graduates of a Midwest high school; and research and interventions on gender and science and technology with middle-school-age girls, undergraduate students, and faculty. She has received the Henry Murray Award in personality psychology and the Carolyn Wood Sherif Award in psychology of women from the American Psychological Association and the American Association of University Women Eleanor Roosevelt Fund Award. Dr. Stewart received her PhD in Personality (1975) from Harvard University.
Ashley Bear - (Staff Officer)
Dr. Ashley Bear is a Senior Program Officer with the Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Before coming to the Academies, Dr. Bear was a Presidential Management Fellow with the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Division of Biological Infrastructure in the Directorate for Biological Sciences, where she managed a portfolio of mid-scale investments in scientific infrastructure and led analyses of the impact of NSF funding on the career trajectories of postdoctoral researchers. During her fellowship years, Dr. Bear also worked as a Science Policy Officer for the State Department’s Office of the Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary of State, where she worked to promote science diplomacy and track emerging scientific trends with implications for foreign policy, managed programs to increase the scientific capacity of State Department, and acted as the liaison to the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs and the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs.

Dr. Bear holds a Sc.B. in Neuroscience from Brown University and a Ph.D. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Yale University. While working on her doctoral research on the developmental basis of courtship behavior in butterflies, Dr. Bear co-founded the Evolution Outreach Group, a volunteer organization composed of students and postdoctoral researchers that visit schools, museums, and camps in the greater New Haven, CT area to teach K-12 students about evolution through hands-on activities and demonstrations. Dr. Bear is passionate about science outreach to the public and about promoting diversity and inclusion in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Symposium

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ashley Bear
Contact Email:  abear@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2486

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ashley Bear
Contact Email:  abear@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2486

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.