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Project Information

Project Information


Roundtable on Systemic Change in Undergraduate STEM Education


Project Scope:

The Roundtable on Systemic Change in Undergraduate STEM Education will enable leaders from across the STEM policy, research, and implementation communities of higher education to 1) learn from each other's efforts, 2) work more efficiently to address complex issues related to undergraduate STEM education, and 3) make collective decisions about future policies and priorities as well as plan their own work based on deeper understanding of the perspectives of other stakeholders in the system. The Roundtable will foster ongoing discussion of the challenges to and strategies for improving undergraduate STEM education among federal officials, the business community, policy makers, educators, and academic scientists, mathematicians, and engineers. It will provide major federal and national stakeholders with the foundational knowledge of the evidence base on systemic reform in higher education while fostering ongoing interdisciplinary discussions by gathering experts from the major stakeholder groups. Roundtable members will learn from each other and other invited experts about broad systemic issues such as policies and practices that can facilitate or impede reform, effective approaches to supporting students' learning and engagement, the needs of faculty members as such efforts move forward, how institutional leaders can encourage and support improvements, and strategies for identifying and generating resources to support reforms. 
The major goals of the Roundtable are to:
• make participating members aware of current evidence across multiple disciplines that can be used to guide systemic reforms in undergraduate STEM education (USE).
• provide a formal mechanism for ongoing collaboration and communication among stakeholders.
• advance discussion among stakeholders about systemic changes which can improve USE at the state and national levels including articulation of challenges; identification of leverage points; and identification of the appropriate roles for federal, state, local, private, and non-profit organizations and institutions.
• develop mechanisms to scale the implementation and dissemination of key findings/recommendations emerging from the portfolio of consensus studies being led by the Board on Science Education (BOSE) and the Board on Higher Education and the Workforce (BHEW) in the area of STEM education.  All activities of the Roundtable will be conducted in accordance with institutional guidelines described in "Roundtables:  Policy and Procedures," and separate GBEC approval will be sought for any workshops under the Roundtable. 




Status: Current

PIN: DBASSE-BOSE-16-03

RSO: Brenner, Kerry



Geographic Focus:
North America

Committee Membership


Ann E. Austin - (Co-Chair)
ANN E. AUSTIN is a professor of higher, adult, and lifelong education at Michigan State University, recently on leave for almost two years to serve as a program director in the Division of Undergraduate Education at the National Science Foundation in Washington, D.C. On October 1, 2016, she returned to Michigan State University, where she has been on the faculty since 1991. She has held the Mildred Erickson Chair in Higher, Adult, and Lifelong Education at Michigan State for two terms. She is currently serving as associate dean for Research in the College of Education and Assistant Provost for Faculty Development--Career Paths. Her research concerns organizational change in higher education, faculty careers and professional development, teaching and learning in higher education, the academic workplace, doctoral education, and reform in science, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. She is a fellow of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), and she has been a council member for AERA. She is a past-president of the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE), and she was a Fulbright Fellow in South Africa (1998). She has also served for more than a decade as the Co-PI and Co-Leader of the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL), funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and has been the principal investigator of an NSF-funded grant to study organizational change strategies used in NSF ADVANCE grants to create more inclusive academic environments and support the success of women scholars in STEM fields. Currently, she is the principal investigator of two NSF projects, one to study the use of organizational networks to foster change in STEM undergraduate education and one to study how new developments in teaching evaluation encourage change in the culture around teaching within universities. She earned a B.A in history from Bates College, an M.S. in higher/post secondary education from Syracuse University, a M.A. in American culture from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. in higher education from the University of Michigan.
Mark B. Rosenberg - (Co-Chair)
MARK B. ROSENBERG is the fifth president of Florida International University (FIU), where he oversees an expansion of FIU’s investments into STEM education, including partnerships with local schools, community colleges, and community organizations to ensure that the FIU entering student body is STEM capable. A political scientist specializing in Latin America, he is the first FIU faculty member to ascend to the university’s presidency. From 2005 to 2008, he served as chancellor for the board of governors of the State University System (SUS) of Florida. As chancellor, he led the system’s strategic development and financial planning and policy initiatives, working closely with Governor Charlie Crist and the legislature to secure support for SUS priorities. Prior to becoming chancellor, he served as provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at FIU. He has written or co-edited seven books and numerous scholarly articles in leading journals including the Latin American Research Review and the Hispanic American Historical Review. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, has testified before Congress numerous times regarding U.S.-Latin American relations and has served as a consultant to the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development. He is also the Chair of the Coalition of Urban Serving Universities. He has served as a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine study on Barriers and Opportunities in Completing Two- and Four- Year STEM Degrees, and as Chair on Developing Indicators in Undergraduate STEM Education. He received a B.A. in political science from Miami University, an M.A. and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Pittsburgh.
Andrea Beach
ANDREA BEACH is a professor of higher education leadership and co-founder and co-director of the Center for Research on Instructional Change in Postsecondary Education at Western Michigan University. Her research centers on organizational change in higher education, support of innovation in teaching and learning, faculty learning communities, and faculty development as a change lever. She has been PI and co-PI on NSF-funded grants that have produced several articles on instructional change strategies. She is a co-author of Creating the Future of Faculty Development: Learning from the Past, Understanding the Present, and is currently lead author on a 10-year follow-up to that work, Faculty Development in the Age of Evidence. She is most recently director of a $3.2 million project funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s First in the World program to undertake, document and measure outcomes of institutional transformation aimed at improving the persistence and academic success of students from low-income families and disadvantaged backgrounds. Dr. Beach is a 2018-2019 ACE Fellow and holds a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D, all from Michigan State University.
Kamau Bobb
KAMAU BOBB is a national authority in STEM education in the United States. He is the founding Senior Director of the Constellations Center for Equity in Computing at Georgia Tech. He brings to his current position a wealth of experience as a former Program Officer at the National Science Foundation (NSF). At NSF, he was responsible for $30 million annually of investments targeted on improving computing and STEM education. He has worked with members of the Office and Science and Technology Policy in the Obama Administration to set the U.S. national strategy for STEM education at both post-secondary and secondary school levels. He was selected as a member of President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper STEM + Entrepreneurship Taskforce to help U.S. cities craft strategies to engage young men and boys of color in the STEM landscape. Dr. Bobb brings to STEM education a fierce commitment to equity as an indicator of justice. Dr. Bobb holds a Ph.D. in Science and Technology Policy from Georgia Tech and M.S. and B.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.
Erin Dolan
ERIN DOLAN is a professor of biochemistry & molecular biology and Georgia Athletic Association Professor of Innovative Science Education at the University of Georgia. As a graduate student in neuroscience at University of California San Francisco, she volunteered extensively in K-12 schools, which prompted her to pursue a career in biology education. She teaches introductory biology and biochemistry, and her research group studies scalable ways of engaging students in science research and mentoring of undergraduate researchers in the life sciences. In 2014-2016, she served as founding Executive Director of the Texas Institute for Discovery Education in Sciences (TIDES), the teaching innovation initiative in the College of Natural Sciences at University of Texas Austin. She has designed and led a wide range of professional development on active learning and mentoring, including intensive sessions for faculty to develop course-based undergraduate research experiences. She is principal investigator or co-investigator on more than $10 million in grants, including one for CUREnet, a network of people and programs integrating research experiences into undergraduate courses. She is also Editor-in-Chief of the leading biology education journal, CBE – Life Sciences Education. Dr. Dolan received her bachelor’s degree in biology from Wellesley College and her Ph.D. in neuroscience from University of California, San Francisco.
Levon T. Esters
LEVON ESTERS is an associate professor of youth development and agricultural education at Purdue University. Prior to this role, he was an assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural Education & Studies at Iowa State University. His current research interests include: career development theory and practice; career education; use of agriculture as a context for teaching and learning STEM; application of social cognitive career theory to diverse youth in urban life science educational contexts. In particular, he studies factors that influence the educational and career choice behaviors of students enrolled in urban secondary agricultural education programs. He has been awarded the Teaching Award of Merit from the North American Colleges and Teachers in Agriculture for his work with students, the North Central Region Outstanding Early Career Agricultural Educator Award from the American Association for Agricultural Education (AAAE) and the Early Career Award from the Youth Development and Agricultural Education Department at Purdue University. Dr. Esters has assisted in the planning of the Urban Agriculture Forum, has been actively involved with the National Association of Agricultural Educators, and served on the Committee on a Leadership Summit to Effect Changes in Teaching and Learning for the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Dr. Esters received his B.S. from Florida A&M University, his M.S. from North Carolina A&T State University, and his Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University.
Mica Estrada
MICA ESTRADA is an Associate Professor at the University of California San Francisco’s School of Nursing in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences and the Institute for Health and Aging. Her research program focuses on social influence, including the study of identity, values, kindness, well-being, and integrative education. Currently she is engaged in several longitudinal studies, which involve implementing and assessing interventions aimed to increase student persistence in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) careers (funded by NIH, NSF, and HHMI). She is also currently co-PI and Director of a National Science Foundation Climate Change Education Partnership grant that provides educational tools and learning opportunities to San Diego regional leaders and residents regarding the changing climate. A common characteristic of Dr. Estrada’s work is designing and empirically testing interventions that can change individual behavior, social norms, and community consciousness. Further, Dr. Estrada’s work focuses on ethnic populations that are historically underrepresented in higher education, most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, and have the potential to provide diverse and creative solutions to the pressing challenges of our day. She received the Leadership Institute Graduate Award from the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) in 2013 and the Adolphus Toliver Award for Outstanding Research in 2016. She has previously served as a member of the study on Strengthening Research Experiences for Undergraduate STEM Students at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Dr. Estrada earned her B.A. in Psychology from the University of California, Berkeley and her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Harvard University.
Noah Finkelstein
NOAH FINKELSTEIN is a professor of physics at the University of Colorado Boulder and conducts research in physics education. He serves as a director of the Physics Education Research (PER) group at Colorado. Dr. Finkelstein is also a director of the national-scale Center for STEM Learning at CU-Boulder, which has become one of eight national demonstration sites for the Association of American Universities’ STEM Education Initiative. He is in charge of a new initiative designed to create and study a national network of STEM education. Finkelstein’s research focuses on studying the conditions that support students’ interest and ability in physics – developing models of context. These research projects range from the specifics of student learning particular concepts, to the departmental and institutional scales of sustainable educational transformation. This research has resulted in over 100 publications. He is increasingly involved in education policy. In 2010, he testified before the U.S. Congress on the state of STEM education at the undergraduate and graduate levels. He serves on many national boards including chairing the American Physical Society’s Committee on Education and PER Topical Group. He serves on the board of trustees for the Higher Learning Commission, and since 2011 is a technical advisor to the Association of American University’s STEM Education Initiative. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, and a Presidential Teaching Scholar for the University of Colorado system. Dr. Finkelstein received a B.S. in mathematics from Yale University and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Princeton University.
Ann Q. Gates
ANN QUIROZ GATES is a professor and chair of the Computer Science Department and past Associate Vice President of Research and Sponsored Projects at the University of Texas at El Paso. Dr. Gates directs the NSF-funded Cyber-ShARE Center of Excellence that was established in 2007 with a mission to advance and integrate cyber-enhanced, collaborative, and interdisciplinary education and research through technologies that support the acquisition, exchange, analysis, and integration of data, information, and knowledge. Her research areas are in requirements specification and modeling approaches and techniques. Dr. Gates was a founding member of the NSF Advisory Committee for Cyber-infrastructure, a committee that provided advice to NSF’s director, assistant directors, and office heads regarding the agency’s plans and programmatic strategies to develop, support, and use state-of-the-art cyberinfrastructure for advancing fields of science and engineering. Dr. Gates was given the IEEE Computer Society Golden Core Award for her service to the IEEE-Computer Society. She leads the Computing Alliance for Hispanic-Serving Institutions , an NSF-funded consortium that is focused on the recruitment, retention, and advancement of Hispanics in computing, and is a founding member of the National Center for Women in Information Technology. Dr. Gates received the 2015 Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards Corporation Educator award, the Computing Research Association’s 2015 A. Nico Habermann Award, the 2010 Anita Borg Institute Social Impact Award, and the 2009 Tapia Achievement Award for Scientific Scholarship, Civic Science, and Diversifying Computing. She was named to Hispanic Business magazine’s 100 Influential Hispanics in 2006 for her work on the Affinity Research Group model that focuses on development of undergraduate students involved in research. Dr. Gates received a B.S. in mathematics and biology and a M.S. in computer science from the University of Texas at El Paso, and Ph.D. in computer science from New Mexico State University.
Jeff Gold
JEFF GOLD is the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Success Strategic Initiatives at the California State University Office of the Chancellor. In this role, he provides leadership to the Graduation Initiative and a variety of related strategic projects that empower CSU faculty, staff, and administrators with innovative analytical tools that enable them to understand the impact that their programs are having on student success. He has over twenty-five years of education experience in both the public and private sectors. He began his career as a public school teacher in San Diego and has taught online and face-to-face courses in Pepperdine University’s Masters of Educational Technology Program. He holds a B.A. from University of California-San Diego, a teaching credential in bilingual education from California State University-San Marcos, and an MBA from Escuela de Negocios Las Palmas, a business school in Spain.
Junius Gonzales
JUNIUS GONZALES is the Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs at the New York Institute of Technology. He previously served as senior vice president for academic affairs of the 17-campus University of North Carolina system. Prior to this role he was the provost and vice president for academic affairs of the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP). As UTEP’s chief academic officer, Dr. Gonzales spearheaded student success efforts to increase the number of students receiving degrees and decrease the time they take to earn them. He supported revisions to the student advising system, developed online and blended learning initiatives, facilitated growth of early-alert interventions in large lecture courses, piloted new bridge and tutoring programs, and expanded undergraduate honors and research initiatives. These efforts have been facilitated by innovative applications of data and increased faculty involvement. In addition, he has developed new mechanisms to enhance the faculty’s ability to pursue research and scholarship. Dr. Gonzales received a Bachelor’s degree from Brown University in Rhode Island, a M.D. at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Medicine, and completed a residency at Massachusetts General Hospital and post-doctoral fellowship at the National Institute of Mental Health. He also earned an MBA at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business.
Cassandra V. Horii
CASSANDRA VOLPE HORII is director of the Center for Teaching, Learning, & Outreach at the California Institute of Technology. She has led teaching and learning related initiatives, programs, and centers for faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates in her prior roles as Dean of the Faculty and Founding Director of the Faculty Center for Professional Development and Curriculum Innovation at Curry College in Milton, MA, and as Associate Director of the Bok Center for Teaching and Learning at Harvard University. She has taught courses in atmospheric and environmental science for majors and non-majors, environmental chemistry for undergraduate and graduate students, first-year expository writing, freshman seminar, and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) pedagogy. In addition to publications on spectroscopic measurements of tropospheric reactive nitrogen trace gas concentrations and fluxes, her articles and talks have addressed topics such as student writing in the sciences, adult learning theories, peer teaching mentors, learner-centered teaching, educational technology, STEM education, and faculty/educational development. She has been the recipient of grants, fellowships, and awards from the Association of American Universities, National Science Foundation, Davis Educational Foundation, NASA Earth System Science program, American Geophysical Union, Merck Foundation, Phi Beta Kappa, and Boettcher Foundation. Dr. Horii is currently President Elect of the POD Network in Higher Education, a national professional organization dedicated to advancing the research and practice of educational development in higher education since 1976. This is her first year of an elected three-year term on the Executive Committee and she has previously served on the POD Network Board of Directors and as Conference Co-chair. Dr. Horii received a B.A. in physics at the University of Colorado at Boulder and a Ph.D. in atmospheric chemistry and biosphere-atmosphere exchange at Harvard University.
Collin Jones
COLLINS JONES is a biotechnology professor and coordinator of the biotechnology program at Montgomery College (Maryland). He teaches and trains students in all aspects of biotechnology, including cell culture, protein biotechnology, immunological methods, and biomanufacturing. Dr. Jones develops and implements curriculum that is current and industry relevant, including good laboratory practices and good manufacturing practices, lab math and basic experimental design and analysis. Additionally, he interacts with the local Biotech Industry and with county and state economic development groups, including BioReliance, Human Genome Sciences, Qiagen and EntreMed. He consults for the National Institute of Standards and Technology Nimble program run by the University of Delaware to align educational curricular with workforce needs of industry. Prior to his appointments, Dr. Jones spent ten years as a research scientist at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr. Jones received his B.S. in biochemistry from Albright College and his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of Maryland.
John M. Lee, Jr.
JOHN MICHAEL LEE, JR. currently serves as the Vice Chancellor for University Advancement and Executive Director of the Foundation at Elizabeth City State University (ECSU). In this role, he provides leadership over all aspects of the university’s fundraising programs and development initiatives. Prior to joining ECSU, John served as Special Assistant to the President at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. As the Special Assistant to the President, he worked on fundraising, strategic planning and enrollment management. Dr. Lee also worked as the Assistant Vice president for alumni Affairs and University Advancement at FAMU, and oversaw the development of the relationship between the University and its estimated 70,000 alumni. He has more than a decade of leadership experience in fundraising, educational advocacy, outreach, and engagement. John also previously served as the Vice President for the Office of Access and Success at the Association for Public & Land-grant-Universities and as a policy director for The College Board Advocacy and Policy Center where he developed solutions for college access and preparation, college affordability, financial aid, college admission, retention, and graduation. Dr. Lee is an accomplished researcher and scholar. He has published several peer-reviewed journal articles, policy reports, a book, numerous articles, and paper presentations at various conferences on topics ranging from diverse student populations to student access and success. He is a member of several professional associations including the Council for Advancement and Support of Higher Education (CASE), Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP), American Educational Research Association (AERA), and the Association for the Study of Higher Education (ASHE). He also serves on the West Virginia University Diversity Visiting Committee, Board of Regents-University System of Georgia- Hispanic-Latino Executive Leadership Committee, and the American Dental Education Association Minority Affairs Advisory Committee. Dr. Lee earned his Ph.D. in higher education administration from the Steinhardt School of Culture Education and Human Development at New York University, an MPA with a concentration in economic development from the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University, and a bachelor of science in computer engineering from the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering at Florida A&M University.
Mark Lee
MARK LEE is an associate professor in the biology department at Spelman and is committed to STEM education for underrepresented groups, especially women scientists. He was a scientist at Emory University School of Medicine in the Winship Cancer Center (1996-1999) before joining the research faculty in the pathology and laboratory medicine department (1999-2002) where his basic science research was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Lee joined the Spelman biology department in 2002, and he served as chair from 2009 - 2016. In the science education community at large, Dr. Lee has collaborated with the Emory Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) Program, Albany State University, Michigan State University, Atlanta Public Schools, the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL), New York University Faculty Resource Network, Quality Education for Minorities (QEM) Network, Stanford Asilomar Conference for Online Education, and the National Academies Summer Institutes for Science Education. His science education research is currently funded by the National Science Foundation, and he is a member of the American Association of Physics Teachers, and the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Dr. Lee has a B.S. in chemistry from Morris Brown College and a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Clark Atlanta University.
Patty Lopez
PATTY LOPEZ is a Senior Platform Applications Engineer for the Intel Corporation’s Fort Collins Design Center. She is noted for her research on computer vision, image processing, and image enhancement. Her most notable work is her early efforts on neural networks, modeling human vision and imaging patents. She is also noted for her leadership in broadening participation in computing. She is a founding member of Latinas in Computing, she serves on the Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Anita Borg Institute, and Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research Boards, and was the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing 2013 General Co-Chair. She previously served on the Vision and Robotics group at New Mexico State University. At Hewlett Packard Co. she was an R&D Software Design Engineer developing image processing algorithms and photo imaging software and an Imaging Scientist responsible for new imaging technologies. In 2008, she moved to Intel Corporation as a Component Design Engineer for Logic Validation and in 2010 as a Platform Applications Engineer for the Mission Critical Data Center. Dr. Lopez received a B.S. in computer science, a M.S. in computer science with a minor in EE and psychology, and a Ph.D in computer science from New Mexico State University.
Cordelia Ontiveros
CORDELIA ONTIVEROS is the interim Associate Vice President, Faculty Affairs and Professor of Chemical and Materials Engineering at California State Polytechnic University-Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona). Prior to this role, she was the associate dean of the College of Engineering at Cal Poly Pomona since 2007, with responsibility for curriculum, enrollment, student advising and K-12 outreach programs. Ontiveros joined the Cal Poly Pomona faculty in 1984 as an assistant professor in the chemical and materials engineering department. She was promoted to associate professor and then full professor, with tenure. Among her administrative posts at Cal Poly Pomona, Ontiveros served as department chair and associate vice president for faculty affairs. She accepted a position in 1997 at the CSU Office of the Chancellor as senior director for academic human resources. Outside of academia, she has experience at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center and at the Getty Oil Co. Research Center. She is a registered professional engineer in chemical engineering with the state of California. Ontiveros attended Harvard’s Management Development Program and was selected as a CSU Executive Fellow and an American Council on Education Fellow. She is dedicated to the educational mission of the CSU and to providing opportunities for students, faculty, and staff to be successful. Dr. Ontiveros received her bachelor’s in chemical engineering from Cal Poly Pomona and earned her master’s and doctoral degrees in chemical engineering from Princeton University.
Annette Parker
ANNETTE PARKER is the President of South Central College, a Minnesota State community and technical college. She has been involved in manufacturing industry and workforce education for more than 35 years. She started her career at General Motors in Lansing, Michigan and moved into education first as a faculty member and administrator at Lansing Community College and later as System Director of Workforce Education for the Kentucky Community and Technical College System. In this role, she also served as Executive Director and Principal Investigator of the Automotive Manufacturing Technical Education Collaborative (AMTEC), a National Science Foundation Advanced Automotive Manufacturing Center of Excellence, which was selected by the National Governors Association as the 2011 Best Practice. Dr. Parker has served on President Obama’s Advanced Manufacturing Partnership (AMP) Steering Committee 2.0 and co-chaired AMP’s “Demand-Driven Workforce Development” work team. She has also sat on the Boards of Directors for the American Association of Community Colleges, National Coalition of Advanced Technology Centers, Center for Quality People and Organizations, and Corporate Voices for Working Families, as well as the SkillsUSA Corporate Board and National Career Pathways Network Advisory Board. She currently serves on the Center for Community College Student Engagement National Advisory Board, Council for Adult and Experiential Learning Advisory Council (Chair), National Academy of Sciences Roundtable on Systemic Change in Undergraduate STEM Education, The Presidents’ Roundtable (Vice Convenor) and Iowa-Minnesota Campus Compact Board of Directors (Chair of MNCC and Vice Chair of IAMNCC) and on MIT’s Work of the Future Task Force.
Chris Rasmussen
CHRIS RASMUSSEN is the associate chair of Mathematics Education at San Diego State University. His research focuses on the teaching and learning of undergraduate mathematics, with an emphasis on courses that typically function as a transition to advanced mathematics. Additionally, his work explores how pedagogical approaches and instructional design principles that have been successful at promoting student learning in earlier grade levels can be adapted to the university setting. Central to this work is careful attention to student thinking and a systematic, theory-driven study of the social interactions in which meanings are established, where norms for convincing arguments and presentations are negotiated, and where students can connect more formal mathematical developments to their personal experience. Dr. Rasmussen has refereed numerous journal publications, book chapters, and conference proceedings. He has received an Outstanding Faculty Scholar Award from Purdue University Calumet, an Excellence in Teaching Award for Graduate Assistants from the Department of Mathematics at the University of Maryland, and the Selden Prize in 2006. Dr. Rasmussen earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering, a master’s degree in mathematics, and a doctorate in mathematics education all from the University of Maryland-College Park.
Barbara A. Schaal
BARBARA SCHAAL (NAS) is dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Mary-Dell Chilton distinguished professor at Washington University in St. Louis. As dean of the faculty, she is responsible for the appointment, promotion, recommendation of tenure, and salary of all faculty members, as well as the appointments of the deans of the College, the Graduate School, and University College. She oversees all academic, financial, and administration aspects of Arts and Sciences, including the development and implementation of strategic plans for faculty, students, and facilities. In her scientific career, Dr. Schaal is a nationally recognized plant evolutionary biologist. She uses DNA sequences to understand evolutionary processes such as gene flow, geographical differentiation, and the domestication of crop species. Dr. Schaal was among the first plant scientists to use molecular biology-based approaches to understand evolutionary processes in plants, and she has worked to advance understanding of plant molecular systematics and population genetics. Dr. Schaal has been president of the Botanical Society of America, the Society for the Study of Evolution, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, where she served as vice president for 8 years. She was appointed as a U.S. science envoy by former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Dr. Schaal has served as chair of the Division on Earth and Life Studies at the National Research Council and was a member of President Obama’s Council of Advisors for Science and Technology from 2009-17. She graduated from the University of Illinois, Chicago, with a degree in biology, and received master’s and doctoral degrees in population biology from Yale University.
Eric Schulze
ERIC SCHULZE is the current vice president of product and regulation at Memphis Meats, where he leads the technical design and development of edible bioprocess animal cell and tissues as well as Federal regulatory affairs. At Memphis Meats, Dr. Schulze also interacts with the public in lay and technical settings, serves as communications and scientific advisor to the chief executive and scientific officers, and is charged with defining technical theory for clean meat production. Dr. Schulze most recently served as senior scientist for Memphis Meats, launching their cell line design and development program as well as developing messaging around the concept of ‘clean meat.’ Prior, Dr. Schulze served in the public sector for six years as a Federal regulator within the US Food and Drug Administration set with the task of how to appropriately regulate the products of biotechnology, including both food and biomedical drug applications. During his tenure, Dr. Schulze helped and worked alongside numerous Federal regulatory agencies to coordinate and execute regulatory decisions on a multitude of complex, innovative biotechnology applications, including genetically engineered animals and foods. He also served within the National Science Foundation to help coordinate Federal STEM Education programming for this country and the next generation. In addition, he is an award-winning science communicator who currently hosts the Webby-nominated (Best Science/Education Series) show, “Ask Smithsonian,” for The Smithsonian Institution. His show is seen in over 30,000 schools nation-wide and by over 100,000 students and educators monthly. Dr. Schulze is regularly invited to speak and present about how science and technology, the arts, and human creativity. Dr.Schulze earned a bachelor’s degree from Loyola University – New Orleans and a Ph.D. in stem cell/molecular biology from the University of Southern California.
Susan R. Singer
SUSAN SINGER is vice president for academic affairs and provost at Rollins College, where she is responsible for administering the educational program, for making faculty appointments, for coordinating all academic activities of the College, for overseeing institutional and faculty research, for facilitating budgetary and institutional planning, and for maintaining the academic standards of the College. She served as the director of the Division of Undergraduate Education at the National Science Foundation (NSF), leading a team of 50 with a budget of more than $300 million annually to catalyze transformation in undergraduate learning and success across the nation. She helped lead the collaboration between 14 federal agencies to increase their collective impact on improving undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. She was a member of the Carleton College faculty from 1986-2016, where her experience included directing the Perlman Learning and Teaching Center and co-directing the Carleton Interdisciplinary Science and Math Initiative as well as research on the development and evolution of flowering in legumes. She was a co-author of the Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology report. In addition, she chaired the NRC committee that produced America’s Lab Report (2006) and the committee that wrote the report on Discipine-Based Education Research: Understanidng and Improving Learning in Undergraduate Science and Engineering (2012). Dr. Singer earned B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
Grace Suh
GRACE SUH serves as senior program manager for IBM Corporate Citizenship & Corporate Affairs. In her position, Ms. Suh manages IBM’s global STEM initiatives. These include web-based programs, including the newly launched Teachers TryScience, which provides teachers with lessons and professional development supports; TryScience, which provides teachers, students, and parents with access to online experiments and multimedia adventures; and PowerUp, a 3-D online game designed to teach high school students about engineering and the environment. Ms. Suh also developed and manages IBM MentorPlace, a global mentoring program that matches IBM employees with students in online relationships focused on academics, and she is part of the team that is creating Pathways in Technology Early College High School, a new grades 9-14 school that opened in September 2011. Prior to IBM, Ms. Suh worked at the Children’s Defense Fund, a national child advocacy organization in Washington, D.C. where she focused primarily on child welfare issues, including family care, foster care and adoption services. In addition to the corporate and nonprofit sectors, Ms. Suh has worked on education and children’s issues for state and city governments. She has a a bachelor’s degree in English and Political Science from Columbia University and a master’s degree in public policy from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.
Kyle Swanson
KYLE SWANSON is the dean of the College of Sciences at Metropolitan State University. Prior to joining Metropolitan State, he held the positions of professor, department chair and associate dean in the College of Letters and Science at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. For two decades he has been engaged in theoretical and observational research on the fluid dynamic character of the atmosphere, emphasizing variability on time scales ranging from days to years. He also held a postdoctoral appointment at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory in Princeton, NJ and was a NSF/NATO fellow at the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France. He is the author or coauthor of over 40 peer-reviewed scientific articles, appearing in such journals as Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and Physical Review Letters. He has given over 50 interviews and talks, including presentations at MIT, University of Illinois, University of Wisconsin, and the California Institute of Technology. At UW-Milwaukee, he was instrumental in the implementation of remedial mathematics reform at institutional scale, as well as integrating early college career experiences for STEM majors. For these and other activities, he was awarded the UW-Milwaukee Distinguished Faculty University Service Award in 2016. He holds Bachelor's degrees in mathematics and physics, magna cum laude with honors, from St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN, and a Ph.D. in Geophysical Sciences from the University of Chicago.
Jim Swartz
JIM SWARTZ is Dack Professor of Chemistry and director of the Center for Science in the Liberal Arts at Grinnell College, and served as dean of the College (1998-2008). While science division chair, he lead efforts to substantially reform teaching of introductory science courses, expand undergraduate research and improve science facilities. He was a leader in the planning of the Grinnell Science Project, a major effort to improve the success in science of members of groups traditionally under-represented in science which received a Presidential Award for Excellence Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring in 2011. While dean, he helped to expand programs for scholarly leaves, student-faculty research, faculty diversity, and creation of a major interdisciplinary teaching focus. He coordinated the planning for three science building projects at Grinnell and is currently a co-chair of the planning committee for a $110 million humanities and social studies facility. He was a participant in the very first Project Kaleidoscope facilities workshop and served as a presenter for many others. He has consulted with over 40 institutions on science curriculum and pedagogy and/or science facilities. He has been a PI or co-PI on NSF grants supporting improvements of in undergraduate chemistry, including a major national Systemic Initiative collaborative grant (ChemLinks) to reform the introductory chemistry. He served as the program director of the Pew Midstates Science and Math Consortium and the Coalition for Faculty Diversity, each for six years. He worked with the NSF-funded Project Kaleidoscope Pedagogies of Engagement faculty development project. He directs the pedagogical workshops for the Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska NSF-LSAMP project. He is a graduate of Stanislaus State College in California, and received a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California at Santa Cruz.
Howard Gobstein - (Ex Officio Member)
HOWARD GOBSTEIN is the Executive Vice President of the Association of Public Land Grant Universities (APLU), where he is responsible for research policy and STEM education – with their affiliated groups and portfolio of funded projects. He also contributes to overall association planning and management. His past positions include Associate Vice President for Governmental Affairs and Director of Federal Relations at Michigan State University, Senior Policy Analyst in the Office of Science and Technology in the Executive Office of the President, Vice President and Senior Program Officer at the Association of American Universities and Director of Federal Relations for Research at the University of Michigan. Mr. Gobstein spent the first 11 years of his career designing and leading evaluations of government science programs and policies with the U.S. Government Accountability Office. He was named the distinguished alumni of 2010 by the Purdue School of Engineering Education and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He earned a Bachelor's degree in Interdisciplinary Engineering at Purdue University and a Master's degree in Science, Technology, and Public Policy at George Washington University.
Mary Heiss - (Ex Officio Member)
MARY HEISS serves as senior vice president for academic and student affairs at the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC). In this role, she oversees a department that implements strategies and grant-funded programs to advance student access, diversity, and success in the nation’s community colleges, including activities with the National Science Foundation through the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program, international programs and services, and the Plus 50 initiative. She joined AACC in 2006. She most recently served as Associate Vice President of Strategic Initiatives, where she led efforts related to the development of the association’s 2013-2016 Strategic Plan, and fundraising for the AACC 21st-Century Initiative. Before that, she directed the association’s outreach and engagement with corporations, foundations, and nonprofit organizations. Prior to joining AACC, Ms. Heiss led resource development and communications efforts for two nonprofit organizations, including a national k-12 education foundation. Earlier in her career, she held increasingly responsible positions with global corporations for over 15 years. Ms. Heiss is a graduate of Michigan State University and St. Clair County Community College in Port Huron, Michigan. She has completed executive
Lynn Pasquerella - (Ex Officio Member)
LYNN PASQUERELLA has been president of the Association of American Colleges and Universities since July 2016. A philosopher whose career has combined teaching and scholarship with local and global engagement, she has continuously demonstrated a deep and abiding commitment to ensuring that all students have access to excellence in liberal education, regardless of their socioeconomic background. Dr. Pasquerella began her own education as a student at Quinebaug Valley Community College in Danielson, Connecticut. She joined the faculty of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Rhode Island in 1985, rising rapidly through the ranks to the positions of vice provost for research, vice provost for academic affairs, and dean of the graduate school. In 2008, she was named provost of the University of Hartford. In 2010, she was appointed the eighteenth president of Mount Holyoke College. Dr. Pasquerella’s presidency of Mount Holyoke was marked by a robust strategic planning process; outreach to local, regional, and international constituencies; and a commitment to a vibrant campus community. Dr. Pasquerella has written extensively on medical ethics, metaphysics, public policy, and the philosophy of law. She serves as senator and vice president of Phi Beta Kappa, as a Trustee of the Lingnan Foundation, and as host of Northeast Public Radio's The Academic Minute. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Mount Holyoke College and her Ph.D. in Philosophy from Brown University.
Tobin Smith - (Ex Officio Member)
TOBIN (TOBY) SMITH is Vice President for Policy at the Association for American Universities (AAU). He oversees and coordinates policy and policy analysis activities for the organization. Among his specific areas of responsibility are issues relating to science and innovation policy; academic research; regulation, compliance and research costs; technology transfer; and openness and security. Toby also oversees AAU’s Undergraduate STEM Education Initiative. Prior to joining AAU in January 2003, he worked as a federal relations representative in the Washington D.C. Offices of the University of Michigan (1999-2002) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1992-1999). He began his Washington career on Capitol Hill as a legislative assistant to Congressman Bob Traxler (D-Michigan). He has written and spoken widely on science policy and funding issues. He is the co-author of a book on national science policy published in 2008 by the University of Michigan Press titled, Beyond Sputnik – U.S. Science Policy in the 21st Century. He is a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine Roundtable on the Communication and Use of Social and Behavioral Sciences and serves on the Advisory Board to the National Alliance for Broader Impacts (NABI). He is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Mr. Smith holds a master’s degree in Legislative Affairs from George Washington University, and a Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) degree from the University of Michigan.
Robin L. Wright - (Ex Officio Member)
ROBIN WRIGHT is Head of the Department of Biology Teaching and Learning, Senior Associate Dean for Undergraduate Initiatives in the College of Biological Sciences (CBS) and professor of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Development at the University of Minnesota. She is also the current Division Director for the Division of Undergraduate Education at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Her biological research program has focused on the genetics and physiology of sterol biosynthesis and cold adaptation in yeast. Over the past 21 years, she has mentored more than 100 undergraduate researchers. She is currently working exclusively on undergraduate education research and initiatives. Dr. Wright has experience teaching both large and small classes, including freshman seminars, large introductory biology courses, and skill-oriented courses for honors students. The University of Washington, her previous institution, recognized her teaching innovations with a university-wide Distinguished Teaching Award. In her roles as associate dean, her major goal is to catalyze the development of the nation’s best biology curriculum, including biology courses that apply principles of active learning, research, and engagement. She helped to develop and co-teaches in Nature of Life, a student success course required for all 500 incoming freshmen in the college. She has also been a leader in development of Foundations of Biology, an innovative, team-based introductory biology course for biological sciences majors. Dr. Wright has served on the education committees of the American Society for Cell Biology and the Genetics Society of America. In addition, she served as an editor and senior editor of the Journal: Life Science Education. She is a member of the Advisory Committee for the HHMI/National Academies of Science-sponsored Summer Institute on Biology Education, and has served as a mentor and presenter at each annual workshop since the first one in 2003. She is currently the founding editor-in-chief of a new biology education journal, CourseSource, which published biology curriculum resources that are linked to learning outcomes established by biological sciences professional societies. In 2012, she was named as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2014, she was awarded the Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education from the Genetics Society of America. Dr. Wright began her academic career as an Assistant Professor at the University of Washington in the Department of Zoology in 1997, before joining the faculty at the University of Minnesota in 2003. She received her bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Georgia and her doctorate in biological sciences from Carnegie-Mellon University.

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001

500 Fifth St NW
Washington, DC, 20001
USA

Event Type :  
Workshop

Description :   

This workshop brought together stakeholders with many perspectives on the future of undergraduate STEM education. The first day focused on how we value and evaluate teaching as well as strategies for spreading evidence-based instruction to students of all backgrounds and goals. Representatives of disciplinary societies in STEM were invited to participate in these discussions. The second day considered the impact of globalization and technological change on undergraduate STEM learning. Participants encountered new ideas for thinking broadly and systemically about improving student learning in undergraduate STEM education. They networked and strategized together about how we educate the increasingly diverse student population and consider the impact of the surrounding system on efforts to improve learning.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Leticia Green
Contact Email:  lgreen@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3212

Agenda
Agenda

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Workshop

Description :   

The workshop will consider the future of undergraduate STEM education in light of the rapidly changing social and economic environment. Participants will leave with new ideas for thinking broadly and systemically about improving student learning in undergraduate STEM education. They will network and strategize together about how we educate the increasingly diverse student population and consider the impact of the surrounding system on efforts to improve learning. 


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Leticia Garcilazo Green
Contact Email:  lgreen@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3212

Agenda
Agenda

Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
Agenda

Supporting File(s)
2-Summary of Pitches

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
1-Agenda

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

Publications

No data present.