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Project Information

Project Information


Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable (STIGUR)


Project Scope:

The NRC Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable (STIGUR) convenes senior-most representatives from industry, universities, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and other government agencies to define and explore critical issues related to NASA’s space technology research agenda that are of shared interest; to frame systems-level research issues; and to explore options for public-private partnerships. This forum will be designed to facilitate candid dialogue among participants, to foster greater partnership among the NASA-related space technology community, and, where appropriate, carry awareness of consequences to the wider public. All activities of the Roundtable will be conducted in accordance with institutional guidelines described in “Roundtables: Policy and Procedures."

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-ASEB-14-01

RSO: Angleman, Alan

Topic(s):

Engineering and Technology
Space and Aeronautics



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 10/15/2018

Wanda A. Sigur - (Chair)
WANDA A. SIGUR (Chair) is an independent consult. She is retired from the position of vice president/ general manager of civil space, space systems for Lockheed Martin Corporation. In this capacity, she had executive responsibility for national space programs relating to human space flight and space science missions; including planetary, solar, astrophysical, and Earth remote sensing for civil government agencies. These major programs included the Orion Multi-purpose Crew Vehicle, Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, GOES-R weather satellites; the Juno, Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL), Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN), Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey, and Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-Rex) planetary missions, and the company’s nuclear space power programs. Her responsibilities included research and science objectives and early development investments for the wide range of leap-frog technologies necessary to support anticipated space forward steps. Previously, Ms. Sigur was vice president of engineering for space systems for Lockheed Martin Corporation. In this capacity, she was responsible for leading the corporation’s space systems engineering product technical validation for military space, strategic and defense missiles, commercial satellites and civil space, including personnel development, engineering process development and deployment, engineering tools and training, with emphasis on ensuring operational excellence and first-time-right engineering. She has been an active participant in many Academies studies associated with future space technologies, particularly materials technologies, thermal protection systems, on-orbit materials processing, spacecraft design, on-orbit satellite servicing, energy systems, and human space exploration. Ms. Sigur received a B.S. for mechanical and materials science from Rice University and a M.B.A. from Tulane University. She has not previously served on an Academies committee.
Joshua Brost
JOSHUA BROST is the Senior Director of Government Business Development at SpaceX and leads all aspects of SpaceX’s sales efforts to United States civil and national security customers. He is focused on finding new ways for the government to leverage commercial capabilities and accelerate innovation in the space industry through the use of flexible contracting mechanism such as Space Act agreements and other transaction authority agreements. He also works to make it possible to do more science with less money by exploiting the efficiency of commercial companies. Prior to Joining SpaceX, Mr. Brost worked as an aerospace engineer for the Boeing Company and as a management consultant for the Boston Consulting Group. He earned his M.B.A. from Harvard Business School and his M.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Washington. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Carissa B. Christensen
CARISSA B. CHRISTENSEN is the chief executive officer of Bryce Space and Technology, LLC, which she founded. She previously co-founded and was a managing partner of The Tauri Group, an analytic consulting firm based in Alexandria, Virginia. Ms. Christensen is a recognized expert in commercial space and, for more than two decades, has engaged the leading edge of the space industry with innovative analysis of space systems, industry economics, advanced technologies, unique regulatory requirements, and underlying demand. Ms. Christensen conceived and originated data resources that remain industry standards. Ms. Christensen’s on-going work with government agencies, industry organizations, launch firms, and satellite manufacturers and operators helps decision makers better understand market positioning, future demand for space services, and competitive dynamics. She has been an expert witness on space markets, given Congressional testimony on demand for suborbital launch, and served as an external space industry expert for the industrial base analysis conducted by the Department of Defense Office of Manufacturing and Industrial Base Policy. Ms. Christensen's publications include more than 60 contributions to peer-reviewed journals, industry publications, books, and conference proceedings. She is often quoted in trade and popular media, and recently appeared in a Financial Times documentary on space investment. She holds a Master of Public Policy from Harvard University, with a concentration in science and technology. She was a member of the 2014 Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable.
Douglas R. Cooke
DOUGLAS R. COOKE is an aerospace consultant at Cooke Concepts and Solutions. He has been an aerospace consultant since retiring from NASA in 2011 after a 38 year career at Johnson Space Center and NASA Headquarters. He provides advice on company strategies, program management, proposal development, program strategies, and technical matters. His experience at NASA was in engineering and senior level program management positions in the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, and Human Exploration Programs. In his last three years at NASA, he served as the associate administrator of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters. His responsibilities included the Constellation Program, the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, the Space Launch System, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite, the Commercial Cargo and Crew Programs, and the Human Research and Exploration Technology Programs. Mr. Cooke spent 31 years at NASA, Johnson Space Center in engineering and program management positions. His awards include the Presidential Distinguished Rank Award, Presidential Meritorious Rank Award, NASA Distinguished Service Medal, three NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals, NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, NASA Exceptional Service Medal, two JSC Certificates of Commendation, the Space Transportation Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Texas A & M Outstanding Aerospace Engineering Alumni Award. Mr. Cooke has a B.S. in aerospace engineering from Texas A&M University–College Station. He was a member of the 2014 Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable and the Committee on Human Spaceflight: Technical Panel.
Antonio L. Elias
ANTONIO L. ELIAS (NAE) is executive vice president and chief technical officer at Orbital ATK, Inc. Prior to the merger between Orbital Sciences and ATK he served as Orbital Sciences Corporation chief technical officer, corporate senior vice president, and founder and general manager of its Advanced Programs Group. He was the lead architect of the Cygnus cargo resupply spacecraft and also led the technical team that designed and built the Pegasus air-launched booster, flying as launch vehicle operator on the carrier aircraft for the rocket’s first and fourth flights. He headed the design teams of Orbital’s APEX and Sea Star satellites and X-34 hypersonic research vehicle. Dr. Elias came to Orbital from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he held various teaching and research positions, including the Boeing Chair in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Dr. Elias is a fellow of the AIAA, the American Astronautical Society (AAS), and the International Academy of Astronautics. His awards include the AIAA Engineer of the Year, the AIAA Aircraft Design Award, AIAA Von Karman lectureship and the AAS Brouwer Award. He is a co-recipient of the National Medal of Technology and the National Air and Space Museum Trophy. He has a Ph.D. in flight transportation from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has participated in many National Academies activities, most recently as a member of the Committee on Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Cooperation on Space and Earth Science Missions, the Committee for a Review of the En Route Air Traffic Control Complexity and Workload Model, the 2014 Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable, and the Naval Studies Board.
Michael S. Elsperman
MICHAEL S. ELSPERMAN is the director of Advanced Space Exploration for Boeing Space and Missile Systems at The Boeing Company. He currently leads a cross functional/multiple site engineering team focused on technologies and systems to support NASA’s plans for beyond earth orbit exploration. He has extensive experience managing multi-million dollar research and development proposals and projects focused on Space Science, Human Spaceflight, and maturing emerging space related technologies. These projects have included planetary and earth science mission proposals, advanced solar arrays, space power management systems, solar electric propulsion, autonomous systems, in-space habitat systems, advanced optical sensors, cryogenic propellant management, extreme environment avionics, and advanced GNC systems. Mr. Elsperman’s program management experience includes both small and large projects including responsibility for over $100 million annual operating budgets including facilities and infrastructure (software, computer systems, and instrumentation). He has over 27 years of space exploration experience including 18 years on the Space Shuttle program in increasing positions of responsibility including associate program manager/program integration and chief of staff reporting directly to the Boeing program manager. Mr. Elsperman has received two NASA Group Achievement awards for his work establishing the Space Shuttle Day of Launch lLoad (initial load) Update process. He has made over 40 presentations, white papers, scientific posters, and conference panel memberships including the 2016 IAC, Goddard Space Flight Symposium, Keck Institute Workshops, Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable (STIGUR), Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, Outer Planets Assessment Group, and Small Bodies Assessment Group. Mr. Elsperman has also served as chair of the Scientific Goals in Robotics Missions session at the 2014 International Academy of Astronautics Conference and as National Chair, and the 2015 American Astronautical Society Guidance and Control Conference Low-Thrust Mission Planning Session. Dr. Elsperman has completed several leadership development classes at the Boeing Leadership Center focused on program management and business development. He has a B.S. in aerospace engineering from San Diego State University with an emphasis in astrodynamics. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Charbel Farhat
CHARBEL FARHAT (NAE) is the Vivian Church Hoff Professor of Aircraft Structures. He is also the chairman of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. He also serves as professor of mechanical engineering, professor in the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, director of the Army High Performance Computing Research Center, and director of the King Abdullah City of Science and Technology Center of Excellence for Aeronautics and Astronautics. His research interests include mathematical models, advanced computational algorithms, and high-performance software for the design and analysis of complex systems in aerospace, marine, mechanical, and naval engineering. He is designated as an ISI Highly Cited Author in Engineering by the Institute for Science Information (ISI) Web of Knowledge. He is an elected member of the of the Royal Academy of Engineering (UK), an elected member of the Lebanese Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of six international societies: the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the International Association of Computational Mechanics, the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics, the United States Association of Computational Mechanics, and the World Innovation Foundation. He was knighted by the Prime Minister of France in the Order of Academic Palms and awarded the Medal of Chevalier dans l'Ordre des Palmes Academiques. He earned his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He served as a member of the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board’s Panel on Air and Ground Vehicle Technology and currently serves on the Air Force Science Advisory Board.
James M. Free
JAMES M. FREE is the vice president of Aerospace Systems at Peerless Technologies in Fairborn, Ohio, where is responsible for Peerless’ aerospace portfolio, including civilian and military space programs. He recently retired from NASA as the deputy associate administrator for technology in the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate in Washington. As such he was responsible for assisting the associate administrator in providing strategic direction for all aspects of NASA’s human spaceflight exploration mission and for providing cross-agency support for space communications and space launch vehicles including the International Space Station, Space Launch System, Orion spacecraft, and the commercial crew and commercial cargo programs that will provide logistics and crew transportation to the space station. Previously, he served as the director, deputy director, and director of space flight systems at Glenn Research Center. As director of Space Flight Systems at Glenn, he was responsible for overseeing center activities related to the Constellation, Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Space Communications, Human Research, and Science Programs. Mr. Free is the recipient of a NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, NASA Exceptional Service Medal, and NASA Significant Achievement Medal. Mr. Free hold an M.S. in space systems engineering from Delft University in the Netherlands. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Alec D. Gallimore
ALEC D. GALLIMORE is the Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering, the Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Professor of Engineering and an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Michigan (UM), where he directs the Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory. Previously, Dr. Gallimore served as associate dean for academic affairs and associate dean for research and graduate education at the UM College of Engineering and associate dean at the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies. His primary research interests include electric propulsion and plasma diagnostics. He has experience with a wide array of electric propulsion technologies including Hall thrusters, ion thrusters, arcjets, radiofrequency plasma sources, 100-kW-class steady magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and megawatt-level quasi-steady MPD thrusters. Dr. Gallimore has implemented a variety of probe, microwave, and optical/laser plasma diagnostics and is the author of over 300 journal and conference papers on electric propulsion and plasma physics. He has graduated 39 Ph.D. students and 14 master’s students. He has served on a number of advisory boards for NASA and the Department of Defense, including the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (AFSAB). He was awarded the Decoration for Meritorious Civilian Service in 2005 for his AFSAB work. In 2010, he was elected a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). He has a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from Princeton University. He has been a member of many National Academies’ study groups, including the 2014 Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable, the Committee for An Assessment of Concepts and Systems for U.S. Boost-Phase Missile Defense in Comparison to Other Alternatives, and the NASA Technology Roadmap: Propulsion and Power.
Steve Jurczyk
STEPHEN G. JURCZYK is the NASA associate administrator, the agency's highest-ranking civil servant position. Formerly, he was the associate administrator of the Space Technology Mission Directorate. As the STMD associate administrator, he managed and executed the space technology programs, focusing on infusion into the agency’s exploration and science mission needs, proving the capabilities needed by the greater aerospace community, and developing the nation’s innovation economy. Mr. Jurczyk has also served as the director of NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. He began his NASA career at Langley in 1988 as an electronics engineer in the electronic systems branch. On detail to NASA Headquarters, he managed the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission and formulated the technology development strategy for the Earth Science Enterprise. From 1994 to 1997, he was the instrument systems engineer and, later, the spacecraft systems manager for the Landsat 7 project at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Mr. Jurczyk returned to Langley in 1997 to serve in a variety of leadership positions, including director of systems engineering, director of research and technology, ultimately being selected in January 2006 to serve as the center's deputy director. Mr. Jurczyk holds a B.S. and a M.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia. He was a member of the 2014 Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable.


Fred Kennedy, III
FRED G. KENNEDY III is the director of the Tactical Technology Office (TTO) of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). He has previously served as the TTO deputy director, as the senior policy advisor for national security space and aviation in the National Security and International Affairs Division of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), and as a colonel in the U.S. Air Force assigned as a senior materiel leader in both the Air Force’s Space and Missile Systems Center’s Remote Sensing Directorate and the Air Force Lifecycle Management Center’s Battle Management Directorate. Dr. Kennedy earned a Ph.D. in electronics and physical sciences from the University of Surrey. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Mark J. Lewis
MARK J. LEWIS is the director of the IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute, a federally-funded research and development center that supports the White House and other executive branch agencies. Previous to that he was the Willis Young, Jr., Professor and chair of the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland. He has also served as the chief scientist of the U.S. Air Force. He is the past president of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Dr. Lewis has been teaching and conducting basic and applied research in the fields of hypersonic aerodynamics, advanced propulsion, and space vehicle design and optimization. His work has spanned the aerospace flight spectrum from the analysis of conventional jet engines to entry into planetary atmospheres at hypervelocity speeds, with a specialty in the integration of high-speed engines with highly-efficient airframes. Dr. Lewis is the author of more than 350 technical publications, and he has been adviser to more than 70 graduate students. A recipient of both the Department of Defense Meritorious Civilian Service Award and Exceptional Civilian Service Award, Dr. Lewis received the AIAA International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference Lifetime Achievement Award and has been named as an Aviation Week and Space Technology Laureate. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, an honorary fellow of AIAA, and a president’s fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society. Dr. Lewis holds a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has served on the National Academies’ Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board and as chair of the Committee on Future Air Force Needs for Defense Against High-Speed Weapon Systems. He was also a member of the Air Force Studies Board, and a member of the 2014 Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable.
Sandra H. Magnus
SANDRA H. MAGNUS is a principal with AstroPlanetview. Formerly she was the executive director of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Selected to the NASA Astronaut Corps in April 1996, Dr. Magnus flew in space on the STS-112 space shuttle mission in 2002 and on the final space shuttle flight, STS-135, in 2011. In addition, she flew to the International Space Station (ISS) on STS-126 in November 2008, served as flight engineer and science officer on Expedition 18, and returned home on STS-119 after 4½ months on board. Following her assignment on the ISS, Dr. Magnus served at NASA Headquarters in the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. Her last duty at NASA, after STS-135, was as the deputy chief of the Astronaut Office. While at NASA, Dr. Magnus worked extensively with the international community, including the European Space Agency and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, as well as with Brazil on facility-type payloads. She also spent time in Russia developing and integrating operational products and procedures for the ISS. Before joining NASA, Dr. Magnus worked for McDonnell Douglas Aircraft Company as a stealth engineer. While at McDonnell Douglas, she worked on internal research and development and on the Navy’s A-12 Attack Aircraft program studying the effectiveness of radar signature reduction techniques. Dr. Magnus has received numerous awards, including the NASA Space Flight Medal, the NASA Distinguished Service Medal, the NASA Exceptional Service Medal, and the “40 at 40 Award” (given to former collegiate women athletes to recognize the impact of Title IX). Dr. Magnus has a Ph.D. for the material science and engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She was a member of the National Academies’ Committee on Science-Based Additive Manufacturing of Space Hardware and the 2014 Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable.
Pamela A. Melroy
PAMELA A. MELROY is CEO of a Melroy & Hollett Technology Partners, LLC. She is also a retired NASA astronaut and Air Force test pilot, and she is one of two women to command the Space Shuttle. She flew the KC-10 operationally and has over 6000 hours in more than 60 aircraft. Melroy is a graduate of the Air Force Test Pilot School and was a test pilot on the initial test team for the Air Force’s C-17 aircraft. At NASA, she flew three assembly missions to the International Space Station: STS-92, STS-112, and STS-120, which she commanded. Also while at NASA, she was the lead for the reconstruction of the Columbia crew module after the mishap, and was deputy program manager of the Columbia Crew Survival Investigation. After leaving NASA, Melroy served as deputy program manager for space exploration initiatives at Lockheed Martin, supporting the Orion Program. Later she served as director of field operations and acting deputy associate administrator for commercial space transportation at the Federal Aviation Administration. More recently she was the deputy director of the Tactical Technology Office at DARPA, where she oversaw multiple major air and space technology development programs. Melroy earned an M.S. in earth and planetary science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Robert Meyerson
ROBERT MEYERSON is the president of Blue Origin, which is developing reusable launch systems and technologies including the New Shepard system for suborbital human and research flights, the BE-3 rocket engine fueled by liquefied oxygen and liquefied hydrogen, the BE-4 rocket engine fueled by liquefied oxygen and liquefied natural gas. Previously, Mr. Meyerson was a senior manager at Kistler Aerospace, where he was responsible for the landing and thermal protection systems of a two-stage reusable launch vehicle as well as all technical activities related to Kistler’s Space Launch Initiative contract with NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. He began his career at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, where he led the aerodynamic design of the Space Shuttle Orbiter drag parachute, as well as the overall design, integration, and flight test of a gliding parachute for the X-38 Crew Rescue Vehicle project. He is an AIAA Associate Fellow and a former member of the Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Technical Committee. He is a trustee at the Museum of Flight in Seattle and a member of the board of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation. Mr. Meyerson earned an M.S. in engineering management from the University of Houston. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Roger M. Myers
ROGER M. MYERS is an owner of R. Myers Consulting. He is a senior aerospace consultant with more than 30 years of experience in space technology development, flight programs, and in-space mission architecture planning. He currently provides expertise in space propulsion and power systems, program management, and strategic planning to multiple clients. He retired from Aerojet Rocketdyne in July of 2016, where his most recent position was executive director of Advanced In-Space Programs. In that role, he oversaw programs and strategic planning for next-generation in-space missions and architectures, propulsion systems, power systems, and space vehicles for DOD, NASA, and commercial missions. Prior to this appointment he was Aerojet Rocketdyne’s executive director of Electric Propulsion and Integrated Systems, where he led efforts focused on the development and production of next-generation chemical and electric space propulsion systems and vehicles. Dr. Myers has also served as deputy lead of Aerojet Rocketdyne’s Space and Launch Systems and general manager of Redmond Operations. Prior to joining Aerojet Rocketdyne, Dr. Myers was held supervisory and research positions at NASA’s Glenn Research Center, conducting research for the On-Board Propulsion Branch. Dr. Myers has authored more than 80 publications on spacecraft propulsion and advanced mission architectures, he is a former chair of the AIAA Electric Propulsion Technical Committee, and he is a former associate editor of the Journal of Propulsion and Power. Dr. Myers is president of the Electric Rocket Propulsion Society (ERPS), serves as chair of the Washington State Joint Center for Aerospace Technology Innovation, and is a member of the board of directors of the ERPS, the Washington State Academy of Sciences, and Seattle’s Museum of Flight. He is a fellow of the AIAA and was awarded the AIAA Wyld Propulsion Award in 2014. Dr. Myers holds a Ph.D. in mechanical and aerospace engineering from Princeton University. He has been a member of several National Academies’ study groups, most recently the Propulsion and Power Panel for the NASA Technology Roadmap Propulsion and Power Panel, the 2014 Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable, and the Panel to Review Air Force Office of Scientific Research Proposals–2005.
Darryll J. Pines
DARRYLL J. PINES is the dean of the Clark School of Engineering and the Nariman Farvardin professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland. His research interests include smart structures, structural dynamics and control; guidance, navigation, and control of aerospace vehicles. Previously, Dr. Pines was a member of the Technical Staff at Lawrence Livermore Lab, and served as Program Manager at DARPA. Dr. Pines is a reviewer for the Journal of Aircraft, the Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics, and the Journal of the American Helicopter Society. He earned his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has served on the Academies’ Committee on Guiding Implementation of PreK-12 Engineering Education in the U.S.; the Committee on A Vision for the Future of Center-Based; Multidisciplinary Engineering Research; and the Committee on A Guide for Recruiting and Advancing Women in Science and Engineering Careers in Academia.
James L. Reuter
JAMES L. REUTER is the acting associate administrator within the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters. During the last 35 years Mr. Reuter has held many other positions within NASA, including STMD deputy associate administrator, senior executive for technical integration in the Center Director’s Office at Marshall Space Flight Center, and chair of the Standing Review Board of the Exploration Systems Division at NASA Headquarters. Currently, Mr. Reuter provides executive leadership and management of the technology programs within STMD, with an annual investment value of over $600 million. He is responsible for budget planning and allocation of resources, and he serves as the final decisional authority for project content, ensuring that technology investments align with the NASA Strategic Plan and Roadmaps. Mr. Reuter has received numerous NASA awards and honors, including an Outstanding Leadership Medal, a NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal, and a NASA Exceptional Service Medal. He has a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Marcia S. Smith
MARCIA S. SMITH is president of Space and Technology Policy Group, LLC. She is also founder and editor of SpacePolicyOnline.com. Previously, she was director of the Space Studies Board and the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board of the National Academies. For the prior 31 years, she was a space and technology policy specialist for the Congressional Research Service (CRS), which is a department of the Library of Congress that provides objective, non-partisan research and analysis exclusively for members and committees of Congress. She took a leave of absence from CRS to serve as executive director of the 1985-1986 congressionally chartered, presidentially appointed National Commission on Space. Chaired by former NASA Administrator Thomas O. Paine, the commission laid out a 50-year plan (through 2035) for the civilian space program in its report, Pioneering the Space Frontier. She is the author of more than 200 reports and articles on military, civil, commercial space programs and other technology policy issues including telecommunications and nuclear energy. Ms. Smith is the North American editor for the quarterly journal Space Policy and a member of the board of editors of the quarterly journal New Space. She is a fellow of American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and has served on many of its committees and as an AIAA distinguished lecturer. She is a fellow of the American Astronautical Society (AAS). In the past she has served as AAS president, vice president of public policy, and in other official capacities, and she has received the AAS John F. Kennedy Award in 2006. She is a founder, past president, and emeritus member of Women in Aerospace and received its Lifetime Achievement Award. She is member and past trustee of the International Academy of Astronautics; a member and past vice president of the International Institute of Space Law, and has received its Lifetime Achievement Award. She is a life member of the New York Academy of Sciences, the Washington Academy of Sciences, and Sigma Xi. Ms. Smith earned an A.B. in political science from Syracuse University. She previously served as a member of the 2014 Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable and the Committee on Evaluating NASA's Strategic Direction.

Alfred Tadros
ALFRED TADROS is vice president of Civil and Department of Defense Business at Space Systems/Loral (SSL), responsible for applying SSL’s technologies, products, and access to space. He also develops and maintains relationships with federal agencies and manages sales and marketing activities. Mr. Tadros’ 24 years of experience includes development and integration of the Japanese Advanced Meteorological Imager, an actively cooled visible and infrared imager on the Japanese multipurpose satellite, MTSAT-1R. He also developed the GPS Tensor, a space qualified receiver deployed on 77 satellites in the Globalstar constellation. He developed control system algorithms on five missions and conducted launch and commissioning of nine missions. Mr. Tadros has conducted research in telerobotic systems and the on-orbit construction of space systems. Mr. Tadros holds patents in the field of dynamics and attitude control systems. He holds an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was a member of the 2014 Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable.
Roger W. Teague
ROGER W. TEAGUE serves as vice president, space, intelligence, and missile defense for The Boeing Company’s government operations unit. Major General Teague oversees core and adjacent business growth strategies, and he works to expand Boeing’s business in the satellite and space systems, intelligence, integrated missile defense, and cyber information systems markets. Previously, Major General Teague was director of Space Programs in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Acquisition, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, where he directed the development and purchasing of space programs for Air Force major commands, product centers, and laboratories. His responsibilities included crafting program strategies and options for representing Air Force positions to Headquarters U.S. Air Force, the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Congress, and the White House. His Air Force career also included a broad range of space related assignments, primarily involving the acquisition, launch, test, and operation of satellites and other space systems. He holds an M.B.A. from the University of Central Oklahoma and a M.S. for strategic studies from the Air University. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
C. Megan Urry
C. MEGAN URRY (NAS) is the Israel Munson Professor of Physics and Astronomy and director of the Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics and former chair of the Physics Department at Yale. Her scientific research focuses on active galaxies that host accreting supermassive black holes in their centers, and she has published over 280 refereed related research articles. Prior to moving to Yale, Dr. Urry was a senior astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which runs the Hubble Space Telescope for NASA. She is the past president of the American Astronomical Society and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society, and American Women in Science. Dr. Urry received an honorary doctorate from Tufts University and was awarded the American Astronomical Society’s Annie Jump Cannon and George van Biesbroeck prizes. She is also known for her efforts to increase the number of women and minorities in science, for which she won the 2015 Edward A. Bouchet Leadership Award from Yale University and the 2010 Women in Space Science Award from the Adler Planetarium. Dr. Urry received her Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University for physics. She has participated in many National Academies’ activities, including the U.S. National Committee for the International Astronomical Union, member-at-large of the U.S. Liaison Committee for the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, and as chair of the Astro2010 Panel on Galaxies Across Cosmic Time.
Laurence R. Young
LAURENCE R. YOUNG (NAE/NAM) is an Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics and Professor of Health Sciences and Technology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the Institute of Medical Engineering and Science (IMES). He was the founding director of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute and the co-founder of the Man-Vehicle Laboratory, which does research on the visual and vestibular systems, visual-vestibular interaction, flight simulation, space motion sickness and manual control and displays. He was principal investigator or co-investigator on seven Space Shuttle missions. In 1991 Professor Young was selected as a Payload Specialist for Spacelab Life Sciences 2. He spent two years in training at Johnson Space Center and served as alternate payload specialist during the October 1993 mission. He was chairman of the Harvard-MIT Committee on Biomedical Engineering and Physics and the Interdepartmental Ph.D. Program in Biomedical Engineering and directs the Harvard/MIT Graduate Program in Bioastronautics. He serves on the External Advisory Board of the Aerospace Engineering and Science Department of the University of Colorado–Boulder. Dr. Young is a full member of the International Academy of Astronautics and a fellow of the IEEE and the International Metabolic Engineering Society. He chairs the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts (NIAC) External Council He holds a Sc.D. degree in Instrumentation from MIT. Dr. Young has served on many National Academies’ committees including most recently the Committee to Review NASA's Evidence Reports on Human Health Risks, the 2014 Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable, and the Committee on Aerospace Medicine and the Medicine of Extreme Environments.

Events



Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Andrea Rebholz
Contact Email:  arebholz@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2857

Supporting File(s)
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Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

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Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Space Technology Industry-Government-University Roundtable (STIGUR) Spring Meeting 2019


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Anesia Wilks
Contact Email:  awilks@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1607

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

Publications

No data present.