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Project Information

Project Information


Improving Consumer Data for Food and Nutrition Policy Research for the Economic Research Service, USDA


Project Scope:

An ad hoc panel will review the Consumer Data and Nutrition Research (CDNR) program for the Economic Research Service (ERS) in the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The CDNR (originally the Consumer Data and Information Program) includes several components, such as supplements to existing federal surveys, use of relevant administrative and commercial data, linkages of databases, and the Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS). The expert panel will critically assess the value of each of the various ERS investments in food and nutrition data and provide directions for the next 10 years of the CDNR. As part of its information-gathering activities, the panel will conduct a workshop to discuss the views of data users and survey experts. The panel will produce a consensus report with conclusions and recommendations about the future of the CDNR, and a rapporteur-authored proceedings of the workshop also will be prepared.

Status: Current

PIN: DBASSE-CNSTAT-17-05

Project Duration (months): 27 month(s)

RSO: Mackie, Chris

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Committee on National Statistics

Topic(s):

Agriculture



Geographic Focus:
North America

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 03/20/2018

Marianne P. Bitler - (Chair)
Marianne Bitler is a professor in the Department of Economics at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Bitler’s expertise lies in in public economics, labor economics, health economics and applied microeconomics, with particular emphasis on the effects of government safety net programs on disadvantaged groups. Prior to arriving at UC Davis, she was a professor of economics at UC Irvine. She has worked at the Public Policy Institute of California, the RAND Corporation, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve, and the Federal Trade Commission. Dr. Bitler is a research associate with the National Bureau of Economic Research and a research fellow at Institute of Labor Economics (IZA). She has served on HMD’s Panel to Review the WIC Food Package and the just completed CNSTAT Panel to Review and Evaluate the 2014 Survey of Income and Program Participation's Content and Design. Dr. Bitler holds a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Tim Beatty
Tim Beatty is a professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Davis. Prior to joining UC Davis, he was a faculty member in the Department of Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota, and has held visiting positions with the University of British Columbia, Statistics Norway, and the University of Bologna. His research relates to the empirical analysis of consumption behavior, in particular as it relates to health outcomes at both the household and aggregate levels. He has served as a co-editor of the American Journal of Agricultural Economics. He is a longtime member of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, serving in leadership roles in the Food Safety and Nutrition and Econometrics sections. He holds an M.Sc. in applied economics from the École des Hautes Études Commerciales de Montréal, and a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Berkeley.
F. J. Breidt
Jay Breidt is a professor in the Department of Statistics at Colorado State University; from 2005-2010, he served as department chair. Dr. Breidt joined the Colorado State faculty in 2002 after nearly ten years in the Department of Statistics at Iowa State University. His research interests include estimation for complex surveys, survey sampling, time series, and environmental monitoring. He is an associate editor of the Electronic Journal of Statistics, and Journal of Forecasting. He has previously served on several National Academies’ committees including the Panel on Using ACS to Estimate Children in Poverty for School Breakfast and Lunch Programs, as well as the Panel on the Census Bureau's Reengineered Survey of Income and Program Participation. Dr. Breidt is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He holds an M.S. and a Ph.D., both in statistics, from Colorado State University.
Jean-Pierre Dube
Jean-Pierre Dubé is the Sigmund E. Edelstone Professor of Marketing at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He is also director of the Kilts Center for Marketing at the Booth School and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research interests include empirical quantitative marketing and empirical industrial organization, with specific interests in pricing, advertising, branding, digital marketing and retailing. Dubé’s work has been published in the The American Economic Review, Econometrica, The Journal of Marketing Research, and many others. He was the recipient of the Chicago Booth class of 2016 Phoenix Award for service to the extracurricular and community activities of the graduating class, the 2008 Paul E. Green Award for best paper in the Journal of Marketing Research and of the 2005 Faculty Teaching Excellence Award for Evening MBA and Weekend MBA Programs at the Chicago Booth. Dubé holds an M.A. and Ph.D. from Northwestern University, both in economics.
Craig Gundersen
Craig Gundersen is Soybean Industry Endowed Professor of Agricultural Strategy in the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics at the University of Illinois. Prior to joining the University of Illinois, he served as an economist at USDA’s Economic Research Service as well as academic positions at Iowa State University. His research attempts to inform policymakers and program administrators who are seeking paths to reduce food insecurity and its consequences with emphasis on food assistance programs, particularly the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Dr. Gundersen serves as an editor for the Journal of Nutrition and the American Journal of Agricultural Economics. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of California, Riverside.
Michael W. Link

Michael W. Link is division vice president for Data Science, Surveys and Enabling Technologies at Abt Associates. Prior to joining Abt, he was chief methodologist for research methods at The Nielsen Company. He has a broad base of experience in survey research, having worked in academia (University of South Carolina), not-for-profit research (RTI International, government (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), and the private sector (Nielsen). His research centers around developing methodologies for confronting some of the most pressing issues facing survey research, including techniques for improving survey participation and data quality (use of address-based sampling, impact of call screening technologies), methodological issues involving use of multiple modes in data collection (web, mail, CATI, field, mobile, meters), and obtaining participation from hard-to-survey populations (linguistically isolated, racial and ethnic groups). His research articles have appeared in Public Opinion Quarterly and other leading scientific journals. In 2011 he, along with several research colleagues, received AAPOR’s Warren J. Mitofsky Innovators Award for their work on address- based sampling designs. His current research focuses on emerging technologies, such as mobile and social platforms, as vehicles for measuring and understanding public attitudes and behaviors. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of South Carolina.

Bruce D. Meyer
Bruce D. Meyer is the McCormick Foundation professor of public policy in the Harris School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago. Prior to this appointment he was a professor in the Economics Department at Northwestern University, where he taught for seventeen years. His current research includes studies of poverty and inequality, government safety net programs, welfare policy, unemployment insurance, workers’ compensation, disability, the health care safety net, labor supply, and the accuracy of household surveys. Previously, he was a visiting faculty member at Harvard University, University College London, and Princeton University. He is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance and the Conference on Research on Income and Wealth. Meyer has served as an advisor to the U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, New York State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance, Human Resources Development Canada, Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, and Mathematica Policy Research. He has an M.A. degree from Northwestern University and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, both in economics.
Amy B. O'Hara
Amy O’Hara is a senior research scholar at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, joining in July 2017. From 2014 until her move to Stanford, she was chief of the Center for Administrative Records Research and Applications (CARRA), which was then part of the research and methodology directorate at the U.S. Census Bureau. She began her career at the Census Bureau in 2004 as an economist/statistician in the Social, Economic, and Housing Statistics Division before shifting to CARRA in 2008. Among other accomplishments in attempting to integrate administrative records data into the full suite of Census Bureau processes, she led the 2010 Census Match Study—an unprecedented complete match/linkage of the full set of returns from the 2010 decennial census to a composite of administrative records data from 8 federal agencies. It has been used to examine differences in coverage and possible sources of error in both sources. She received an Arthur S. Flemming Award, recognizing outstanding achievement and leadership in federal government service, from the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration, George Washington University, in 2012. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from the University of Notre Dame.
Eric B. Rimm
Eric Rimm is a professor of epidemiology and nutrition and director of the Program in Cardiovascular Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, and is also a professor of medicine at the Harvard Medical School. His research group has specific interests both in the study of modifiable lifestyle choices (e.g. diet and physical activity) in relation to cardiovascular disease as well as the translation of these findings into public health interventions that are effective for schoolchildren, adults and the food insecure. He has previously served on the scientific advisory committee for the 2010 U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans. He has published more than 450 peer reviewed publications during his 20+ years on the faculty at Harvard. Rimm is an associate editor for the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and the American Journal of Epidemiology. He also was awarded the 2012 American Society for Nutrition General Mills Institute of Health and Nutrition Innovation Award. He holds an Sc.D. in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health.
Nora C. Schaeffer
Nora Cate Schaeffer is Sewell Bascom professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where she also serves as faculty director of the University of Wisconsin Survey Center, teaches courses in survey research methods, and conducts research on questionnaire design and interaction during survey interviews. She currently serves as a member of the Public Opinion Quarterly Advisory Board of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, and of the General Social Survey Board of Overseers. She recently completed terms as the Council on Sections Representatives for the Survey Research Methods Section of the American Statistical Association and as a member of the Census Advisory Committee of Professional Associations. She is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association. She has served on multiple National Academies’ committees, including seven consensus studies, and is a former member of CNSTAT. She holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago.
Diane Schanzenbach
Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach is director of the Institute for Policy Research, the Margaret Walker Alexander Professor in the School of Education and Social Policy, and faculty fellow at Northwestern University. She is also currently research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution, a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, and a faculty affiliate in the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin. She studies policies aimed at improving the lives of children in poverty, including education, health, and income support policies. Her recent work has focused on tracing the impact of major public policies such as SNAP (formerly the Food Stamp Program) and early childhood education on children’s long-term outcomes. She holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Princeton University, both in economics.
Sofia B. Villas-Boas
Sofia Berto Villas-Boas is a professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at UC Berkeley. Her research interests include industrial organization, consumer behavior, food policy, and environmental regulation. Her recent empirical work estimates the effects of policies on consumer behavior, such as bottled water tax, a plastic bag ban, and a soda tax campaign and its implementation. Other published work has focused on the economics behind wholesale price-discrimination-banning legislation, contractual relationships along a vertical supply chain, and identifying the role of those contracts in explaining pass-through of cost shocks along the supply chain into retail prices that consumers face. She is widely published in top economics and field journals such as Review of Economic Studies, Rand Journal of Economics, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and Marketing Science. She holds a Ph.D from the University of California, Berkeley, both in economics.
James P. Ziliak
James P. Ziliak is Carol Martin Gatton endowed chair in microeconomics in the Department of Economics at the University of Kentucky, and founding director of the Center for Poverty Research. His research expertise is the areas of tax and welfare policy, poverty, and food insecurity. He is the principal investigator on the Research Program on Childhood Hunger funded by the Food and Nutrition Service and was a member of HMD’s Committee on the Examination of the Adequacy of Food Resources and SNAP Allotments, as well as CNSTAT’s Panel on the Review and Evaluation of the 2014 Survey of Income and Program Participation Content and Design. He has served as a visiting scholar at Brookings Institution and as visiting professor at University College London and the Universities of Michigan and Wisconsin. He served as chair of the CNSTAT Workshop on an Agenda for Child Hunger and Food Insecurity Research. He has an M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Indiana University.

Events



Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Workshop

Registration for Online Attendance :   
https://nasem.zoom.us/j/265581580

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Michael Siri
Contact Email:  msiri@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3113

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Michael Siri
Contact Email:  msiri@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3113

Agenda
Day 1, June 14: Open Public Sessions

8:30 Registration and networking; light breakfast available.

9:00 Welcome, introductions, overview of agenda, goals for the meeting and the study
­ Marianne Bitler, Chair
­ ERS (Mary Bohman, Administrator; Jay Variyam, Division Director; Mark Denbaly, Deputy Division Director for Food Economics Data)

9:15 Proprietary data used by (or of interest to) ERS
This session will build on the April 16 presentation by Megan Sweitzer and David Levin (ERS). Commercial data sources can supplement (and, in some cases, replace) survey data, and CFDS program planners would like to explore the potential for increasing the use of commercial, web-based, and other non-survey data. Goals of a multi-source approach include reducing costs and respondent burden, increasing granularity or timeliness of information, and filling data gaps. ERS uses, or has used, consumer data from IRI, NPD, and Nielsen. Questions for presenters from commercial data firms include: How are data collected? What are the coverage and characteristics of the data? How are their data currently being used for research and policy? What access limitations and privacy issues affect data use? And, what is the level of transparency of methods to outside users? Presenters should identify data products they produce or plan to produce that may be of interest to statistical agencies.

• Overview of commercial data currently used by ERS/CFDS program; ideas for expanding its use. ERS is doing some creative work to estimate food prices to construct food plans. How are the quality and properties of data they are bringing into their program being evaluated (analogous to OMB quality standards for surveys)? What are the strengths and weaknesses of the data currently being used?
? Abigail Okrent, ERS (15 minutes)

• IRI. IRI is a big data analytics firm that collects information applicable to food policy research. Of particular interest to ERS are proprietary household and retail scanner price data (e.g., InfoScan) and also data on nutrition information and health and wellness claims for a large number of products.
? Brian Burke, IRI (15 minutes)

• NPD Group. NPD collects consumer spending and consumption data across 3 main datasets, comprising direct point-of-sales feeds from retailers, consumer survey data and a receipt-based service, across 24+ sectors. With its Food databases, NPD provides research on food consumption, restaurants, commercial foodservice and eating patterns.
? Ann Hanson, Louis Lesce, NPD (20 minutes)

• Nielsen. ERS has used Nielsen Homescan and TDLinx data. TDLinx is a store/outlet-level database of retailers selling consumer packaged goods, including food.
? Joseph Fortson, Nielsen (15 minutes)

• Panel questions and comments, open discussion (15 minutes)

10:30 Coffee break

10:45 Combining data sources to advance food and nutrition policy and research
• The USDA Branded Food Products Data Base. This data source augments the USDA National Nutrient Database with nutrient composition and ingredient information on branded and store-brand food products provided by the food industry.
? Alison Kretser, Kyle McKillop, ILSI North America (30 minutes)

• Linking The Food Availability Data System (FADS) to nutrition intake data from the Agricultural Research Service and National Center for Health Statistics to monitor and research the health and dietary outcomes of the U.S. population.
? Biing-Hwan Lin, ERS (20 minutes)

• Panel questions and comments, open discussion

11:45 Use of specialized modules added to federal surveys
• The Eating and Health Module (EHM) supplement to the BLS American Time Use Survey, the Flexible Consumer Behavior Survey (FCBS), and other plans/opportunities for using the modules.
? Brandon Restrepo, Eliana Zeballos, ERS (15 minutes)

• The Food Security Survey Module—how many versions are used (number of items and reference period) and what Federal surveys has it been added to? What are the research applications?
? Alisha Coleman-Jensen, ERS (15 minutes)

• Panel questions and comments (Jay Breidt, Bruce Meyer, Eric Rimm); open discussion

12:30 Lunch

1:30 FoodAPS status; Data users’ and stakeholders’ input. After a progress report on FoodAPS-2, participants will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of using FoodAPS, and ideas for making future iterations more powerful. Other ERS data sources may also be discussed.
• An update from Westat on FoodAPS-2 progress
? Laurie May (collection and survey protocols/methods) and Tom Krenzke (mathematical/statistics side) (20 minutes)

• User feedback from researchers using FoodAPS 1 (30 minutes)
? Parke Wilde and Mehreen Ismail, Tufts University (data needs for measuring SNAP/non-SNAP differences in food spending or other outcomes, as a representative use case for thinking about data requirements for FoodAPS and other federal data sources).
? Robert Moffitt, Johns Hopkins (applied research on program outcomes—food expenditure, reporting errors, SNAP impacts).

• Use of USDA consumer food data system data for health research. Using the Healthy Eating Index to assess the diet quality of the food supply chain (FoodAPS provides data for measuring consumer purchases)
? Susan Krebs-Smith, National Cancer Institute (20 minutes)

• Food and Nutrition Service (FNS)—How does FNS use the information put out by CFDS, and for what purpose?
? Melissa Abelev, FNS (15 minutes)

• Panel questions and comments (Bruce Meyer, Eric Rimm, Tim Beatty, Jim Ziliak, Craig Gundersen); open discussion

3:00 Group discussion of Meeting #3 content options (see Tab K)

3:30 Adjourn Open Session

Day 2, June 15: This session is closed to the public in its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Michael Siri
Contact Email:  msiri@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3113

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.