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Project Information

Project Information


Assessment of Technologies for Improving Fuel Economy of Light-Duty Vehicles–Phase 3


Project Scope:

The committee that will be formed to carry out this study will continue the work of the National Academies for the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in the assessment of technologies for improving the fuel economy of light-duty vehicles. While the committee will need to consider the near term deployment of fuel economy technologies, it is tasked with looking out into the 2025 to 2035 time frame to provide updated estimates of the potential cost, fuel economy improvements, and barriers to deployment of technologies. The committee will need to broadly consider the types of technologies that might emerge over this time period and their impacts on fuel consumption. It will also consider shifts in the personal transportation and vehicle ownership models and how such shifts might impact vehicle technologies. The committee will build on the assessments completed in earlier National Academies reports, including the first two phases of this series of studies Assessment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Improving Light-Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy (2011) and Costs, Effectiveness, and Deployment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles (2015). It will reflect on developments since these reports were issued and investigate any new technologies and trends in consumer behaviors that may become important by 2035. In particular, the committee will:

1.  Examine the costs (direct and indirect), fuel economy improvements, and potential implementation timing for high volume production of technologies for internal combustion engine powertrains.
  
2.  Examine the costs (direct and indirect), fuel economy improvements, and potential implementation timing for high volume production of electric powertrain technologies. The committee shall include an examination of the cost, performance, durability, usable battery capacity and other issues related to critical components, including batteries, ultracapacitors, and power electronics and auxiliary vehicle systems such as heating and cooling. The committee will also address transition issues associated with meeting the infrastructure needs for such powertrains.
  
3.  Examine the costs (direct and indirect), fuel economy improvements, and potential implementation timing for high volume production of non-powertrain technologies including mass reduction, aerodynamics, low rolling resistance tires, and vehicle accessories. For mass reduction, the committee shall consider opportunities for a range of baseline vehicle materials, including steel, high strength steel, mixed metal, aluminum, polymers, composites and others. The committee shall include an examination of methodologies for cost assessment of mass reduction, including equipment and retooling costs, manufacturing issues, supply chain requirements, and implications for durability, safety, and reparability.

4.  Consider the current and possible future role of flexibilities in the CAFE program on the introduction of new technologies, including credit trading, treatment of alternative fuel vehicles, off-cycle provisions, and flexibilities for small volume manufacturers.
   
5.  Assess how shifts in personal transportation and vehicle ownership models might evolve out to 2035, how these changes could impact fuel economy-related vehicle technologies and operation, and how these changes might impact vehicle scrappage and vehicle miles traveled. Scenarios might be used to bound this task.

6. Examine consumer behavior issues associated with new fuel efficiency technologies, including acceptance of any utility or performance impacts and cost of new technologies. This could include considerations of consumers’ willingness to pay for improvements in fuel economy and other vehicle attributes.

7. Write a final report documenting the committee’s conclusions and recommendations.

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-BEES-17-03

Project Duration (months): 44 month(s)

RSO: Zeitler, Elizabeth

Topic(s):

Energy and Energy Conservation
Engineering and Technology
Transportation and Infrastructure
Policy for Science and Technology



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 08/24/2018

Gary Marchant - (Chair)
Gary Marchant is a Regent's Professor of Law and Director of the Center for Law, Science and Innovation at Arizona State University. His research interests include legal aspects of genomics and personalized medicine, the use of genetic information in environmental regulation, risk and the precautionary principle, and governance of emerging technologies such as nanotechnology, neuroscience, biotechnology and artificial intelligence. He teaches courses in Law, Science and Technology, Genetics and the Law, Biotechnology: Science, Law and Policy, Health Technologies and Innovation, Privacy, Big Data and Emerging Technologies, and Artificial Intelligence: Law and Ethics. He was named a Regents' Professor in 2011 and also is a professor in ASU’s School of Life Sciences, a Distinguished Sustainability Scientist in ASU’s Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability, and is a Lincoln Professor of Emerging Technologies Law and Ethics with the Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics at ASU. Prior to joining ASU in 1999, Professor Marchant was a partner at the Washington, D.C., office of Kirkland & Ellis, where his practice focused on environmental and administrative law. During law school, he was Editor-in-Chief of the Harvard Journal of Law & Technology and editor of the Harvard Environmental Law Review, and was awarded the Fay Diploma (awarded to top graduating student at Harvard Law School). Professor Marchant frequently lectures about the intersection of law and science at national and international conferences. He has authored more than 150 articles and book chapters on various issues relating to emerging technologies. Among other activities, he has served on five previous National Academy of Sciences committees (including Committee on Assessment of Technologies and Approaches for Reducing the Fuel Consumption of Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles, Phase 2, February 2013-present; Committee on Assessment of Solid State Lighting, May 2011-February 2013; and Committee on State Practices in Setting Mobile Source Emission Standards, 2004-2006), has been the principal investigator on several major grants, and has organized numerous academic conferences on law and science issues. He has a Ph.D. in genetics from the University of British Columbia.
Carla Bailo
Carla Bailo is the President and CEO of the Center for Automotive Research (CAR). Ms. Bailo is a leader in engineering and vehicle program management with 35 years of experience in the automotive industry. In addition to her role at CAR, Ms. Bailo is the 2016-2018 vice president of automotive for SAE International, a global association of more than 138,000 engineers and related technical experts in the aerospace, automotive and commercial-vehicle industries. Prior to joining CAR, Ms. Bailo was the assistant vice president for mobility research and business development at The Ohio State University. In that capacity, she assisted the University in accelerating sustainable mobility and transportation innovation, while integrating related research and education across Ohio State’s academic units. She also helped coordinate Ohio State’s involvement as the primary research partner for Smart Columbus, a $140 million program to transform central Ohio into a premier transportation innovation region. Ms. Bailo has 25 years of experience at Nissan North America, Inc., where in her most recent role at Nissan she served as senior vice president of research and development. She was responsible for vehicle engineering and development operations in Michigan, Arizona, Mexico and Brazil, managing a $500 million budget and 2,500 employees. In this role, she improved the efficiency of Nissan’s R&D functions. Ms. Bailo has a MS degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan and a BS degree in mechanical engineering from Kettering University.
Rodica A. Baranescu
Rodica Baranescu (NAE) is retired as Professor in Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago. Prior to that, she was manager of the fuels, lubricants, and engine group of the International Truck and Engine Corporation, at Melrose Park, Illinois. She is an internationally sought after public speaker on technical issues related to mobility technology, environmental control, fuels, and energy. She has extensive expertise in diesel engine technology and was elected to the NAE in 2001 for research leading to effective and environmentally sensitive diesel and alternative-fuel engines and leadership in automotive engineering. She is a fellow of SAE International and was its president in 2000. In 2003 she received the Internal Combustion Engine Award of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering) (ASME). Dr. Baranescu received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering in 1961 and 1970, respectively, from the Politehnica University in Bucharest, Romania, where she served as assistant professor (1964-1968), lecturer (1970-1974), and associate professor (1974-1978).
Nady Boules
Nady Boules is president, NB Motors, LLC. He began his engineering and management consultancy practice with a focus on electrified, connected, and autonomous vehicles in September 2013 after 45 years of engineering experience (32 years with General Motors and Delphi), including 14 years as director of R&D, and Innovation. In his most recent capacity, as Director of GM’s Research & Development’s Electrical & Control Systems Research Lab, Boules was responsible for the development of advanced electrical systems and components for electrified, connected and automated vehicles to enhance vehicle safety, comfort and efficiency. He led all R&D activities in areas of electronics and control software globally and coordinated research in this area, internally with sister research labs and engineering customers; and externally with collaborators at universities, national labs, suppliers, and other automotive OEMs (USCAR). Boules first joined General Motors Research Laboratories in 1982. He held several positions leading and managing research activities in automotive mechatronic and electric drive systems. In September 1999, he was named director of research and development for Delphi Steering Systems in Saginaw, MI. His responsibilities expanded to cover brakes and suspension when he was named director of the dynamics innovation center in 2002. In 2005, he was named director, dynamics innovation center and materials engineering and his responsibilities expanded to materials to the energy and chassis division. From May 2006 until returning to GM, he held the position of director, innovation & technology leadership. Boules received his doctorate of engineering degree in 1978 from the Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany. He is the author of numerous patents, technical and invited papers and has received several awards from GM in recognition of his accomplishments, including John Campbell Award (for scientific accomplishments), Charles McCuen Award (recognizing contributions to the business success of GM), Extraordinary Accomplishment Award, and the President’s Council Honors Award. Boules has been a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) since 1991 and was named a life fellow in January 2015. He is also the recipient of the 2011 IEEE Nikola Tesla Award. He is a member of the Industry Applications Society (IAS) and a past member of its executive board. He was also a member of the board of directors of Intelligent Transportation Society of America (ITS-A) and a member of the executive board of several University consortia, and currently serving on the Committee on Review of the U.S. DRIVE Research Program of the National Academies.
Nigel N. Clark
Nigel Clark is a professor and the George B. Berry Chair of Engineering in the Statler College of Engineering & Mineral Resources at West Virginia University (WVU) He has held positions of Campus Provost of WVU Tech and the WVU Beckley Campus, WVU Associate Vice President for Academic Strategic Planning, and Director of the Center for Alternative Fuels, Engines & Emissions at WVU. Dr. Clark has chaired the WVU Faculty Senate and served on the institution’s Board of Governors. He holds a Ph.D. in Engineering from the University of Natal, South Africa, and previously held assistant and associate professor positions in the Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering at WVU. Dr. Clark’s areas of interest include vehicle design, advanced vehicle concepts, alternative fuels and the measurement and reduction of vehicle emissions. He has taught courses in Internal Combustion Engines, Hybrid Vehicle Design, Machine Design and Heat Transfer, and has led student design teams in national DOE – Industry light duty automotive design competitions. Dr. Clark has a strong background in combustion, fuels, engine management, vehicle modeling and controls, and systems integration. He has conducted research for government and industry in the areas of fuel economy and emissions, including truck, bus, marine and rail emissions, idle reduction, fuel standards and hybrid electric drive vehicle economy. He has worked with the International Council for Clean Transportation on technology and efficiency review, and has served on two prior NRC committees on medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fuel economy. Dr. Clark has contributed to understanding the influence of vehicle activity, regenerative braking and test cycles on energy efficiency, and to relating engine and vehicle dynamometer data. His most recent grants have addressed methane losses from natural gas fueled vehicles, the design of linear engine/generator systems, and assessment of a proposed Inspection & Maintenance program. He commenced his career with a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award, was recognized as a Benedum Scholar by his institution, and is a Fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers.
David L. Greene
David L. Greene is a Senior Fellow of the Howard H. Baker, Jr. Center for Public Policy and a Research Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Tennessee. In 2013 he retired from Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a Corporate Fellow after a 36-year career at ORNL. He holds a PhD in Geography and Environmental Engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. Greene’s research interests are focused on energy use in transportation and policies to reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas emissions and achieve a transition to sustainable energy sources. He has published extensively on automotive fuel economy and the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards, and served on all four National Research Council committees that evaluated US fuel economy policy and technologies for cars and light trucks. He was also a member of the Committee on Transitions to Alternative Vehicles and Fuels. How technology and policy can accomplish a cost-effective transition to sustainable energy for transportation is a current focus of his research and modeling. He is an author of more than 275 professional publications on transportation and energy issues, including 100 articles in peer-reviewed journals and 12 National Research Council reports. The 2012 recipient of the Transportation Research Board’s Roy W. Crum Award, he is also an emeritus member of both the Energy and Alternative Fuels Committees of the TRB and a lifetime National Associate of the U.S. National Academies. He received the Society of Automotive Engineers’ 2007 Barry D. McNutt Award for Excellence in Automotive Policy Analysis, the Department of Energy’s 2007 Hydrogen R&D Award, DOE’s 2011 Vehicle Technologies R&D Award, and DOE’s Distinguished Career Service Award. Dr. Greene was recognized by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for contributing to the IPCC’s receipt of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.
Daniel Kapp
Daniel Kapp, is principal, D.R. Kapp Consulting providing consulting services in the area of automotive powertrain product technology and strategy, following his retirement from Ford Motor Company 2012. He was with Ford since 1977 upon graduation from Michigan Technological University with a BSME degree. He has spent his entire 35+ year career in the area of engine and powertrain product development. From the late 80's through the mid 90's, Kapp was involved in the design and development of the "Modular" V8 and V6 engines as Ford revamped its engine line-up to modern overhead cam designs. He was the Program Manager of the Triton V8 truck engines through their launch and then spent 3 years in the Truck Vehicle Center as the Powertrain Systems Manager for full size trucks and SUV's. In 2001, Kapp was appointed to his first executive position as Director of Core and Advanced Powertrain Engineering responsible for powertrain controls, catalyst and emission systems, and calibration. One year later, he became Executive Director for Powertrain Operations and for five years led the product development of all engines and transmissions in North America, during which time he also acted as a global powertrain product development lead for the enterprise. In late 2006, Kapp moved to Ford's Research and Advanced activity and remained there until retiring in 10/12. During that time he led the development of advanced powertrain technologies such as EcoBoost. In that role, he also led the development of Ford’s technology roadmaps for future sustainability and emission reduction strategy. He served as an internal technical consultant in the field of powertrain technologies and did significant external interfacing as a spokesman for Ford in this area.
Therese Langer
Therese Langer is the Transportation Program Director at the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE). Langer works to advance energy efficiency of both vehicles and systems for the movement of passengers and freight. Her current areas of activity include: technologies and policies to improve light- and heavy-duty fuel economy; energy impacts of vehicle automation; applications of information and communications technology to reduce transportation fuel use; integration of electric vehicles into the electric grid; and life-cycle and fuel-cycle environmental impacts of motor vehicles. Prior to joining ACEEE in 2001, Langer was staff scientist for the Rutgers University Environmental Law Clinic, working to make the transportation system in the greater New York metropolitan area more sustainable. Langer holds a PhD in mathematics from UC Berkeley. She served as a member of the NRC Committee on the Assessment of Technologies for Improving Fuel Economy of Light-Duty Vehicles, Phase 2.
Zhenhong Lin
Zhenhong Lin a senior R&D staff member at National Transportation Research Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and joint Associate Professor of University of Tennessee, Industrial & Systems Engineering. As PI and manager of the Transportation Energy Evolution Modeling (TEEM) program, he is interested in analyzing technologies, strategies and policies that can transform the transportation energy system for societal objectives. Lin received the 2017 Vehicle Technologies Office Distinguished Achievement Award on his contribution to a joint study on CAV energy impact. He also received the 2011 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office R&D Award for his work on modeling consumer choices of advanced powertrain technologies. Having authored over 30 peer-reviewed articles, Lin has studied electric vehicle market acceptance, range optimization for battery and fuel cell electric vehicles, on-road fuel economy, alternative fuel infrastructure optimization, diesel engine injection control and fuel cell powertrain simulation. Lin is a member of the Alternative Transportation Fuels and Technologies Committee of the Transportation Research Board and a Senior Member of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He received his PhD in Transportation Engineering in 2008 and MS in Transportation Technology & Policy from University of California, Davis. Before that, Lin obtained his BE/MS in Automotive Engineering from Tsinghua University in Beijing.
Joshua Linn
Joshua Linn is an Associate Professor at the University of Maryland and a Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF). Linn’s research centers on the effect of environmental regulation and market incentives on technology, with particular focus on the electricity sector and markets for new vehicles. His work on the electricity sector has compared the effectiveness of cap and trade and alternative policy instruments in promoting new technology, including renewable electricity technologies. Studies on new vehicles markets investigate the effect of CAFE standards and fuel prices on new vehicle characteristics, technology, consumer well-being, and manufacturer profits. He has published in leading general interest and field journals in environmental, energy, and health economics. Linn, who joined the University of Maryland in 2018, joined RFF in March 2010, was an assistant professor in the economics department at the University of Illinois at Chicago and a research scientist at MIT. Linn holds a PhD in economics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a BA in Astronomy and physics from Yale University.
Nic Lutsey
Nic Lutsey is Program Director at the International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT), where he directs its electric vehicle research and co-leads its U.S. activities. Nic manages the ICCT’s role as the Secretariat for the International Zero-Emission Vehicle Alliance. He has co-authored 19 peer-reviewed journal articles and dozens of reports on technology potential, regulatory design, and policy cost-effectiveness. He has received awards from the U.S. Department of Transportation, the University of California at Davis, the Transportation Research Board, and the California Air Resources Board for his research contributions. In 2015, he received the SAE International Barry D. McNutt Award for Excellence in Automotive Policy Analysis. Previously, with the California Air Resources Board, he participated in the regulatory development of the 2004 and 2012 greenhouse gas emission regulations for automobiles. He received a B.S. in Agricultural and Biological Engineering from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in Transportation Technology and Policy from the University of California, Davis.
JoAnn Milliken
JoAnn Milliken is currently self-employed as a Senior Energy Consultant. She has 34 years of Federal program management experience, more than 20 of those with the Department of Energy, where she developed and directed clean energy R&D portfolios having budgets of up to $200 million per year. She has a strong track record of success in advancing energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, practices and policy, working in collaboration with industry, universities, small businesses and national laboratories. Dr. Milliken is a recognized expert in hydrogen and fuel cell systems, and experienced in leading Federal programs in energy efficient buildings, solar, wind, and geothermal energy. Prior to joining DOE in 1994, Dr. Milliken was a research chemist at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and a program manager at the Office of Naval Research where she conducted and managed mission-related materials research. She earned a B.A. degree in chemistry from LaSalle University and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania, researching electronically conducting polymers under Nobel Laureate Professor Alan MacDiarmid. Dr. Milliken retired from DOE in 2015.
Randa Radwan
Randa Radwan is currently a vehicle safety and engineering consultant with over 27 years of experience in transportation safety and vehicle crashworthiness research, including 17 years as a research program manager at US DOT National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Dr. Radwan has forged alliances and successfully collaborated with the safety community at large from government and industry on both national and international levels. She led a multi-disciplinary research program from concept to the Notice for Proposed Rulemaking for NHTSA’s 2007 FMVSS 214 upgrade forecast to save over 300 lives and reduce 400 serious injuries per year. She has received multiple awards while at NHTSA, including the Secretary of Transportation Award and the NHTSA Administrator’s Award, which she received four times. Dr. Radwan then spent nine years as the Director of Advanced Research and Senior Research Scientist at the George Washington University (GWU) National Crash Analyses Center where she engaged in and directed innovative analyses and methodologies in vehicle and transportation safety research. Dr. Radwan created strategy and modeling methodology to assess safety performance of new vehicle designs, resulting in the Vehicle Fleet Simulation methodology used for NHTSA’s “Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards (CAFE) and Midterm Evaluation for Light-Duty Vehicles, Model Years 2022-2025” safety studies. She also served as adjunct faculty in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at GWU (2009-2013). Dr. Radwan has authored 29 peer reviewed professional publications on vehicle safety, including two reports to the US Congress. She has a PhD in transportation safety engineering from GWU and a master’s and BS in electrical engineering from Rice University.
Anna Stefanopoulou
Anna G. Stefanopoulou is the William Clay Ford Professor of Manufacturing at the University of Michigan. She has been on the faculty of the Department of Mechanical Engineering since 2000. She obtained her Diploma (1991, Nat. Tech. Univ. of Athens, Greece) in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering and her Ph.D. (1996, University of Michigan) in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. She served as the Director of the Automotive Research Center a multi-university U.S. Army Center of Excellence in Modeling and Simulation of Ground Vehicles (2009-2018). She was an assistant professor (1998-2000) at the University of California, Santa Barbara and a technical specialist (1996-1997) at Ford Motor Company where she developed and implemented multivariable controllers for advanced engines and powertrains. She has been recognized as a Fellow of three different societies; the ASME (08), IEEE (09), and SAE (18). She is an elected member of the Executive Committee of the ASME Dynamics Systems and Control Division and the Board of Governors of the IEEE Control Systems Society. She is the Founding Chair of the ASME DSCD Energy Systems Technical Committee and a member of a U.S. National Research Council committee on the 2025 US. Light Duty Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards. She is a recipient of the 2018 Rackham Distinguished Graduate Mentor Award, the 2017 IEEE Control System Technology award, the 2012 College of Engineering Research Award, the 2009 ASME Gustus L. Larson Memorial Award, a 2008 Univ. of Michigan Faculty Recognition award, the 2005 Outstanding Young Investigator by the ASME DSC division, a 2005 Henry Russel award, a 2002 Ralph Teetor SAE educational award, a 1997 NSF CAREER award and selected as one of the 2002 world’s most promising innovators from the MIT Technology Review. She has co-authored a book, 20 US patents, and more than 250 publications (5 of which have received awards) on estimation and control of internal combustion engines and electrochemical processes such as fuel cells and batteries.
Deidre Strand
Deidre Strand is Chief Scientific Officer at Wildcat Discovery Technologies. Dr. Strand has over twenty five years of experience in materials research, development, and commercialization, primarily in the areas of energy storage (lithium ion batteries) and electronic applications. Prior to joining Wildcat in 2012, Dr. Strand served as a Research Fellow at Dow Chemical, where she was the technical lead in Dow Energy Materials, as well as the Principal Investigator on external research programs with universities and national labs on battery materials. Dr. Strand also has extensive experience in patent analysis and technical due diligence of new technologies. Dr. Strand completed her Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, under the supervision of Professor John Schrag. Her Ph.D. research focused on rheology and birefringence of polymeric solutions. Dr. Strand also holds a Master of Science degree in Chemistry from the California Institute of Technology and a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from North Dakota State University.
Kate Whitefoot
Kate Whitefoot is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. She is a thrust leader of Technology Commercialization for the NextManufacturing Center and a Faculty Affiliate at the Carnegie Mellon Scott Institute for Energy Innovation. Prior to her current position, she served as a Senior Program Officer and the Robert A. Pritzker fellow at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine where she directed the Academies’ Manufacturing, Design, and Innovation program. Professor Whitefoot’s research bridges engineering design theory and analysis with that of economics to study the design and manufacture of energy efficient and low-carbon products and processes and their adoption in the marketplace. Her areas of expertise include vehicle fuel efficiency, consumer choice, design and adoption of green products, energy-efficient and productive manufacturing, and energy and environmental policies. Professor Whitefoot has gained recognition nationally and internationally for her research and teaching. She served on the National Academies Committee on the Review of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Engineering Laboratory. Her research is featured in the Washington Post, Popular Mechanics, Bloomberg Business, and Business Insider, and referenced in the 2017-2025 Corporate Average Fuel Economy rulemaking. She has worked with several companies in automotive, aerospace, and high-tech industries, and has been invited to present briefings at the White House, Capitol Hill, the Department of Commerce, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Whitefoot earned three degrees from the University of Michigan: a B.S. and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Design Science—a multidisciplinary program where she concentrated in Mechanical Engineering and Economics, completing course sequences and having an advisory committee across both disciplines.
Elizabeth Zeitler - (Staff Officer)

Committee Membership Roster Comments

Randa Radwan has been added to the committee.


Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest

Disclosure of Conflict of Interest: Daniel Kapp

The conflict of interest policy of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (http://www.nationalacademies.org/coi) prohibits the appointment of an individual to a committee authoring a Consensus Study Report if the individual has a conflict of interest that is relevant to the task to be performed. An exception to this prohibition is permitted if the National Academies determines that the conflict is unavoidable and the conflict is publicly disclosed. A determination of a conflict of interest for an individual is not an assessment of that individual's actual behavior or character or ability to act objectively despite the conflicting interest.

Daniel Kapp has a conflict of interest in relation to his service on the Committee on Assessment of Technologies for Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Vehicles, Phase 3, because he owns Ford Motor Company stocks, and because he has a consulting relationship with AVL Powertrain Engineering, a supplier of engineering services to automobile manufacturers.

The National Academies has concluded that in order for the committee to accomplish the tasks for which it was established, its membership must include current direct experience with leading gasoline engine and powertrain programs at a major automaker, focusing on gasoline engine technologies under research, development, and large-scale deployment. As his biographical summary makes clear, Daniel Kapp has deep automotive experience in the areas of engine design and development, launch of vehicle programs, and leadership and management of powertrain systems deployed in the vehicle fleet.

The National Academies has determined that the experience and expertise of Mr. Kapp is necessary for the committee to accomplish the task for which it has been established. The National Academies could not find another available individual with the equivalent experience and expertise who does not have a conflict of interest. Therefore, the National Academies has concluded that the conflict is unavoidable.

The National Academies believes that Mr. Daniel Kapp can serve effectively as a member of the committee, and the committee can produce an objective report, taking into account the composition of the committee, the work to be performed, and the procedures to be followed in completing the study.

BIO:

Daniel Kapp, is principal, D.R. Kapp Consulting providing consulting services in the area of automotive powertrain product technology and strategy, following his retirement from Ford Motor Company 2012. He was with Ford since 1977 upon graduation from Michigan Technological University with a BSME degree. He has over 35 years of experience in the area of engine and powertrain product development. From the late 80's through the mid 90's, Kapp was involved in the design and development of the "Modular" V8 and V6 engines as Ford revamped its engine line-up to modern overhead cam designs. He was the Program Manager of the Triton V8 truck engines through their launch and then spent 3 years in the Truck Vehicle Center as the Powertrain Systems Manager for full size trucks and SUV's. In 2001, Kapp was appointed as Director of Core and Advanced Powertrain Engineering responsible for powertrain controls, catalyst and emission systems, and calibration. One year later, he became Executive Director for Powertrain Operations and for five years led the product development of all engines and transmissions in North America. In late 2006, Kapp moved to Ford's Research and Advanced activity where he led the development of advanced powertrain technologies such as EcoBoost. In that role, he also led the development of Ford’s technology roadmaps for future sustainability and emission reduction strategy.

Disclosure of Conflict of Interest: Deidre Strand

The conflict of interest policy of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (http://www.nationalacademies.org/coi) prohibits the appointment of an individual to a committee authoring a Consensus Study Report if the individual has a conflict of interest that is relevant to the task to be performed. An exception to this prohibition is permitted if the National Academies determines that the conflict is unavoidable and the conflict is publicly disclosed. A determination of a conflict of interest for an individual is not an assessment of that individual's actual behavior or character or ability to act objectively despite the conflicting interest.

Deidre Strand has a conflict of interest in relation to her service on the Committee on Assessment of Technologies for Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Vehicles, Phase 3, because she is the Chief Scientific Officer of Wildcat Discovery Technologies (a battery material discovery firm.

The National Academies has concluded that in order for the committee to accomplish the tasks for which it was established, it must include a committee member with current experience managing a research and development portfolio focused on emerging battery chemistries and the implications of battery performance for integration into the vehicle market. As her biographical summary makes clear, Dr. Strand has extensive current experience in the newest battery chemistries developed across many industries, including for the automotive, cell phone, and laptop computer industries.

The National Academies has determined that the experience and expertise of Dr. Strand is needed for the committee to accomplish the task for which it has been established. The National Academies could not find another available individual with the equivalent experience and expertise who does not have a conflict of interest. Therefore, the National Academies has concluded that the conflict is unavoidable.

The National Academies believes that Dr. Deidre Strand can serve effectively as a member of the committee, and the committee can produce an objective report, taking into account the composition of the committee, the work to be performed, and the procedures to be followed in completing the study.

BIO:

Deidre Strand is Chief Scientific Officer at Wildcat Discovery Technologies. Dr. Strand has over twenty five years of experience in materials research, development, and commercialization, primarily in the areas of energy storage (lithium ion batteries) and electronic applications. Prior to joining Wildcat in 2012, Dr. Strand served as a Research Fellow at Dow Chemical, where she was the technical lead in Dow Energy Materials, as well as the Principal Investigator on external research programs with universities and national labs on battery materials. Dr. Strand also has extensive experience in patent analysis and technical due diligence of new technologies. Dr. Strand completed her Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, under the supervision of Professor John Schrag. Her Ph.D. research focused on rheology and birefringence of polymeric solutions. Dr. Strand also holds a Master of Science degree in Chemistry from the California Institute of Technology and a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry from North Dakota State University.

Events



Location:


Center for Automotive Research
3005 Boardwalk Drive
Ann Arbor, MI, 48108
USA

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

The committee will be hearing views from experts in automotive technologies, the light-duty vehicle market in the 2025-2035 timeframe. Presentations will highlight advancements in propulsion and power train systems and other vehicle technologies, especially their impact on vehicle energy use and fuel economy. The open session will take place on Oct. 15 from 1:00PM - 4:00 PM (ET) and on Oct. 16 from 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM (ET). 





If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Elizabeth Zeitler
Contact Email:  ezeitler@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1926

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Gary Marchant
Carla Bailo
Nady Boules
Nigel Clark
David Greene
Daniel Kapp
Therese Langer
Zhenhong Lin
Joshua Linn
Nic Lutsey
JoAnn Milliken
Anna Stefanopoulou and Randa Radwan.

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

In the closed session, the committee engaged in a bias and conflict of interest discussion upon addition of new members. The Committee also discussed the outline for the report; began to establish a methodology for cost and effectiveness information; and site visit planning.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Speaker bios

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
October 19, 2018
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting




If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Michaela Kerxhalli-Kleinfeld
Contact Email:  MKerxhalliKleinfield@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2453

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Gary Marchant
Carla Bailo
Rodica Baranescu
Nady Boules
Nigel Clark
David Greene
Daniel Kapp
Therese Langer
Zhenhong Lin
Joshua Linn
Nic Lutsey
Deidre Strand
Kate Whitefoot

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

During closed session, the committee discussed the information it has gathered so far. They identified key study outputs and met in subgroups to outline report content and plan information gathering strategies.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

n/a

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 19, 2018
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Beth Zeitler
Contact Email:  ezeitler@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1926

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Gary Marchant
Rodica Baranescu
Nady Boules
Nigel Clark
David Greene
Daniel Kapp
Therese Langer
Zhenhong Lin
Joshua Linn
Nic Lutsey
JoAnn Milliken
Anna Stefanopoulou
Deidre Strand
Kate Whitefoot

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Committee conflict and bias; origin of study and Academies study procedures; discussion of committee charge; review of past studies; discussion of division of labor into subgroups; and plans for future meetings.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

none

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 23, 2018
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.