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Project Information

Project Information


Assessing the Minerva Research Initiative and the Contribution of Social Science to Addressing Security Concerns


Project Scope:

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine will conduct a program evaluation of the Minerva Research Initiative (MRI) that resides within the Office of the Secretary of Defense. The committee will be tasked to address: (1) quality and impact of the program, (2) processes and procedures that may affect the success of the program, and (3) direction and vision based on the challenges of the world today. This will be an unclassified study.

Study Part I. - Quality and Impact

The first part of the program review will look at the historical context of the program, specifically at the quality of the research it has supported and the impact of funding such research, based on the outputs the program has facilitated. Questions include:

  1. What has been accomplished after eight years of the program in terms of (a) basic science advances and (b) policy-relevant insights or tools for the security community?

  2. What is the quality of research funded and its impact on the social science knowledge base, as well as on public understandings of the problems addressed by the researchers?

  3. What challenges has MRI confronted in generating interest in participation in the program among basic social scientists and how has it addressed those challenges?

  4. Has MRI effectively fostered the development of communities working on social science issues around security and the creation of organizational structures and processes to advance this research?

  5.  What communities have benefited from MRI-supported research, and how would those benefits be characterized?

  6. Is MRI unique as a funding source, or are there other agencies/organizations funding similar research at similar levels?

  7. What is the relationship between basic research and applied insights of the research that MRI seeks to generate?

Study Part II. - Program and Function

The second part of the study will look at program-related process issues that impact the success of the program and will consider questions such as:

  1. How does the proposal review process compare to similar programs at NSF, DHS, and processes that the service branch research agencies use?

  2. How does the project implementation and management process compare to similar programs at NSF, DHS, and the service branch research agencies?

  3. Are the right projects being prioritized for (a) national security needs, generally speaking and (b) the particular missions of the service branch research agencies?

  4. Is the program successful in connecting researchers to policymakers?

  5. How might the program improve outreach and integration of basic research insights into DoD?

Study Part III. - Direction and Vision

The third part of the study will look at how the initial charge of the program reflects the challenges of our world today, looking specifically at how Parts I and II of the study can best address the contemporary issues faced by DoD.

  1. Has the vision that initiated MRI evolved, or are there ways in which it needs to evolve to better address contemporary security concerns?

  2. How can MRI shape the future of basic research in social science around the issues of security?

  3. How is MRI influencing academic disciplines in their engagement with security and facilitating interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary research and are their opportunities for improving in these efforts?

  4. How might MRI cultivate the interests of young scholars in working with DoD on social science security issues?

Status: Current

PIN: DBASSE-BBCSS-17-01

Project Duration (months): 24 month(s)

RSO: Wanchisen, Barbara

Topic(s):

Behavioral and Social Sciences
Conflict and Security Issues
Math, Chemistry, and Physics


Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 01/05/2018

Dr. Burt S. Barnow
Burt Barnow is Amsterdam professor of public service and of economics at George Washington University. Prior to joining George Washington University, Dr. Barnow was associate director for research at Johns Hopkins University’s Institute for Policy Studies. He also worked at the Lewin Group and at the U.S. Department of Labor, including four years as director of the Office of Research and Evaluation in the Employment and Training Administration. He has extensive experience conducting research on implementation of large government programs, and has published widely in the fields of labor economics and evaluation. He has been a member of eight other NASEM committees, most recently the Committee for the Context of Military Environments: Social and Organizational Factors; Committee on Emerging Workforce Trends in the U.S. Energy and Mining Industries; Committee on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Workforce Needs for the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Defense Industrial Base; Committee on External Evaluation of NIDRR and its Grantees; and Committee to Review EPA's Title 42 Hiring Authority for Highly Qualified Scientists and Engineers. Dr. Barnow also served two terms on the NASEM Board on Higher Education and the Workforce. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
Dr. Karen S. Cook
Karen Cook is the Ray Lyman Wilbur professor of sociology, director of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, and vice-provost for faculty development and diversity at Stanford University. She conducts research on social exchange networks, power and influence dynamics, inter-group relations, negotiation strategies, social justice, and trust in social relations. Dr. Cook’s research underscores the importance of trust in facilitating exchange relationships and of networks in creating social capital. She has edited and co-edited a number of books in the Russell Sage Foundation Trust Series. She received the ASA Social Psychology Section Cooley Mead Award for Career Contributions to Social Psychology. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Board of Trustees of the Russell Sage Foundation, and the SBE Advisory Committee at the National Science Foundation. Dr. Cook is a current member of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) Division Committee for the Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, and has served on a large number of other NASEM committees in the past. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from Stanford University.
Dr. Susan E. Cozzens
Susan E. Cozzens is professor emeritus of public policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She previously served as director of the Technology Policy and Assessment Center, and associate dean for research in the Ivan Allen College at Georgia Tech. Her research interests are in science, technology, and innovation policies in developing countries, including issues of equity, equality, and development. She is active internationally in developing methods for research assessment and science and technology indicators. From 1995 through 1997, Cozzens was director of the Office of Policy Support at the National Science Foundation (NSF) where she coordinated policy and management initiatives for the NSF director, primarily in peer review, strategic planning, and assessment. Dr. Cozzens prior service on NASEM committees includes: the Committee on Review of EPA's “Science to Achieve Results” Research Grants Program; the Committee on the Review of NIOSH Research Programs; and the Committee on Evaluating the Efficiency of Research and Development Programs at the Environmental Protection Agency. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University.
Dr. Barbara Entwisle
Barbara Entwisle is Kenan distinguished professor of sociology and was formerly vice chancellor for research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She also served as director of the Carolina Population Center (CPC) and as CPC’s training program director. Dr. Entwisle studies social context and demographic and health behavior and outcomes. Her recent research includes examining the demographic responses to rapid social change, migration and social networks, and the interrelationships between population and environment in Northeast Thailand. She has been involved in the design and implementation of innovative social surveys around the world, including Add Health, the China Health and Nutrition Survey, the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, and the Nang Rong Surveys. She has served on several committees of the National Academy of Sciences, Medicine, and Engineering, including most recently as chair of the Standing Committee on the Future of Major NSF-Funded Social Science Surveys, and as members of the Board on Research Data and Information and Committee on Population. Dr. Entwisle received her Ph.D. in sociology from Brown University.
Dr. Ivy Estabrooke
Ivy Estabrooke is executive director of the Utah Science Technology and Research Initiative (USTAR). Prior to joining USTAR, she served as the program officer for basic research in the Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare & Combating Terrorism Department at the Office of Naval Research (ONR). While at the ONR, she managed a high risk/high payoff research portfolio including cutting edge social and computational science programs and innovative neuroscience programs. She has also developed and implemented a strategy for examining emerging technology areas globally. Additionally, she led the department’s efforts in support of Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics Education efforts, and managed a multi-million dollar yearly investment in the Sciences Addressing Asymmetric Explosive Threats basic research efforts for the ONR. Estabrooke is a former AAAS Science and Technology Policy fellow. She previously served on the Committee on the Value of Social and Behavioral Science to National Priorities and the Committee on the Role of Experimentation Campaigns in the Air Force Innovation Life Cycle. She holds an M.S. in national security strategy and resource management from the Eisenhower School of the National Defense University (formerly ICAF) and a Ph.D. in neuroscience from Georgetown University.
Dr. Paul A. Gade
Paul Gade retired as a senior research psychologist and the chief of the Basic Research Unit of the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences (ARI), where he developed and led ARI’s intramural and extramural basic research programs for over 10 years. He currently holds a research professor appointment in the organizational sciences and communications department at George Washington University, where his work is focused on the history of ARI. Dr. Gade’s professional interests are in military psychology history, theories and applications of intelligence and individual differences, and the neuroscience of how the brain generates the mind. His current research is on the history of military psychology. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA), past president of the APA Society for Military Psychology, and current Society historian. He received the Society’s Charles S. Gersoni award for outstanding contributions to military psychology. Dr. Gade serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Military Psychology and is editor for the spotlight on history column in The Military Psychologist, the Society for Military Psychology’s newsletter. He received his Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Ohio University.
Dr. Robert M. Hauser
Robert Hauser is the executive officer of the American Philosophical Society. Formerly he served as executive director of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education at the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Dr. Hauser is the Vilas research professor and Samuel Stouffer professor of sociology, emeritus, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research interests include statistical methodology, trends in social mobility and in educational progression and achievement, the uses of educational assessment as a policy tool, and changes in socioeconomic standing, cognition, health, and well-being across the life course. He has been an investigator on the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (WLS) since 1969 and led the study from 1980 to 2010. While at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, he directed the Center for Demography and Ecology, the Center for Demography of Health and Aging, and the Institute for Research on Poverty. Dr. Hauser is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Education, and the American Philosophical Society. He earned a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan.

Dr. Steven Heeringa
Steven Heeringa is a senior research scientist at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research (ISR). He is a member of the faculty of the University of Michigan Program in Survey Methods and the Joint Program in Survey Methodology. Dr. Heeringa has over four decades of experience developing research designs for ISR’s major longitudinal and cross-sectional survey programs and was the University of Michigan principal investigator for the multi-center Army STARRS study of suicide and adverse mental health outcomes in U.S. Army soldiers. He has served as a sample design consultant to international research programs in over 30 countries worldwide, including Russia, the Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, India, Nepal, China, Egypt, Iran, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, South Africa, and Chile. Dr. Heeringa is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He currently serves as member of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's Committee to Evaluate the Department of Veterans Affairs Mental Health Services and formerly served on the Panel on Statistical Methods for Measuring the Group Quarters Population in the American Community Survey. He has a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of Michigan.
Dr. Daniel R. Ilgen
Daniel Ilgen is John A. Hannah distinguished professor of psychology and management at Michigan State University. He previously held faculty appointments at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, and Purdue University. Dr. Ilgen’s research is in the areas of work motivation, team behavior, and leadership. He a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the American Psychological Association, the Academy of Management, the International Association of Applied Psychology, and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. He received the Distinguished Scientific Contributions Award from the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology and the Herbert A. Henneman, Jr. Lifetime Career Achievement Award given by the Human Resources Division of the Academy of Management. He has served in numerous roles for the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine including as a member of the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences, a member of the Committee on Human Factors, and as a member of study panels on pay for performance, human protection in social and behavioral research, and future human behavior needs in soldier systems. Dr. Ilgen received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Illinois.

Dr. Virginia Lesser
Virginia Lesser is director of the Survey Research Center and department chair and professor in the department of statistics at Oregon State University. Her expertise includes survey methodology, applied statistics, environmental statistics, and ecological monitoring. Dr. Lesser is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. She has served on several NASEM committees including: the Committee on Capitalizing on Science, Technology, and Innovation: An Assessment of the Small Business Innovation Research Program-Phase II; Panel on the Review of the Study Design of the National Children's Study Main Study; Panel on Survey Options for Estimating the Illegal Alien flow at the Southwest Border; Panel to Review the Occupational Information Network; and Committee on the Review of the National Institute of Safety and Health/Bureau of Labor Statistics Respirator Use Survey Program. She has a Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Dr. Arthur Lupia
Arthur Lupia is Hal R. Varian professor of political science and research professor at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. His research explores how information and institutions affect policy and politics with a focus on how people make decisions when they lack information. Dr. Lupia is also interested in issues related to data access and research transparency, and the value of social science and political science. His work draws from multiple scientific and philosophical disciplines and uses multiple research methods. He is the recipient of many honors and awards including: the Ithiel de Sola Pool Award from the American Political Science Association, the Warren Mitovsky Innovators Award from the American Association of Public Opinion Research and the NAS Award for Initiatives in Research from NASEM. He has been a Carnegie fellow, a Guggenheim fellow, and a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is chair of the board at the Center for Open Science, and has served as an editorial board member for several journals, including the American Journal of Political Science, American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, Political Analysis, Political Behavior, Public Opinion Quarterly, and State Politics and Policy Quarterly. Dr. Lupia is a current member of the NASEM Division Committee for the Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, and recently chaired the NASEM Roundtable on the Communication and Use of Social and Behavioral Sciences. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the California Institute of Technology.
Dr. Kathryn E. Newcomer
Kathryn Newcomer is director of the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration at George Washington University and professor of public policy and public administration. She frequently conducts research and training for federal and local government agencies and nonprofit organizations on performance measurement and program evaluation, and has designed and conducted evaluations for several federal agencies and dozens of nonprofit organizations. Dr. Newcomer is the editor of the Handbook of Practical Program Evaluation, a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, and president of the American Evaluation Association. She has received two Fulbright awards to conduct research in Taiwan and in Egypt. Her service on NASEM committees includes membership on: the Committee on Review of Specialized Degree-Granting Graduate Programs of the DoD in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) and Management; the Committee on External Evaluation of NIDRR and its Grantees; the Committee on Laboratory Security and Personnel Assurance Systems for Laboratories Conducting Research on Biological Select Agents and Toxins; the Committee on a Review of United States Institute of Peace Senior Fellows Program; and Committee on Approaches for an Evaluation of the NIST/NRC Postdoctoral Research Associateships Program. Dr. Newcomer received a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Iowa.
Dr. Allen L. Schirm - (Chair)
Allen Schirm is former director of methods and former senior fellow at Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR). He was previously vice president and director of human services research at MPR. Prior to joining MPR, he was Andrew W. Mellon assistant research scholar and adjunct assistant professor of economics, Population Studies Center and Department of Economics at the University of Michigan. Dr. Schirm has extensive experience conducting evaluations of federal and state programs on a variety of topics including at-risk youth, food nutrition assistance, and health insurance coverage. He is a National Associate of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, having contributed to 14 NASEM reports and chaired the Panel on Estimating Children Eligible for School Nutrition Programs Using the American Community Survey. Additional committee service includes the 2018 Census End-to-End Test and Key Issues for the 2020 Census Workshop Steering Committee; the Committee on Affordability of National Flood Insurance Premiums; the Panel on the Design of the 2010 Census Program of Evaluations and Experiments; Panel on the Research on Future Census Methods; the Panel on a Review of Statistical Issues in the Allocation of Federal and State Program Funds; and the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas. Dr. Schirm is a fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA) and former chair of the ASA Social Statistics Section. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania.
Mr. Mark L. Weiss
Mark Weiss is retired director of the Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences Division, within the Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences at the National Science Foundation. Earlier at NSF he served as senior science adviser and as deputy assistant director of the Directorate. Dr. Weiss also served as assistant director for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences at the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President. Formerly, he was professor and chair of the department of anthropology at Wayne State University, where he also served three rotations as an NSF program officer and director of Anthropology. Weiss' research expertise is in the application of genetic approaches to the study of nonhuman primate evolution and behavior. During his career he served on several interagency groups, including as NSF’s representative to the White House’s Committee on Sciences’ Subcommittee on Forensic Science. He was a commissioner on the Department of Justice-National Institute for Science and Technology’s National Commission on Forensic Science. He was also a member of the National Science and Technology Council’s Subcommittee on Human Factors for Homeland and National Security. Dr. Weiss received a Ph.D. in physical anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley.

Committee Membership Roster Comments

Dr. Jeffrey Kopstein resigned from the committee on 1/9/2018.

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Conference room 105


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Anthony Mann
Contact Email:  amann@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3266

Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed



Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Conference room 125
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Anthony Mann
Contact Email:  amann@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3266

Agenda
THURSDAY, JULY 19 - PUBLIC SESSION

10:30-10:40 Introductions
Allen Schirm, Committee Chair, Mathematica Policy Research (retired)

10:40-10:50 Updates from the Department of Defense
Lisa Troyer, Army Research Office

10:50-12:00 Panel discussion with representatives of social science associations
Natalie Konopinski, American Anthropological Association
Steve Newell, American Psychological Association
Betsy Super, American Political Science Association

12:00-1:00 Lunch
National Academies Cafeteria

1:00-1:10 Introductions
Allen Schirm, Committee Chair, Mathematica Policy Research (retired)

1:10-3:00 Panel discussion on the Minerva vision, goals, and topics funded
David Chu, Institute for Defense Analyses
Michael Desch, University of Notre Dame
Thomas Fingar, Stanford University
James Goldgeier, Council on Foreign Relations
David Honey, Office of the Director of National Intelligence

3:00 Adjourn public session
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Allen Schirm (Chair)
Burt Barnow
Karen Cook
Susan Cozzens
Barbara Entwisle
Paul Gade
Bob Hauser
Steve Heeringa
Dan Ilgen
Virginia Lesser
Arthur Lupia
Kathryn Newcomer
Mark Weiss

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Thursday, July 19
Discussion of agenda
Updates to Minerva project
Public session debrief
Plans for bibliometric analysis

Friday, July 20
Finalize questionnaires
Plans for DoD staff interviews
Discuss report outline

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 24, 2018


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Conference Room 101
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Anthony Mann
Contact Email:  amann@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202.334.3266

Agenda
Thursday, April 12

10:30-10:35 AM Introductions
Allen Schirm, Committee Chair, Mathematica Policy Research (retired)

10:35-11:00 Updates from the Department of Defense
Lisa Troyer, Army Research Office

11:00-12:30 PM Panel discussion with Minerva grantees (via Zoom webconferencing)
Eli Berman, University of California, San Diego
Kathleen Carley, Carnegie Mellon University
Hasan Davulcu, Arizona State University
James Walsh, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

12:30-1:30 Lunch

1:30-3:00 Panel discussion with organizations that fund social science research
Alan Tomkins, Acting Division Director, Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences, National Science Foundation
Adam Russell, Program Manager, Defense Sciences Office, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
Gerald (Jay) Goodwin, Chief, Foundational Science Research Unit, U.S. Army Research Institute
Matthew Clark, Director of University Programs, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security
Steven Riskin, Director of Grants and Christina Hegadorn, Senior Program Specialist, United States Institute of Peace

3:00 PM Adjourn public session
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Burt Barnow
Karen Cook
Susan Cozzens
Barbara Entwisle
Ivy Estabrooke (by phone)
Paul Gade
Bob Hauser (by phone)
Steve Heeringa
Daniel Ilgen
Virginia Lesser
Arthur Lupia
Kathryn Newcomer
Allen Schirm
Mark Weiss

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Thursday, April 12
Overview of the agenda
Discuss the revised matrix of research questions and data sources
Begin to finalize the list of data collection activities
Brief reactions to the public session presentations
Finalize plans for bibliometric analysis

Friday, April 13
Finalize plans for the grantee survey
Finalize plans for a survey of applicants who did not receive grants
Discuss potential survey of deans and department chairs (or other ways to collect input about “potential grantees”)
Finalize plans for collecting input from subject matter experts
Finalize plans for interviews with DoD staff and any other data gathering activities



The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
April 16, 2018


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Anthony Mann
Contact Email:  amann@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3266

Agenda
First Meeting of the Committee on Assessing the Minerva Research Initiative and the Contribution of Social Science to Addressing Security Concerns

January 16 - Public Session
National Academy of Sciences Building, Room 120

10:45-10:55
Introductions
Allen Schirm, Committee Chair, Mathematica Policy Research (retired)

10:55-11:05
Welcome on behalf of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine
Barbara Wanchisen, Director, Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences

11:05-11:20
Welcome on behalf of the Department of Defense and discussion of study goals
Bindu Nair, Basic Research Office

11:20-12:15
Detailed discussion of the committee’s charge
Lisa Troyer, Program Manager, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Army Research Office

12:15-1:15
Lunch to continue morning discussions

1:15-3:00
Overview of the Minerva Research Initiative
Lisa Troyer, Army Research Office
David Montgomery, University of Maryland

3:00-3:15
Break

3:15-4:15
Discussion of the Minerva grants
Martin Kruger, Office of Naval Research
Gary Kollmorgen, SETA Contractor; GSK Inc.
Benjamin Knott, Air Force Office of Scientific Research
Lisa Troyer, Army Research Office

4:15-4:45
Revisit the study goals and charge--questions from the committee

4:45-5:00
Floor discussion

5:00 Adjourn public session
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Burt Barnow
Karen Cook
Susan Cozzens
Barbara Entwisle (by phone)
Ivy Estabrooke
Paul Gade
Bob Hauser
Steve Heeringa
Virginia Lesser
Arthur Lupia
Kathryn Newcomer
Allen Schirm
Mark Weiss

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Project background and timeline
Review of agenda
Discussion on statement of task
Committee bias discussion
Recap of previous day's discussion
Evaluation plan
Next steps and schedule

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
January 23, 2018

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.