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Project Information

Project Information


Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space


Project Scope:

 

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will appoint the Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space (CESAS) to operate as an ad-hoc committee. The overarching purpose for the committee is to support scientific progress in Earth system science and applications, with an emphasis on research requiring global data that are best acquired from space and to assist the federal government in planning programs in these fields by providing advice on the implementation of decadal survey recommendations. The CESAS provides an independent, authoritative forum for identifying and discussing issues in Earth Sciences and Applications from Space between the research community, the federal government, and the interested public.

The CESAS will issue reports that will provide guidance to federal agencies that support Earth science research and application from space. The CESAS scope spans space-based and supporting ground-based activities in support of progress in developing a scientific understanding of the Earth system and its response to natural and human-induced changes in order to enable improved prediction of climate, weather, and natural hazards for present and future generations. These programs include an end-to-end approach encompassing observations from space-based and suborbital platforms, data and information management, research and analysis, modeling, scientific assessments, applications demonstration, technology development, and education. The CESAS’s scope also includes appropriate cross-disciplinary areas and consideration of budget and programmatic aspects of the implementation of the relevant ESAS-2007 or ESAS-2017 decadal survey.

The Committee will build on the current decadal survey of the field, "Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond” (ESAS-2007)--and subsequently the ESAS-2017 report when it is released--and monitor the progress of its recommended priorities for the most important scientific and technical activities in the relevant decadal survey report and recommendations in the mid-decadal review report issued in 2012.

The committee will carry out its charge by undertaking the following tasks:

1. At each of its in-person meetings, as appropriate, the committee may prepare concise assessments of progress on the implementation of the decadal survey's recommended scientific and technical activities. The assessments will be based on evidence gathered by the committee at its in-person and virtual meetings. The committee’s assessment reports may include findings and conclusions on key strategies being pursued by the agencies and the status of agency actions that relate to the state of implementation. The reports may also highlight scientific discoveries and engineering and technical advances relevant to progress on the science objectives identified in the ESAS-2007 or ESAS-2017 decadal report, as appropriate, and in addition will focus on one or more of the following types of issues:
  • The scientific impact of a change in the technical and engineering design, cost estimate, schedule, or programmatic sequencing of one or more of the survey-recommended activities;
  • The impact of a scientific advance on the technical and engineering design, schedule, or programmatic sequencing of one or more survey-recommended activities;
  • The scientific impact of a course of action at a decision point described in the survey report and recommended therein as being suitable for consultation with an independent decadal survey implementation committee;
  • The scientific impact of implementing recommendations from the mid-decadal review and other relevant Academies' reports.
2. At an in-person meeting, the committee may prepare a concise report with advice on the preparation for future decadal and mid-decadal studies.  These reports will be based on evidence gathered by the committee at its in-person and virtual meetings.  Future decadal and mid-decadal studies will be carried out by an ad hoc committee appointed by the Academies under a separate task.

3. For advisory activities assessed to require a more in-depth review than is possible through the normal operation of the CESAS, the committee will assist the Academies in formulating the task and committee membership for such studies which will be designed as separate tasks.

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-SSB-16-10

Project Duration (months): 60 month(s)

RSO: Charo, Art

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Space Studies Board DEPS

Topic(s):

Earth Sciences
Math, Chemistry, and Physics
Space and Aeronautics


Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 04/05/2017

Dr. Michael D. King - (Co-Chair)
MICHAEL D. KING (NAE) is senior research scientist at the University of Colorado Boulder in the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. Dr. King is also the science team leader for the MODIS instrument that flies on the Aqua and Terra satellites currently in orbit. He served as senior project scientist of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). He joined Goddard Space Flight Center as a physical scientist and previously served as project scientist of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). His research experience includes conceiving, developing, and operating multispectral scanning radiometers from a number of aircraft platforms in field experiments ranging from arctic stratus clouds to smoke from the Kuwait oil fires and biomass burning in Brazil and southern Africa. Dr. King is also interested in surface reflectance properties of natural surfaces as well as aerosol optical and microphysical properties. Earlier, he developed the Cloud Absorption Radiometer for studying the absorption properties of optically thick clouds as well as the bidirectional reflectance properties of many natural surfaces. He was formerly the principal investigator of the MODIS Airborne Simulator, an imaging spectrometer that flies onboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft—an instrument that has aided in the development of atmospheric and land remote sensing algorithms for MODIS, which is used for studies of the Earth’s environment from space. Dr. King is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), a recipient of the Verner E. Suomi Award of the AMS for fundamental contributions to remote sensing and radiative transfer, and a recipient of the Space Systems Award of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) for NASA’s Earth Observing System. He received his Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from the University of Arizona. Dr. King previously served on the National Academies’ Committee on NASA Science Mission Extensions, Committee on a Framework for Analyzing the Needs for Continuity of NASA-Sustained Remote Sensing Observation of the Earth from Space, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, the Climate Research Committee, and the Standing Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space.
Dr. Joyce E. Penner - (Co-Chair)
JOYCE E. PENNER is the Ralph J. Cicerone Distinguished University Professor of Atmospheric Science and associate chair of the Department of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering at the University of Michigan. Dr. Penner’s research focuses on improving climate models through the addition of interactive chemistry and the formation of aerosols and their direct and indirect effects on the radiation balance in climate models. She is also interested in urban, regional, and global tropospheric chemistry and budgets, cloud and aerosol interactions and cloud microphysics, climate and climate change; and model development and interpretation. Dr. Penner has been a member of numerous advisory committees related to atmospheric chemistry, global change, and Earth science, including the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and, consequently, a co-winner of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. She was the coordinating lead author for IPCC (2001) Chapter 5 on aerosols and was a lead author for the IPCC (2007) report and a review editor for the IPCC (2014) report. Dr. Penner received her Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Harvard University. She has served on the Academies Decadal Survey for Earth Science and Applications from Space, the Committee on A Framework for Analyzing the Needs for Continuity of NASA-Sustained Remote Sensing Observations of the Earth from Space, and the Committee on Geoengineering Climate: Technical Evaluation and Discussion of Impacts. She has also served as a member of the Space Studies Board, Committee on Assessment of NASA’s Earth Science Program, the U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, the Panel on Climate Variability and Change, and the Standing Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space
Dr. Steven A. Ackerman
STEVEN A. ACKERMAN is a professor of atmospheric and ocean sciences and director of the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Ackerman’s research focuses on satellite remote sensing and has produced several new methodologies for interpreting satellite observations, which has led to improved understanding of the radiative properties of clouds, a critical factor in weather and climate. He was elected a fellow of the American Meteorological Society and a fellow of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the NASA Exceptional Public Service Medal and the American Meteorological Society’s Teaching Excellence Award. He received his Ph.D. in atmospheric science from Colorado State University. Dr. Ackerman has served on the National Academies’ Panel on Weather and Air Quality of the Decadal Survey for Earth Science and Applications from Space, and the Standing Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space.
Academies’ Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate.

Dr. Stacey Boland

STACEY W. BOLAND is a senior systems engineer at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She is also the project systems engineer for ISS-RapidScat. Previously she served as the Observatory System Engineer for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) Earth System Science Pathfinder mission. She is also a cross-disciplinary generalist specializing in Earth mission concept development and systems engineering and mission architecture development for advanced (future) Earth observing mission concepts. Dr. Boland received her Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from California Institute of Technology. Dr. Boland was awarded NASA’s Exceptional Achievement Medal in 2009. Dr. Boland’s National Academies service includes current membership on the Committee on the Decadal Survey for Earth Science and Applications from Space and prior membership on the Planning Committee on Lessons Learned in Decadal Planning in Space: A Workshop, the Committee on the Assessment of NASA’s Earth Science Programs, the Committee on the Assessment of Impediments to Interagency Cooperation on Space and Earth Science Missions, and the Standing Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space.

Dr. Molly Brown
MOLLY E. BROWN is an associate research professor at the University of Maryland, College Park, (UMCP) in the Department of Geography. Dr. Brown has 15 years of experience in interdisciplinary research using satellite remote sensing data and models with socio-economic and demographic information to better understand food security drivers. She has current research projects in Africa and South Asia and lived in Senegal while in the Peace Corps in the early 1990s. She has published over 100 journal articles in a variety of disciplines and is the author of two books. In 2015, she was the lead author of a U.S. climate assessment report published by the US Department of Agriculture entitled Climate Change, Global Food Security and the U.S. Food System. Previously, Dr. Brown worked for 13 years— first as a contractor and then as a civil servant—at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in the Biospheric Sciences Branch. She received the NASA Robert H. Goddard Honor Science Award in 2008, NOAA David Johnson Award National Space Club in 2010, Women in Aerospace (WIA) Outstanding Achievement Award in 2013 and USDA Abraham Lincoln Honor Award in 2016 for the writing team Climate Change, Global Food Security, and the US Food System. She served as a member of the Coordination Group on Meteorological Satellites Working Group III Tiger team on Socio-Economic Benefits (CGMS), 2013-2015 and the National Science Foundation (NSF) Environmental Research and Education Advisory Committee (ERE-AC), 2010-2012, and was the Lead author of a 2015 USDA Technical report entitled Climate Change, Global Food Security, and the US Food System, which was published as part of the National Climate Assessment process. She is currently the editor in chief of the Elsevier journal Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment. She earned her Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Maryland in College Park, MD. Her previous National Academies service was on the planning committee for, “Estimating the Ecosystem Benefits of Urban Forestry: A Workshop.
Dr. Otis B. Brown, Jr.
OTIS B. BROWN is a research professor in the Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, at North Carolina State University (NCSU). He is also the director of the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies. At NCSU, Dr. Brown has led the formation and development of the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies, a co-located effort with NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information in Asheville, NC. NCICS is the host for the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites – NC, which Dr. Brown founded in 2009. NCICS/CICS-NC provides research to operations, stewardship, access, system engineering, and system prototyping support to NCEI. Previously Dr. Brown was on the faculty of the University of Miami (UM) as a professor in the Division of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography, and dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. While at UM Dr. Brown was a member of the NASA EOS MODIS Science Team and was responsible for the algorithms and processing system for the global sea surface temperature product as well as validation methodologies and support for the TERRA/ MODIS and AQUA/MODIS instruments. Dr. Brown’s specialties include radiative transfer in the ocean-atmosphere system for visible light; particulate scattering in sea water; satellite infrared observations of sea surface temperature; kinematical studies of warm core rings; transient processes in western boundary currents; tropical eco-system function in the Caribbean and Arabian Seas; innovative approaches to developing diversity and K-12 education; and inter-disciplinary studies of climate change and severe weather impacts. His interests also include strategies to address the science / policy interface and public outreach. He is the recipient of multiple NASA Group Achievement Awards, and a fellow of the American Meteorological Society and the AAAS. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Miami. He served as a member of the Academies Oceans Studies Board, Earth Sciences Decadal Survey Committees Panel on Land-use Change, Ecosystem Dynamics, and Biodiversity and the Committee on Radio Frequencies. He also was a member of the Environmental Task Force and MEDEA.
Dr. Efi Foufoula-Georgiou
EFI FOUFOULA-GEORGIOU is a distinguished professor at the University of California, Irvine in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Henry Samueli School of Engineering. Previously, she was at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, where she was a McKnight Distinguished Professor and the Joseph T. and Rose S. Ling Chair in Environmental Engineering. She has served as director of the National Science Foundation’s (NSF’s) National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics (NCED) and the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Foufoula-Georgiou’s area of research is hydrology and geomorphology, with special interest on scaling theories, multiscale dynamics, and space-time modeling of precipitation and landforms. She has served as chair of the board of directors of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, trustee of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and president of the Hydrology section of the American Geophysical Union. Dr. Foufoula-Georgiou has been an advisor to several national and international agencies and research foundations, including the advisory council of NSF’s GEO directorate, NASA Earth science subcommittee, the Water Science and Technology Board, and the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. She is a fellow of the AGU and AMS, an elected member of the European Academy of Sciences, and the recipient of several disciplinary awards including the John Dalton Medal of the European Geophysical Society the AGU Hydrologic Sciences Award, and the AMS Hydrologic Sciences Medal. She received her Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of Florida. Her National Academies service includes the Committee on Challenges and Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences, the Committee on Progress and Priorities of U.S. Weather Research and Research-to-Operations Activities, the Committee to Assess the National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service (AHPS) Initiative, the Committee on Risk-Based Analyses for Flood Damage Reduction Studies, the Mapping Science Committee, and the Standing Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space.
Dr. Chelle L. Gentemann
CHELLE L. GENTEMANN is a senior scientist at Earth and Space Research where she works on air-sea interactions, upper ocean dynamics, and passive microwave sea surface temperatrures. Prior to that she was with Remote Sensing Systems where she focused on air-sea interactions, diurnal warming, passive-microwave SST retrievals, instrument calibration, and radio frequency interference. Dr. Gentemann participates in a number of science teams and committees, including the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperatures (GHRSST). She has been the principal investigator for the US component of GHRSST, the Multi-sensor Improved Sea Surface Temperature project, since 2003. She was awarded the National Oceanographic Partnership Program’s Excellence in Partnering Award and the American Geophysical Union’s Charles S. Falkenberg Award. She received her Ph.D. in meteorology and physical oceanography from the University of Miami. Dr. Gentemann has served on several National Academies’ committees including the Intelligence Science and Technology Experts Group (ISTEG), the Committee on a Framework for Analyzing the Needs for Continuity of NASA-Sustained Remote Sensing Observations of the Earth from Space, , and the Standing Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space.
Dr. Everette Joseph
EVERETTE JOSEPH is the director of the University at Albany’s Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC). He is also the SUNY Empire Innovations Professor in Atmospheric Sciences. Before joining University at Albany, he served as director of the Howard University Program in Atmospheric Sciences (HUPAS), director of the Howard University Beltsville Center for Climate System Observations, and deputy director of the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Science at Howard University. Most recently, Dr. Joseph served as co-lead for the development of the New York State Mesonet, which is a $25 million dollar project for development of an early warning system to aid state emergency managers and to assist the public in mitigation of the effects of hazardous weather. He also leads an international team of scientists from the U.S. and Taiwan in the study weather extremes and decision-making and he helped lead the development of a major field observation program with university, government, and industry partners to improve satellite capabilities to monitor the atmosphere from space and the skill of atmospheric models to better forecast weather, climate and air quality. Dr. Joseph received his Ph.D. in physics at the University at Albany. He has served on the National Academies’ Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate.
Dr. R. Steven Nerem
R. STEVEN NEREM is a professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder in the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences. He is also a fellow of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and associate director of the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research. Dr. Nerem specializes in analyzing and interpreting satellite measurements of sea level change, including satellite altimeter, satellite gravity, and other space geodetic measurements. Previously, he worked as a geophysicist at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and was on the faculty at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a recipient of the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal. He is also a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union. He was a lead author for the IPCC fifth Assessment Report. He earned his Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas. He previously served as a member of the National Academies’ Committee on a Strategy to Mitigate the Impact of Sensor De-scopes and De-manifests on the NPOESS and GOES-R Spacecraft
Dr. Eric J. Rignot
ERIC J. RIGNOT is the Donald Bren Professor of Earth System Science in the Department of Earth System Science, University of California Irvine, CA, and a senior research scientist and joint faculty appointee by the chief scientist at Caltech’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA. Dr. Rignot has 26 years of experience in glaciology, polar physical oceanography, ice-ocean interaction, synthetic-aperture radar applications for ice sheet mass balance, low-frequency radar sounding of glaciers, airborne surveying of Greenland and Antarctica, and numerical ice sheet modeling. He is a principal investigator on several NASA-funded projects to study the mass balance of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets using radar interferometry combined with other methods; the interactions of ice shelves with the ocean; and the dynamic retreat of Patagonian glaciers. He received the JPL Lew Allen Director's Award for Excellence in 1998 and was the recipient of NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement awards in 2003 and 2007. He also received a NASA Outstanding Team Leadership award in 2012 and NASA Group Achievement awards in 2009, 2011, and 2013. He is a member of CLIVAR and NASA’s Sea Level Change Team and is the science lead for Operation IceBridge, which uses aircraft-based instruments to study annual changes in thickness of sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets. He is also a member of the Science Definition Team for the NISAR, a dedicated U.S. and Indian interferometric synthetic aperture radar mission. He earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. He served as a member of the National Academies’ Committee on a Framework for Analyzing the Needs for Continuity of NASA-Sustained Remote Sensing Observations of the Earth from Space.
Dr. Christopher Ruf

CHRISTOPHER S. RUF is a professor of atmospheric science and electrical engineering at the University of Michigan in the Climate and Space Department. Dr. Ruf is principal investigator for the NASA CYGNSS Earth Venture Mission, which measures ocean surface wind speed in tropical cyclones with rapid sampling using a constellation of eight microsatellites in low earth orbit. CYGNSS successfully launched on December 15, 2016. His research interests include remote sensing technology and earth science applications related to climate and weather studies. Previously, Dr. Ruf was on the faculty of the Pennsylvania State University in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and on the technical staff of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech. He earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He served as a member of the National Academies Committee on the Scientific Uses of the Radio Spectrum, the Weather Panel for the Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future (the 2007 Earth Science Decadal), the Committee on Radio Frequencies, and is currently serving on the Panel on Climate Variability and Change for the Decadal Survey for Earth Science and Applications from Space.

Dr. David L. Skole
DAVID L. SKOLE is professor of global change science at Michigan State University (MSU). He has more than 25 years of experience with research on the global carbon cycle and climate exchange. Dr. Skole leads the Carbon to Markets Program, a project of MSU that focuses on combining value chains from carbon credits in the carbon financial markets and agro-forestry products for small holders in developing countries. He was instrumental in constructing the first numerical carbon accounting model and has been spearheading the integration of satellite-based remote sensing into carbon accounting models. He is now active in the emerging carbon financial markets and applications of his research to carbon sequestration projects in developing countries. He has more than 100 peer-reviewed publications on land-use change and forestry issues related to carbon emissions and sequestration. Dr. Skole is past chair of the NSF Advisory Committee on Environmental Research and Education. He has a Ph.D. in natural resources from the University of New Hampshire. His past National Academies service includes the Geographical Sciences Committee, the Panel on Earth Science Applications and Societal Needs, the Panel on Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities for Environmental Decision Making, the Committee on Ecological Impacts of Road Density, the Committee for Review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan, the Committee on the Geographic Foundation for Agenda 21, and the Standing Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space.
Dr. Steven C. Wofsy
STEVEN C. WOFSY (NAS) is the Abbott Lawrence Rotch Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Science at Harvard University. His research emphasizes sources and distributions of greenhouse gases on urban, regional and global scales and the impacts of climate change and land use on ecosystems and atmospheric composition. Dr. Wofsy’s extensive research interests include: terrestrial carbon, effects of forests on climate, and climate in forests; inference of large-scale carbon budgets from atmospheric and land surface data; CO2 as a tracer of atmospheric transport in the upper troposphere and stratosphere; and new instrumentation for measuring atmospheric carbon cycle species (CO2, CO, CH4). Dr. Wofsy has published over 300 journal articles during a career spanning four decades. His awards include the AGU's Macelwane prize and NASA’s Distinguished Public Service Medal. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry from Harvard University. He has served on the NASA Earth System Science and Applications Advisory and on the NASA Advisory Council as well as on the Carbon Cycle Science Plan Working Group and North American Carbon Program writing group. His recent National Academies service includes the Committee on anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States, the Committee on Understanding and Monitoring Abrupt Climate Change, the Committee on the Assessment of NASA Science Mission Directorate 2014 Science Plan, and the Standing Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space.


Committee Membership Roster Comments

Note1: Posted Committee on 3/7/17 Note 2: Added Otis B. Brown 4/5/17. Note 3: Lee-Leung Fu resigned from the committee 3/31/17.

Events



Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2100 C St. NW
Washington D.C.
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Andrea Rebholz
Contact Email:  arebholz@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
Tentative Draft Agenda

Tentative (Placeholder) Draft Agenda

See www.nas.edu/spacescienceweek for updated outline agenda for Space Science Week

Open and closed session are expected to change

March 27, 2018

8:00 am Meeting opens
12:00 pm Working Lunch
1:00 pm Meeting continues
6:00 pm Meeting adjourns for the day

March 28, 2018

8:00 am Meeting opens
12:00 pm Working Lunch
1:00 pm Meeting continues
6:00 pm Meeting adjourns for the day

March 29, 2018

8:00 am Meeting opens
12:00 pm Working Lunch
1:00 pm Meeting continues
6:00 pm Meeting adjourns for the day
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes



Location:

University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)
Conference Room #2126 | Center Green 1
3090 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301

Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Andrea Rebholz
Contact Email:  arebholz@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  2023372857

Agenda
DRAFT AGENDA

Monday, October 23

OPEN SESSION

10:45 Discussion with UCAR
Antonio Busalacchi Jr.
President, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)

11:30 Building a Community-Driven Vision for the Next Generation U.S. Weather Enterprise: Discussion of a Proposed Study
Amanda Staudt (by WebEx)
Director, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

12:00 noon Working Lunch

1:00 p.m. Discussion with NOAA
Karen St. Germain (by WebEx)
Director NOAA/NESDIS Office of System Architecture and Advanced Planning (OSAAP)

2:00 Discussion with NASA
Mike Freilich (by WebEx)
Director, NASA’s Earth Science Division

3:00 Break / Adjourn to Closed Session

6:00 Working Dinner, Private Home, Boulder, CO

Tuesday, October 24

CLOSED SESSION in its entirety

Please contact Andrea Rebholz for Web ex connection information.
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes



Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2100 C St. NW
Washington D.C.
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Andrea Rebholz
Contact Email:  arebholz@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
Draft Agenda

Please visit our website at www.nas.edu/ssw for an updated agenda.

SPACE SCIENCE WEEK
SPRING 2017 MEETING OF THE COMMITTEE ON EARTH SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS FROM SPACE
March 28-29, 2017
NAS Building – 2101 Constitution Ave NW – Washington D.C

Updated March 16, 2017

Tuesday March 28, 2017


7:30 AM Registration opens and breakfast is available in the Great Hall

MORNING PARALLEL BREAK-OUT SESSION
COMMITTEE ON EARTH SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS FROM SPACE (CESAS)—Members Room
OPEN SESSION

9:45 AM Discussion with Michael Freilich, Director, Earth Science Division, NASA HQ

11:00 AM Break

11:10 AM Discussion with Conrad C. Lautenbacher (Vice Admiral, USN ret) – Chief Executive Officer, GeoOptics

12:00 PM Lunch available in the Great Hall

PLENARY SESSION
Auditorium – NAS Building
Moderator: Michael Moloney, SSB Director

1:00 PM Welcome and Overview of Current Activities
Sarah Gibson, SSB Executive Committee
Jim Lancaster, BPA Director

1:15 PM NASA-SMD Budget, Program, and Priorities Thomas Zurbuchen, NASA
Presentation 20 mins / Q&A 25 mins

Focus Session on The Discovery Frontiers of Data Analytics in Space Science
Moderator: Sarah Gibson, SSB member

2:00 PM Short 15-minute Talks Across Space Science Disciplines
Lea Shanley, University of North Carolina
Yaser S. Abu-Mostafa, California Institute of Technology
Barbara J. Thompson, NASA GSFC

2:45 PM Moderated Discussion include Q&A with all
Standing and Discipline Committee members in attendance

3:30 PM Break Available in the Great Hall

Focus Session on International Programs
Moderator: Michael Moloney, SSB Director

4:00 PM Russian Space Science Program Lev Zelenyi, Russian Academy of Sciences
Chinese Space Science Program Chi Wang, Chinese Academy of Sciences

5:45 PM Closing Comments

6:00 PM Public Meeting Adjourns

Wednesday March 29, 2017
COMMITTEE ON EARTH SCIENCE AND APPLICATIONS FROM SPACE (CESAS) – Members Room

7:30 AM Registration opens and breakfast is available in the Great Hall

OPEN SESSION

10:00 AM Overview of the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation (JCSDA)
Jim Yoe, JCSDA Chief Administrative Officer and NOAA NWS/NCEP

10:45 AM Break available outside room

11:00 PM Frontiers of Numerical Weather Prediction Jim Yoe, NOAA

12:00 PM General Discussion
Lunch available in the Great Hall

1:00 PM NOAA’s Commercial Weather Data Pilot & Review of the Space Platforms Requirements Working Group
Dan St. Jean, Deputy Director, Office of Systems Architecture and Advanced Planning, NOAA NESDIS
Karen St. Germain, Director of the Office of Systems Architecture and Advanced Planning, NOAA NESDIS

2:00 PM Roundtable Discussions Committee and Guests

Closed Session 2:30-NLT 4:00 PM (Meeting Adjourns)

OPEN SESSION

7:00 PM Plenary Public Talk - The Search for Life in Oceans Beyond Earth Kevin Hand, JPL


GENERAL NOTES

Pre-registration: All participants, including committee members, invited speakers and other attendees, are strongly encouraged to preregister at http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3260581/SSW2017

Registration will be located in the Great Hall during the event. Please check-in there to receive your badge.

NAS Building: Is located at 2101 Constitution Ave., NW, between the State Department and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Additional information about the NAS Building is available at http://www.nationalacademies.org/about/contact/nax.html.

Metro: The closest Metro station (0.5 miles) is Foggy Bottom (Blue and Orange lines; exit and turn right, then turn left once you have passed the State Department).

Parking: Very limited parking is available onsite at the NAS. The 22 available parking spaces are first come first served. Other possible parking options are as follows:
• PMI (Columbia Plaza) –2400 Virginia Avenue NW.
• PMI - 111 19th Street NW.
• Colonial Parking - 2100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW.
• GW Elliot School Garage is located near the Department of Interior at 1957 E Street NW.

Space Science Week Website: http://sites.nationalacademies.org/SSB/SSB_177653

The following information is provided for any members of the general public who may be in attendance:

This meeting is being held to gather information to help the committee in its charge. This committee will examine the information and material obtained during this, and other public meetings, in an effort to inform its work. Although opinions may be stated and lively discussion may ensue, no conclusions are being drawn nor will recommendations be made. Observers who draw conclusions about the committee’s work based on this meeting’s discussions will be doing so prematurely.
Furthermore, individual committee members often engage in discussion and questioning for the specific purpose of probing an issue and sharpening an argument. The comments of any given committee member may not necessarily reflect the position he or she may actually hold on the subject under discussion, to say nothing of that person’s future position as it may evolve in the course of the project. Any inference about an individual’s position are therefore also premature.

RECORDING OF THE MEETING

This meeting will be recorded by the NRC. Please be aware that by attending the meeting, you consent to your voice being recorded for use by the NRC for the purpose of note-taking. This recording will not be publicly released, shared outside of the NRC, or used for other public purposes.

NOTES FOR PRESENTERS

If your presentation contains unpublished data, ITAR controlled and/or other sensitive information, please be aware that the open sessions at the meeting may be recorded and/or webcast. Presentation materials given to the committee may be posted on a publicly accessible website. Please edit your presentations accordingly.

Mac users should assume that their presentation will be displayed via one of the NRC’s PCs. If your presentation is graphics heavy and best displayed via your own laptop, you should also bring a plain-vanilla pdf version of your presentation with you. The audience in the meeting room will see your presentation via your laptop and we will webcast the pdf file.

At some point a staff member will be asking you to sign a consent form allowing us to use your presentation, specifically to post it on our website.

REMOTE CONNECTION DETAILS
WebEx & Telecon Instructions will be added closer to the meeting date.

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No


Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.