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Project Information

Project Information


Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space


Project Scope:

 

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will appoint the Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space (CESAS) to operate as an ad-hoc committee. The overarching purpose for the committee is to support scientific progress in Earth system science and applications, with an emphasis on research requiring global data that are best acquired from space and to assist the federal government in planning programs in these fields by providing advice on the implementation of decadal survey recommendations. The CESAS provides an independent, authoritative forum for identifying and discussing issues in Earth Sciences and Applications from Space between the research community, the federal government, and the interested public.

The CESAS will issue reports that will provide guidance to federal agencies that support Earth science research and application from space. The CESAS scope spans space-based and supporting ground-based activities in support of progress in developing a scientific understanding of the Earth system and its response to natural and human-induced changes in order to enable improved prediction of climate, weather, and natural hazards for present and future generations. These programs include an end-to-end approach encompassing observations from space-based and suborbital platforms, data and information management, research and analysis, modeling, scientific assessments, applications demonstration, technology development, and education. The CESAS’s scope also includes appropriate cross-disciplinary areas and consideration of budget and programmatic aspects of the implementation of the relevant ESAS-2007 or ESAS-2017 decadal survey.

The Committee will build on the current decadal survey of the field, "Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond” (ESAS-2007)--and subsequently the ESAS-2017 report when it is released--and monitor the progress of its recommended priorities for the most important scientific and technical activities in the relevant decadal survey report and recommendations in the mid-decadal review report issued in 2012.

The committee will carry out its charge by undertaking the following tasks:

1. At each of its in-person meetings, as appropriate, the committee may prepare concise assessments of progress on the implementation of the decadal survey's recommended scientific and technical activities. The assessments will be based on evidence gathered by the committee at its in-person and virtual meetings. The committee’s assessment reports may include findings and conclusions on key strategies being pursued by the agencies and the status of agency actions that relate to the state of implementation. The reports may also highlight scientific discoveries and engineering and technical advances relevant to progress on the science objectives identified in the ESAS-2007 or ESAS-2017 decadal report, as appropriate, and in addition will focus on one or more of the following types of issues:
  • The scientific impact of a change in the technical and engineering design, cost estimate, schedule, or programmatic sequencing of one or more of the survey-recommended activities;
  • The impact of a scientific advance on the technical and engineering design, schedule, or programmatic sequencing of one or more survey-recommended activities;
  • The scientific impact of a course of action at a decision point described in the survey report and recommended therein as being suitable for consultation with an independent decadal survey implementation committee;
  • The scientific impact of implementing recommendations from the mid-decadal review and other relevant Academies' reports.
2. At an in-person meeting, the committee may prepare a concise report with advice on the preparation for future decadal and mid-decadal studies.  These reports will be based on evidence gathered by the committee at its in-person and virtual meetings.  Future decadal and mid-decadal studies will be carried out by an ad hoc committee appointed by the Academies under a separate task.

3. For advisory activities assessed to require a more in-depth review than is possible through the normal operation of the CESAS, the committee will assist the Academies in formulating the task and committee membership for such studies which will be designed as separate tasks.

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-SSB-16-10

Project Duration (months): 60 month(s)

RSO: Charo, Art

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Space Studies Board

Topic(s):

Earth Sciences
Math, Chemistry, and Physics
Space and Aeronautics



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 10/03/2018

Steven W. Running - (Co-Chair)
STEVEN W. RUNNING is Emeritus University Regents Professor of Global Ecology and Emeritus Director, Numerical Terradynamic Simulation Group, Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula. . His primary research interest is the development of global and regional ecosystem biogeochemical models integrating remote sensing with bioclimatology and terrestrial ecology. . He is the Land Team Leader for the NASA Earth Observing System, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and is responsible for the EOS global terrestrial net primary production and evapotranspiration datasets. . He has published more than 300 scientific articles and two books. . He was a co-lead chapter author for the 2014 U.S. National Climate Assessment. . He is a recent chair of the NASA Earth Science Subcommittee, and was a member of the NASA Science Advisory Council. . Dr. Running was a chapter lead author for the 4th Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change which shared the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. . Dr. Running is an elected fellow of the American Geophysical Union, has been designated a highly cited researcher by the Institute for Scientific Information, and in 2014 was designated one of “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds” in Geosciences. . He has been honored with the E.O.Wilson Biodiversity Technology Pioneer Award, and received the W.T.Pecora award for lifetime achievement in Earth remote sensing from NASA and U.S. Geological Survey. . He has served on some 34 national and international advisory committees, including those advising NASA, NCAR, USGS, and the World Climate Research Program. . Dr. Running received his Ph.D. in forest ecology from Colorado State University. He has served on the Academies Committee on Ecological Impacts of Climate Change, the Panel on Water Resources and the Global Hydrologic Cycle - Survey Steering Committee for "Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future", and the Committee on Earth Studies.
Nancy L. Baker
NANCY L. BAKER is a meteorologist and head of the data assimilation section at the Naval Research Laboratory in the Marine Meteorology Division. She has more than 30 years of experience with the U.S. Navy in atmospheric data assimilation, observation impact assessment, observation quality control and numerical weather prediction. She has expertise in advanced data assimilation methods such as 3D-Var, 4D-Var and hybrid ensemble/variational 4D-Var, and has had a leading role in the development and transition of those systems to the U.S. Navy for operational implementation. Satellite data assimilation has been one of her primary areas for the past 20 years. She has served as the associate director for the Navy to the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, and as the Navy technical liaison. She led a Navy-sponsored study to assess the dependency on foreign satellites for environmental characterization. She is principal investigator for a Navy-sponsored project designed to assess the impact of the upcoming NASA CYGNSS (GNSS-R) mission on tropical NWP and tropical cyclone track, intensity, and structure forecasts. Her dissertation research developed the observation adjoint sensitivity theory, which subsequently led to the ground-breaking development of the Forecast Sensitivity Observation Impact with Dr. Rolf Langland. She earned her Ph.D. in meteorology from the Naval Postgraduate School. She served as a member for the Academies’ Committee on the Future of Rainfall Measuring Missions, as well as a member and then co-chair for the Panel on Weather and Air Quality: Minutes to Subseasonal, one of five study panels for the 2017-2027 Decadal Survey for Earth Science and Applications from Space.
Otis B. Brown, Jr.
OTIS B. BROWN is a research professor in the Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, at North Carolina State University (NCSU). He is also the director of the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies. At NCSU, Dr. Brown has led the formation and development of the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies, a co-located effort with NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information in Asheville, NC. NCICS is the host for the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites – NC, which Dr. Brown founded in 2009. NCICS/CICS-NC provides research to operations, stewardship, access, system engineering, and system prototyping support to NCEI. Previously Dr. Brown was on the faculty of the University of Miami (UM) as a professor in the Division of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography, and dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. While at UM Dr. Brown was a member of the NASA EOS MODIS Science Team and was responsible for the algorithms and processing system for the global sea surface temperature product as well as validation methodologies and support for the TERRA/ MODIS and AQUA/MODIS instruments. Dr. Brown’s specialties include radiative transfer in the ocean-atmosphere system for visible light; particulate scattering in sea water; satellite infrared observations of sea surface temperature; kinematical studies of warm core rings; transient processes in western boundary currents; tropical eco-system function in the Caribbean and Arabian Seas; innovative approaches to developing diversity and K-12 education; and inter-disciplinary studies of climate change and severe weather impacts. His interests also include strategies to address the science / policy interface and public outreach. He is the recipient of multiple NASA Group Achievement Awards, and a fellow of the American Meteorological Society and the AAAS. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Miami. He served as a member of the Academies Oceans Studies Board, Earth Sciences Decadal Survey Committees Panel on Land-use Change, Ecosystem Dynamics, and Biodiversity and the Committee on Radio Frequencies. He also was a member of the Environmental Task Force and MEDEA.
Molly Brown
MOLLY E. BROWN is an associate research professor at the University of Maryland, College Park, (UMCP) in the Department of Geography. Dr. Brown has 15 years of experience in interdisciplinary research using satellite remote sensing data and models with socio-economic and demographic information to better understand food security drivers. She has current research projects in Africa and South Asia and lived in Senegal while in the Peace Corps in the early 1990s. She has published over 100 journal articles in a variety of disciplines and is the author of two books. In 2015, she was the lead author of a U.S. climate assessment report published by the US Department of Agriculture entitled Climate Change, Global Food Security and the U.S. Food System. Previously, Dr. Brown worked for 13 years— first as a contractor and then as a civil servant—at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in the Biospheric Sciences Branch. She received the NASA Robert H. Goddard Honor Science Award in 2008, NOAA David Johnson Award National Space Club in 2010, Women in Aerospace (WIA) Outstanding Achievement Award in 2013 and USDA Abraham Lincoln Honor Award in 2016 for the writing team Climate Change, Global Food Security, and the US Food System. She served as a member of the Coordination Group on Meteorological Satellites Working Group III Tiger team on Socio-Economic Benefits (CGMS), 2013-2015 and the National Science Foundation (NSF) Environmental Research and Education Advisory Committee (ERE-AC), 2010-2012, and was the Lead author of a 2015 USDA Technical report entitled Climate Change, Global Food Security, and the US Food System, which was published as part of the National Climate Assessment process. She is currently the editor in chief of the Elsevier journal Remote Sensing Applications: Society and Environment. She earned her Ph.D. in geography from the University of Maryland in College Park, MD. Her previous Academies service was on the planning committee for “Estimating the Ecosystem Benefits of Urban Forestry: A Workshop.
Ivona Cetinic
IVONA CETINIC is an oceanographer in the Ocean Ecology Laboratory at Universities Space Research Association / NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Her research focuses on developing new ways of resolving ocean biogeochemistry and phytoplankton diversity from satellite and other remote observations. At the University of Southern California, she conceived of and participated in field campaigns focused on developing innovative ocean observing technology, several for which she served as chief scientist. These campaigns include the ground breaking Tara Oceans circumnavigation of the globe, as well as others that utilized unique fusions of cutting edge technology such as hyperspectral radiometry, light polarimeters, and airborne lidar, allowing for more detailed information about concentration and composition of particles in the ocean (as well as the atmosphere). Dr. Cetinic has served as the project scientist for EXPORTS (EXport Processes in the Ocean from RemoTe Sensing), a large scale NASA-led field campaign, and as the PACE (Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem) Project Science Lead for Ocean Biogeochemistry, a NASA mission scheduled for launch in 2022. In the last 10 years, she has been a member of multiple international science teams and committees and has served as the co-chair of the Ocean Optics Conference, the premiere biannual gathering of the ocean color remote sensing community. She earned her Ph.D. in biological oceanography at University of Southern California. She has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.

William E. Dietrich
WILLIAM E. DIETRICH (NAS) is professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Dietrich’s research focuses on the processes that underlie the evolution of landscapes. His research group and collaborators are developing geomorphic transport laws for soil production, weathering and transport, and river and debris flow incision into bedrock. They are exploring the processes that control the sorting of sediment on river beds, the transport of sediment in steep, coarse bedded channels, the routing of sediment through river networks, the influence of sediment supply on river morphodynamics, the entrainment of sediment to form debris flows, and the dispersion and deposition of sediment across floodplains. New computational approaches are being tested to predict the size and location of shallow landslides. He is collaborating in an intensive field investigation to identify, quantify, and model the processes that will control the co-evolution of climate, vegetation and water availability in Northern California forested landscapes. He is part of the Mars Science Laboratory Mission to Mars, and is collaborating on related field studies of the soil development and landscape evolution in the hyper arid Atacama Desert in Chile. Dr. co-founded the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping. As part of the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics he is co-developing a digital terrain model for predicting salmon populations from digital terrain data. Other collaborative studies are underway to link ecologic and geomorphic processes. He earned his Ph.D. in geology from the University of Washington. He has served on the Academies’ 2017-2027 Decadal Survey for Earth Science and Applications from Space.
Chelle L. Gentemann
CHELLE L. GENTEMANN, Co-Chair, is a senior scientist at Earth and Space Research where she works on air-sea interactions, upper ocean dynamics, and passive microwave sea surface temperatrures. Prior to that she was with Remote Sensing Systems where she focused on air-sea interactions, diurnal warming, passive-microwave SST retrievals, instrument calibration, and radio frequency interference. Dr. Gentemann participates in a number of science teams and committees, including the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperatures (GHRSST). She has been the principal investigator for the US component of GHRSST, the Multi-sensor Improved Sea Surface Temperature project, since 2003. She was awarded the National Oceanographic Partnership Program’s Excellence in Partnering Award and the American Geophysical Union’s Charles S. Falkenberg Award. She received her Ph.D. in meteorology and physical oceanography from the University of Miami. Dr. Gentemann has served on several National Academies’ committees including the Intelligence Science and Technology Experts Group (ISTEG), the Committee on a Framework for Analyzing the Needs for Continuity of NASA-Sustained Remote Sensing Observations of the Earth from Space, , and the Standing Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space.
Everette Joseph
EVERETTE JOSEPH is director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Previously he was the director of the University at Albany’s Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC). He is also the SUNY Empire Innovations Professor in Atmospheric Sciences. Before joining University at Albany, he served as director of the Howard University Program in Atmospheric Sciences (HUPAS), director of the Howard University Beltsville Center for Climate System Observations, and deputy director of the NOAA Center for Atmospheric Science at Howard University. Most recently, Dr. Joseph served as co-lead for the development of the New York State Mesonet, which is a $25 million dollar project for development of an early warning system to aid state emergency managers and to assist the public in mitigation of the effects of hazardous weather. He also leads an international team of scientists from the U.S. and Taiwan in the study weather extremes and decision-making and he helped lead the development of a major field observation program with university, government, and industry partners to improve satellite capabilities to monitor the atmosphere from space and the skill of atmospheric models to better forecast weather, climate, and air quality. Dr. Joseph received his Ph.D. in physics at the University at Albany. He has served on the National Academies’ Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate.
George J. Komar
GEORGE J. KOMAR is a consultant. He retired as associate director in the Earth Science Division and program manager for the Earth Science Technology Office at NASA. He has over thirty-five years’ experience in engineering, program, project and operational management. Mr. Komar has also served as the deputy associate administrator for Technology for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, where he facilitated the development and optimization of advanced technology. He served as the program manager for the Landsat 7 Program, an Earth imaging satellite with eight spectral bands and resolution from 15 to 60 meters, and the TOPEX/Poseidon Program. Prior to his NASA experience, he served in the Air Force in various capacities. In his 21 years of service, he flew various missions, as well as coordinated all Air Force headquarters activities for strategic airlift weapons system acquisition programs. He has received the NASA Medal for Exceptional Achievement, as well as the NASA Exceptional Leadership Medal. Mr. Komar has an M.B.A. in management and finance from the Hardin-Simmons University, as well as a B.S. in program management from the Defense Service Management College. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.
Anna M. Michalak
ANNA M. MICHALAK is a faculty member at the Carnegie Institute for Science in the Department of Global Ecology. She is also a professor in the Department of Earth System Science at Stanford University. Prior to joining Carnegie, she was the Frank and Brooke Transue Faculty Scholar and associate professor at the University of Michigan. Dr. Michalak studies the cycling and emissions of greenhouse gases at urban to global scales – scales directly relevant to informing climate and policy – primarily through the use of atmospheric observations. She also explores climate change impacts on freshwater and coastal water quality via influences on nutrient delivery to, and on conditions within, water bodies. Her approach is focused on the development of spatiotemporal statistical data fusion methods that optimize the use of limited in situ and satellite data. She is the lead author of the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan (2011), a former editor of the journal Water Resources Research (2013 – 2017), chair of the scientific advisory board for the European Integrated Carbon Observation System (2016 – present), member of the OCO-2 science team (2011 – present), and former member of the NASA Advisory Council Early Science Subcommittee (2009 – 2017). Dr. Michalak is the recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (nominated by NASA), the NSF CAREER award, and the Leopold Fellowship in environmental leadership, among other recognitions. She holds a Ph.D. and M.S. in civil and environmental engineering from Stanford University, and a B.S. in environmental engineering from the University of Guelph, Canada. Dr. Michalak has served on the Academies’ Committee on Models of the World for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency.
R. S. Nerem
R. STEVEN NEREM is a professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder, in the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences. He is also a fellow of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and associate director of the Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research. Dr. Nerem specializes in analyzing and interpreting satellite measurements of sea level change, including satellite altimeter, satellite gravity, and other space geodetic measurements. Previously, he worked as a geophysicist at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and was on the faculty at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a recipient of the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal. He is also a fellow of the American Geophysical Union. He was a lead author for the IPCC fifth Assessment Report. He earned his Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas. He previously served as a member of the Academies’ Committee on a Strategy to Mitigate the Impact of Sensor De-scopes and De-manifests on the NPOESS and GOES-R Spacecraft.
Eric Rignot
ERIC J. RIGNOT, NAS, is the Donald Bren Professor of Earth System Science in the Department of Earth System Science, University of California Irvine, CA, and a senior research scientist and joint faculty appointee by the chief scientist at Caltech’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA. Dr. Rignot has 26 years of experience in glaciology, polar physical oceanography, ice-ocean interaction, synthetic-aperture radar applications for ice sheet mass balance, low-frequency radar sounding of glaciers, airborne surveying of Greenland and Antarctica, and numerical ice sheet modeling. He is a principal investigator on several NASA-funded projects to study the mass balance of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets using radar interferometry combined with other methods; the interactions of ice shelves with the ocean; and the dynamic retreat of Patagonian glaciers. He received the JPL Lew Allen Director's Award for Excellence in 1998 and was the recipient of NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement awards in 2003 and 2007. He also received a NASA Outstanding Team Leadership award in 2012 and NASA Group Achievement awards in 2009, 2011, and 2013. He is a member of CLIVAR and NASA’s Sea Level Change Team and is the science lead for Operation IceBridge, which uses aircraft-based instruments to study annual changes in thickness of sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets. He is also a member of the Science Definition Team for the NISAR, a dedicated U.S. and Indian interferometric synthetic aperture radar mission. He earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. He served as a member of the Academies’ Committee on a Framework for Analyzing the Needs for Continuity of NASA-Sustained Remote Sensing Observations of the Earth from Space.
Christopher Ruf
CHRISTOPHER S. RUF is a professor of atmospheric science and electrical engineering at the University of Michigan in the Climate and Space Department. Dr. Ruf is principal investigator for the NASA CYGNSS Earth Venture Mission, which measures ocean surface wind speed in tropical cyclones with rapid sampling using a constellation of eight microsatellites in low earth orbit. CYGNSS successfully launched on December 15, 2016. His research interests include remote sensing technology and earth science applications related to climate and weather studies. Previously, Dr. Ruf was on the faculty of the Pennsylvania State University in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and on the technical staff of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory/Caltech. He earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He served as a member of the Academies’ Committee on the Scientific Uses of the Radio Spectrum, the Weather Panel for the Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future (the 2007 Earth Science Decadal), the Committee on Radio Frequencies, and is currently serving on the Panel on Climate Variability and Change for the Decadal Survey for Earth Science and Applications from Space.
Duane E. Waliser
DUANE E. WALISER is chief scientist of the Earth Science and Technology Directorate at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), which formulates, develops, and operates of a wide range of Earth science remote sensing instruments for NASA’s airborne and satellite program. He provides science guidance and scrutiny to mission concept, development and implementation across the breadth of JPL’s Earth Science program. Dr. Waliser is also a visiting associate at the Geological and Planetary Sciences of the California Institute of Technology, as well as an adjunct professor for the Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Department at the University of California. Dr. Waliser’s principle research interests lie in weather-climate prediction and predictability, with emphasis on the Tropics, Earth system processes and the Earth's water cycle. His recent research focuses on utilizing new and emerging satellite data sets to study weather and climate, as well as advance model simulation and forecast capabilities, particularly for long-range weather and short-term climate applications. Previously, he served as the principle scientist for the Water and Carbon Cycle Group at JPL. He was also an adjunct associate professor at the Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres, part of the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. Dr. Waliser has earned multiple honors and awards, including the NASA Group Achievement Award, the JPL People Leadership Award, the JPL Magellan Award, and a fellowship from the American Meteorological Society. He holds a Ph.D. in physical oceanography from the University of California, San Diego. He has previously served as a member of the National Academies’ Committee on Assessment of Intraseasonal to Interannual Climate Prediction and Predictability, the Committee on Developing a U.S. Research Agenda to Advance Subseasonal to Seasonal Forecasting, and the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate.
Eric F. Wood
ERIC F. WOOD, NAE, is the Susan Dod Brown Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Princeton University. His research area is hydroclimatology with an emphasis on the modeling and analysis of the global water and energy cycles through land surface modeling, satellite remote sensing, and data analysis. This includes the monitoring and forecasting of drought, hydrologic impacts from climate change, and seasonal hydrological forecasting. Recently, he has developed state of the art, coupled water and energy process based models that include the Variable Infiltration Capacity model, which is now one of the most widely-used land surface models. He participates in Global Energy and Water EXchange (GEWEX) activities to develop long-term data records for climate studies. He has been a Science Team member on the NASA Aqua/Terra AMSR-E and MODIS instruments, the NASA Global Precipitation Mission and the NASA soil moisture SMAP mission. For UNESCO he has guided the development of a Global Flood and Drought Monitoring and Forecasting system. Dr. Wood has received many honors, including a Doctor Honoris Causa from Gent University (Belgium) in 2011, and he is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the American Geophysical Union. Dr. Wood received his B.A.Sc. in civil engineering from the University of British Columbia and his S.M., C.E., and Sc.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has served the Academies’ Committee on Hydrologic Science and the Committee to Review the New York City Department of Environmental Protection Operations Support Tool for Water Supply.
Ping Yang
PING YANG is a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences at Texas A&M University where he is also department head. He is the holder of the David Bullock Harris Chair in Geosciences, in the College of Geosciences. Dr. Yang is highly interested in the radiative transfer and single-scattering properties of particles in the atmosphere. Specifically, his research concentrates on the development of fast radiative transfer models as it relates to solar and infrared radiation in cloudy and aerosol-dusty regions. Dr. Yang also examines the radiative forcing of ice clouds, using data sets from MODIS, CERES, AIRS, and CALIPSO instruments. Previously, he worked as an associate research scientist in the Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center at the University of Maryland. Dr. Yang has received multiple honors and awards, including the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, the NASA Group Achievement Award to ACCRI Aircraft Cloud Effects Team, and he was elected as a fellow of the American Geophysical Union in 2015. He has not previously served on an Academies’ committee.

Committee Membership Roster Comments

Note1: Posted Committee on 3/7/17 Note 2: Added Otis B. Brown 4/5/17. Note 3: Lee-Leung Fu resigned from the committee 3/31/17. Note 4. 2018 rotation - Six members reappointed and ten new members added: removed Michael King (NAE), Joyce Penner, Steven A. Ackerman, Steven C. Wofsy (NAS), Efi Foufoula-Georgiou, David L. Skole, Lee-Lueng Fu, and Stacey W. Boland. Added Chelle Gentemann, Steven Running, Ivona Cetinic, Nancy L. Baker, Ping Yang, George J. Komar, Duane E. Waliser, Anna M. Michalak, Eric F. Wood (NAE), and William E. Dietrich (NAS). 10/03/18.

Events


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Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space Fall Meeting: October 25-26, 2018


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If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

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Contact Email:  arebholz@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 337-2857

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Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

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National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
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If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Andrea Rebholz
Contact Email:  arebholz@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

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Prior to 2017 the Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space was a standing committee that was not subject to FACA requirements.  Meetings posted from 2013-2016 are for information only.


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Prior to 2017 the Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space was a standing committee that was not subject to FACA requirements.  Meetings posted from 2013-2016 are for information only.


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Publication(s) resulting from the event:

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Event Type :  
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Prior to 2017 the Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space was a standing committee that was not subject to FACA requirements.  Meetings posted from 2013-2016 are for information only.


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NA

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NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

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Contact Phone:  -

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Prior to 2017 the Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space was a standing committee that was not subject to FACA requirements.  Meetings posted from 2013-2016 are for information only.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

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Meeting

Description :   

Prior to 2017 the Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space was a standing committee that was not subject to FACA requirements.  Meetings posted from 2013-2016 are for information only.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Prior to 2017 the Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space was a standing committee that was not subject to FACA requirements.  Meetings posted from 2013-2016 are for information only.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Prior to 2017 the Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space was a standing committee that was not subject to FACA requirements.  Meetings posted from 2013-2016 are for information only.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Prior to 2017 the Committee on Earth Sciences and Applications from Space was a standing committee that was not subject to FACA requirements.  Meetings posted from 2013-2016 are for information only.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.