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Project Information

Project Information


Frontiers of Materials Research: A Decadal Survey


Project Scope:

The Academies shall prepare a report that will articulate the status and promising future directions of materials research (MR) in the United States in the context of similar efforts world-wide. For this assessment, MR will be considered broadly in terms of material type, forms/structure, property, and phenomenon, as well as the full breadth of approaches to MR (e.g., experiment, theory, computation, modeling and simulation, instrument/technique development, synthesis, characterization, etc.).  In particular, the report shall:

·         Assess the progress and achievements in MR over the past decade;

·         Identify the principal changes in the research and development landscape for MR in the United States and internationally over the past decade, and how those changes have impacted MR;

·         Identify MR areas that offer promising investment opportunities and new directions for the period 2020-2030 or have major scientific gaps;

·         Identify fields in MR that may be good candidates for transition to support by other disciplines, applied R&D sponsors, or industry;

·         Identify the impacts that MR has had and is expected to have on emerging technologies, national needs, and science, broadly;

·         Identify challenges that MR may face over the next decade in making the impacts identified in response to the previous bullet and offer guidance to the materials research community for addressing those challenges; and

·        Evaluate recent trends in investments in MR in the United States relative to similar research that is taking place internationally by using a limited number of case studies of representative areas of MR that have either experienced significant recent growth or are anticipated to see significant near-term growth.  Based on those trends, recommend steps the United States might take to either secure leadership or to enhance collaboration and coordination of such research support, where appropriate, for identified subfields of MR.

 

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-BPA-16-03

Project Duration (months): 24 month(s)

RSO: Svedberg, Erik



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 02/27/2017

Laura H. Greene - (Co-Chair)
LAURA H. GREENE [NAS] is the Chief Scientist at the National High Field Magnet Laboratory and the Francis Eppes Professor of Physics at Florida State University. Her research is in experimental condensed matter physicist, investigating strongly correlated electron systems and focusing primarily on revealing the mechanisms of unconventional superconductivity by planar-tunneling and point-contact electron spectroscopies and growing and developing methods for predictive design of new superconductors. She is recognized for her work on superconductor/semiconductor proximity effects, elucidating the physical properties of the pure and doped high-temperature superconductors (HTS), the discovery of broken time-reversal symmetry in HTS, and spectroscopic studies of the electronic structure in heavy-fermion metals. She is the President-Elect of the American Physical Society (APS) and her theme in 2017 will be “Science Diplomacy” with a focus on how physics can impact human rights. In the APS she has served as Chair of the Division of Materials Physics and co-founded their Forum on Outreach and Engaging the Public. Other service includes the Board of Directors of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Chair of the Board of Governors of the International Institute for Complex and Adaptive Matter, Chair-elect of both the C10 commission of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics and their US Liaison Committee, has served on the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee for the Department of Energy, the Board on Physics and Astronomy for the National Academy of Sciences, the Board of Directors for Gordon Research Conferences, and the Sloan Fellowship Selection Committee. Greene is committed to increasing the diversity of women and underrepresented minorities in physic and has given many COACh workshops, internationally, to increase the participation and status of these groups in the sciences. She is also working to increase the public engagement of science, having given many public lectures and is working to start a new journal in that area. Greene has been a visiting scientist at CNRS in Orsay, University of California at Irvine, Trinity College at Cambridge, and is a visiting distinguished professor at Seoul National University. Her various editorial positions include Reports on the Progress in Physics (editor-in-chief), Philosophical Transactions A, and Current Opinions in Solid State & Materials Science (COSSMS). Greene is a member of the National Academy of Sciences; and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Physics (U.K.), the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Physical Society. She has been a Guggenheim Fellow, received the E.O. Lawrence Award for Materials Research from the U.S. Department of Energy, the Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award from the APS, and the Bellcore Award of Excellence. She has co-authored over 200 publications and given ~500 invited talks.
Tom C. Lubensky - (Co-Chair)
TOM LUBENSKY [NAS] is the Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a theoretical condensed matter theorist with extensive research experience in phase transitions and critical phenomena, liquid crystals, soft-matter physics (colloids, membranes, biological materials), and topological mechanics. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (Sec. 33 Chair 2008-2011) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and honored member of the International Liquid Crystal Society. He is a recipient of the 2004 Oliver E. Buckley Prize of the American Physical Society (APS). He served as chairman of the Department of Physics at the University of Pennsylvania from 2001 to 2009. He has served on numerous committees reviewing physics departments in the US and in Korea; on editorial boards of Physical Review E, Annals of Physics, and PNAS; as member the advisory board of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, member at large of the executive committee of the Divisions of Condensed Matter Physics of the APS. He is co-author with Paul Chaikin of a best-selling graduate textbook, Principles of Condensed Matter Physics.
Matthew V. Tirrell - (Co-Chair)
MATTHEW TIRRELL [NAE] is the founding Pritzker Director and Dean of IME, and Deputy Laboratory Director for Science at Argonne National Laboratory. Before becoming founding director of the IME in 2011, Tirrell served as the Arnold and Barbara Silverman Professor and chair of the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and as professor of materials science and engineering and chemical engineering and faculty scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Prior to that, he was dean of engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Tirrell began his academic career at the University of Minnesota as an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering and later became head of the department. He received his BS in chemical engineering from Northwestern University and his PhD in polymer science and engineering from the University of Massachusetts. He specializes in the manipulation and measurement of the surface properties of polymers, materials that consist of long, flexible chain molecules, leading to new insight into polymer surface phenomena, such as adhesion, friction, and biocompatibility. Tirrell’s honors include the Polymer Physics Prize of the American Physical Society, the Chevalier dans l'Ordre des Palmes Académiques (Ministry of Education of France), the William H. Walker Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the Charles M. A. Stine Award, and the Professional Progress Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Indian National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Engineering. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering.
Paul M. Chaikin
PAUL CHAIKIN [NAS] is the Silver Professor of Physics at New York University (NYU). Prior to joining the faculty of NYU, Dr. Chaikin was a professor at the University of California, Los Angeles; University de Paris-Sud, Orsay; the University of Pennsylvania; and Princeton University. He also worked as a research associate and consultant for Exxon Research and Engineering Company and the NEC Institute. He has published more than 300 articles in journals such as Physics Review, Journal of Materials Science, Physical Review Letters, Journal of Physics, Nature, and Science, and he co-authored the book Principles of Condensed Matter Physics with T.C. Lubensky (1995). Dr. Chaikin has served on the editorial boards of numerous refereed journals and has lectured at more than 200 meetings and at more than 200 universities and laboratories. He has also registered two patents. He received a Sloan Foundation Fellowship and a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He received his B.S. from Caltech in 1966 and his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1971. Dr. Chaikin served as a member of the NRC Committee on Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science (2003-2005), the Committee on an Assessment of and Outlook for NSF’s Material Research Laboratory Program (2005-2007), the Solid State Sciences Committee (2007-2010), and the Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space: Fundamental Physics Panel (2009-2011).
Hong Ding
HONG DING is a distinguished professor of the Institute of Physics (IOP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the Managing Director and Chief Scientist of Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics. He obtained his B.S. degree in physics from Shanghai Jiao Tong University in 1990 and his Ph.D. degree in physics from University of Illinois at Chicago in 1995. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Argonne National Laboratory from 1996 to 1998. He joined the Department of Physics at Boston College as an assistant professor in 1998, became an associate professor in 2003, and became a full professor in 2007. He joined the IOP full time in 2008. Over the past 20 years, he has made important contributions to understanding of high temperature superconductors and topological materials using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. His major scientific achievements include discovery of pseudogap in cuprate superconductors, first observation of s-wave superconducting gap in iron-based superconductors, and experimental discovery of Weyl fermions in solid-state materials. He has published more than 200 papers with a total citation number over 11000 and the H-index of 53, and has given more than 90 invited talks in international scientific conferences. He has received Sloan Research Fellowship Award in 1999, was selected as one of first “Thousand Talents Experts”, and was elected as American Physical Society Fellow in 2011.
Katherine T. Faber
KATHERINE FABER is the Simon Ramo Professor of Materials Science at the California Institute of Technology. Her research interests include fracture of brittle materials, toughening mechanisms, ceramic composites and coatings, porous ceramics, and cultural heritage science. Educated at Alfred University with a B.S. in Ceramic Engineering, she earned a M.S. in ceramic science at the Pennsylvania State University and a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to joining the faculty at Caltech in 2014, she was assistant and associate professor of ceramic engineering at the Ohio State University (1982-87), and associate professor, professor, and Walter P. Murphy Professor of Materials Science and Engineering in the McCormick School of Engineering at Northwestern University (1988-2014). Until 2016, she was co-director of the Northwestern University-Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts. Her administrative positions at Northwestern have included associate dean for Graduate Studies and Research in the McCormick School and chair of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. Among Professor Faber’s awards are the National Science Foundation’s Presidential Young Investigator Award, fellow of the American Ceramic Society and of ASM International, the Charles E. MacQuigg Award for Outstanding Teaching at Ohio State, the Society of Women Engineers Distinguished Educator Award, and the YWCA Achievement Award for Education. She is an ISI Highly Cited Author in Materials (2003), served as President of the American Ceramic Society (2006-2007), and was elected to the 2014 American Academy of Arts and Sciences class of fellows.
Paula T. Hammond
PAULA HAMMOND [NAM] is the David H. Koch Professor in Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She is a member of MIT's Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, the MIT Energy Initiative, and a founding member of the MIT Institute for Soldier Nanotechnology. She has recently been named the new head of the Department of Chemical Engineering (ChemE). She is the first woman and the first person of color appointed to the post. She also served as the executive officer (Associate Chair) of the Chemical Engineering Department (2008-2011). She was elected into the 2013 Class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is also the recipient of the 2013 AIChE Charles M. A. Stine Award, which is bestowed annually to a leading researcher in recognition of outstanding contributions to the field of materials science and engineering, and the 2014 Alpha Chi Sigma Award for Chemical Engineering Research. She received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1984, and her M.S. from Georgia Tech in 1988 and earned her Ph.D. in 1993 from MIT. She has developed new biomaterials including targeted nanoparticle drug carriers capable of delivering combinations of chemotherapy drugs, thin film coatings that release drugs from implant surfaces for tissue, and controlled release microneedle vaccines against infectious disease.
Christine Heckle
CHRISTINE E. HECKLE is the research director of the inorganic materials research division at Corning Inc. She is responsible for setting the materials research strategy and vision to deliver new materials to support next-generation products in glass and ceramics. She received her Ph.D. in Glass Science from Alfred University. Previously, she was Research Director, Crystalline Materials Research, where she led the development of new ceramic products to support the Environmental Technologies and Specialty Materials segments, as well as new business and exploratory arenas. Heckle joined Corning in 1997 in Corning Specialty Materials development. She then moved to Environmental Technologies to lead a variety of programs that introduced new products into the marketplace. Under her leadership, DuraTrap® AT was expanded into the heavy duty market, and two new product offerings were launched for the light duty market. In August 2012 she won the inaugural R, D & E Leadership Award from NOBCChE for her proven track record of producing results with an excellent use of emotional intelligence and people skills, as well as for being a key advocate and champion of diversity initiatives. Heckle is a member of SPECTRA, Corning’s LGBT employee resource group, and ADAPT, Corning’s employee resource group for people with disabilities and those who care for people with disabilities. She mentors and coaches members of EDGE (Ethnically Diverse Group of Employees) and SBP (Society of Black Professionals).
Kevin J. Hemker
KEVIN HEMKER is the Alonzo G. Decker Chair and Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University and holds joint appointments in the Departments of Materials Science & Engineering and Earth & Planetary Sciences. He joined the faculty at JHU in 1993, was an NSF National Young Investigator (1994), an invited Professor at the EPFL (1995) and the University of Paris XIII (2001), and received the ASM Materials Science Research Silver Medal in 2001. He served as Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering (2007-2013), editor of Scripta Materialia (2004-2011), and was a member and Vice-Chair of the DARPA Defense Science Research Council (2010-2015). He is currently a member of the HRL Technical Advisory Group, the SRI Technology Council and in-coming vice president of The Minerals, Metals, Materials Society (TMS). Hemker has been named a fellow of: the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the American Society of Metals (ASM International), and TMS. His group strives to elucidate the underlying atomic-level details that govern the mechanical response, performance and reliability of disparate material systems including nanocrystalline materials, materials for MEMS, metallic micro-lattices, thermal barrier coatings, armor ceramics, extreme environments, and high temperature structural materials in general. The results of their research have been disseminated in over 200 scientific articles, four co-edited books and approximately 300 invited presentations and plenary lectures.
Joseph P. Heremans
JOSEPH HEREMANS is an Ohio Eminent Scholar and a Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the Ohio State University. He holds courtesy appointments in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and in the Department of Physics of OSU. He joined OSU after a 21 year career at the General Motors and the Delphi Research Laboratories, where his research resulted in three commercial products. His current research interests lie in materials for solid-state thermal to electric energy conversion technologies. This includes thermoelectric semiconductors and materials for thermal energy conversion based on thermally driven spin fluxes (spin-caloritronics). In thermoelectrics, he pioneered the use of resonant levels in semiconductors to increase the figure of merit. In spin-caloritronics, the study of heat-driven spin currents which in turn drive electron currents, he is the lead author of a giant spin-Seebeck effect in InSb. His most current work aims at applying thermally driven spin fluxes in thermoelectrics to improve their ZT. He holds 39 US patents, three sets of which went into production.


Barbara A. Jones
BARBARA JONES is a senior researcher who leads the theoretical and computational physics project at IBM’s Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California. She received an A.B. degree in physics from Harvard University in 1982, followed by a year at Cambridge as a Churchill Scholar. She earned M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from Cornell University in 1985 and 1988, respectively. After postdoctoral research at Harvard University, she joined IBM at the Almaden Research Center in 1989. She has worked on a range of projects both fundamental and more applied, including managing experimentalists working on media and read heads, to theories of quantum wells and other effects in magnetic multilayers. Currently she leads research to calculate the effects of magnetic atoms, in clusters or nanolattices, on metallic/insulating surfaces, as engineered and measured by STM. Among other distinctions, Dr. Jones was the 2001 recipient of a TWIN Award (Tribute to Women in Industry) and is currently Chair of the Division of Condensed Matter Physics of the APS, the Chair and Founder of the APS/IBM Research Internship for Undergraduate Women, past member and Chair of the American Physical Society (APS)’s Committee on the Status of Women in Physics (1999-2002), and past chair of the IBM Almaden Diversity Council.
Nadya Mason
NADYA MASON is a professor of physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She received her bachelor’s degree in physics from Harvard University and her Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University. Before joining the department at Illinois, Dr. Mason was a postdoc at Harvard, and then a junior fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows. A condensed matter experimentalist, her research focuses on how electrons behave in low-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, and nano-structured superconductors. She is especially interested in the interplay between electron correlations and reduced dimensionality, as enhanced interactions in low dimensions are expected to create novel phenomena. Improved understanding of such systems is important for applications ranging from superconducting power lines to nano-scale electronic elements to quantum computers. She has received multiple awards for her work, including a National Science Foundation CAREER award and a Woodrow Wilson Career Enhancement Award, and she was honored as an “Emerging Scholar” by Diverse Magazine in 2008. In addition to her research and teaching, Dr. Mason is committed to increasing the numbers of under-represented people in the sciences.
Thomas Mason
THOMAS MASON is the Senior VP for Laboratory Operations at Battelle. Previously he was the director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He graduated from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, with a Bachelor of Science degree in physics and completed his postgraduate study at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, receiving a Doctor of Philosophy degree in experimental condensed matter physics. After completing his Ph.D., he held a postdoctoral fellowship at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey, and then became a Senior Scientist at Risø National Laboratory in Denmark. In 1993 he joined the faculty of the Department of Physics at the University of Toronto. Thom joined Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1998 as scientific director for the Department of Energy’s Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project. In April 2001 he was named Associate Laboratory Director for SNS and Vice President of UT Battelle, LLC, which manages ORNL for the Department. In 2006 he became Associate Laboratory Director for Neutron Sciences, leading a new organization charged with delivering safe and productive scientific facilities for studying of structure and dynamics of materials. In May 2007, Thom was named Director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, holding this post until his transition to Battelle. Thom has coauthored over 100 refereed publications describing experimental studies of novel magnetic materials and superconductors. As Director of the largest science and energy laboratory in the Department of Energy, he was focused on translating breakthroughs in fundamental science to applications relevant to energy technology and national security and the advantages to economic, environmental, and national security that will entail. Thom was named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Institute of Physics, the American Physical Society, and the Neutron Scattering Society of America.
Talat S. Rahman
TALAT SHAHNAZ RAHMAN is a Pegasus Professor and Distinguished Professor of Physics at University of Central Florida. Her research interests focus in computational design of functional nanomaterials through microscopic understanding of their physical and chemical properties. A related interest is in multiscale modeling of chemical reactions and thin film growth processes. Apart from using density functional theory (DFT) based methods as her workhorse, her group also works on techniques that go beyond DFT. Her research is funded through grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Vacuum Society, and recipient of several professional awards including the Research Incentive Award from UCF, Alexander von Humboldt Research Prize, Higuchi Research Award from the University of Kansas, and the Distinguished Graduate Faculty Award, Kansas State University. She is engaged in establishing research initiatives in developing countries such as Pakistan. She has published over 250 articles in high impact journals and mentored over two dozen PhD students. She has been engaged nationally and internationally in efforts to promote the participation of women and minorities (particularly through the Bridge Program of American Physical Society) in STEM disciplines. She is also involved in pedagogical reforms in the teaching of physics and in the recruitment and training of students for careers in teaching through the APS PhysTEC program. She is chair of the APS Topical Group on Energy Research and Applications (GERA) and member, executive committee, Surface Science Division, American Vacuum Society. She also serves on the executive editorial board of the Journal of Physics Condensed Matter and Progress in Surface Science.
Elsa Reichmanis
ELSA REICHMANIS [NAE] is the Pete Silas Chair in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Prior to joining Georgia Tech, she was Bell Labs Fellow and director of the Materials Research Department, Bell Labs, Murray Hill, NJ. She received her Ph.D. and B.S. degrees in chemistry from Syracuse University. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Latvian Academy of Sciences, and has received several awards for her work. She has also been active in professional societies; she served as 2003 president of the ACS, and has participated in many National Research Council activities. Her research, at the interface of chemical engineering, chemistry, materials science, optics, and electronics, spans from fundamental concept to technology development and implementation. Her interests include the chemistry, properties and application of materials technologies for photonic and electronic. She has contributed to the development of a molecular-level understanding of how chemical structure affects materials function, leading to new families of lithographic materials and processes for advanced VLSI manufacturing. Currently her research relates to active, polymer and hybrid organic/inorganic materials chemistries and processes for plastic electronics, photovoltaics and photonic technologies.
John L. Sarrao
JOHN L. SARRAO is the Associate Director for Theory, Simulation, and Computation (AD-TSC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. John received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Los Angeles based on thesis work performed at LANL. As AD-TSC, he leads the Laboratory's efforts in applying science-based prediction to existing and emerging national security missions. TSC spans LANL’s Theoretical; Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences; and High Performance Computing organizations. Previously, Sarrao was the Program Director for Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Office of Science Programs, and for MaRIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes), LANL’s signature facility concept which will provide transformational materials solutions for national security challenges. John has held a number of leadership positions within LANL’s materials community, including Division Leader of the Materials Physics and Applications Division and Group Leader of Condensed Matter and Thermal Physics. John has also served on a number of U.S. Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Subcommittees, helping to set strategic directions for materials research. John’s primary research interest is in the synthesis and characterization of correlated electron systems, especially actinide materials. He was the 2013 winner of the Department of Energy’s E.O. Lawrence Award and the 2004 winner of the LANL Fellows Prize for Research, in part for his discovery of the first plutonium superconductor. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Physical Society (APS), and Los Alamos National Laboratory.
Susan B. Sinnott
SUSAN SINNOT is a Professor and Department Head of Materials Science and Engineering at Pennsylvania State University. She received her B.S. in chemistry from the University of Texas at Austin and her Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Iowa State University. She was a National Research Council Postdoctoral Associate at the Naval Research Laboratory and was on the faculty at the University of Kentucky prior to joining the University of Florida (UF) in 2000. Susan's research is focused on the use of electronic structure calculations and atomistic simulations to optimize the processing 'and properties of materials. Her research interests include examining the chemical modification of polymer surfaces through mass-selected ion-beam deposition, exploring the dynamics associated with the growth of thin films, developing new methodologies for the atomistic simulation of materials, using atomic-scale simulations to study the catalytic behavior of metal clusters, investigating the molecular origin of friction and wear at interfaces, and combining electronic structure and thermodynamic calculations to predict defect formation in metal oxides. Susan is the author of over 160 technical publications, including over 140 journal publications and eight book chapters; she has also delivered over 120 invited presentations. She is a member of AVS, ACerS ACS, APS, MRS, and AAAS, and was named a fellow of AVS in 2005. She was named a fellow of ACerS in 2011 and a fellow of the AAAS in 2010.
Susanne Stemmer
SUSANNE STEMMER is Professor of Materials at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She received her Diploma in Materials Science from the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany). She did her doctoral work at the Max-Planck Institute for Metals Research in Stuttgart (Germany) and received her doctoral degree from the University of Stuttgart in 1995. Following postdoctoral positions she held an assistant professor appointment in Materials Science at Rice University from 1999 to 2002. In 2002, she joined the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her current research interests include scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques, novel functional oxide thin films, molecular beam epitaxy, strong electron correlation phenomena, and topological materials. She has authored or co-authored more than 220 publications. Honors include election to fellow of the American Ceramic Society, fellow of the American Physical Society, fellow of the Materials Research Society, fellow of the Microscopy Society of America, and a Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship.
Samuel I. Stupp
SAMUEL STUPP [NAE] is Board of Trustees Professor of Chemistry, Materials Science, and Medicine and
Director of the Institute for BioNanotechnology in Medicine at Northwestern University. He obtained his B.S. in chemistry at the University of California at Los Angeles, and his Ph.D. in materials science from Northwestern University. He spent 18 years at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he was the Swanlund Professor of Materials Science, Chemistry, and Bioengineering. In 1999, he joined the faculty at Northwestern. Professor Stupp is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Spanish Royal Academy of Pharmacy. He is also a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Materials Research Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the World Technology Network, and the World Biomaterials Congress. His awards include the Department of Energy Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Materials Chemistry, a Humboldt Senior Award, the Materials Research Society's Medal Award, the American Chemical Society Award in Polymer Chemistry, and the Sir Edward Youde Memorial Award in Hong Kong. He has held the appointment of Joliot Curie Professor at Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chemie in Paris, Merck-Karl Pfister Visiting Professor in Organic Chemistry at MIT, visiting professor at the Institut de Science et d'Ingenierie Supramoléculaires in Strasbourg, and is currently distinguished professor of Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands. In 2009, Professor Stupp received an honorary doctorate from Eindhoven University for revolutionary research in complex molecular systems, and in 2011 an honorary doctorate from the National University of Costa Rica. His research is focused on self-assembly and supramolecular materials with special emphasis in regenerative medicine, cancer therapies, and solar energy.

Tia B. Tolle
TIA BENSON TOLLE is the Director of Advanced Materials, BCA Product Development. Prior to joining Boeing, Tia held several technical and leadership positions at the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, and prior to that was a crew training instructor at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Tia earned her B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Washington, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in materials engineering from the University of Dayton. She also holds a Master’s Certificate in Leadership and Executive Development from the University of Dayton and completed the Air Force Senior Leadership Development Course and Air War College Senior Leader Course from the Air University, Maxwell Air Force Base. Tia is a fellow of the Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering (SAMPE), and has been active in professional societies serving at several levels, including president of SAMPE, as well as president of the Materials Research Society (MRS). She is currently a member of the Condensed Matter and Materials Research Committee, a standing board of the National Research Council; serves on Iowa State University’s Aerospace Engineering and University of Washington’s Materials Science and Engineering Industry Advisory Boards; and is a trustee for Edmonds Community College. Tia is also Boeing’s executive focal for SAMPE and for the University of Washington’s Materials Science and Engineering Department, which enable her to help guide material research and students towards future aerospace needs.
Mark L. Weaver
MARK WEAVER is a professor and interim department head at the University of Alabama in the Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering. Dr. Weaver has extensive experience in the characterization and development of materials for use in extreme environments. He holds Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in materials science and engineering from the University of Florida and a B.S. degree in metallurgical engineering from the University of Washington. He is an active member in several professional societies including TMS where he is a member of the high-temperature alloys and mechanical behavior committees.
Todd Younkin
TODD YOUNKIN is the Executive Director of the Joint University Microelectronics Program (JUMP) - a $200M, 5-yr. research initiative with support from DARPA and 9 electronics companies representing both defense and commercial industries. He received his Ph.D. in organometallic and polymer chemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 2001. His technical contributions have been in the areas of novel materials, integration, advanced lithography, and integrated photonics. With 16 years of R&D experience spanning Intel’s 0.18µm-5nm technology nodes, Todd has held technical leadership roles in novel materials, integration, advanced lithography, and integrated photonics that have contributed to Intel’s logic, memory, and networking products. Todd has always looked to maximize the industrial relevance and impact of fundamental academic research. He spent 3-years (2010-13) at IMEC to ensure that both extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) and directed self-assembly (DSA) would graduate from ‘pre-competitive, research’ efforts into clearly defined internal development programs. More recently, Todd has championed faster materials innovation following President Obama’s Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) by serving as a scientific advisor during the onset of the NIST-sponsored, Center for Hierarchical Materials Design (CHiMaD). In late 2015, Todd undertook an Intel Labs external assignment to the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) to serve as the Program Manager for STARnet. STARnet is a ~$40M/yr. research effort focused on delivering novel beyond-CMOS hardware and architecture solutions. During that timeframe, Todd owned the definition and birth of a new, 5-yr. research program with DARPA, the defense industry, and commercial microelectronics sponsors. Todd is now the Executive Director of that Joint University Microelectronics Program (JUMP). JUMP is a $200M, 5-year research initiative scheduled to start on 1-Jan-2018. It will challenge and change the research paradigm to focus on heterogeneous electronic solutions for end-to-end sensing, signal and information processing, communication, computing, and storage to yield a smarter, autonomous future based on ubiquitous computing. Materials are a critical part of that future.
Steven J. Zinkle
STEVEN ZINKLE [NAE] is currently Governor’s Chair Professor for Nuclear Materials at the University of Tennessee. Since 1985, he has held a series of research staff and management positions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dr. Zinkle received a B.S. degree in nuclear engineering, M.S. degrees in materials science and nuclear engineering, and a Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Much of his research has utilized materials science to explore fundamental physical phenomena that are important for advanced nuclear energy applications. His research interests include deformation and fracture mechanisms in structural materials and investigation of radiation effects in ceramics, fuel systems, and metallic alloys for fusion and fission energy. He is a former recipient of the Robert Cahn Award and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Committee Membership Roster Comments

Added new member Hong Ding on 7/3/17
Added new member Christine Heckle on 7/3/17
Added new member Thomas Mason on 7/3/17
Added new member John Sarrao on 7/3/17
Added new member Todd Younkin on 7/3/17


Disclosure of Conflicts of Interest

A majority of the committee will consist of members with a balance of research expertise in the fields that broadly make up materials research, emphasizing emerging areas. In addition, the committee will have a few members who work in closely related fields to materials research or in fields that rely upon such research, selected from among the energy, chemical, life, and environmental sciences, engineering, and other branches of physics beyond condensed matter physics. The committee will also contain members from industries that rely upon advances in materials research, as well as members from international communities that engage in similar research.

Events



Location:

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Erik Svedberg
Contact Email:  esvedberg@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2308

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Laura H. Greene - (Co-Chair)
Tom C. Lubensky - (Co-Chair)
Matthew V. Tirrell - (Co-Chair)
Paul M. Chaikin (phone)
Katherine T. Faber
Kevin J. Hemker
Joseph P. Heremans
Barbara A. Jones
Nadya Mason
Thomas Mason
Talat S. Rahman
Ian M. Robertson
John L. Sarrao
Susan B. Sinnott
Samuel I. Stupp
Mark L. Weaver
Todd Younkin
Steven J. Zinkle

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The report draft

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

none

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
January 26, 2018
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

The Boston Marriott Copley located at 110 Huntington Avenue in Boston, MA
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Erik Svedberg
Contact Email:  esvedberg@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2308

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Laura H. Greene - (Co-Chair)
Tom C. Lubensky - (Co-Chair)
Matthew V. Tirrell - (Co-Chair)
Paul M. Chaikin
Hong Ding
Katherine T. Faber (Phone)
Christine Heckle
Kevin J. Hemker
Joseph P. Heremans
Barbara A. Jones
Talat S. Rahman
Ian M. Robertson
Susan B. Sinnott
Susanne Stemmer
Tia B. Tolle (Phone)
Mark L. Weaver
Todd Younkin
Steven J. Zinkle

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The Presentations, The report draft, next meeting

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

none

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
December 04, 2017
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Intercontinental Hotel, Camelot Room, 505 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Erik Svedberg
Contact Email:  esvedberg@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2308

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Berthoud Hall, Colorado School of Mines, Denver, Colorado
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Erik Svedberg
Contact Email:  esvedberg@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2308

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Laura H. Greene - (Co-Chair)
Tom C. Lubensky - (Co-Chair)
Matthew V. Tirrell - (Co-Chair)
Paul M. Chaikin
Hong Ding
Katherine T. Faber
Kevin J. Hemker
Joseph P. Heremans
Barbara A. Jones
Thomas Mason
Talat S. Rahman
Elsa Reichmanis
Ian M. Robertson
John L. Sarrao
Susan B. Sinnott
Susanne Stemmer
Samuel I. Stupp
Mark L. Weaver
Todd Younkin
Steven J. Zinkle

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

What the committee just heard. The report outline. Planning of the next meeting.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 31, 2017
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Erik Svedberg
Contact Email:  esvedberg@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2308

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Dr. Laura H. Greene - (Co-Chair)
Dr. Tom C. Lubensky - (Co-Chair)
Dr. Matthew V. Tirrell - (Co-Chair)
Dr. Katherine T. Faber (Phone)
Dr. Kevin J. Hemker
Dr. Joseph P. Heremans
Dr. Barbara A. Jones
Dr. Nadya Mason
Dr. Talat S. Rahman
Dr. Elsa Reichmanis
Dr. Ian M. Robertson
Dr. Susan B. Sinnott
Dr. Susanne Stemmer
Dr. Tia B. Tolle
Dr. Mark L. Weaver
Dr. Steven J. Zinkle

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The report outline
The next meeting, content such as potential speakers

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 19, 2017
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office