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Project Information

Project Information


Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security


Project Scope:

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will carry out a decadal survey on the social and behavioral sciences (SBS) in areas relevant to national security in two integrated phases.  The first phase, a national summit (workshop) was completed in fall, 2016.

The statement of task for the second phase, a consensus process is below.

An ad hoc committee drawing on membership from the summit steering committee will be appointed to conduct the decadal survey aimed at identifying opportunities that are poised to contribute significantly to the IC's analytic responsibilities. The study will identify opportunities throughout the social sciences (e.g., sociology, demography, political science, economics, anthropology) and from behavioral sciences (e.g.  psychology, cognition, neuroscience) and will draw on discussions at the summit to frame its inquiry.  Attention will also be paid to work in allied professional disciplines such as engineering, business, and law, and a full variety of cross-disciplinary, historical, case study, participant, and phronetic approaches.

The committee will work with ODNI and security community members to understand government needs and expectations.  The final report will be based on the committee's consideration of broad national security priorities; relevant capabilities of elements within the security community to support and apply SBS research findings; cost and technical readiness; likely growth of research programs; emerging SBS data, procedures, personnel, and other resources; and opportunities to leverage related research activities not directly supported by government . The committee will specify a range of relevant work that could be useful to the IC for their consideration in developing future research priorities.

The committee's primary tasks will be:

1.      Assess progress in addressing selected major social and behavioral scientific challenges that might prove useful to national security. Include discussion of approaches that are gaining strength and those that are losing strength. Where possible, rely on published meta-analyses.

2.      Identify SBS opportunities that can be used to guide security community investment decisions and application efforts over the next 10 years.

3.      Specify approaches to facilitate productive interchange between the security community and the external social science research community.

Status: Current

PIN: DBASSE-BBCSS-17-02

Project Duration (months): 36 month(s)

RSO: Bhatt, Sujeeta



Geographic Focus:
North America

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 03/01/2017

Paul R. Sackett - (Chair)
PAUL R. SACKETT is the Beverly and Richard Fink Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Liberal Arts at the University of Minnesota. His research interests revolve around various aspects of testing and assessment in workplace, educational, and military settings. He has served as editor of two journals: Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice and Personnel Psychology, as president of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, as co-chair of the committee producing the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, as a member of the National Research Council's Board on Testing and Assessment, as chair of APA's Committee on Psychological Tests and Assessments, and as chair of APA’s Board of Scientific Affairs. He holds a Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from the Ohio State University.
Gary G. Berntson
GARY G. BERNTSON is an Emeritus Academy Professor of Psychology at The Ohio State University. His research is in the areas of neuroscience, social neuroscience and psychophysiology. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed articles and has edited numerous books, including the Handbook of Psychophysiology, the Handbook of Neuroscience for the Behavioral Sciences, and Social Neuroscience. Berntson is a Fellow in several professional associations and has served on the editorial boards of numerous journals, including Psychobiology, Psychophysiology, the International Journal of Psychophysiology and Emotion Review, among others. He is a Past-President of the Society for Psychophysiological Research (2011-2013). He has served on numerous federal advisory committees, including NIH and NSF panels, the Portuguese Science Foundation, and the Department of Defense (Defense Science Board) Task Force on Predicting Violent Behavior. He also served as the scientific consultant to the Department of Homeland Security FAST program. He was the recipient of Distinguished Teaching and Distinguished Scholar awards from the Ohio State University, and received the Paul D MacLean Award for Outstanding Neuroscience Research, from the American Psychosomatic Society (2013). Dr. Berntson received his Ph.D. in psychobiology and life sciences in 1971 from the University of Minnesota.
Kathleen M. Carley
KATHLEEN M. CARLEY is a professor of computer science in the Institute for Software Research, an IEEE Fellow, and the director of the Center for Computational Analysis of Social and Organizational Systems at Carnegie Mellon University. She is also the CEO of Carley Technologies Inc., aka Netanomics. Her research combines cognitive science, sociology, and computer science to address complex social and organizational issues. Her most notable research contribution was the establishment of Dynamic Network Analysis (DNA) – and the associated theory and methodology for examining large high-dimensional time variant networks. Her research on DNA has resulted in tools for analyzing large-scale dynamic networks and various multi-agent simulation systems. Her group has developed tools for extracting sentiment, social and semantic networks from social media and other textual data (AutoMap), simulating epidemiological models (BioWar), simulating covert networks (DyNet), and simulating changes in beliefs and practice given information campaigns (Construct). She received two B.S. degrees: one in economics and another in political science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard University.


Noshir Contractor
NOSHIR CONTRACTOR is the Jane S. & William J. White Professor of Behavioral Sciences in the McCormick School of Engineering & Applied Science, the School of Communications and the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. He is the director of the Science of Networks in Communities (SONIC) research center. He is investigating factors that lead to the formation, maintenance, and dissolution of dynamically linked social and knowledge networks in a wide variety of contexts. He received the National Communication Association Distinguished Scholar Award in 2014 and was elected as a fellow of the International Communication Association in 2015. He is the co-founder and Chairman of Syndio, which offers organizations products and services based on network analytics. He has a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras and a Ph.D. in communication from the Annenberg School of Communication at the University of Southern California
Nancy J. Cooke
NANCY J. COOKE is a professor of human systems engineering at Arizona State University and is science director of the Cognitive Engineering Research Institute in Mesa, AZ. She is currently president of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and the recent past chair of the Board on Human Systems Integration at the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine. She also recently chaired a study panel for the National Academies on the Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science. She was a member of the US Air Force Scientific Advisory board from 2008-2012. Her research interests include the study of individual and team cognition and its application to the development of cognitive and knowledge engineering methodologies, sensor operator threat detection cyber and intelligence analysis, remotely-piloted aircraft systems, human-robot interaction, healthcare systems, and emergency response systems. She specializes in the development, application, and evaluation of methodologies to elicit and assess individual and team cognition. In addition to large number of awards and appointments to National Academies studies, Dr. Cooke was named an American Psychological Association Fellow in 2009 , a Fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society in 2000, and designated a National Associate of the National Research Council of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in 2016. She received her Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from New Mexico State University.

Barbara A. Dosher
BARBARA A. DOSHER (NAS) is a distinguished professor of cognitive sciences at the University of California at Irvine. Her research studies memory, attention, and perceptual learning in humans using a combination of behavioral testing and mathematical modeling. She was a professor of psychology, Columbia University from 1977- 1992. She moved to University of California, Irvine in 1992, and was dean of the School of Social Sciences from 2002-2013. She is an elected fellow of the American Psychological Society, the Society for Experimental Psychologists, and the National Academy of Sciences, and received the 2013 Howard Crosby Warren Medal of the Society for Experimental Psychologists. She has served on the board and as president of the Society for Mathematical Psychology and on the executive board of the Vision Sciences Society, is a prior associate editor of Psychological Review, and on grant review boards at the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Mental Health. She received a B.A. in psychology from the University of California, San Diego. She received a M.S. and Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of Oregon.
Jeffrey C. Johnson
JEFFREY C. JOHNSON is a professor of anthropology at the University of Florida. He is also is an adjunct professor in the Institute for Software Research at Carnegie Melon University. He was the director of the Summer Institute for Research Design in Cultural Anthropology from 1996-2015. He was a former program manager with the Army Research Office (IPA) where he started the basic science research program in the social sciences. He has conducted extensive long-term research comparing group dynamics and the evolution of social networks of over-wintering crews at the American South Pole Station, with those at the Polish, Russian, Chinese, and Indian Antarctic Stations. Using these isolated human group settings as space analogs, he is currently studying aspects of team cognition on mission success. He is the author of Selecting Ethnographic Informants (Sage, 1990) and is co-author (with Borgatti and Everett) of the book Analyzing Social Networks (Sage, 2013). He was the founding editor of the Journal of Quantitative Anthropology, and co-editor of the journal Human Organization. He is currently an associate editor for the Journal of Social Structure and the journal Social Networks. He received his Ph.D. in Social Science from the University of California, Irvine.
Sallie Keller
SALLIE KELLER is professor of statistics and director for the Social and Decision Analytics Laboratory of the Biocomplexity Institute at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Dr. Keller served as the chair for the Decadal Summit Steering Committee. Her previous positions include Academic Vice-President and Provost at University of Waterloo, director of the IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute in Washington DC, William and Stephanie Sick Dean of Engineering at Rice University, head of the Statistical Sciences group at Los Alamos National Laboratory, professor of statistics at Kansas State University, and statistics program director at the National Science Foundation. Her areas of expertise are social and decision informatics, statistical underpinnings of data science, uncertainty quantification, and data access and confidentiality. She is a national associate of the National Academy of Sciences, fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, elected member of the International Statistics Institute, and member of the JASON advisory group. She is also a fellow and past president of the American Statistical Association. She holds a Ph.D. in statistics from the Iowa State University of Science and Technology.
David Matsumoto
DAVID MATSUMOTO is a professor of social psychology at San Francisco State University and the director of the Culture and Emotion Research Lab. The laboratory focuses on studies involving culture, emotion, social interaction and communication. He is well known for his work in the field of microexpressions, facial expression, gesture, and nonverbal behavior. He has served as the Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and as an Editor of the Culture and Diversity Section for the Social and Personality Psychology Compass. Matsumoto is also an Editorial Board Member for Personality and Social Psychology Review, Asian Journal of Social Psychology, Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, Motivation and Emotion, and Cognition and Emotion. He holds a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley.
Carmen Medina
CARMEN MEDINA is the founder of MedinAnalytics, LLC. Carmen spent 32 years at the Central Intelligence Agency and is a recognized national and international expert on intelligence analysis, strategic thinking, and diversity of thought. She is the co-author of the best-selling book: Rebels At Work: A Handbook for Leading Change from Within. After leaving the CIA, she spent almost five years at Deloitte Federal Consulting. From 2005-2007 Carmen was part of the executive team that led the CIA's Analysis Directorate. She was a leader on diversity issues at the CIA, serving on equity boards at all organizational levels and across Directorates. She was the first CIA executive to conceptualize many IT applications now used by analysts, including online production, collaborative tools, and Intellipedia. Upon her retirement, Carmen received the Distinguished Career Intelligence Medal. While at Deloitte from 2011 - 2015, Carmen served as senior advisor and mentor to Deloitte's flagship innovation program, GovLab, and sponsored research projects on Bitcoin, Millennials, and the impact of the Internet of Things on government. She holds a B.A. degree in comparative government from the Catholic University of America.
Fran P. Moore
FRAN P. MOORE is president of FPM Consulting, LLC, which provides national security and intelligence insight, strategic analysis, learning expertise, and management consulting to private and public sector clients. She is network expert for the Cipher Brief, a digital news and analysis platform. She retired from the Central Intelligence Agency in 2015 as a senior executive with 32 years of leadership and intelligence analysis experience. She serves on the Board of Threat Deterrence Capital, advising its core business, Circinus, which serves the mission needs of the United States in the areas of defense, security, intelligence, and law enforcement. She also serves on INSA’s Security Policy Review Committee and AFCEA’s Intelligence Committee. She is a council member for Gerson Lehrman Group. Since 2014, Fran has served on the board of the intelligence community’s Studies in Intelligence. She was CIA’s Chair for Harvard’s Learning Innovations Lab from 2014 to 2015 and a senior ally for CIA’s LGBT affinity group. Among her many career recognitions, she received a Presidential Rank Award, Distinguished Executive in 2013. She holds B.A. degrees in international relations and political science from Elmira College.
Jonathan D. Moreno
JONATHAN D. MORENO (NAM) is the David and Lyn Silfen University Professor at the University of Pennsylvania where he is a Penn Integrates Knowledge (PIK) professor. He is also a professor of medical ethics and health policy, of history and sociology of science, and of philosophy. He has published a number of books including the latest Impromptu Man: J.L. Moreno and the Origins of Psychodrama, Encounter Culture, and the Social Network (2014), and The Body Politic (2011), Mind Wars (2012), and Undue Risk (2000). He is the U.S. member of the UNESCO International Bioethics Committee. He is a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress and he has served as an adviser to many governmental and non-governmental organizations. He received his Ph.D. in philosophy from Washington University in St. Louis and holds an honorary doctorate from Hofstra University.
Joy Rohde
JOY ROHDE is an assistant professor at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan. She is also a faculty member with the Science, Technology, and Society Program and the Department of History. Her work examines the relationship between the social and behavioral sciences and the American state from the late 19th century to the present. Her first book, Armed with Expertise: The Militarization of American Social Research during the Cold War (Cornell University Press, 2013), investigates the Cold War origins and contemporary consequences of Pentagon social research contracting for national security. She is currently working on a book project that explores how ideas about cybernetics and advances in computing impacted the social sciences, policy analysis, and national security in the United States since the 1960s. Prior to joining the Ford School, Rohde was an assistant professor of history at Trinity University, and she has held fellowships from the Miller Center of Public Affairs and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She received her Ph.D. in History and Sociology of Science from the University of Pennsylvania.
Jeffrey Taliaferro
JEFFREY W. TALIAFERRO is an associate professor of political science at Tufts University. His research and teaching focus on security studies, international relations theory, international history and politics, and United States foreign policy, intelligence, and national security. He is the author of Balancing Risks: Great Power Intervention in the Periphery (Cornell University Press, 2004), which won the American Political Science Association's Robert L. Jervis and Paul W. Schroeder Award for the Best Book in International History and Politics. He is co-author with Steven E. Lobell and Norrin P. Ripsman, of Neoclassical Realist Theory of International Politics (Oxford University Press, 2016) and co-editor with Lobell and Ripsman, of Neoclassical Realism, the State, and Foreign Policy (Cambridge University Press, 2009) and of The Challenge of Grand Strategy: The Great Powers and the Broken Balance between the World Wars (Cambridge University Press, 2012). He has been a member of the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency’s Historical Review Panel (HRP) since 2008. He earned a bachelor's degree in history and political science from Duke University and a Ph.D. in government from Harvard University.
Gregory F. Treverton
GREGORY F. TREVERTON is the former chairman of the National Intelligence Council. Previously, he directed the RAND Corporation’s Center for Global Risk and Security, and before that its Intelligence Policy Center and its International Security and Defense Policy Center, and he was associate dean of the Pardee RAND Graduate School. He has served in government for the first Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, handling Europe for the National Security Council and as vice chair of the National Intelligence Council, overseeing the writing of America's National Intelligence Estimates (NIEs). He has taught at Harvard and Columbia universities and been a Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Deputy Director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London. His latest books are Dividing Divided States, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014; and Beyond the Great Divide: Relevance and Uncertainty in National Intelligence and Science for Policy, (with Wilhelm Agrell), Oxford University Press, 2015. He holds a B.A. summa cum laude from Princeton University and a M.P.P (Master's in Public Policy) and Ph.D. in economics and politics from Harvard.
Jeremy M. Wolfe
JEREMY M. WOLFE is professor of ophthalmology and radiology at Harvard Medical School and head of the Visual Attention Lab at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He has extensive expertise in vision, binocular perception, visual attention, and cognitive science. His research focuses on visual search and visual attention with a particular interest in socially important search tasks in areas such as medical image perception (e.g. cancer screening), security (e.g. baggage screening), and intelligence. His work has developed the “Guided Search” (GS) model through several iterations. In recent years, he has become increasingly interested in the role of vision and attention in medical and security errors. He is editor-in-chief of Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications (CRPI). He is President of the Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Science (FABBS) and past-Chair of the Board of the Psychonomic Society. He received an A.B. in psychology from Princeton and his Ph.D. in psychology from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Committee Membership Roster Comments

Joseph Arvai resigned from the committee on 8/23/17
Mauro Guillen resigned from the committee on 11/14/17

Events


Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

This is a virtual committee meeting that is closed to the public.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Thelma Cox
Contact Email:  tcox@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1734

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Paul Sackett
Kathleen Carley
Nancy Cooke
Barbara Dosehr
Jeffrey Johnson
Sallie Keller
David Matsumoto
Carmen Medina
Joy Rohde
Jeffrey Taliaferro
Gregory Treverton
Jeremy Wolfe

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Final deliberations for consensus report.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Report draft

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 12, 2018
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Thelma Cox
Contact Email:  rwilson@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1734

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Paul Sackett
Kathleen Carley
Noshir Contractor
Nancy Cooke
Barbara Dosher
Jeffrey Johnson
Carmen Medina
Jonathan Moreno
Joy Rohde
Jeffrey Taliaferro
Gregory Treverton
Jeremy Wolfe

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Chapter by chapter review of report draft
Writing group breakout sessions to refine draft
Review of conclusions and recommendations
Meeting review and plans for finalizing report draft

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Briefing book containing:
Agenda
Statement of Task
Report draft
Revised chapter outlines

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
August 01, 2018
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Renee L. Wilson
Contact Email:  rwilson@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2145

Agenda
N/A - Meeting was closed in its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Paul Sackett
Kathleen Carley
Noshir Contractor
Nancy Cooke
Barbara Dosher
Jeffrey Johnson
Sallie Keller
Carmen Medina
Fran Moore
Jonathan Moreno
Joy Rohde
Jeffrey Taliaferro
Gregory Treverton
Jeremy Wolfe

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Review of draft outline and text
Developed findings, conclusions, and recommendations
Plans to complete report draft
Annual Bias/Conflict of Interest
Report review process

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Memo to the committee
Meeting agenda
Statement of task
Study timeline
Draft report outline
Draft report text
Outlines for commissioned papers

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
April 06, 2018
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Renee Wilson
Contact Email:  rwilson@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2145

Agenda
DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES AND EDUCATION

Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences

DECADAL SURVEY OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
FOR APPLICATIONS TO NATIONAL SECURITY

AGENDA
LEARNING FROM THE SCIENCE OF COGNITION AND PERCEPTION
FOR DECISION-MAKING: A WORKSHOP
January 24, 2018

Keck Center, First Floor
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC
Room 100

8:30 a.m. Workshop Registration Opens

9:00 a.m. Workshops Commence

9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview of Events
Sujeeta Bhatt, Study Director
Audience information
Paul Sackett, University of Minnesota, SBS Decadal Survey Chair
Welcome
William “Bruno” Millonig, Acting Director of National Intelligence for Science and Technology, Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Sponsor perspective and context for study and workshops

9:30 a.m. Opening Remarks
Jeremy Wolfe, Harvard Medical School, Workshop Committee Chair

9:35 a.m. Data and Analysis in the Intelligence Community
Thomas Fingar, Stanford University

Research Panel Presentations and Discussion

9:55 a.m. Panel 1: Forecasting and Anticipatory Thinking

This panel will discuss methods of improving the accuracy of human forecasts from large dispersed crowds. In addition, it will cover research on anticipatory thinking or mental simulations, planning, and preparing for events. What differentiates experts from novices in both of these domains? What aspects of these skills can be trained? How can people be prepared to forecast and think about a broad range of possible futures, especially low probability, high impact events?

How is research in this area likely to progress in the near future? What research questions need to be addressed? What new methodologies and tools are available?

Moderators: Sallie Keller, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Barbara Mellers, University of Pennsylvania
Title: Five Ways to Improve Forecasts
Gary Klein, Macrocognition
Title: Introduction to Anticipatory Thinking
Alyson Wilson, North Carolina State University
Title: Prediction and Anticipatory Thinking

10:45 a.m. Discussion and Q&A
Moderators, Presenters, and Members of the Committee on a Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security

11:45 a.m. LUNCH (cafeteria is on the 3rd floor or food trucks are on 7th St, NW between F and G Streets)

12:45 p.m. Panel 2: Trust

This panel will consider the state of the science on trust in three respects: What is known about an individual’s level of trust with respect to data and sources; with respect to automated analyses – output of machines and models; and with respect to people.

How is research in this area likely to progress in the near future? What research questions need to be addressed? What new methodologies and tools are available?

Moderators: Fran Moore, CENTRA Technology, Inc.

David Dunning, University of Michigan
Title: Interpersonal Trust: Current Findings and Mysteries
Roger Mayer, North Carolina State University
Title: The Importance of Interpersonal Trust: Now More than Ever
Adam Waytz, Northwestern
Title: Humans and Machines
Victoria Stodden, University of Illinois
Title: Trust in Research Findings

1:45 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
Moderators, Presenters, and Members of the Committee on a Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security

2:30 p.m. BREAK


2:45 p.m. Panel 3: Perceptual and cognitive constraints on and aids for analysis and presentation

This panel will consider the state of the science on perception and cognition as it applies toward how individuals make sense of information. How do they deal with massive amounts or high dimensional data? What techniques can be used to reduce or analyze data to information that can be used for anomaly detection or decision making? What is known about presentation to make information more memorable? Do certain forms of presentations play into people’s biases?

How is research in this area likely to progress in the near future? What research questions need to be addressed? What new methodologies and tools are available?

Moderators: Barbara Dosher, University of California, Irvine

Edward Awh, University of Chicago
Title: Capacity Limits in Online Memory and Attention
Danielle Albers Szafir, University of Colorado, Boulder
Title: Visualization and Perception across Scales
Remco Chang, Tufts University
Title: From Vision Science to Data Science: Applying Perception to Problems in Big Data
Peter L.T. Pirolli, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition
Title: Integrated Cognitive Models for Collaborative Human-AI Sensemaking

3:45 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
Moderators, Presenters, and Members of the Committee on a Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security

4:40 p.m. Closing Remarks from Workshop Committee
Jeremy Wolfe, Harvard Medical School, Workshop Committee Chair
Barbara Dosher, University of California, Irvine
Sallie Keller, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Fran Moore, CENTRA Technology, Inc.
Alyson Wilson, North Carolina State University


5:00 p.m. ADJOURN
________________________________________________________________________________________________

DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES AND EDUCATION

Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences

DECADAL SURVEY OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
FOR APPLICATIONS TO NATIONAL SECURITY

AGENDA (DRAFT, subject to change)
WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT AND INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS
FOR NATIONAL SECURITY PURPOSES:
A WORKSHOP
January 24, 2018

Keck Center
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC
Room 106

8:30 a.m. Workshop Registration Opens

9:00 a.m. Workshops Commence

9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview of Events
Sujeeta Bhatt, Study Director
Audience information
Paul Sackett, University of Minnesota, SBS Decadal Survey Chair
Welcome
William “Bruno” Millonig, Acting Director of National Intelligence for Science and Technology, Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Sponsor perspective and context for study and workshops

9:30 a.m. Opening Remarks
Noshir Contractor, Northwestern University, Workshop Committee Chair

9:35 a.m. Intelligence Analysis: Characteristics of the Workforce and Workload
Ted Clark, Analytic Director at CENTRA

9:55 a.m. Questions/Discussion with Dr. Clark


Research Panel Presentations and Discussion

10:00 a.m. Series 1: Building a Workforce

This series of presentations examines cutting-edge SBS research that can inform the building and professionalization of the analytic workforce. What does research show to be critical individual-level factors in recruitment and selection of analysts? How do individual differences contribute to team effectiveness? What factors matter in hiring for team success (selecting individuals who will later be assigned to teams - what makes someone generically effective as a team member, regardless of which team they are on)? How do you maximize the utility of training and professional development? How can leadership contribute to analyst skill acquisition, improve analytic outcome accuracy, and motivate the workforce? How is research in this area likely to progress in the near future? What research questions need to be addressed? What new methodologies and tools are available?

Moderator: Noshir Contractor, Workshop Committee Chair, Northwestern University

Topics to be covered:
Recruiting and Selecting the Workforce
Nancy Tippins, CEB Valtera
Title: Process for recruiting and selecting a workforce

Training the Workforce
Jill Ellingson, The University of Kansas

Motivation and Support of the Workforce through Organizational Leadership
Steve Zaccaro, Workshop Committee Member, George Mason University

11:00 a.m. Discussion and Q&A
Moderators, Presenters, and Members of the Committee on a Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security

11:45 p.m. LUNCH (cafeteria is on the 3rd floor or food trucks are on 7th St, NW between F and G Streets)

12:45 p.m. Series 2: Systems and Collaborations

This series of presentations will consider the state of the science on current challenges facing the analytical workforce. What are the strengths and limitations to the increased use of technology in intelligence analysis? What are some best practices regarding the use of artificial intelligence, automation, etc. for decision making? What is the latest state of the science on human-system collaborations? How to we maximize collaborative knowledge building within and across the IC? What factors matter in standing up an analytic team? What is the most effective way for analysts to communicate with each other and with decision makers? How is research in this area likely to progress in the near future? What research questions need to be addressed? What new methodologies and tools are available?

Moderator: Jonathan Moreno (NAM), Survey and Workshop Committee Member, University of Pennsylvania

Topics to be covered:

Human Systems Integration
Nancy Cooke, Survey and Workshop Committee Member, Arizona State University
Title: Integrating the Workforce into the National Security System

Collaborative Knowledge Building
Steve Fiore, University of Central Florida
Title: Developing team cognitive computing to augment collaborative knowledge building

Building a Team
Kara Hall, National Cancer Institute

The Challenge of Communication
Eric Eisenberg, University of South Florida

2:15 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
Moderators, Presenters, and Members of the Committee on a Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security

3:00 p.m. BREAK

3:15 p.m. Series 3: Trends in Workforce Development

We are living through a fundamental transformation in the way we work. Automation and ‘thinking machines’ are replacing human tasks and jobs, and changing the skills that organizations are looking for in their people. These momentous changes raise huge workforce challenges. The pace of change is accelerating. Workforce ‘talent’ no longer means the same as ten years ago; many of the roles, skills and job titles of tomorrow are unknown to us today. This set of presentations will consider the changing landscape of the workforce and utilization of technology in analysis. What are the most effective strategies to recruit and manage diverse (cognitively, experientially, etc.) talent? How is the global workforce changing? What challenges are on the horizon for the analytic workforce? How is research in this area likely to progress in the near future? What research questions need to be addressed? What new methodologies and tools are available?

Moderator: Gerald (Jay) Goodwin, Army Research Institute

How to Recruit Diverse Talent (and How to Manage Them)
Scott E. Page, University of Michigan
Title: What do we mean by diverse talent, and how do we leverage it?

Global Trends in Workforce Development (with an eye towards AI and Autonomous Systems)
Andrew Ysursa, Salesforce, Inc.
Title: Evolution of work: Thriving in an age of automation

AI and the Problem of Reproducibility in Science
Brian Uzzi, Northwestern University
Title: Expanding the consciousness of scientists with AI: The case of reproducibility in science

4:30 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
Moderators, Presenters, and Members of the Committee on a Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security


4:45 p.m. Closing Remarks
Noshir Contractor, Northwestern University, Workshop Committee Chair

5:00 p.m. ADJOURN

_________________________________________________________________________________________________
DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES AND EDUCATION

Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences

DECADAL SURVEY OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
FOR APPLICATIONS TO NATIONAL SECURITY

AGENDA (DRAFT – SUBJECT TO CHANGE)
UNDERSTANDING NARRATIVES FOR NATIONAL SECURITY PURPOSES: A WORKSHOP
January 24, 2018

Keck Center
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC
Room 101


8:30 a.m. Workshop Registration Opens

9:00 a.m. Workshops Commence

9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview of Events
Sujeeta Bhatt, Study Director
Audience information
Paul Sackett, University of Minnesota, SBS Decadal Survey Chair
Welcome
William “Bruno” Millonig, Acting Director of National Intelligence for Science and Technology, Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Sponsor perspective and context for study and workshops

9:30 a.m. Opening Remarks
Carmen Medina, MedinAnalytics LLC, Workshop Committee Chair

Research Panel Presentations and Discussion

9:35 a.m. Panel 1: Introduction to Narrative Research in the Social and Behavioral Sciences
Moderators: Jeffrey Johnson, University of Florida and Betty Sue Flowers, University of Texas, Austin

Speakers will present on the state-of-the-art in narrative studies and examine cutting-edge questions relevant to national security and intelligence analysis.

Roberto Franzosi, Emory University
Mark Turner, Case Western University
James Pennebaker, University of Texas, Austin
Michael Bamberg, Clark University


10:30 a.m. Audience Q&A

10:45 a.m. BREAK

10:55 a.m. Panel 2: Why Study Narrative? What is the comparative advantage of the study of narrative for national security? How might we study/track narratives comprehensively in real time?
Moderators: Carmen Medina, MedinAnalytics, LLC and David Matsumoto, San Francisco State University

Mark Turner, Case Western University
Pauline Cheong, Arizona State University
Michael Dahlstrom, Iowa State University


11:50 a.m. Audience Q&A

12:05 p.m. LUNCH (cafeteria is on 3rd floor & food trucks on 7th St, NW between F and G Streets)

1:05 p.m. Panel 3: How might artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies affect narratives and their formation? What is the impact of social media on the development and dissemination of narratives?
Moderators: Sara Cobb, MedinAnalytics, LLC and Doug Randall, Protagonist

Babak Rasolzadeh, Former Director of Data Science, Protagonist
Catherine Tejeda, Parenthetic
Michael Young, University of Utah


2:00 p.m. Audience Q&A

2:15 p.m. BREAK

2:25 p.m. Panel 4: What is the relation of narrative to power? How does narrative work as a tool for mobilization and intervention? How do different societies’ narratives vary and sometimes clash?
Moderators: Jeffrey Johnson, University of Florida and Sara Cobb, George Mason University

James Phelan, The Ohio State University
Michael Bamberg, Clark University
Deb Lavoy, Narrative Builders

3:20 p.m. Summative Comments
Karen Monaghan, Central Intelligence Agency (retired)
Josh Kerbel, National Intelligence Council (invited)


3:50 p.m. Audience Q&A


4:50 p.m. Closing Remarks
Carmen Medina, MedinAnalytics LLC, Workshop Committee Chair

5:00 p.m. ADJOURN

The Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security is conducted by the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences and sponsored by:
Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)

CROWD RELEASE: Please be aware that by entering this area, you consent to your voice and likeness being recorded for use on television and in any media now known or hereafter devised in perpetuity, and you release the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine from any liability due to such usages. If you do not wish to be subject to the foregoing, please do not enter this area.
Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security

_____________________________________________________________________
January 25, 2018
Open Session (Open to the Public)

9:00 a.m. Welcome & Study Introductions
• Barbara Wanchisen, Director, Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences
• Sujeeta Bhatt, Study Director, Brief welcome to the committee’s 4th meeting
• Paul Sackett, Committee Chair, University of Minnesota, Welcome sponsor

9:10 a.m. Discussion of the Workshops: Committee and Sponsor (sponsor by phone)
• William “Bruno” Millonig, Acting Director of National Intelligence for Science and Technology, Office of the Director of national Intelligence
• Paul Sackett, Committee Chair, University of Minnesota



Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Paul Sackett
Kathleen Carley
Noshir Contractor
Nancy Cooke
Barbara Dosher
Jeffrey Johnson
Sallie Keller
David Matsumoto
Carmen Medina
Fran Moore
Jonathan Moreno
Joy Rohde
Jeffrey Taliaferro
Gregory Treverton
Jeremy Wolfe

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Primary messages for the report
Review of Committee’s Approach/Structuring the Messages
Discussion of information collected
Discussion of Report Structure
Assessment of Progress
Discussion of Next Steps and Writing Assignments

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Memo to the Committee
Agenda (Workshops and Committee Meeting)
Biographies of Presenters
Approved Statement of Task
Study Timeline
Notes from 3rd meeting
The IC Challenges
Criteria for topic selection
Updated draft report outline
Sample report models
Status of topic development
Recap of workshop topics and presenters
Statement of task for commissioned papers
Committee Roster
Committee Biographies
Committee Generated Text


Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
February 01, 2018
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Thelma Cox
Contact Email:  tcox@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1734

Agenda
Committee on a Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences and Applications to National Security

PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

October 11-13, 2017
Keck Center of the National Academies
500 Fifth St. N.W., Rooms 201, 206 & 208
Washington, D.C.

October 11 - three separate public workshops

(Common welcome)
9:00 a.m. Welcome and Overview of Events
* Sujeeta Bhatt, Study Director
* Paul Sackett, Chair
* David Honey, Director of Science and Technology, ODNI, Study Sponsor

Keck room 201 - Leveraging Advances in Social Network Thinking for National Security: A Workshop

9:30 a.m. Opening Remarks on the Future of Social Network Thinking
* Kathleen Carley, Carnegie Mellon University, Workshop Committee Chair

Research Panel Presentations and Discussion

9:45 a.m. Panel 1: Networks Plus – Beyond the Individual

Moderators: Kathleen Carley, Carnegie Mellon University and Matthew Brashears, University of South Carolina

* Leslie DeChurch, Northwestern University
Title: Organizing in Teams
* Zachary Neal, Michigan State University
Title: The Future of Urban Network Research
* Regina Joseph, New York University
Title: Super-synthesizers: Confronting the Coming Analytical Crisis in an Age of Influence
* Guido Cervone, Pennsylvania State University
Title: Use of Crowdsourced Data during Emergencies

10:35 a.m. Response to Presentations
* Randolph H. Pherson, Pherson Associates, LLC

10:45 a.m. Discussion and Q&A
Moderators, Presenters, and Members of the Committee on a Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security

11:45 a.m. LUNCH

12:45 a.m. Panel 2: Networks Plus – Within the Individual
Moderators: Noshir Contractor, Northwestern University and Emily Falk, University of Pennsylvania

* Carolyn Parkinson, University of California, Los Angeles
* Emily Falk, University of Pennsylvania (virtual presenter)
* Jesse Hoey, University of Waterloo
Title: Emotional Artificial Intelligence in Socio-Technical Systems
* Kenny Joseph, Northeastern University
Title: Studying Identities and their Impact on Networks using Social Media data

1:35 p.m. Response to Presentations
* Randolph H. Pherson, Pherson Associates, LLC

1:45 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
Moderators, Presenters, and Members of the Committee on a Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security

2:30 p.m. BREAK

2:45 p.m. Panel 3: Multi-Level, High-Dimensional Evolving and Emerging Networks
Moderators: Noshir Contractor, Northwestern University and Markus Mobius, Microsoft

* Hsinchun Chen, University of Arizona
* Benjamin Golub, Harvard University
* Alexander Volfovsky, Duke University

3:35 p.m. Response to Presentations
* Randolph H. Pherson, Pherson Associates, LLC

3:45 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
Moderators, Presenters, and Members of the Committee on a Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences for Applications to National Security

4:30 p.m. Summative Comments
* Scott Feld, Purdue University

4:50 p.m. Closing Remarks
* Kathleen Carley, Carnegie Mellon University, Workshop Committee Chair

Keck 206 - Changing Socio-Cultural Dynamics and Implications for National Security: A Workshop

9:30 a.m. Workshop Welcome and Ethical Considerations for SBS Research in Support of National Security
* Jeffrey Johnson, University of Florida; Workshop Steering Committee Chair; SBS Decadal Survey Committee Member
* Joy Rohde, University of Michigan; SBS Decadal Survey Committee Member; Workshop Steering Committee Member

9:45 a.m. Linking Culture, Language, Behavior, and Data
Susan Weller, University of Texas Medical Branch; Session Moderator; Workshop Steering Committee Member

* Dan Kahan, Yale University
* William Dressler, University of Alabama
* Dhiraj Murthy, University of Texas, Austin

10:45 a.m. BREAK

11:00 a.m. Linking Culture, Language, Behavior and Data Panel Discussion
Susan Weller, Moderator

11:45 a.m. LUNCH

12:45 p.m. Cultural, Linguistic, and Behavioral Research and the Triangulation of Data
Mark Liberman, University of Pennsylvania; Session Moderator; Workshop Steering Committee Member

* Joe Labianca, University of Kentucky
* David Broniatowski, George Washington University
Title: Surveys, Laboratory Experiments, and Social Media: Better Together
* Philip Resnik, University of Maryland, College Park

1:45 p.m. Cultural, Linguistic, and Behavioral Research and the Triangulation of Data Panel Discussion
Mark Liberman, Moderator

2:30 p.m. BREAK

2:45 p.m. Cultural, Linguistic, and Behavioral Research and the Challenge of Multiple Levels of Analysis
David Matsumoto, San Francisco State University; Session Moderator; SBS Decadal Survey Committee Member; Workshop Steering Committee Member

* Gwyneth Sutherlin, Human Geography and Analytics Research
* Michele Gelfand, University of Maryland, College Park
* Jesse A. Egbert, Northern Arizona University

3:45 p.m. Cultural, Linguistic, and Behavioral Research and the Challenge of Multiple Levels of Analysis Panel Discussion
David Matsumoto, Moderator

4:30 p.m. Roundtable Discussion of Presentations and Wrap Up
* Jeffrey Johnson, SBS Decadal Survey Committee Member; Workshop Steering Committee Member

Keck room 208 - Emerging Trends and Methods in International Security: A Workshop

9:30 a.m. Opening Remarks on the Emerging Trends and Methods in International Security
* Jeffrey Taliaferro, Tufts University; SBS Decadal Survey Committee Member; Workshop Steering Committee Member

Research Panel Presentations and Discussion

9:40 a.m. Panel 1: Reputation, Power, and Status
Jeffrey Taliaferro, Session Moderator

* Steven Ward, Cornell University
* Deborah Larson, University of California, Los Angeles
* Amanda Murdie, University of Georgia

10:25 a.m. Response to Presentations
* Suzanne Fry, National Intelligence Council

10:35 a.m. Moderated Open Discussion

11:05 a.m. Panel 2: Strategic Use of Information
Sumit Ganguly, Indiana University; Session Moderator; Workshop Steering Committee Member

* Herb Lin, Stanford University (virtual speaker)
* Jacklyn Kerr, Stanford University
* Richard J. Harknett, University of Cincinnati

11:50 a.m. Response to Presentations
* Suzanne Fry, National Intelligence Council

12:00 p.m. Moderated Open Discussion

12:30 p.m. LUNCH

1:30 p.m. Panel 3: Forecasting Methods and Topics
Sumit Ganguly, Session Moderator

* Kacey Ernst, Arizona University (virtual speaker)
* Afreen Siddiqi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
* Jennifer Dresden, Georgetown University
* Christopher Gelpi, The Ohio State University

2:30 p.m. Response to Presentations
* Suzanne Fry, National Intelligence Council

2:40 p.m. Moderated Open Discussion

3:10 p.m. BREAK

3:25 p.m. Methodology
* Andrew Bennett, Georgetown University; Workshop Steering Committee Member

3:45 p.m. Panel 4: Discussant Panel
Andrew Bennett, Session Moderator

* James Goldgeier, American University
* Sean Lynn-Jones, Harvard University
* William R. Thompson, Indiana University

4:45 p.m. Closing Remarks
* Jeffrey Taliaferro

5:00 p.m. ADJOURN

OCTOBER 12
Keck 201

9:00 a.m. Welcome & Study Introductions
* Barbara Wanchisen, Director, Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences
* Sujeeta Bhatt, Study Director
* Paul Sackett, Committee Chair, University of Minnesota

9:15 a.m. Discussion of the Workshops: Committee and Sponsor
* David Honey, Director of Science and Technology, Office of the Director of National Intelligence
* Paul Sackett, Committee Chair, University of Minnesota

9:45 a.m. Other Federal Programs and the SBS Decadal Survey
* Howard C. Nusbaum, Division Director (SBE/BCS), National Science Foundation
* Adam Russell, Program Manager, Next Generation Social Science, DARPA

10:15 a.m. Discussion and Q&A with committee

10:45 a.m. BREAK

11:00 a.m. Other Federal Programs and the SBS Decadal Survey
* Lisa Troyer, Army Research Office, Acting Director, Minerva Research Initiative
* Other TBD

11:30 a.m. Discussion and Q&A with committee

12pm END OPEN SESSION

OCTOBER 13
Keck 201

11:50 a.m. Other Federal Programs and the SBS Decadal Survey
* Jason Matheny, Director, IARPA

12:10 p.m. Discussion and Q&A with committee

12:30pm END OPEN SESSION

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Paul Sackett
Gary Berntson
Kathleen Carley
Noshir Contractor
Barbara Dosher
Jeffrey Johnson
David Matsumoto
Carmen Medina
Joy Rohde
Jeffrey Taliaferro
Jeremy Wolfe

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Review of the workshops
Discussion of report framework
Refinement of review criteria for report topics and cited research
Discussion of January 2018 workshop topics
Development of committee writing assignments
Planned for future meetings

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Agenda, roster, member bios, and travel information
Statement of Task
Highlights from the Academies’ report “Value of SBE to National Priorities”
Summary of projects supported by IARPA, DARPA, MINERVA, NSF (SBE/BCS)
Notes from meeting #2
Information on Town Halls (IdeaBuzz and SRA)
Possible options for report framework
Rough text for report

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
October 25, 2017
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

J. Erik Jonsson Woods Hole Center
314 Quissett Ave.
Woods Hole, Massachusetts
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Thelma Cox
Contact Email:  tcox@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1734

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

In Person:
Paul Sackett
Gary Berntson
Kathleen Carley
Nancy Cooke
Noshir Contractor
Jeffrey Johnson
David Matsumoto
Carmen Medina
Jonathan Moreno
Jeffrey Taliaferro
Gregory Treverton
Jeremy Wolfe

By Phone/WebEx:
Joy Rohde


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Review of the statement of task
Discussion of the white papers submitted in response to the calls for white papers
Committee conflicts of interest and bias discussion
Identification of workshop topics (1: Culture, Language, and Behavior; 2: Political/strategic reasoning; 3: Networks; 4: Sensory, Cognitive, and Decision Sciences; 5: Workforce Development; 6: Narratives)
Planned for future meetings

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Agenda, roster, member bios, and travel information
Statement of Task
Summary of White Papers for both Calls 1 and

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 12, 2017
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
n/a
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Hannah During
Contact Email:  hhduring@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1511

Agenda
Committee on a Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences and Applications to National Security

PUBLIC MEETING AGENDA

March 23, 2017
Keck Center of the National Academies
500 Fifth St. N.W., Room 105 & 106
Washington, D.C.

9:15 a.m. Welcome & Study Introductions
• Barbara Wanchisen, Director, Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences
- Welcome and Brief Introduction to the National Academies
• Sujeeta Bhatt, Study Director, Social and Behavioral Sciences for National Security: A Decadal Survey
- Open session rules
• Paul Sackett, Committee Chair, University of Minnesota
- Introduction of Committee Members, Sponsor, Staff, and Attendees
- Introduction of Sponsor

9:40 a.m. Sponsor Perspective
• David Honey, Director of Science and Technology, Office of the Director of National Intelligence
- Charge & expectations of the consensus report

10:00 a.m. Reflections on the October 2016 Summit
• Sallie Keller, Biocomplexity Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

10:15 a.m. Nature & Expectations of a Decadal Survey
• Roger D. Blandford, School of Humanities and Sciences, Stanford University

10:45 a.m. Break

11:00 a.m. Framing the Issues: Challenges Facing National Security and Intelligence Analysts
- What are some of the challenges faced by analysts within the intelligence and national security communities with respect to utilizing SBS research?
- How can this decadal survey best explore the use of social and behavioral science to address the needs of analysts?
• Rita Bush, National Security Agency
• Charles R. Gaukel, National Intelligence Council
• George Gerliczy, Office of Strategic Programs, Central Intelligence Agency
• Nancy Hayden, Sandia National Laboratories

12:00 p.m. Follow-up Questions & Comments
• Paul Sackett, Committee Chair, Facilitator

12:15 p.m. Break for Lunch*
*The webcast will pause during lunch and the CREST presentation and resume at the beginning of the SBS Research Panel (1:45 p.m.).

1:15 p.m. Research for Analysis
- What are some of the challenges faced by analysts within the national security and intelligence communities?
- In what ways, can and does research in social and behavioral sciences support the work of analysts?
• Emma Barrett, Centre for Research and Evidence on Security Threats (CREST)
• Presenter to be confirmed

1:45 p.m. Research Panel (Webcast resumes)
- How does research in political science and social and political psychology provide insight into issues of national security and/or intelligence analysis?
- What are future directions for SBS research?
• Bear Braumoeller, The Ohio State University
• Sarah Croco, University of Maryland
• Michael Desch, University of Notre Dame

2:45 p.m. Break

3:00 p.m. Research Panel (Continued)
- How does research in political science and social and political psychology provide insight into issues of national security and/or intelligence analysis?
- What are future directions of SBS research?
• Ian McCulloh, Johns Hopkins University of Applied Physics Lab
• Leah Windsor, The University of Memphis

4:00 p.m. Panelist Discussion
• How can the science provide an interdisciplinary approach to addressing IC challenges?

4:30 p.m. Meeting Open for Public Comments

5:00 p.m. Closing Comments
• Paul Sackett, Committee Chair

5:15 p.m. Adjourn Open Session

CROWD RELEASE: Please be aware that this meeting will be webcast. By entering the meeting room, you consent to your voice and likeness being recorded for use on television and in any media now known or hereafter devised in perpetuity, and you release the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine from any liability due to such usages. If you wish to remain off camera, please sit in the overflow room in Keck 106.

The Decadal Survey of Social and Behavioral Sciences and Applications to National Security is conducted by the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences and sponsored by: Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI)
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

In Person:
Paul Sackett
Joseph Arvai
Gary Berntson
Nancy Cooke
Barbara Dosher
Jeffrey Johnson
Sallie Keller
Carmen Medina
Fran Moore
Joy Rohde
Jeffrey Taliaferro
Jeremy Wolfe

By Phone/WebEx:
Noshir Contractor
Mauro Guillen


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

• Orientation on the NAS consensus study process
• Committee conflict of interest and bias discussion
• Discussed statement of task and project timeline
• Reviewed information gained from summit and March 23 presentations and first round of white papers
• Planned for second call for white papers
• Planned for future meetings

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

• Agenda, roster, member bios, and travel information
• Journal articles related to social and behavioral sciences and national security


Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
April 04, 2017
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications