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Project Information

Project Information


Review of Planetary Protection Policy Development Processes


Project Scope:

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine will appoint an ad hoc committee to carry out a study that will describe how international and national planetary protection policy has been formulated and adopted and identify associated lessons to inform future policy development. Specifically, the committee will assess the current state of planetary protection policy development, and the extent to which the current policy-making process is responsive to the present state of science, technology, and engineering, including biological science, as well as the exploration interests of state and non-state actors. The committee's review will lead to recommendations on how to assure the planetary protection policy process is supportive of future scientific and societal interests, as well as spaceflight missions.

It is suggested that the committee organize its review around three themes:

  • Historical context and the current policy development process--including a working definition of planetary protection and its goals;
  • Key factors in the current policy development process; and
  • The future of the policy development process.

Historical Context and the Current Policy Development Process--including a working definition of planetary protection and its goals


In addressing this theme, the committee should consider the following questions and formulate lessons learned where appropriate:
  • How has the planetary protection policy development process evolved over the course of lunar and planetary exploration? What approaches to planetary protection policy development were used in the Apollo and Viking eras of solar system exploration, and subsequent Mars exploration? What factors informed and drove those choices? 
  • What worthwhile lessons can policymakers take from the history of planetary protection policy development in looking toward future exploration and sample return missions? 
  • Who are the actors involved in the present-day planetary protection policy development process? What are the respective roles and responsibilities of international organizations, national organizations and national space agencies (including agencies' planetary protection officers), advisory committees, and others in the process? 
  • What scientific, technical, philosophical, and/or ethical assumptions and values about the importance of avoiding forward contamination of extraterrestrial planetary environments are prioritized in the current planetary protection policy development process? 
  • What scientific, technical, philosophical, and ethical assumptions and values about the importance of protecting Earth and its environment (“backward contamination”) are prioritized in the current planetary protection policy development process? 
  • How does the current process take into account new scientific and technical knowledge?
  • How does the state of scientific understanding of planetary environments and their ability to harbor life inform the current planetary protection policy development process? What scientific knowledge or exploration interests are not taken into account?
  • How does the current planetary protection policy development process balance interest in acquiring scientific knowledge of planetary environments to inform future scientific studies, exploration, and planetary protection policy choices with the interest in protecting those environments in the here-and-now?

Key Factors in the Current Policy Development Process


In addressing this theme, the committee should consider the following questions and formulate recommendations as appropriate:
  • To what extent does the current process consider the interests of state and non-state actors in exploring planetary environments, including obligations under Article VI of the Outer Space Treaty?
  • How does the current process reconcile uncertainties in knowledge, differences between scientific and other exploration interests, as well as potentially competing interests? 
  • What are the barriers, or challenges, that inhibit the process of effective planetary protection policy development? 
The Future of the Policy Development Process

Looking at both historical and contemporary approaches to planetary protection policy development, the committee should make recommendations about the future of planetary protection policy process development in relation to these questions:
  • How could the planetary protection policy development process be made more adaptable to the evolving landscape of knowledge about and myriad interests in planetary environments? 
  • How can a planetary protection regulatory environment in the U.S. government be established and evolve to keep pace with non-governmental spacefaring entities? 
  • How does a future process evaluate the state of the art and what technologies are required to ensure compliance with planetary protection policy for future missions? 
  • What risk assessment and/or quality control principles should be applied to ensure that a future process takes into account our understanding of the capabilities of Earth organisms and the potential for extraterrestrial life to be encountered by planetary missions? 

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-SSB-16-01

Project Duration (months): 24 month(s)

RSO: Smith, David

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Space Studies Board DEPS

Topic(s):

Space and Aeronautics
Policy for Science and Technology


Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 03/02/2017

Mr. Joseph K. Alexander - (Chair)
JOSEPH K. ALEXANDER is a consultant in science and technology policy at Alexander Space Policy Consultants. He was a senior program officer with the National Academies Space Studies Board (SSB) from 2005 until 2013, and he served as SSB director from 1998 until November 2005. Prior to joining the Academies, he was deputy assistant administrator for science in EPA’s Office of Research and Development where he coordinated a broad spectrum of environmental science and led strategic planning. From 1993 to 1994, he was associate director of space sciences at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and served concurrently as acting chief of the Laboratory for Extraterrestrial Physics. From 1987 until 1993, he was assistant associate administrator at NASA’s Office of Space Science and Applications where he coordinated planning and provided oversight of all scientific research programs. He also served from 1992 to 1993 as acting director of life sciences. Prior positions have included deputy NASA chief scientist, senior policy analyst at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and research scientist at the Goddard Space Flight Center. His research interests were in radio astronomy and space physics. He has a B.A. and M.A. in physics from the College of William and Mary. He has served on the Academies Committee on the Review of NASA's Planetary Science Division's Restructured Research and Analysis Programs.
Dr. John R. Casani

JOHN R. CASANI (NAE) is a consultant who is retired from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He has managed several major flight projects, including Voyager, Galileo, and Cassini. He is a recipient of several NASA awards, including the Distinguished Service Medal. He received the AIAA Space System Award, the von Karman Lectureship, the National Space Club Astronauts Engineer Award, the American Astronautical Society’s Space Flight Award, and the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s Lifetime Achievement Award. He held senior project positions on many of the Mariner missions to Mars and Venus and in 1970 became project manager of Mariner 6 and 7. Later, Dr. Casani would project-manage NASA’s Voyager mission to the outer planets, Galileo mission to Jupiter, and Cassini mission to Saturn, as well as the proposed Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter mission. He is a member of the NAE and an honorary member of the AIAA. Dr. Casani holds a B.S. in electrical engineering and an honorary D.Sc. from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and an honorary degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Rome, Italy. He has previously served on the Academies’ Entry, Descent, and Landing Panel of the NASA Technology Roadmap and the Giant Planets Panel of the Planetary Science Decadal Survey.

Dr. Leroy Chiao
LEROY CHIAO is co-founder and CEO of One Orbit, LLC. He is a former NASA astronaut and International Space Station commander. He works in business, consulting, executive coaching and space education. He is a professional international speaker, and as co-founder and the CEO of OneOrbit, provides keynotes and training to companies and schools. Dr. Chiao also holds appointments at Rice University and the Baylor College of Medicine, and is an advisor to the Houston Association for Space and Science Education. He has worked in both government and commercial space programs, and has held leadership positions in commercial ventures and NASA. Dr. Chiao left NASA following a 15-year career with the agency. A veteran of four space missions, he most served as Commander and NASA Science Officer of Expedition 10 aboard the International Space Station. He has logged over 229 days in space—over 36 hours of which were spent in Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA, or spacewalks). He has served on the White House appointed Review of U.S. Human Spaceflight Plans Committee, and currently serves on the Human Exploration and Operations Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. As a space station commander and space shuttle mission specialist, Dr. Chiao was also a certified co-pilot of the Russian Soyuz spacecraft. He is an expert in all facets of U.S. and Russian EVA hardware and operations and is EVA certified in U.S. and Russian spacesuits, tools, and training programs. He became the first American to visit China’s Astronaut Research and Training Center. There, he met the first two national Chinese astronauts, Yang Liwei and Fei Junlong. Dr. Chiao is a fellow of the Explorers Club, and a member of the International Academy of Astronautics and the Committee of 100. Dr. Chiao studied Chemical Engineering, earning a B.S. from the University of California, Berkeley and an M.S. and Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has not previously served on an Academies committee.
Mr. David P. Fidler
DAVID P. FIDLER is the James Louis Calamaras Professor of Law at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law and an adjunct senior fellow for Cybersecurity at the Council of Foreign Relations. Professor Fidler works on international law and global governance across many policy areas, including cyberspace, global health, trade and investment, environmental protection, weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and national/international security. His current research focuses on various aspects of national and international cybersecurity, including policy efforts to establish deterrence in cybersecurity policies. He is the recipient of a Fulbright New Century Scholar Award. He earned his Juris Doctor from Harvard Law School. He served as a member of the National Academies’ Committee on Dual-Use Research of Concern: Options for Future Management, the Organizing Committee for the Workshop on the H5N1 Research Controversy and Dual-Use Research, and the Committee on Achieving Sustainable Global Capacity for Surveillance and Response to Emerging Diseases of Zoonotic Origin.
Ms. Joanne Gabrynowicz
JOANNE I. GABRYNOWICZ is a professor emerita of space law and editor-in-chief emerita at the University of Mississippi at the Journal of Space Law. She is a visiting professor at the Beijing Institute of Technology School of Law. Dr. Gabrynowicz advises the U.S. government and the U.N. on space law. Dr. Gabrynowicz has taught space law for 30 years. She taught at the University of North Dakota and the University of Mississippi. She is a guest lecturer at universities around the world and the author of numerous articles. Dr. Gabrynowicz is the recipient of a number of awards in the field, including Women In Aerospace’s Outstanding International Award and the International Institute of Space Law’s Lifetime Achievement award. Prior to her academic career, Dr. Gabrynowicz was the managing attorney of a New York City law firm. She is a member of the American Bar Association Forum on Aviation and Space Law and a director of the International Institute of Space Law. She earned her Juris Doctor from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law of Yeshiva University. Dr. Gabrynowicz served on the National Academies’ Committee on the Assessment of NASA’s Orbital Debris Programs.
Mr. G. Scott Hubbard
G. SCOTT HUBBARD is an adjunct professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University, the director emeritus of the Stanford Center of Excellence for Commercial Space Transportation (COE CST) and the editor-in-chief of the peer-reviewed journal New Space. He has been engaged in space-related research as well as program, project, and executive management for more than 40 years including 20 years with NASA - culminating as director of NASA’s Ames Research Center. At Stanford, his research interests include the study of both human and robotic exploration of space with a particular focus on technology and missions for planetary exploration, especially Mars. Examples include novel hybrid propulsion for applications such as a Mars Ascent Vehicle and drilling techniques for a future Mars sample return mission. He served as NASA’s first Mars program director and successfully restructured the entire Mars program in the wake of mission failures. His award-winning book entitled, “Exploring Mars: Chronicles from a Decade of Discovery”, describes his work on NASA’s Mars Program. He previously served as the sole NASA representative on the Columbia Accident Investigation Board and directed the impact testing that established the definitive physical cause of the accident. He was the founder of NASA’s Astrobiology Institute; conceived the Mars Pathfinder mission with its airbag landing and was the manager for NASA’s highly successful Lunar Prospector Mission. Prior to joining NASA, he was a staff scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and directed a high-tech start-up company. He has received eight NASA medals, including NASA’s highest award, the Distinguished Service Medal. He currently chairs the SpaceX Commercial Crew Safety Advisory Panel and serves on the NASA Advisory Council as an at-large member. He has received several honorary doctorates and earned his B.A. in physics and astronomy at Vanderbilt University. He has served on the National Academies’ Committee on Planetary Science Decadal Survey: 2013-2022, the Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Science (CAPS), and the Committee on the Review of NASA’s Planetary Science Division’s Research and Analysis Programs.
Dr. Eugene H. Levy
EUGENE H. LEVY is the Andrew Hays Buchanan Professor of Astrophysics in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Rice University. Dr. Levy’s research interests focus on theoretical cosmic physics, with emphasis on elucidating mechanisms and processes that underlie physical phenomena in planetary and astrophysical systems. His research also includes the generation and influences of magnetic fields in natural bodies, including the Earth, Sun, and planets, the theory of cosmic rays, and the theory of physical processes associated with the formation of the solar system, stars and other planetary systems. Prior to joining Rice University, Dr. Levy served in various capacities at the University of Arizona, including - dean of the College of Science, head of the Planetary Science Department and director of the Lunar & Planetary Laboratory, and professor of Planetary Science. He has won multiple awards including the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung Senior Scientist Award by the Federal Republic of Germany, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Distinguished Leadership Award through the University of Arizona, and NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal. Dr. Levy received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago. He has served on various committees at the National Academies including the Committee for US-USSR Workshop on Planetary Sciences, the ad hoc Panel on Mars Sample Return, and the Planetary and Lunar Exploration Task Group.
Dr. Norine E. Noonan
NORINE E. NOONAN is a professor of biological science at the University of South Florida (USF) at St. Petersburg. Her research includes science and technology policy in the government sector, specifically with regards to space science. Dr. Noonan has over thirty years of experience serving in both the public and academic sector as the vice chancellor for Academic Affairs at USF – St. Petersburg, dean in the School of Sciences and Math at the College of Charleston, and the branch chief of the Science and Space office at the Office of Management and Budget. Her professional activities have included membership on six NSF Advisory Committees, two of which she chaired. She has also served as an expert reviewer for EPSCoR and INBRE programs in two states. In October of 2005, she received the NASA Public Service Medal, the highest civilian honor the agency can bestow. Dr. Noonan received her Ph.D. in cell biology and biochemistry from Princeton University. She has served on the National Academies Committee on the Assessment of Solar System Exploration and the Board on Radioactive Waste Management.
Dr. Kenneth Olden
KENNETH OLDEN is a retired from the Environmental Protection Agemcy. He is an environmental risk assessor who was director of the National Center for Envronmental Assessment and Human Health Risk Assessment Research Program at the Environmental Protection Agency. Prior to that he was the founding dean of a new School of Public Health on the Hunter College campus of the City University of New York. He also served as director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the Nation Toxicology Program (NTP) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In 1977, he became the first African American to be awarded tenure and the rank of independent investigator at the NIH. He held several positions at the Howard University Cancer Center, including director, professor and chairman of the Department of Oncology. Dr. Olden has received numerous awards including - the Presidential Distinguished Executive Rank Award from President William J. Clinton, the Presidential Meritorious Executive Rank Award, the Calver Award, the Sedgwick Medal, and the Julius B. Richmond Award. Dr. Olden received a Ph.D. in cell biology and biochemistry from Temple University. He served as chair of the National Academies’ Medical Follow-up Agency Advisory Committee.
Dr. Francois Raulin
FRANCOIS RAULIN is professor emeritus at Université Paris Est Créteil, and develops his research at LISA (Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques). His scientific fields of interest are related to planetology & exo/astrobiology, including the planetary protection aspects: studies of organic chemistry in extraterrestrial environments (Titan, giant planets, comets and Mars) using complementary approaches: laboratory experiments (experimental simulations, IR and UV spectral data, analytical techniques by GC, GC-MS and Pyr-GC-MS) ; theoretical modeling (using microphysics, kinetics, and thermodynamics); observational data : remote sensing (IR) and in situ (GC-MS) space exploration. He was a research fellow at Carl Sagan’s Laboratory, Cornell University an assistant professor at University Paris Val de Marne and a CNRS/NSF post-doctoral fellow at Cyril Ponnamperuma’s Laboratory of Chemical Evolution, University of Maryland. He later became full professor at University Paris 12, where he developed his researches at PCOS (Space Organic Physical Chemistry) group of LISA, Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques. Awards include ESA Award for Outstanding contribution to the Huygens probe , NASA Group Achievement Award, the Cassini Programme Interdisciplinary Scientist, Cassini GC-MS Team Cassini ACP Team, Cassini CIRS Team - ISSOL Fellow Award- Chevalier, and then officier des palmes académiques - Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur. He was director of LISA and director of the federation of CNRS laboratories in Exobiology (GDR Exobio). He was president of SFE (French Society of Exobiology). He was chair of the Planetary Protection WG of ESA . He is co-investigator of CIRS (Cassini), ACP and GC-MS (Huygens). He is also IDS of the Cassini-Huygens mission (Titan's Chemistry and Exobiology) and is co-investigator of the COSAC and COSIMA experiments of the Rosetta European cometary mission. He is deputy team Leader of the MOMA experiment of the ExoMars mission. He is member of the Planetary Protection WG of ESA and, of HESAC(ESA Human spaceflight and Exploration Science Advisory Committee). He received his Doctorat d'Etat (on the role of sulphur in prebiotic chemistry) from the Université Paris 6.
Dr. Gary Ruvkun
GARY RUVKUN (NAS, NAM) is professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, MA. Dr. Ruvkun’s laboratory identified the first microRNA that is conserved across animal phylogeny including humans. Thousands of microRNAs have subsequently been discovered. Dr. Ruvkun has also explored how bacterial attacks on animals are surveilled and countermeasures are deployed. Using comparative genomics, Dr. Ruvkun’s laboratory has been exploring the few hundred genes that are universal to all known life on Earth, inherited from a common ancestor over the past 3-4 billion years. Meteoritic exchange between Earth and Mars may have innoculated both planets with related ancestral organisms, allowing the sophisticated DNA technology of genomics to be marshalled to the detection of life on Mars. To this end, Ruvkun is collaborating with Chris Carr and Maria Zuber at MIT on a NASA MATISSE project to engineer a DNA sequencing instrument that will be deployed to other planets to search for life that is ancestrally related to life on Earth. Dr. Ruvkun’s honors and awards include the National Academy of Sciences, the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research (with Victor Ambros and David Baulcombe), the Dan David Prize for Aging research (with Cynthia Kenyon), the Wolf Prize (with Victor Ambros), the Gruber Prize (with Victor Ambros and David Baulcombe), and the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences. Dr. Ruvkun has a PhD in biophysics from Harvard University. He has served on the National Academies’ Committee on the Origins and Evolution of Life and the Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Science and is currently serving on the planning committee for Searching for Life Across Space and Time: A Workshop.
Mr. Mark P. Saunders
MARK P. SAUNDERS is an independent consultant. Since retiring from NASA, he has been consulting to various NASA offices providing program/project management and systems engineering expertise. This has included support to the Office of Chief Engineer, the Office of Independent Program and Cost Evaluation, the Mars Program and the Science Office for Mission Assessments (at Langley Research Center). He has participated in the rewriting of NASA’s policy on program/project management; advised and supported the Agency’s independent program/project review process; and has supported the review of various programs and projects. At NASA Headquarters he served as director of the independent program assessment office, where he was responsible for enabling the independent review of the Agency’s programs and projects at life cycle milestones to ensure the highest probability of mission success. At NASA’s Langley Research Center he was initially the deputy director and then the director, Space Access and Exploration Program Office (SAEPO) and had the responsibility for planning, directing and coordinating the center's research, technology, and flight programs for advanced aerospace transportation and human/robotic exploration systems. Prior to this he was the manager of Exploration Programs and led all LaRC space exploration research and development activities supporting the agency’s Aerospace Technology (AST), Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) and Space Science Enterprises (SSE). At the office of space science he served as program manager for the Discovery Program, and at the space station freedom program operations he served as special assistant to the deputy director. He received the Presidential Meritorious Rank Award, Outstanding Performance awards, and multiple NASA Outstanding Leadership Medals. He earned his B.A. at the Georgia Institute of Technology in industrial engineering. He has served on the National Academies’ Committee on Astrobiology and Planetary Science.
Dr. Beth A. Simmons
BETH A. SIMMONS (NAS) is the Andrea Mitchell University Professor of Law and Political Science in the Department of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania. Her area of expertise is primarily in international relations, international law, and international political economy, with her most current research interests include the ways in which international institutions shape and are shaped by domestic political system, and global performance assessments as informal governance mechanisms in international affairs. Prior to joining the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Simmons was a professor of international affairs at Harvard University, director of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University, and president of the International Studies Association. Dr. Simmons received the American Political Science Association’s Woodrow Wilson Award for best book published in the United States on government, politics, or international affairs for two of her books: Who Adjusts? Domestic Sources of Foreign Economic Policy During the Interwar Years and Mobilizing for Human Rights: International Law in Domestic Politics. She received her Ph.D. in government from Harvard University. Dr. Simmons has served on several National Academies’ committees including the Division Committee for the Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, and the Committee on Human Rights of the NAS, NAE, and NAM.
Mr. Pericles D. Stabekis
PERICLES D. STABEKIS is an independent consultant. He is retired from his position as program manager and aerospace consultant with the SETI Institute. His seminal contributions are in Planetary Protection. He has supported the NASA Planetary Protection (PP) program as principal investigator, program manager, and consultant. He has worked with all the NASA Planetary Protection Officers, lending his expertise to the development and definition of planetary protection policy and requirements for outbound and inbound planetary missions; providing advice to international partners on requirements and methods of implementation; contributing to strategic planning and programmatic development; helping to guide NASA efforts in PP-related new technology development; and monitoring PP-related activities of ongoing flight projects. In his 46-year career, Mr. Stabekis worked for Exotech Systems, GE, Lockheed Martin, Windermere, Northrop Grumman, and Genex Systems. He contributed to, and managed contracts supporting NASA’s Exobiology, Astrobiology, and Life Sciences programs. He was the Lockheed Flight Program Manager of the NASA Life Sciences’ flagship shuttle missions SLS-1 and SLS-2, as well as IML-1 and IML-2. He is a recognized expert in the field, and has authored and co-authored a number of technical and policy papers. He has received numerous awards throughout his career, including the NASA Public Service Medal, SLS-2 Group Achievement Award, SLS-1 Group Achievement Award. He received his M.S. in aerospace engineering from Howard University.
Dr. Andrew Steele
ANDREW STEELE is a senior staff scientist at the Geophysical Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Prior to this he was an NRC postdoctoral scientist at NASA Johnson Space Center and a visiting research fellow at Oxford University. At Carnegie he has worked on the question of life detection in the solar system with an emphasis on Mars. Among his research achievements are the discovery of discrete carbonaceous phases on Mars and the Moon, helping to advance the understanding of volatile cycling on the earth, moon, meteorites and comets, developing a robust strategy for life detection on solar system bodies and involvement in the testing and data reduction of planetary mission data from Stardust, Apollo, Curiosity and Rosetta missions. He has a highly technical background in using biological chemical and geological instrumentation to address the science questions he pursues in particular the search for life elsewhere. He has also played a role in the science definition of the Mars 2020 mission and apart from being a Co-I on the SHERLOC instrument is an active member of two committees (CCPPWG and RSSB) seeking to define the conditions for the safe and clean return of samples by Mars2020 and beyond. He has served on many committees on Mars exploration for MEPAG, charing the Astrobiology Field Laboratory mission concept team, and the NASA advisory council as a member of the Planetary Protection subcommittee. He received his PhD in microbiology from the University of Portsmouth and has served as a member of the National Academies’ Committee on the Origin and Evolution of Life.

Committee Membership Roster Comments

Note1: Updated roster with added members John Casani, Leroy Chiao 02/16/18.

Events



Location:

J. Erik Jonsson Conference Center
314 Quissett Ave.
Woods Hole, Massachusetts
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Andrea Rebholz
Contact Email:  arebholz@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  2023342857

Agenda
DRAFT COMMITTEE AGENDA

Tuesday, July 08, 2017
Jonsson Center, Room 202
National Academies
314 Quissett Avenue
Woods Hole, MA 02543

OPEN SESSION

5:15 p.m.
Space Studies Board Icy Bodies Planetary Protection Report
Mitch Sogin
Marine Biological Lab

5:45 p.m.
Break for Working Dinner

6:30 p.m.
Working dinner to discuss presentations
The 41-70 Restaurant
71 Water St, Woods Hole, MA 02543

8:00 p.m.
Adjourn for the day

Wednesday, August 09, and Thursday, August 10, 2017
CLOSED SESSION IN THEIR ENTIRETY
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

J. Alexander
A. Steele
J. Gabrynowicz
P. Stabekis
G.S. Hubbard
M. Saunders
K. Olden
E. Levy
D. Fidler
F. Raulin
N. Noonan
B. Simmons

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Review of current state of draft outline and text drafted to date. Discussion of proposed findings and recommendations

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
November 14, 2017


Location:

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
AGENDA

---

Tuesday, June 27, 2017
Beckman Center, Board Room
100 Academy Way Irvine, CA 92617

OPEN SESSION

10:00 a.m.
The role and operations of the COSPAR’s Panel on Planetary Protection
Len Fisk & Gerhard Kminek
University of Michigan, ESA

11:00 a.m.
Overview of the ESA Planetary Protection Office
Gerhard Kminek
Planetary Protection Officer
European Space Agency

12:00 p.m.
Working Lunch, Discussion Continues
(Lunch will be served in the refectory)

1:00 p.m.
Planetary Society Perspective
Bill Nye
The Planetary Society

2:00 p.m.
Break, Committee goes into CLOSED SESSION

5:30 p.m.
Adjourn for Working Dinner

OPEN SESSION

6:00 p.m.
Working dinner to discuss presentations
Café Beau Soleil
953 Newport Center Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660

8:00 p.m.
Adjourn for the day

---

Wednesday, June 28, 2017
Beckman Center, Board Room
100 Academy Way Irvine, CA 92617

OPEN SESSION

7:30 a.m.
Meeting room opens, working breakfast available in the refectory

8:30 a.m.
Interdisciplinary perspectives on complex risk analysis relevant to emerging technologies
Andrew Maynard
Director, Risk Innovation Lab
Arizona State University

9:15 a.m.
Planetary Protection and the Apollo Program
Betsy Pugel (via WebEx)
NASA GSFC

10:00 a.m.
Break

10:15 a.m.
Overview of Commercial Initiatives
Scott Hubbard
Stanford University

11:00 a.m.
Cost of Planetary Protection
Dave Bearden & Eric Mahr
The Aerospace Corporation

11:30 a.m.
Response to Committee's Interim Report
Michael Meyer
Lead Scientist, Mars Exploration Program
NASA HQ

12 p.m.
Working Lunch, Discussion Continues
(Lunch will be served in the refectory)

1:15 p.m.
Implementation of planetary protection policies for Mars 2020
Ken Farley
California Institute of Technology

2:00 p.m.
Europa Clipper Mission
Barry Goldstein & Brian Cooke (via WebEx)
Jet Propulsion Laboratory

3:00 p.m.
Break, Committee goes into CLOSED SESSION

5:15 p.m
Adjourn for the day

---

Thursday, June 29, 2017
CLOSED SESSION in its entirety
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

J. Alexander
J. Gabrynowicz
P. Stabekis
J. Casani
N. Noonan
E. Levy
D. Fidler
B. Simmons
G. Ruvkun
G.S. Hubbard
F. Raulin
M. Saunders
K. Olden


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Is there a third rationale for planetary protection? Discussion of the current draft outline. The relative roles of the scientific community, mission science teams and the planetary protection office. Potential commercial and human spaceflight concerns about planetary protection. The current regulatory gap in US government oversight of activities relating to planetary protection. Potential findings and recommendations

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
November 14, 2017


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Andrea Rebholz
Contact Email:  arebholz@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2857

Agenda
KECK CENTER - ROOM 105

Tuesday, May 23, 2017
OPEN SESSION

10:00 a.m. Commercial Spaceflight and Planetary Protection
Kelvin Coleman
Chief of Staff
Office of Commercial Space Transportation
Federal Aviation Administration

11:00 a.m. Office of the Chief Scientist’s Role in Planetary Protection
Gale Allen
Chief Scientist (Acting)
NASA Headquarters

12:00 p.m. Working Lunch, Discussion Continues

1:00 p.m. Planetary Protection: Perspective from the Hill
Tom Hammond
Staff Director (majority)
Subcommittee on Space
House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology


2:00 p.m. Day-to-day Operations of the Planetary Protection Office: Past, Present, and Future
Catharine Conley
Planetary Protection Officer
NASA Headquarters

3:00 p.m. Break; adjourn to closed session

OPEN SESSION

6:00 p.m. Working dinner to discuss presentations
La Tasca, 722 7th St NW, wASHINGTON, dc

8:00 p.m. Adjourn for the day


Wednesday, May 24, 2017
OPEN SESSION

8:00 a.m. Meeting room opens, working breakfast available in the meeting room

9:00 a.m. Planetary Protection and Human Exploration
Rick Davis
Assistant Director for Science & Exploration, SMD
NASA Headquarters

10:00 a.m. Break

10:15 a.m. Planetary Protection: The Viking Experience (Webex)
Tom Young
Lockheed Martin (Retired)

11:15 a.m. Planetary Protection Policy as an Aspect of Mission Safety and Assurance
Mark Saunders
NASA, Retired

12:15 p.m. Working Lunch, Discussion Continues

1:15 p.m. COSPAR Planetary Protection Process: A Personal Perspective
Perry Stabekis
SETI Institute (Retired)

2:00 p.m. Planetary Protection: A Commercial Perspective
Ryan Noble
Chair, Regulatory Committee
Commercial Spaceflight Federation

3:00 p.m. Break

3:15 p.m. Planetary Protection Policy: Perspective from the Hill
Pamela Whitney (TBC)
Senior Professional Staff (minority)
Subcommittee on Space
House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology

4:15 p.m. Break, adjourn to closed session


Thursday, May 25, 2017
CLOSED SESSION in its entirety
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

J. Gabrynowicz
P. Stabekis
G.S. Hubbard
M. Saunders
K. Olden
E. Levy
G. Ruvkun
D. Fidler
F. Raulin
N. Noonan
B. Simons
J. Alexander

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Discussion of the interim report, presentations heard at this meeting, and plans for the committee's next meeting. The committee also worked on a draft outline for its final report

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
November 14, 2017


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Andrea Rebholz
Contact Email:  arebholz@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3477

Agenda
Committee to Review the Planetary Protection
Policy Development Processes

Meeting 1: March 7-9, 2017

FINAL AGENDA


Tuesday, March 7, 2017
Members Room National Academy of Sciences
2101 Constitution Ave. NW Washington, D.C. 20418

7:30 – 9:45 a.m. CLOSED SESSION

9:45 a.m. Break

OPEN SESSION

WebEx: https://nationalacademies.webex.com/nationalacademies/j.php?MTID=mb3d5b8902a988a0a41812f481d03589d
Meeting Password: PPPDopen Dial In: 1-(866) 668-0721 Telecon Conference Code: 261 122 5317

10:00 a.m. Introduction to Planetary Protection: Goals and Rationales Catharine Conley
NASA Planetary Protection Officer
and John Rummel
SETI Institute

12:00 p.m. Working Lunch with Thomas Zurbuchen
(Lunch will be served in the meeting room)

12:15 p.m. NASA’s Need for an Interim Report Thomas Zurbuchen
Associate Administrator
NASA Science Mission Directorate

1:00 p.m. Planetary Protection and the Outer Space Treaty Ken Hodgkins
Director
Office of Space and Advanced Technology
U.S. Department of State

1:45 p.m. General Discussion Committee and Guests

3:00 p.m. Break

3:15 – 5:00 p.m. CLOSED SESSION

5:00 p.m. Break

OPEN SESSION

6:00 p.m. Working dinner to discuss presentations:

8:00 p.m. Adjourn for the day


Wednesday, March 8, 2017
Board Room
National Academy of Sciences
2101 Constitution Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20418

OPEN SESSION

WebEx: https://nationalacademies.webex.com/nationalacademies/j.php?MTID=m13ddaa664e673bfc00dc3ffc35e6937d
Meeting Password: PPPDopen Dial In: 1-(866) 668-0721 Telecon Conference Code: 261 122 5317

7:30 a.m. Meeting room opens, working breakfast available in the meeting room

9:00 a.m. Motivation for this Study Ellen Stofan
NASA Chief Scientist, retired

9:45 a.m. Break

10:00 a.m. Perspectives from the Mars Exploration Program David Beaty
Mars Exploration Program Office
Jet Propulsion Laboratory

11:00 a.m. General Discussions Committee and Guests

12:00 p.m. Working Lunch, Discussion Continues
(Lunch will be served in the meeting room)

1:00 – 5:00 p.m. CLOSED SESSION

5:00 p.m. Adjourn for the day


Thursday, March 9, 2017

7:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. CLOSED SESSION

12:00 p.m. Meeting adjourns (lunch available in NAS Refectory)


NOTES

Note to Presenters: If your presentation contains unpublished data, ITAR controlled and/or other sensitive information, please be aware that the open sessions at the meeting may be webcast and presentation materials given to the committee may be posted on a publicly accessible website. Please edit your presentations accordingly.

NAS Building: Is located at 2101 Constitution Ave., NW, between the State Department and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Additional information about the NAS Building is available at http://www.nationalacademies.org/about/contact/nax.html.

Metro: The closest Metro station (0.5 miles) is Foggy Bottom (Blue, Orange and Silver lines; exit and turn right, then turn left once you have passed the State Department)—see http://www.nationalacademies.org/about/contact/na_069684.html. Information about the D.C. Metro can be found at http://www.wmata.com/.

Parking: Very limited parking is available onsite at the NAS. The 22 available parking spaces are first come first served. Other available parking options are as follows:
• PMI (Columbia Plaza) –2400 Virginia Avenue NW. Phone (202) 785-2448. The daily rate is $24.
• PMI - 111 19th Street NW. Phone (202) 466-7557. The daily rate is $16.
• Colonial Parking - 2100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW. Phone (202) 295-8100. The daily rate is $17.00.
• GW Elliot School Garage is located near the Department of Interior at 1957 E Street NW. The daily rate is $26.00.
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No


Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office