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Project Information

Project Information


Improving Data Collection and Reporting about Agriculture with Increasingly Complex Farm Business Structures


Project Scope:

An ad hoc panel will review, assess, and make recommendations for the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) and the Economic Research Service (ERS), USDA, on effective methods for collecting data and reporting information about American agriculture given the changes and increased complexity in farm business structure. Although the vast majority of today's farms continue to be run by a single operator or by spousal partners, the large farms that produce a substantial percentage of the nation's food tend to have more complex business structures. The panel will take into consideration the effect any changes in concepts and data collection practices could have on the number of farms and the reliability of sector finance and performance indicators. Specifically, the panel will

·       review existing information about the structure of U.S. farms, and how the information is collected, reported, and used. 

·       seek to identify best practices for accounting for multi-unit operations and operations that are vertically integrated, both on the farm register and in data collection and estimation, while ensuring sufficient coverage and reliable estimates in the face of increased farm concentration.

·       seek to identify best practices for identifying and collecting information about ancillary or “value-added” economic activities  that may be associated with a farm (such as agri-tourism, making and selling wine, jellies, or cheese, etc.).

·       examine the concept of the “farm operator” under different business structures (particularly the practice of attempting to identify one primary operator of a farm household) and the effects of a change in concept on the subsequent estimates of farm household finances and existing data series. 

 The panel will produce a final report with findings and recommendations at the conclusion of the study.

Status: Current

PIN: DBASSE-CNSTAT-15-14

Project Duration (months): 36 month(s)

RSO: Mackie, Chris

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Committee on National Statistics

Topic(s):

Agriculture
Behavioral and Social Sciences
Surveys and Statistics


Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 10/18/2016

Dr. Catherine L. Kling - (Chair)
Iowa State University

Catherine L. Kling (NAS) is Charles F. Curtiss distinguished professor of agriculture and life sciences and a professor of economics at Iowa State University (ISU). Kling has served as the director of ISU’s Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) since July 2013, after having served many years as the division head of CARD’s Resource and Environmental Policy Division. In her work at CARD, Kling is undertaking research to examine how agricultural practices affect water quality, wildlife, soil carbon content, and greenhouse gases. Kling was elected the the National Academy of Sciences in 2015. She currently serves on the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board and has been a member of several previous panels including the Panel to Review USDA's Agricultural Resource Management Survey. Kling holds a B.S. in business and economics from the University of Iowa and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Maryland.
Dr. J. G. Arbuckle, Jr.
Iowa State University

J. Gordon Arbuckle, Jr. is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Iowa State University. His research and extension activities focus on improving the social and environmental performance of agriculture. He has published dozens of articles on climate change and agriculture, water quality, non-operator landownership, natural resource-based rural development, and agri-environmental policy and practice in general. He is co-director of the Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll, a program that collects and disseminates information on issues of importance to agricultural stakeholders across Iowa and the Midwest. Arbuckle holds an M.S. in agricultural economics and a Ph.D. in rural sociology, both from the University of Missouri.
Dr. Norman M. Bradburn
The University of Chicago

Norman M. Bradburn is the Tiffany and Margaret Blake distinguished service professor emeritus at the University of Chicago, where he also served on the faculties of the Department of Psychology, the Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies, the Booth School of Business, and the College. He is a senior fellow at NORC at the University of Chicago. Bradburn previously served as assistant director for social, behavioral, and economic sciences at the National Science Foundation. His research focuses on psychological well-being and the assessment of quality of life using large-scale sample surveys. He is a past president of the American Association of Public Opinion Research. He has an M.A. degree in clinical psychology and a Ph.D. in social psychology, both from Harvard University.
Dr. Richard A. Dunn
University of Connecticut

Richard Dunn is an assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Connecticut. He is also an affiliate of the Connecticut Center for Health Improvement and Policy and the Charles J. Zwick Center for Food and Resource Policy. Dunn’s research agenda focuses on the use of federal administrative data to better measure the contribution of food and agriculture industries to the United States economy. Of particular concern is the effect of different reporting requirements across federal administrative and survey programs on estimates of industry size and establishment dynamics. He currently has a five-year Federal Statistical Research Data Center project related to these issues supported by USDA through a Hatch grant, a cooperative agreement with the Economic Research Service, and a four year National Institutes of Food and Agriculture AFRI grant. Dunn was previously an assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at Texas A&M University. He holds a B.A. in economics and mathematics from Williams College, an M.Sc. in econometrics and mathematical economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Dr. Allen M. Featherstone
Kansas State University

Allen Featherstone is a department head and professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics and director of the masters in agribusiness program at Kansas State University. As a leading agriculture finance scholar, he has studied land markets, investment decisions, mergers in the financial services industry, the probability of agricultural loan default and loan loss severity, the influence of taxes on farmland, and alternative federal tax systems. Featherstone worked to create the Comparative Food and Agriculture Systems course to give students first-hand knowledge of agriculture and cultural situations in other parts of the world. He is currently an executive director of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association. Featherstone holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in agricultural economics, both from Purdue University.
Dr. Joseph W. Glauber
International Food Policy Research Institute

Joseph Glauber is a senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in Washington, DC where his areas of interest are price volatility, global grain reserves, crop insurance and trade. Prior to joining IFPRI, Glauber spent over 30 years at the U.S. Department of Agriculture including as chief economist from 2008 to 2014. As chief economist, he was responsible for the Department’s agricultural forecasts and projections, oversaw climate, energy and regulatory issues, and served as chairman of the board of directors of the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation. From 2007-2009, Glauber was the Special Doha Agricultural Envoy at the office of the U.S. Trade Representative where he served as chief agricultural negotiator in the Doha talks. He is an elected Fellow of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association and holds a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of Wisconsin in 1984 and holds an AB in anthropology from the University of Chicago.
Dr. Brent Hueth
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Brent Hueth is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics and director of the University of Wisconsin Center for Cooperatives at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His research and teaching focus on agricultural firms and markets, cooperative enterprise, and economic development. Hueth has published in top economics journal (American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Journal of Regulatory Economics, etc.) and is a research fellow at the Institute for Exceptional Growth Companies. He also serves as executive director of the Census Bureau’s Research Data Center at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. Hueth holds a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of Maryland.
Dr. Ani L. Katchova
The Ohio State University

Ani Katchova is Farm Income Enhancement Chair at The Ohio State University and associate professor in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics. She chairs the Farm Income Enhancement Program, which is one of the largest programs in the department. Katchova’s research areas include agricultural finance, cooperatives, agribusiness management and marketing, and applied econometrics. Her research has been published in the American Journal of Agricultural Economics and the Agricultural Finance Review, and Agribusiness. Katchova currently serves as an executive board director of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association. She holds a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University.
Ms. Doris Mold
Sunrise Agricultural Associates

Doris Mold is the president of Sunrise Agricultural Associates, LLC, an agricultural consulting firm, based out of Minnesota and Wisconsin, as well as president of American Agri-Women, the nation's largest coalition of women in agriculture. She also teaches classes on farm and agri-business management at the University of Minnesota for MAST International. Mold has recently served on the Expert Panel on Statistics for Women and Beginner Farmers for USDA, and served six years on the agricultural statistics advisory committee for NASS, chairing the committee for three years. Mold was recently appointed to the Commodity Futures Trading Commission Agricultural Advisory Committee. Previously, Mold worked as an agricultural economist at the University of Minnesota and continues to work on special research and education projects with the U of MN on a project basis. Mold maintains a unique position as a producer who uses NASS data and provides data to NASS, and as an economist who utilizes the data in research, teaching, business and in volunteer advocacy. Mold holds an MS degree in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Minnesota.
Dr. Jean Opsomer
Colorado State University

Jean Opsomer is a professor and department chair in the Department of Statistics at Colorado State University. His research focuses on survey statistics, nonparametric regression, and environmental statistics. Opsomer is the associate editor of the Journal of the Royal Statistical Society (Series B) and the Electronic Journal of Statistics and Survey Methodology. He sits on the Bureau of Labor Statistics technical advisory committee and previously served on the NRC’s Panel to Review USDA’s Agricultural Resource Management Survey. Opsomer is a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics (IMS) and the American Statistical Association (ASA), and a member of the International Statistical Institute (ISI). He holds a Ph.D. in statistics from Cornel University.
Mr. Greg Peterson
Statistics Canada

Greg Peterson is director general of the Agriculture, Energy, Environment and Transportation Statistics Branch at Statistics Canada. Since joining Statistics Canada in 1990, Peterson has worked in many areas, covering manufacturing, culture and tourism, and retail trade. Since 2011, he has directed the statistical program that measures science, technology and innovation, the digital economy, capital spending, as well as building permits and property values. Peterson also leads Canada’s census of agriculture, a program that sends out and compiles data from 250,000 questionaries every 5 years. Peterson holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from Concordia University and a master’s degree from Queen’s University.

Mr. Krijn Poppe
LEI Wageningen UR

Krijn Poppe is a senior economist at Wageningen University & Research, as well as in a research manager at Wageningen Economic Research (known as LEI in Dutch). He supports, on a scientific base, decision makers in policy and business to understand and act upon trends in agriculture and food. Poppe also manages various research programmes for the European Union (EU) on the food industry, including the several studies for the Information and Communication Technologies campaign, and the Farm Accountancy Data Network (FADN). For several years he co-led the EU’s Standing Committee on Agricultural Research’s Strategic working group on Agricultural Knowledge and Innovation Systems. Recently the Dutch government appointed him as member of the Netherland’s Council for the Environment and Infrastructure. Poppe is involved in managing the professional journals the European Review of Agricultural Economics and EuroChoices, and was for 12 years Secretary-General of the European Association of Agricultural Economists. From 2009-2011 Poppe was chief science officer of the former Dutch Ministry of Agriculture. He co-owns a small farm and is a board member of SKAL, the Dutch Inspection Organisation for Organic Farming. Poppe holds an M.Sc. in from economics from Erasmus University Rotterdam.
Dr. Daniel A. Sumner
University of California, Davis

Daniel Sumner is the Frank H. Buck, Jr., professor in the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Davis and the director of the University of California, Agricultural Issues Center. He participates in research, teaching, and directs an outreach program related to public issues related to agriculture. Sumner has served as on the President's Council of Economic Advisers, is a former assistant secretary for economics at the United States Department of Agriculture, and former chair of the International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium, a consultant for farm organization, government agencies and firms and is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences and symposia. Sumner is a fellow of the American Agricultural Economics Association and holds Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago in 1978.
Dr. James Wagner
University of Michigan

James Wagner is a research associate professor at the Survey Research Center and research affiliate at the Population Studies Center, both at the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan. He teaches in the Joint Program in Survey Methodology, and serves as principal investigator on several large studies. He is currently the chief mathematical statistician on the National Survey of Family Growth. His research interests include nonresponse error, quality indicators for survey data, and responsive or adaptive design. He also develops and implements responsive design plans for large surveys. He has an M.S. in political science, and a Ph.D. from the program in survey methodology, both from the University in Michigan.
Dr. Jeremy G. Weber
University of Pittsburgh

Jeremy Weber is an assistant professor in Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. He previously worked at the World Bank, USDA’s Economic Research Service—where he produced numerous reports on farm income characteristics—and was an adjunct faculty member for the master’s program in applied economics at Johns Hopkins University. Weber’s current resaerch focus on energy, natural resource, and agricultural economics; and he has published more than a dozen articles in journals such as Energy Economics, Resource and Energy Economics, World Development, Land Economics, and the American Journal of Agricultural Economics. Weber holds a Ph.D. in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Wisconsin--Madison.

Events



Location:

Chicago, IL
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Michael Siri
Contact Email:  msiri@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3113

Agenda
This meeting is closed in its entirety.
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes



Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Michael Siri
Contact Email:  msiri@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3113

Agenda
This meeting is closed to the public in its entirety.
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Michael Siri
Contact Email:  msiri@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3113

Agenda
TBA
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes



Location:

Davis, CA
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Michael Siri
Contact Email:  msiri@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3113

Agenda
Day 1, May 24, 2017: Open Public Session (9:20am to 1:30pm)
Walter A. Buehler Alumni Center, 530 Alumni Lane, Davis, CA 95616
Meeting room: Founders Board Room

9:20am Welcome, Introductions, Overview of Agenda
­ Cathy Kling, Chair

9:30 View from the NASS Pacific Regional Field Office
The Director will discuss: the current survey design, identifying aspects that work more and less effectively; changes over time in respondents’ cooperation and attitudes; trends in special handling requests (e.g., willingness or unwillingness to provide certain types of information, preferences regarding interviewers or survey mode, etc.); data system modernization needs.
­ Chris Messer, Director of Pacific Regional Field Office, NASS
­ Open discussion

10:15 Perspective of a data user (who is also a data provider)
Views on the evolution of NASS data programs along with U.S. Agriculture. Insights into complex operations, responding to the Census (and other surveys), and complications created by the interaction of operations and family members.
­ Don Brown, Commissioner of the Colorado Department of Agriculture
­ Open discussion

11:15 Break

11:30 Perspectives of producers/owners/operators/decision makers
The goal of this session is to elicit insights that may help NASS and ERS improve the comprehensiveness and relevance of their surveys, and increase the value of resultant data and statistics to users. Among the questions open for discussion: What is the organizational structure for your production? What complexities exist in terms of what is produced, how it is produced, and who produces it? What are the current reporting requirements, and how well do the questionnaires capture your farm’s activities? Is the person who responds to surveys the same as the person who makes decisions, runs operations? What is the level of reporting burden—is it household or business-centric? Do you have farm management software, are you or is your accountant able/willing to deliver data to NASS with a click of your mouse (or are you forced to fill in paper forms). Is there value to your operation of resulting USDA data, statistics and reports?
- Kevin Phillips, Michael David Winery
- Jim and Mary Rickert Prather Ranch, Shasta County (by phone)
- Tony Turkovich, Button and Turkovich Ranch, Yolo County
­ Open discussion

12:30pm Working lunch with guests to continue discussion

1:30 Adjourn open session

Closed Session (panel and staff only)

1:45pm Reconvene

5:00 Adjourn

6:30 Working Dinner (by invitation), Mustard Seed (222 D Street, Davis CA)


Day 2, May 25, 2017: Open Public Session (9:00am to 1:30pm)

9:00 Depart for Button & Turkovich Farms, 24604 Buckeye Rd, Winters, CA 95694 [Gather in hotel lobby after breakfast]

The goal of the field trip is to observe firsthand the business relationships involved in the production processes of a large multi-product operation. One task for the committee is to investigate the extent to which data generated by USDA surveys capture activities and processes on the farm. We may revisit some of the questions from the Day 1 discussion about complex operations—what is produced, how it is produced, and who produces it (and how are these reported)?

12:xx Lunch in Winters CA—Putah Creek Café

1:xx Return to UC Davis

Closed Session (panel and staff only)
UCD Social Sciences & Humanities Building
Meeting room: DeLoach Room

2:00 Wrap up discussions

3:00 Adjourn
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

J. Arbuckle
Norman Bradburn
Richard Dunn
Allen Featherstone
Joe Glauber
Brent Hueth
Ani Katchova
Catherine Kling
Doris Mold
Jean Opsomer
Krijn Poppe
Daniel Sumner
James Wagner
Jeremy Weber

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The panel discussed both the presentations from the previous day and the morning's field trip, and future plenary and subgroup meetings were scheduled.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 14, 2017


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Michael Siri
Contact Email:  msiri@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3113

Agenda
February 10, 2017: Open Session (Room 120)

9:00am Welcome, Introductions, Overview of Agenda
­ Cathy Kling, Chair

9:10 Sampling methods/approaches, and implications for measurement concepts and characteristics of statistics produced by NASS and ERS

Use and purpose of the Principal Operator construct. The ERS farm typology classifies farms by operators’ primary occupations, by size, and by family/nonfamily ownership. ERS will discuss the relevance of the ‘principal operator’ concept to the intent of the survey that captures financial flows along the ‘field-farm-household’ continuum. NASS will discuss how they arrived at the decisions about how to collect principal operator information on the 2017 Census.
- Linda Young, NASS (20 minutes)
- Dan Prager, ERS (20 minutes)
- Open discussion (10 minutes)

Sampling units used by NASS. NASS will provide details about the sample unit specifications for its surveys—i.e., information on exactly who/what is sampled in its operator dominant vs. operation dominant surveys. Examples will be presented illustrating how information covering complex farms is organized and stored on the list frame and exactly what components of these complex farms are sampled.

- Mark Apodaca, NASS (20 minutes)
- Open Discussion (10 minutes)

10:30 Break

10:45 Overview of methods used by statistical offices in peer countries. Among the topics that the panel will want to look at closely are: approaches for dealing with sampling and observation unit issues; how complexities such as multiple units and diverse production activities are treated; how boundaries of the “sector” are defined; how data are collected and structured (e.g., is the farm register simply a special case of a business register in terms of sampling and reporting units, and what are the alternatives). International standards and best practices—for example, relating to how do other countries' statistical agencies define and conceptualize the statistical unit that is the amalgam of farm households and businesses—will help guide the panel's consideration of optimal approaches to sampling and specifying observation units as they relate to farms.

Methods for dealing with complex statistical structures in Statistics Canada programs. This presentation will focus on the sampling/observation unit questions and will include two aspects: (1) a theoretical discussion on international best practices in statistical registers; and (2) how, on a more practical level, different agencies represent farm operations in their programs. StatCanada's practices may be compared to those of peer statistical offices such as Australia (ABS) and Eurostat.
- Gaetan St-Louis, Director of Statistical Registers and Geography Division, Statistics Canada (30 minutes)

. . . And in European programs. This presentation will outline approaches used by the European Union in general and Statistics Netherlands in particular to some of the above-described conceptual issues in their Farm Accountancy Data Network (more or less the EU's ARMS) and in Eurostat's Farm Structures Survey.
- Krijn Poppe (panel member) (20 minutes)

- Open Discussion (until lunch). Ron Jarmin, U.S. Census Bureau, and Dave Talon, BLS, may be available to comment on how key U.S. statistical agencies treat farm operations and, in the context of improving overall coherence of resulting statistical products, how this compares with NASS/ERS, and with Statistics Canada. [Some of this discussion may be held for the 4:00pm session.]

12:15pm Working lunch to continue morning discussions.

1:15 Use of Administrative (and perhaps other nonsurvey) Data; Linked Data Sources

Current uses of administrative and commercial data in the production of agricultural statistics will be described. Additionally, visions for next steps in the use of administrative sources and data linking may be discussed (e.g., how would does/could admin data tie into ARMS). Legal and other constraints aside, what uses could administrative data be put to by the agencies, from a data collection (NASS) and data analysis (ERS) standpoint?

Developments at ERS. ERS will provide information on two types of initiatives: (1) a summary of input that the agency has provided as input to the Ryan-Murray Commission—e.g., on current practices regarding passing administrative data and survey data back and forth given confidentiality constraints; and (2) some examples of ongoing work that involve linkages (e.g., between administrative databases, and between administrative data and ARMS).
- Cynthia Nickerson, ERS, and Steve Wallender, ERS (30 minutes)

Improving the Methodology for using Administrative Data Across the Agricultural Statistics System. The discussion will be broadened here to consider data collected from sources other than surveys and censuses for purposes such as maximizing the consistency of cross-sector estimates and helping to align survey data with information from non-statistical sources.
- Emily Berg, Iowa State University (20 minutes)

- Open Discussion (10 minutes)

Use of administrative data across the U.S. statistical system more broadly. Administrative data are widely used across U.S. statistical agencies. For example, IRS and SSA data are used in the construction of business lists/sampling frames, creating linked data sets, and serving other statistical/research purposes. Linkages to data from other agencies make resources such as the LEHD employee data possible. This presentation will describe what is being done now through the Census Bureau's data linkage infrastructure. Questions about what may be possible for the future may also be addressed.
- Amy O'Hara, Center for Administrative Records Research and Applications (30 minutes)

Generic Statistical Business Process Model (GSBPM). The GSBPM offers a model of the steps involved in a statistical activity—i.e., the set of business processes needed to produce official statistics. It is a tool that encompasses administrative data as well as survey-based sources, and includes aspects that are applicable to our work.
- Greg Peterson, StatCAn/panel member (15 minutes)

- Open Discussion (10 minutes)

3:15 Break

3:30 Advancing uses of new data and technology

NASS uses GIS and remote sensing data for improving data collection, reducing respondent burden, and for use in research. How does the survey cycle and the availability of data such as the Cropland Data Layer (CDL) impact when and how such data can be used? Also, what are the legal issues involved with using this data?
- Lance Honig, NASS (20 minutes)
- Open discussion (10 minutes)

4:00 Conceptual questions and statement of task issues of scope for the study

This presentation will consider approaches for measuring food and agriculture as a supply chain that cuts across current industry definitions. Dividing the economy into "farm" and "non-farm" sectors is a useful distinction for reporting, but may be less so for data collection and analysis. Various sectors bleed into one another in markets for labor, farm supplies, and downstream processing, marketing, and retailing. For example, in the case of contract labor from an off-farm employer, is the employer in "farming" or labor services management? How does this factor into the NIPA?
- Brent Hueth, Richard Dunn (30 minutes)

- Open Discussion, beginning with Ron Jarmin, U.S. Census Bureau; Dave Talon, BLS; and [Carrie Litkowski and Kurt Kunze (BEA estimates of proprietor income) and Patrick Canning (ERS, on food dollar expenditure series, especially the part going to the farm) may also be able to attend] to comment on the presentation and to help respond to the following types of questions:
? How do other statistical agencies measure/differentiate agricultural and non-ag sectors for purposes such as measuring productivity by sector, constructing the NIPAS, and for conducting the census of manufacturing and various surveys, and for construction of business lists.
? How does statistical coverage of the economy get the overall and sector specific measures right?
? How should agencies be collaborating to take advantage of data from different sources to capture overlaps? How does current definition of “farm” for purpose of data reporting impact various estimates?
? Details about MOU with BEA for farm proprietor income. Also, for their state measures.

5:00pm Adjourn--panel in recess

February 11, 2017: Closed Session (Board Room)

This session is closed to the public in its entirety.
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

J. Arbuckle
Norman Bradburn
Richard Dunn
Allen Featherstone
Joe Glauber
Brent Hueth
Ani Katchova
Catherine Kling
Doris Mold
Jean Opsomer
Greg Peterson
Krijn Poppe
Daniel Sumner
James Wagner
Jeremy Weber

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The panel reviewed the extensive presentations from day 1, discussed their draft report outline, and made plans for future plenary and subgroup meetings.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 14, 2017


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Michael Siri
Contact Email:  msiri@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3113

Agenda
National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW
Washington, DC

Day 1: October 31, 2016
Open/Public Sessions, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Room 120

Breakfast available outside meeting room

9 a.m. Welcome, Introductions, Overview of Agenda (30 minutes total)
- Cathy Kling, Chair (10 minutes)
- Connie Citro, Director, Committee on National Statistics (10 minutes)
- Robert Hauser, Director, DBASSE (10 minutes)

9:30 Sponsor’s Welcome
- Catherine Woteki, USDA Undersecretary for Research, Education, and Economics OR Ann Bartuska, Deputy Undersecretary for REE (5 minutes)
- Renee Picanso, Deputy Administrator, NASS (5 minutes)
- Mary Bohman, Administrator, ERS (5 minutes)

9:45 Sponsor’s Interests and Goals for the Study—to include specific feedback requested by the agencies regarding how to measure the contribution to the sector and economy of complex farms, as well as how to engage with them effectively to gather data.
- Marca Weinberg, ERS, and Barbara Rater, NASS (30 minutes)

10:15 Break

10:30 Discussion of the project Statement of Task, and prioritization of topics
- Panel members' perspectives on the purpose, key topics, and optimal orientation of the study (5 minutes each)
- Response from sponsors and open discussion (30 minutes total)

12:15 Working lunch to continue morning discussions

1:15 Presentations by Statistical Agencies: Goals, programs, key concepts and stakeholders

Overview of NASS—numbers and types of surveys conducted, the portfolio of products/publications created, and the stakeholders who use them. This overview will provide the framework for how complex operations fit into NASS surveys (15 minute presentation, 5 minute Q&A)
- Joe Parsons, NASS

Overview of ERS—data requirements and goals of the agency and description of how the Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) fits into the ERS goals and allows the agency to deliver information to stakeholders (15 minute presentation, 5 minute Q&A)
- Marca Weinberg or Jeff Hopkins, ERS

How data are kept on NASS’s list frame—the definition of a farm, and differences between operator, operation, and the Person-Operation Identifier (POID). The presentation will explain why POIDs are the target for most surveys as well as what information on the list frame is used to construct them (20 minute presentation, 10 minute Q&A)
- Mark Apodaca, NASS

How common are complex farms? This question will be answered using common definitions of large/complex farms – including complex based on size (production, sales, land), ownership and value added enterprises, contracting arrangements (both marketing and production), off farm activities including related companies, etc. Where possible, data will be presented from the list frame for items such as the number of operators who are involved in more than one operation, the number of operations with more than one operator, ownership of farming operations by non-farm businesses, etc.
(20 minute presentation, 10 minute Q&A)
- Kathy Ott, NASS, and Jim MacDonald, ERS

3:00 Break

3:15 Presentations by Statistical Agencies: Overview of major survey programs and methods

The Census of Agriculture—data collection and methods for creating estimates (15 minutes)
- Donald Buysse, NASS

The Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS)—data collection, methods for creating estimates, and data uses, with a particular emphasis on how some complex farm information (including income from contracting and income from value added enterprises) is incorporated into the farm sector income accounts (15 minutes)
- Jeff Hopkins, ERS, and Andrew Dau, NASS

Other production surveys—to include data collection and methods for creating estimates, as well as how these differ from Census and ARMS. (15 minutes)
- Jeff Bailey, NASS
Summary of how the various agency surveys and methods are similar and different (15 minutes plus 10 minutes Q&A)
- Linda Young or Jody McDaniel, NASS

NASS/USDA’s Practices Across State Offices: Data collection from large complex farms are currently handled in a decentralized way based on NASS field office assessment of the skewness of data for farms based on size, high number of surveys (burden) for some records, response rate concerns, need for data from operations with large amount of production or inventories for commodities and other data items of interest. (20 min presentation + 10 minute Q&A)
- Jay Johnson or Kevin Barnes, NASS

5:00 Adjourn public session


Day 2: November 1, 2016
Closed Session--panel and staff only, 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Room 120

This session is closed in its entirety.
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

J. Arbuckle
Richard Dunn
Allen Featherstone
Joe Glauber
Brent Hueth
Ani Katchova
Catherine Kling
Doris Mold
Jean Opsomer
Greg Peterson
Krijn Poppe
Daniel Sumner
Jeremy Weber

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The panel held a bias and conflict of interest discussion, discussed topics from day 1, and reviewed their tasks and timeline.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 14, 2017

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.