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Project Information

Project Information


NASA Technology Roadmaps


Project Scope:

The NRC will appoint an ad hoc committee to evaluate the most recent drafts of 14 technology roadmaps that NASA has revised and updated. The scope of the technologies to be considered includes those that enable NASA’s human exploration and science missions.

With regard to assessing the revised roadmaps, the committee will in its report:

  • Compare the list of technologies in the 2015 draft of NASA’s space technology roadmaps to the list of technologies in the revised technology area breakdown structure that appears in the 2012 NRC report, "NASA Space Technology Roadmaps and Priorities: Restoring NASA's Technological Edge and Paving the Way for a New Era in Space."
  • Identify the technologies that appear in the 2015 roadmaps that do not appear in the 2012 report and assess these new technologies using the same prioritization criteria that were used to prioritize the technologies listed in the 2012 report.
  • Determine which of the new technologies should be added to (1) the list of 83 high-priority technologies presented in the 2012 report and (2) the list of 16 highest priority technologies that also appear in the 2012 report.

In addition the committee will recommend a methodology for conducting independent reviews of future updates to NASA’s space technology roadmaps, which are expected to occur every four years. The recommended methodology should take into account the extent of the changes expected to be implemented in the roadmaps from one generation to the next and the amount of time since the initial comprehensive independent review of the roadmaps, which took place during the study that led to the NRC’s 2012 report.

The scope of this study does not include assessing or recommending changes to the content of the new aeronautics technology roadmap, nor does it include reassessing the prioritization of the technologies that appear in the NRC’s 2012 roadmaps report.

 

 

Status: Completed

PIN: DEPS-ASEB-15-01

Project Duration (months): 18 month(s)

RSO: Angleman, Alan

Topic(s):

Engineering and Technology
Space and Aeronautics



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 10/19/2015

Todd J. Mosher - (Co-Chair)
Syncroness

TODD J. MOSHER, co-chair, is the vice president of Engineering for Syncroness, where he leads the Syncroness product development engineering organization in developing medical, aviation and other commercial products. Dr. Mosher has 25 years of experience as an engineering professional working in industry and serving as a professor at two universities. He has directed the design of both human spaceflight and robotic spacecraft projects. Previously, Dr Mosher was the Senior Director of Strategic Opportunities for Sierra Nevada Corporation's (SNC) Space Exploration Systems business area within the Space Systems Group. In that role he led the formation of strategic partnerships with Lockheed Martin, United Launch Alliance, Draper Laboratory, Aerojet Rocketdyne, the Walt Disney Corporation and Lucasfilm. He directed the proposal efforts for the next phase of the NASA Commercial Crew Program and NASA's next Commercial Resupply Services contracts with possible values of over $5B. Dr. Mosher successfully led the three previous NASA crew proposals valued at over $350M. Prior to that role, Dr. Mosher was the Director of Design and Development for the Dream Chaser program managing the design team for all of the major subsystems and a staff of over 100 SNC engineers and contractors while keeping design and development milestones on schedule and within budget. He has been recognized as one of The Denver Post Colorado Top Thinkers (2012) and the University of Colorado Kalpana Chawla Outstanding Recent Alumni award (2012). At SNC, he was awarded the Explorer’s Cup Management Team Award (2012), the SNC Director of the Year (2011), and the STAR Award for Technical Excellence (2010). Dr. Mosher holds a Ph.D. and M.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Colorado, an M.S. in Systems Engineering from the University of Alabama in Huntsville and a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from San Diego State University. He has served on multiple NRC studies including previously as the Entry, Descent and Landing area lead for the last NRC study of the NASA technology portfolio.
Liselotte J. Schioler - (Co-Chair)
National Institute of Aerospace

LISELOTTE J. SCHIOLER, co-chair, is responsible for non-NASA Langley Research Center government agency programs at the National Institute of Aerospace (NIA). She has over 25 years of experience in fundamental research, as well as program and proposal development, proposal consulting, and program management. Prior to her employment at NIA, she worked for the federal government as a researcher in high-temperature structural ceramics (U.S. Army) and as a program manager for ceramics/high-temperature materials (USAF Office of Scientific Research and the National Science Foundation), as well as at a large aerospace company, a small high-tech business, and running her own consulting company. She has participated on several advisory committees, including for DOE and NASA, and was a member of the steering committee for the 2012 NRC review of NASA’s Draft Space Technology Roadmaps. Dr. Schioler is a Fellow of the American Ceramic Society. She holds a Sc.D. in Ceramic Science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Arden L. Bement, Jr.
Purdue University

ARDEN L. BEMENT, JR. (NAE) is the David Ross Distinguished Professor of Nuclear Engineering Emeritus at Purdue University. He has held academic appointments in Materials Science and Engineering and Nuclear Engineering at MIT and in Materials Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, Krannert School of Management (courtesy), Industrial Engineering (courtesy) and Technology Leadership and Innovation (courtesy) at Purdue University. His government experience includes Director, Office of Materials Science, DARPA, Deputy Under Secretary for Research and Advanced Technology, Department of Defense, Director of the National Institute, Department of Commerce, Director of the National Science Foundation, and member of the National Science Board. His previous space science and technology experience includes Vice President of Science and Technology, TRW (1980-1992), and member of the technology Advisory Committee and Space Station Sub Committee for NASA (under Administrator Daniel Goldin). He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has recently (2011-2015) participated in the following NRC studies: Performance Measures and Metrics for the Global Nuclear Detection Architecture (chair), Globalization of Science and Technologies Opportunities and Challenges (co-chair), and Aligning the Governance Structure of the NNSA Laboratories to Meet 21st Century Challenges (member).
John C. Brock
Northrop Grumman Space Technology

JOHN BROCK is an independent aerospace technology consultant. He is retired from Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems where he was Director of Technology Strategy and Planning. Before its acquisition by Northrop Grumman, Dr. Brock was chief technologist of TRW’s Space and Technology sector and a senior scientist with expertise in optoelectronics, high-energy lasers, space systems and technologies, and technology planning and road mapping. Prior to joining TRW in 1980, Dr. Brock was a NASA-JPL NRC fellow studying atmospheric photochemistry. Dr. Brock has served as member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and chaired that board’s study on the Operational Utility of Small Satellites. He also has served on the Defense Science Board Advisory Group on Electron Devices, the Air Force Tactical Applications Center Space Advisory Group, and the advisory boards of numerous university optoelectronic Centers of Excellence. He is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), received the Air Force Exemplary Civilian Service Medal in 2008, and was a TRW/NGC senior technical fellow from 1995 until his retirement. Dr. Brock earned a B.S. in chemistry from the University of Washington and his Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of California, Berkeley. He has participated in one NRC study as a member of the Committee on NASA’s Strategic Direction.
James L. Burch
Southwest Research Institute

JAMES L. BURCH is vice president of the division of space science and engineering at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas. He is an expert in the design and use of space plasma physics instruments. He has served as principal investigator on the IMAGE, Rosetta, Dynamics Explorer 1, and ATLAS-1 space science missions, and he is principal investigator of the instrument suite science team for the NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. He received his B.S. in physics from St. Mary’s University, his Ph.D. in space science from Rice University, and an M.S.A. in R&D management from George Washington University. He has an extensive history with the NRC having served as a chair on the Committee on Distributed Arrays of Small Instruments for Research and Monitoring in Solar-Terrestrial Physics: A Workshop, the Committee on Exploration of the Outer Heliosphere: A Workshop, the Committee on Solar and Space Physics, and as a member on the Committee on the Scientific Context for the Exploration of the Moon, the Committee for the Review of NASA Science Mission Directorate Science Plan, the Committee on the Assessment of the Role of Solar and Space Physics in NASA’s Space Exploration Initiative, and the Space Studies Board, the Committee on Solar and Space Physics: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future, the Panel on Solar-Wind-Magnetosphere Interactions, the Committee on Solar and Space Physics, and the AFOSR Atmospheric Sciences Review Panel.
Stephen Gorevan
Honeybee Robotics, Ltd.

STEPHEN GOREVAN is the chairman and co-founder of Honeybee Robotics Spacecraft Mechanisms Corporation of New York. Honeybee Robotics is a NASA and DOD supplier of advanced robotics research and development engineering as well as a supplier of spacecraft subsystems. Honeybee has produced devices such as the Phoenix Lander Ice Removal Tool, the Mars Exploration Rover Rock Abrasion Tool and the Dust Removal Tool and Sample Manipulation System aboard the Curiosity Rover. Mr. Gorevan has guided Honeybee to act as a close industry R&D companion to the planetary science community as well focusing on the development of sampling acquisition and containment systems for future missions to comets, asteroids, Venus and the outer planets. Mr. Gorevan has also guided Honeybee to support DARPA in the use of robotics for on-orbit servicing operations. Mr. Gorevan has a B.A. in music from New York University and a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the City College of New York. He has previously served as a member of the NRC Steering Committee for Workshops on Issues of Technology Development for Human and Robotic Exploration and Development of Space.
Charles L. Isbell, Jr.
Georgia Institute of Technology

CHARLES L. ISBELL is the senior associate dean of computing at Georgia Tech. He conducts research on artificial intelligence. In particular, he focuses on applying statistical machine learning to building autonomous agents that must live and interact with large numbers of other intelligent agents, some of whom may be human. Lately, Dr. Isbell has turned his energies toward adaptive modeling, especially activity discovery (as distinct from activity recognition); scalable coordination; and development environments that support the rapid prototyping of adaptive agents. As a result, he has begun developing adaptive programming languages, worrying about issues of software engineering, and trying to understand what it means to bring machine learning tools to non-expert authors, designers, and developers. Isbell was a National Academy of Sciences Kavli Fellow for three years and earned both the NSF CAREER and DARPA CSSG awards for young investigators. He has best papers at Agents and ICML. He has served on the organizing committees for ICML, NIPS, RoboCup, Tapia, and the NAS Frontiers of Science Symposia, among others, and organized meetings at a number of conferences. Dr. Isbell holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from MIT. He has not previously served as a member of an NRC study committee.
H. Jay Melosh
Purdue University

H. JAY MELOSH (NAS) is a Distinguished Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Physics, and Aerospace Engineering at Purdue University. Dr. Melosh’s previous positions include professor of planetary sciences at the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, associate professor of planetary science at Caltech, and associate professor of geophysics at State University of New York. He has made many important contributions to Earth and planetary sciences, including definitive studies of the collisional origin of the Moon and the process of impact cratering. His other major contributions include acoustic fluidization, dynamic topography, and planetary tectonics. He is active in astrobiological studies relating chiefly to microorganism exchange between the terrestrial planets. Dr. Melosh is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He received his A.B. in physics from Princeton University and his Ph.D. in physics and geology from Caltech. Dr. Melosh has served on the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration and on both the Steering Committee and the Mitigation Panel for the Review of Near-Earth Object Surveys and Hazard Mitigation Strategies. He also served on the Steering Committee of the previous NRC study NASA space technology roadmaps and priorities.
David P. Miller
University of Oklahoma

DAVID P. MILLER is a professor of space science and robotics in the School of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering at the University of Oklahoma with additional appointments in the School of Computer Science and the bioengineering programs at the University of Oklahoma and the College of Teachers at the International Space University. While at JPL, Dr. Miller led the design and prototyping of the lab’s small rover program which eventually led to the Sojourner rover on the Mars Pathfinder Mission. Miller was one of the founders of iRobot (then known as ISRobotics) and was a co-founder of change to: Sojourner rover on the Mars Pathfinder Mission. Miller was one of the founders of ISRobotics (which became iRobot) and was a co-founder of KIPR, a robotics outreach non-profit. Dr. Miller’s research interests include planetary robot mobility and the interplay between mechanics and intelligence, development of assistive technologies related to human mobility and technology education. Dr. Miller’s space robotics work has been recognized with numerous NASA Certificates of Recognition, NASA Group Achievement Awards, a NASA Space Act Board Award, the JPL Lew Allen Award and the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. His outreach work resulted in receiving the Ames Research Center Dave Lavery Technology Award. He earned his Ph.D. in computer science from Yale University. He served as a member of the 2011-2012 NRC Study on NASA Technology Roadmaps.
Daniel O'Shaughnessy
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

DANIEL O’SHAUGHNESSY is a member of the Principal Professional Staff at the Johns Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory. At JHU/APL, Dan has most recently served as the Mission Systems Engineer for the MESSENGER mission to Mercury. In this role, he was responsible for all technical matters related to the project, including the health, safety and operability of the spacecraft, ground systems, operations and science planning. He successfully oversaw two mission extensions culminating in a novel mission termination phase that allowed observation of Mercury at unprecedented altitudes using unconventional propellants, enabling entirely new and unique science investigations of the planet. His interests include practical use of autonomy in space vehicles as well as using modeling and simulation to reduce the operational cost and complexity of space missions. Previously, Dan served as MESSENGER’s guidance and control team lead, where he pioneered the flight use of solar sailing for planetary flyby risk reduction. He as has also led APL efforts to develop an autonomous aerobraking capability, helping to demonstrate through simulation that aerobraking mission costs can be reduced substantially. For his work on solar sailing he was the inaugural recipient the Heinlein Award for Space Technology. He earned his MS degree in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from the University of Missouri in 2000. He has served on the Naval Research Advisory Committee (assessing the state and potential benefits of autonomous technologies to the Navy) and is currently a member of the OSIRIS-REx project Standing Review Board.
Torrey Radcliffe
The Aerospace Corporation

TORREY RADCLIFFE is the associate director of the Space Architecture Department at the Aerospace Corporation. Dr. Radcliffe leads conceptual design studies and independent analysis of space systems at the architecture and vehicle level for National Security and Civil Space agencies. While supporting all types of space systems, his main areas of interest are launch vehicles and human spaceflight. While Dr. Radcliffe has worked at Aerospace for his whole career he also served as a lecturer at UCLA for a number of years. He also currently serves at the co-chair for the Management, Systems Engineering and Cost track for the IEEE Aerospace Conference. He earned his Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT. He has no previous NRC committee experience.
John R. Rogacki
Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition

JOHN R. ROGACKI is associate director of the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC). Since March 2015, he has been detailed to the Doolittle Institute in Ft. Walton Beach, FL, as Deputy Director. He has an extensive background in space transportation technology, air and space propulsion and power, air vehicles, and materials. He also has experience with robotics, assistive technologies, natural language processing, and technology transfer. Prior to joining IHMC, Dr. Rogacki served as director of the University of Florida’s Research and Engineering Education Facility (REEF), a unique educational facility in Northwest Florida supporting U.S. Air Force (USAF) research and education needs through graduate degree programs in mechanical, aerospace, electrical, computer, industrial, and systems engineering. Among Dr. Rogacki’s past experiences, he served as the NASA’s deputy associate administrator for space transportation technology (in charge of the Space Launch Initiative); program director for the Orbital Space Plane and Next Generation Launch Technology Programs; co-chair of the NASA/DOD Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology Program; director of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center’s Space Transportation Directorate; director of the propulsion directorate for the Air Force Research Laboratory; director of the USAF Phillips Laboratory Propulsion Directorate; and deputy director of the Flight Dynamics Directorate of the USAF Wright Laboratory. An accomplished pilot, Dr. Rogacki has logged more than 3,300 flying hours as pilot, instructor pilot, and flight examiner in aircraft ranging from motorized gliders to heavy bombers. He has served as primary NASA liaison for the National Aerospace Initiative; co-chair of the DOD Future Propulsion Technology Advisory Group; co-chair of the DOD Ground and Sea Vehicles Technology Area Readiness Assessment Panel; member of the National High Cycle Fatigue Coordinating Committee; and senior NASA representative to the Joint Aeronautical Commanders Group. Dr. Rogacki also served as associate professor of engineering mechanics and chief of the materials division at the USAF Academy. In 2005 he graduated from the Senior Executives Program in National and International Security at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. In addition, he is a recent graduate of Leadership Florida. Dr. Rogacki earned his Ph.D. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Washington and his B.S. in engineering mechanics from the USAF Academy. He previously chaired the NRC NASA Technology Roadmap: Propulsion and Power Panel.
Julie A. Shah
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

JULIE A. SHAH is an associate professor in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT and leads the Interactive Robotics Group of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. Shah received her SB (2004) and SM (2006) from the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT, and her Ph.D. (2010) in Autonomous Systems from MIT. Before joining the faculty she worked at Boeing Research and Technology on robotics applications for aerospace manufacturing. She has developed innovative methods for enabling fluid human-robot teamwork in time-critical, safety-critical domains, ranging from manufacturing to surgery to space exploration. Her group draws on expertise in artificial intelligence, human factors, and systems engineering to develop interactive robots that emulate the qualities of effective human team members to improve the efficiency of human-robot teamwork. In 2014 Shah was recognized with an NSF CAREER award for her work on “Human-aware Autonomy for Team-oriented Environments," and by the MIT Technology Review TR35 list as one of the world’s top innovators under the age of 35. Her work on industrial human-robot collaboration was also recognized by Technology Review as one of the 10 Breakthrough Technologies of 2013, and she has received international recognition in the form of best paper awards and nominations from the International Conference on Automated Planning and Scheduling, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the IEEE/ACM International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, the International Symposium on Robotics, and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Prof. Shah served on the NAE 2013 Panel on Information Sciences at the ARL.
Alan M. Title
Lockheed Martin Space Technology Advanced R&D Labs

ALAN M. TITLE is a Senior Fellow at the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center in Palo Alto, CA. He is a leading expert in the development of advanced solar astronomy instruments and sensors. He has played a major role in making all heliophysics data available to the community without restriction in as close to real time as possible. He has been either the principal investigator or responsible scientist for the development of seven space science missions--the Solar H-alpha telescopes on Skylab (NASA), SOUP on Spacelab 2 (NASA), MDI on SOHO (ESA), TRACE (NASA), the Focal Plane Package on Hinode (JAXA), HMI on SDO (NASA), AIA on SDO (NASA), and IRIS (NASA). He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the International Academy of Astronautics, and a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union. He has received the Hale Prize of the AAS, the NASA Public Service and Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medals, the George Goddard Award of the SPIE, and he was selected a member of the Silicon Valley Hall of Fame. He is a former member of the SSB, and he has had the experience of serving on the Steering Committee of two decadal surveys and numerous NASA, NSF, National Laboratory, and University advisory committees. He is a current member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board and the Committee on Achieving Science Goals with CubeSats.

Committee Membership Roster Comments

Note 1: Walt Falconer (co-chair) resigned from the committee and was removed from this list 10/19/2015 Note 2: Todd Mosher had a change in status from member to co-chair effective 9/23/2015.

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dwayne Day
Contact Email:  dday@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3011

Agenda
Note: this meeting will be entirely closed-session so the committee can write its report.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Todd Mosher
Liselotte J. Schioler
Arden L. Bement
John Brock
James L. Burch
Stephen Gorevan
Charles L. Isbell
Jay Melosh
David Miller
Daniel O’Shaughnessy
Torrey Radcliffe
John R. Rogacki
Julie A. Shah
James Burch

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Draft report.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Draft report.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
March 23, 2016
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Dwayne Day
Contact Email:  dday@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3011

Agenda
NASA TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS COMMITTEE
Beckman Center
100 Academy Way
Irvine, CA 92617
Back Bay Room

Monday, January 11, 2016

OPEN SESSION

7:30 am Room opens (breakfast available in dining room)

8:30 am Meeting convenes Co-chairs Todd Mosher and Lise Schioler
Welcome
General discussion

9:30 am Break

9:35 am Views of the Roadmapping Process Mason Peck (via Webex/video)
Cornell University
10:20 am Break

10:25 am Views of the Roadmapping Process Michael Gazarik (in person)

11:10 am Break

11:15 am How Space Command Does Roadmapping Merri Sanchez (via Webex/video)
Chief Scientist, Air Force Space Command

12:00 pm Lunch


1:00 pm How the Decadal Surveys Generate Technology Requirements Steve Battel
Battel Engineering

2:00 pm NASA Thermal Protection Systems Modeling TBD

2:30 pm Break

2:45 pm Views of the Roadmapping Process John Reuther (via Webex/video)

3:30 pm General Discussion

NOTE: COMMITTEE WILL GO INTO CLOSED SESSION AT SOME POINT IN THE LATER AFTERNOON

5:30 pm Adjourn
CLOSED SESSION

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Todd Mosher
Liselotte J. Schioler
Arden L. Bement
John Brock
James L. Burch
Stephen Gorevan
Charles L. Isbell
Jay Melosh
David Miller
Daniel O’Shaughnessy
Torrey Radcliffe
John R. Rogacki
Julie A. Shah
James Burch

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Schedule, preparation of the report, writing assignments, ratings of technologies and methodology.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Draft documents.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
January 13, 2016
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Anesia Wilks
Contact Email:  AWilks@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1607

Agenda
NASA TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS COMMITTEE
National Academy of Sciences Building
Room 125
2100 C St NW, Washington, DC 20418
November 12-13, 2015

NOTE: THE ONLY PORTION OF THIS MEETING THAT WILL BE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC WILL TAKE PLACE ON NOVEMBER 12 STARTING AT 8:30AM. SEE BELOW.

(parking lot entrance on 21st St NW just south of the intersection with C street)
(directions for travel via Metro at http://www.nas.edu/about/contact/na_069684.html )

NOV 12

7:30am
Room opens (breakfast available in meeting room)

8:30am
Meeting convenes
Welcome
Co-chairs Todd Mosher and Lise Schioler

8:45am
NASA Presentations on the following technologies from its Technology Roadmaps. The technologies may not addressed in the order given below.

1.1.7 Liner and Insulation
1.6 Balloon Technologies
5.1.6 Optical Tracking
5.1.7 Integrated Photonics
5.7.1 Orbital Debris Tracking Technologies
5.7.2 Characterization Technologies
7.4.4 Artificial Gravity
11.3.5 Exascale Simulation
11.4.8 Cyber Infrastructure


10:30am
Break

10:45am
NASA Presentations (continued)

12:00pm
Lunch

1:00pm
NASA Presentations (continued)

Open Session ends
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Todd Mosher
Liselotte J. Schioler
Arden L. Bement
John Brock
James L. Burch
Stephen Gorevan
Charles L. Isbell
Jay Melosh
David Miller
Daniel O’Shaughnessy
Torrey Radcliffe
John R. Rogacki
Julie A. Shah
James Burch

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Planning for next meeting. Agenda and timeline for study. Report sections. Methodology for rating technologies.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
November 16, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Anesia Wilks
Contact Email:  AWilks@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1607

Agenda
NASA TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPS COMMITTEE
Keck Center Building
Room 208
500 Fifth Street NW, Washington, DC 20001
(parking lot entrance on 6th St NW)

September 28-29

Note: The committee will also meet in closed session on the morning of September 30

AGENDA

Monday, September 28, 2015

The Technology Roadmaps Committee will meet in closed session until 10:30am. Participants in the open session who arrive before then may wait in room 207.

10:45am
Welcome

11:00am
2010 NRC Study on NASA Technology Roadmaps:
Technology Evaluation Process and Criteria
Lessons Learned
Ray Colladay, Chair, Steering Committee for NASA Technology Roadmaps, 2010-2012

12:00pm
Lunch

1:00pm
Faith Chandler, Director for Strategic Integration, NASA Office of the Chief Technologist

2:00pm
TA 1: Launch Propulsion Systems
(Presenters: Thomas M. Brown Ph.D., NASA Technical Fellow, Propulsion, NASA Engineering and Safety Center, Langley Research Center and Debora Fairbrother, Chief, NASA Balloon Program Office, Goddard Space Flight Center’s Wallops Flight Facility)
1.1 Solid Rocket Propulsion Systems
1.1.6 Integrated Solid Motor Systems
1.1.7 Liner and Insulation

2:25pm
1.6 Balloon Launch Systems—Overview

3:10pm
Break

3:25pm
1.6 Balloon Launch Systems—Technologies
1.6.1 Super-Pressure Balloon
1.6.2 Materials
1.6.3 Pointing Systems
1.6.4 Telemetry Systems
1.6.5 Balloon Trajectory Control
1.6.6 Power Systems
1.6.7 Mechanical Systems: Launch Systems
1.6.8 Mechanical Systems: Parachute
1.6.9 Mechanical Systems: Flotation

4:10pm
Break

4:25pm
TA 13: Ground Launch Systems
(Presenter: Jack Fox, Chief, Science and Technology Projects Division, Exploration Research and Technology Programs, John F. Kennedy Space Center)
13.1 Operational Life-Cycle
13.1.4 Logistics
13.2 Environmental Protection and Green Technologies
13.2.5 Curatorial Facilities, Planetary Protection, and Clean Rooms
13.3 Reliability and Maintainability
13.3.8 Decision-Making Tools

5:00pm
General Discussion

5:30pm
Adjourn



Tuesday, September 29, 2015

7:30am
Room opens (breakfast available in meeting room)

8:30am
TA 7: Human Exploration Destination Systems
(Presenters: Christopher “Chris” Culbert, Chief, Avionic System Division, Johnson Space Center and Diane Linne, Senior Research Engineer, Glenn Research Center)
7.4 Habitat Systems
7.4.4 Artificial Gravity

8:45am
TA 9: Entry, Descent, and Landing Systems
(Presenter: Michelle M. Munk, Entry, Descent and Landing Principal Technologist, Space Technology Mission Directorate, Langley Research Center)
9.2 Descent and Targeting
9.2.6 Large Divert Guidance
9.2.7 Terrain-Relative Sensing and Characterization
9.2.8 Autonomous Targeting
9.4 Vehicle Systems
9.4.1 Architecture Analysis

9:30am
TA 14: Thermal Management Systems
(Presenters: Theodore Swanson, Goddard Senior Fellow and Assistant Chief for Technology, Mechanical Systems Division, Goddard Space Flight Center and Christopher “Chris” B. Kostyk, Aerospace Engineer, Advanced Structures and Measurement Technologies Group, Aerostructures Branch, Armstrong Flight Research Center)
14.3 Thermal Protection Systems
14.3.2 TPS Modeling and Simulation

9:45am
Break

10:00am
TA 11: Modeling, Simulation, Information Technology, and Processing
(Presenters: Ed Glaessgen, Senior Technologist for Computational Materials, Langley Research Center and Bryan Biegel, Deputy Division Chief, NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division, Ames Research Center)
11.2 Modeling
11.2.6 Analysis Tools for Mission Design
11.3 Simulation
11.3.5 Exascale Simulation
11.3.6 Uncertainty Quantifications and Nondeterministic
Simulation Methods
11.3.7 Multiscale, Multiphysics, and Multifidelity Simulation
11.3.8 Verification and Validation
11.4 Information Processing
11.4.6 Cyber Infrastructure
11.4.7 Human-System Integration
11.4.8 Cyber Security

11:25am
General Discussion of TA 11 Technologies

11:45am
Lunch

12:45pm
TA 4: Robotics and Autonomous Systems
(Presenters: Robert Ambrose, Chief, Software, Robotics and Simulation Division, Johnson Space Center and Issa Nesnas, Principal Technologist, Supervisor, Robotic Mobility, Jet Propulsion Laboratory)
4.2 Mobility
4.2.5 Surface Mobility
4.2.6 Robot Navigation
4.2.7 Collaborative Mobility
4.2.8 Mobility Components
4.3 Manipulation
4.3.7 Grappling
4.4 Human-System Interaction
4.4.3 Proximate Interaction
4.4.8 Remote Interaction
4.5 System-Level Autonomy
4.5.8 Automated Data Analysis for Decision Making
4.6 Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking
4.6.4 Mission and System Managers for Autonomy and Automation
4.7 Systems Engineering
4.7.3 Robot Modeling and Simulation
4.7.4 Robot Software
4.7.5 Safety and Trust

2:50pm
General Discussion of TA 4 Technologies

3:20pm
Break

3:35pm
TA 5: Communications, Navigation, and Orbital Debris Tracking and Characterization Systems
(Presenter: Stephen A. Townes, Chief Technologist, Interplanetary Network Directorate, Jet Propulsion Laboratory)
5.1 Optical Communications and Navigation
5.1.6 Optical Tracking
5.1.7 Integrated Photonics
5.7 Orbital Debris Tracking and Characterization
5.7.1 Tracking Technologies
5.7.2 Characterization Technologies

4:20pm
Methodologies for Future Reviews

Suggestions by NASA Technology Roadmap team leads on options for methodologies that could be used for independent reviews of future roadmap updates, taking into account the extent of the changes expected to be implemented in the roadmaps from one edition to the next and the amount of time since the most recent comprehensive independent review of the roadmaps.

5:00pm
General Discussion

5:30pm
Adjourn

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Todd Mosher
Liselotte J. Schioler
Arden L. Bement
John Brock
James L. Burch
Stephen Gorevan
Charles L. Isbell
Jay Melosh
David Miller
Daniel O’Shaughnessy
Torrey Radcliffe
John R. Rogacki
Julie A. Shah


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Meeting schedule, future meetings, future speakers, group assignments, overall goals for the study.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 30, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office