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Project Information

Project Information


Supporting the Parents of Young Children


Project Scope:

An ad hoc committee will conduct a study that will inform a national framework for strengthening the capacity of parents* of young children birth to age 8. The committee will examine the research to identify a core set of parenting knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAPs) tied to positive parent-child interactions and child outcomes, as well as evidence-based strategies that support these KAPs universally and across a variety of specific populations. These KAPs and strategies will be brought together to inform a set of concrete policy recommendations, across the private and public sectors within the health, human services, and education systems. Recommendations will be tied to promoting the wide scale adoption of the effective strategies and the enabling of the identified KAPs. The report will also identify the most pressing research gaps and recommend three to five key priorities for future research endeavors in the field. This work will primarily inform policy makers, a wide array of child and family practitioners, private industry, and researchers. The resulting report should serve as a “roadmap” for the future of parenting and family support policies, practices, and research in this country.

Specific populations of interest include: fathers, immigrant families, parents with substance abuse and/or mental health issues, low income families, single mother headed households, and parents of children with disabilities. Given the diversity of family characteristics in the United States, the committee will examine research across diverse populations of families and identify the unique strengths/assets of traditionally underrepresented groups in the literature, including Native Americans, African Americans, and Latinos.

Contextual areas of interest include: resource poor neighborhoods, unsafe communities, rural communities, availability of quality health care and education systems and services (including early childhood education), and employment opportunities.

The committee will address the following questions:

1. What are the core parenting KAPs (i.e., knowledge, attitudes, practices), as identified in the literature, that support healthy child development, birth to age 8? Do core parenting KAPs differ by specific characteristics of children (e.g., age), parents, or contexts?

2. What evidence-informed strategies to strengthen parenting capacity, including family engagement strategies, in various settings (e.g., homes, schools, health care centers, early childhood centers) have been shown to be effective with parents of young children, prenatal to age 8? Are there key periods of intervention that are more effective in supporting parenting capacity—beginning in high school or even earlier?

3. What types of strategies work at the universal/preventive, targeted, and intensive levels (e.g., media campaigns, information sharing, text reminders; social support groups, self-monitoring and tracking online; modeling and feedback coaching, intensive home visiting), and for which populations of parents and children? The committee will consider the appropriate balance between strategies tailored to unique parent and child needs and common strategies that can be effective and accepted with parents across groups.

4. What are the most pronounced barriers, including lack of incentives, to strengthening parenting capacity and retention in effective programs and systems designed to improve developmental, health, and education outcomes for children birth to age 8? How can programs and systems be designed to remove these barriers?

5. Are there evidence-based models of systems and programs that support parenting capacity and build upon existing assets of families, including underserved, low income families of color?

6. What are 3-5 research areas that warrant further investigation, in order to inform policy and practice?

Specific recommendations to strengthen parenting capacity should target: federal, state, and local governments; the private sector (e.g., faith-based communities, philanthropy, business, employers, insurance companies); public education systems; and health and human service systems. The report will recommend policies to be implemented across all levels of the public sector within the health, human services, and education systems to support parents in their parenting role. For the private sector, the report may recommend specific actions they can take to enact, implement, or fund the outlined strategies or policies. In addition, the committee will make specific recommendations about how programs and policies can be paid for (e.g., insurance waivers, family co-pay subsidies, layering on other government programs, etc.).

*The term "parents" in this study includes the main caregivers of children in the home. In addition, this report will include a special emphasis on fathers.

Status: Completed

PIN: IOM-BCYF-14-07

Project Duration (months): 20 month(s)

RSO: Ford, Morgan



Geographic Focus:
North America

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 12/17/2014

Vivian L. Gadsden - (Chair)
University of Pennsylvania

Vivian L. Gadsden, Ed.D. (Chair), is the William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Professor of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. She is also on the faculties of Africana Studies and of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies; serves as director of the National Center on Fathers and Families; and served as associate director of the National Center on Adult Literacy. Dr. Gadsden’s research and scholarly interests focus on children and families across the life-course, from early childhood through the aging process, particularly children and families at the greatest risk for academic and social vulnerability by virtue of race, gender, ethnicity, poverty, and immigrant status. Her conceptual framework, family cultures, has been used widely to examine the interconnectedness among families’ political, cultural, and social histories and racialized identities; social practices; and literacy processes. Her current, collaborative projects include studies of Head Start children’s literacy learning and teacher communities (the EPIC study), family engagement, and parent involvement; young fathers in urban settings; health and educational disparities within low-income communities; children of incarcerated parents; and intergenerational learning within African American and Latino families. In addition to serving on the Board of the Foundation for Child Development, she has served or serves on foundation and Congressionally-mandated review committees, including the Foundation for Child Development’s Young Scholars Program, the Spencer Foundation where she was a Resident Fellow, and a panel of the National Academy of Sciences. She has held leadership roles in the American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the Society for Research in Child Development. Dr. Gadsden also serves on several journal editorial boards and is Co-Editor-in-Chief of Educational Researcher, published by AERA. She has published numerous journal articles, book chapters, texts, and reports, including booklength volumes on literacy and African American youth; re-entry of incarcerated parents in the lives of children, families, and communities; and risk, equity, and schooling as well as a forthcoming book volume on children of incarcerated parents. Dr. Gadsden is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association. She received her Ed.D. in educational psychology and policy from the University of Michigan.
Clare Anderson
The University of Chicago

Clare Anderson, M.S.W., is a Policy Fellow at Chapin Hall, University of Chicago. She focuses her work on using research, policy and fiscal levers to improve outcomes for vulnerable children and families, and the systems serving them. Ms. Anderson currently works with state child welfare systems with title IV-E waivers and other large-scale systems change efforts to implement evidence-based screening, assessment, and interventions and better integrate the goals of children’s safety, permanency and well-being. Prior to joining Chapin Hall, Ms. Anderson was the Deputy Commissioner at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration on Children, Youth, and Families (ACYF) and responsible for federal programs addressing child abuse and neglect, runaway and homeless youth, domestic and intimate partner violence, and teen pregnancy prevention. During her tenure at HHS, Ms. Anderson co-led, alongside Commissioner Bryan Samuels, the development and implementation of a well-being policy agenda. She was among the chief architects of the effort to address trauma, adverse childhood experiences, and toxic stress in children known to the child welfare system through the focused use of research, policy, and fiscal levers. Prior to joining ACYF, Ms. Anderson spent a decade at the Center for the Study of Social Policy helping states and local jurisdictions change policies and practices to improve outcomes for vulnerable children and families. This work included foundation sponsored initiatives such as Family to Family and the Community Partnerships for Protecting Children, as well as federal court ordered oversight and monitoring of child welfare systems. Starting her career as a front-line social worker, Ms. Anderson has a deep appreciation of the challenges faced by families and systems working to make lasting changes so that children and families can thrive. Ms. Anderson holds an M.S.W. from the University of Alabama.
Oscar A. Barbarin, III
University of Maryland, College Park

Oscar A. Barbarin, III, Ph.D., is the Wilson H. Elkins Professor and Chair of the African American Studies Department (with joint faculty appointment in the Department of Psychology) at the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Barbarin is the former Lila L. and Douglas J. Hertz Endowed Chair, Dept. of Psychology, Tulane University. He earned a Ph.D. in clinical psychology at Rutgers University in 1975. He has served on the faculties of the Universities of Maryland, Michigan, and North Carolina. His research has focused on the social and familial determinants of ethnic and gender achievement gaps beginning in early childhood. He has developed, a universal mental health screening system children pre-k to-8. He was principal investigator of a national study whose focus is the socio-emotional and academic development of boys of color. His work on children of African descent extends to a 20 year longitudinal study of the effects of poverty and violence on child development in South Africa. He served as Editor of the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry from 2009-20014 and on the Governing Council of the Society for Research in Child Development 2007-2013.
Richard P. Barth
University of Maryland at Baltimore

Richard P. Barth, M.S.W., Ph.D., is Dean, School of Social Work, University of Maryland. He previously served as the Frank A. Daniels Distinguished Professor at the School of Social Work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He was also the Hutto Patterson Professor, School of Social Welfare, University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Barth has authored and co-authored 10 books and more than 200 book chapters and articles. He was the 1986 winner of the Frank Breul Prize for Excellence in Child Welfare Scholarship from the University of Chicago; a Fulbright Scholar in 1990 and 2006; the 1998 recipient of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Research from the National Association of Social Workers; the 2005 winner of the Flynn Prize for Research; and the 2007 winner of the Peter Forsythe Award for Child Welfare Leadership from the American Public Human Services Association. Dr. Barth was appointed as a founding board member and elected as President of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare. He has directed more than 50 studies and also served as the Co-Principal Investigator of the landmark National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being, the first national study of child welfare services in the United States. He has served as a lecturer and consultant to the Swedish Board of Health and Social Services; the U.S. Children’s Bureau; the states of California, Washington, North Carolina, Connecticut, and Minnesota; and many universities. Dr. Barth has testified before Congressional and state government sub-committees and has served on many editorial boards including Social Work, Research on Social Work Practice, Adoption Quarterly, Social Service Review, Social Work in Education, and the International Journal of Social Welfare. He served on the Board of the Society for Social Work Research from 2002-2006. He has also served on the boards of numerous child serving agencies, including the Whittaker School, Adopt a Special Kid, San Francisco County’s Teenage Fatherhood Program, and Baltimore City’s Department of Social Services. His A.B., M.S.W., and Ph.D. degrees are from Brown University and the Univeristy of California-Berkeley, respectively.
William R. Beardslee
Harvard Medical School

William R. Beardslee, M.D., directs the Baer Prevention Initiatives at Boston Children's Hospital, is Senior Research Scientist at the Judge Baker Children’s Center, Chairman Emeritus of the Department of Psychiatry, Boston Children's Hospital, and the Gardner-Monks Professor of Child Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Beardslee's long-standing research interest has centered on the development of children at risk because of parental adversities such as mental illness or poverty. His work is focused on the ways in which self- and shared understanding help individuals and families cope with adversity. His early work described civil rights workers and how they endured and significantly changed the South. He studied resilience in survivors of cancer and in children of depressed parents. This led to the development of effective public health interventions for families facing depression, and a ten year randomized trial that showed they were safe and led to lasting gains. Dr. Beardslee and his colleagues adapted the principles in a teacher training and empowerment program for use in Head Start and Early Head Start called Family Connections. He directed the Boston site of a multisite study on the prevention of depression in adolescents using Greg Clarke’s cognitive-behavioral model. This work has demonstrated actual prevention of episodes of major depression in high risk youth fully 33 months after intervention delivery. He is the author of over 200 scientific articles and two books: The Way Out Must Lead In: Life Histories in the Civil Rights Movement and Out of the Darkened Room. Dr. Beardslee has received numerous awards including the Blanche F. Ittleson Award of the American Psychiatric Association for outstanding published research contributing to the mental health of children, the Catcher in the Rye Award for Advocacy of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and the Human Rights Award from the Department of Mental Health of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He received an honorary Doctor of Science degree from Emory University and was awarded the Judge Baker Children’s Center World of Children Award. Dr. Beardslee is on the Board of the Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Task Force, the Public Policy Committee of Mental Health America, and Families for Depression Awareness. He served as a member of the Institute of Medicine-National Research Council (IOM-NRC) Committee on Depression, Parenting Practices, and the Healthy Development of Young Children, and the IOM-NRC Committee on Prevention of Mental Disorders and Substance Abuse Among Children, Youth, and Young Adults. He currently co-chairs with Dr. C. Hendricks Brown the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Forum on Children’s Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Health.
Kimberly Boller
Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.

Kimberly Boller, Ph.D., is a Senior Fellow at Mathematica Policy Research. She studies the effects of early childhood care and education, parenting programs, and policy on children and parents. Her expertise includes measurement of program fidelity, implementation, and quality; child outcomes from infancy through early elementary school; and parent well-being and self-sufficiency. Her current research in the United States focuses on Early Head Start; home visiting; the cost of quality early childhood services; informal child care; and child care quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS). She has conducted research on early childhood and parenting programs and systems in more than 10 countries. She received her Ph.D. in developmental and cognitive psychology from Rutgers University.
Natasha J. Cabrera
University of Maryland, College Park

Natasha J. Cabrera, Ph.D., is Professor in the Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, College of Education, at the University of Maryland-College Park. Before joining the University of Maryland in 2002, Dr. Cabrera had several years of experience as an Executive Branch Fellow and Expert in Child Development with the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). Dr. Cabrera’s research, funded by NICHD, focuses on father involvement and children’s social development; ethnic and cultural variations in fathering and mothering behaviors; family processes in a social and cultural context; and the mechanisms that link early experiences to children’s school readiness. Dr. Cabrera has published in peer-reviewed journals on policy, methodology, theory and the implications of father involvement on child development. She has studied fathers for the last 15 years. In her previous position with NICHD, she developed a major initiative called Developing a Daddy Survey (DADS), which coordinated measures of father involvement across major studies in the field and provided a set of measures for others to use. She is the co-editor of the Handbook of Father Involvement: Multidisciplinary Perspectives, Second Edition (Taylor & Francis, 2013) and Latina/o Child Psychology and Mental Health: Vol 1: Early to Middle Childhood: Development and Context and Vol 2: Adolescent Development (Praeger, 2011). Dr. Cabrera is the Associate Editor of Child Development and Early Childhood Research Quarterly and the recipient of the National Council and Family Relations award for Best Research Article regarding men in families.
Eric Dearing
Boston College

Eric Dearing, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology at Boston College’s Lynch School of Education. He is also a Senior Researcher at the Norwegian Center for Child Behavioral Development, University of Oslo. Dr. Dearing’s work is focused on the consequences of children’s lives outside of school for their performance in school, with a special interest in the power of families, early education and care, and neighborhood supports to bolster achievement and well-being for children growing up poor. He has published on topics such as the relationship between higher-quality early child care and low-income children’s math and reading achievement in middle childhood and how increased family involvement in school predicts improved child-teacher relationships, feelings about school, and literacy for low-income children. He is currently principal investigator for a study, supported by the Heising-Simons Foundation, investigating the role of parents’ engagement in their children’s early math learning for children’s long-term achievement. His other research has been funded by the Foundation for Child Development, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institute of Aging, National Science Foundation, Norwegian Research Council, the Spencer Foundation, and the William T. Grant Foundation. Dr. Dearing holds a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of New Hampshire.
Greg J. Duncan
University of California, Irvine

Greg J. Duncan, Ph.D., is a distinguished professor of education at the University of California, Irvine. Previously, he was a professor at the University of Michigan and director of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. He was a member of the 2008 Panel to Review the National Children’s Study Research Plan. Dr. Duncan’s recent work has focused on understanding the relative importance of early academic skills, cognitive and emotional self-regulation, and health in promoting children’s eventual success in school and the labor market. He has also investigated the roles that families, peers, neighborhoods and public policy play in affecting the life chances of children and adolescents. His research has highlighted the importance of early childhood as a sensitive period for the damaging influences of economic deprivation as well as for the beneficial impacts of policy-induced income increases for working families. Dr. Duncan has served as president of the Population Association of America and of the Society for Research in Child Development. He received the 2013 Klaus J. Jacobs Research Prize of the Jacobs Foundation, given for scientific work of high social relevance to the personality development of children and young people. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.
Norma Finkelstein
Institute for Health and Recovery

Norma Finkelstein, Ph.D., M.S.W., is founder and Executive Director of the Institute for Health and Recovery, a Massachusetts statewide services, policy, program development, training, and research organization. Prior to this, Dr. Finkelstein was the founder and Executive Director of the Women’s Alcoholism Program/CASPAR, Inc., a comprehensive prevention, education, and treatment program for chemically dependent women and their families. Dr. Finkelstein’s work has focused on substance use prevention and treatment, with specific emphasis on women, children and families; pregnancy; co-occurring disorders, including integrated care for women with substance use disorders, mental illness and histories of violence; trauma informed services; services for youth and young adults; tobacco education and cessation; and family-centered care. Her expertise in designing and managing services as well as in the areas of policy, planning and research, has resulted in over 50 professional publications and curricula. Dr. Finkelstein served as Chair of the U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment’s Women’s treatment improvement protocols (TIPS), as a member of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Women’s Advisory Board, and as a consensus panel member for the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention’s FASD TIPS. She currently serves as Co-Chair of the Substance Abuse Subcommittee of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. She also serves on the Board of Directors of the Association for Behavioral Healthcare of Massachusetts, as well as a number of other community and professional boards. She has been the principal investigator and manager of numerous health, mental health and maternal and child health grants and contracts. Dr. Finkelstein has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Francis O’Brien Award given by the Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Association of Massachusetts for Outstanding Leadership in the Field of Substance Abuse; the Mayor’s Crossing Generations Award for support and commitment to young women’s development; the New England Chapter of the National Association for Perinatal Addiction, Research and Education’s Award for dedication and commitment to service and research on behalf of alcohol and drug dependent women; the Massachusetts Chapter of the National Association of Social Work’s Most Significant Contribution to Social Work Practice Award; the Alcohol and Drug Problems Association of North America’s Outstanding Accomplishments in Alcohol and Drug Programming Award; and the National Council on Alcoholism’s New Pioneer Award. Most recently, she received the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare’s National Collaborative Leadership Award, the National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome’s Erin Frey Advocacy Award, and the Women’s Service Network’s and National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors’ Women’s Services Champion award. She received her M.S.W. from the University of Michigan and her Ph.D. from the Florence Heller School, Brandeis University.
Elena Fuentes-Afflick
University of California, San Francisco

Elena Fuentes-Afflick, M.D., M.P.H., is Professor of Pediatrics, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics and Vice Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Fuentes-Afflick’s research has focused on the broad themes of acculturation and immigrant health, with specific emphasis on perinatal and neonatal health disparities. She serves as chair of the UCSF Academic Senate, and serves on national committees of the Society for Pediatric Research, the National Institutes of Health, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She served as president of the Society for Pediatric Research in 2008-2009; and has served or is serving as a member of the National Advisory Council of the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development; the National Advisory Council of the Agency for Healthcare, Research and Quality; the National Advisory Committee of the Thrasher Research Fund, the Federal Advisory Committee of the National Children’s Study; the Board of the International Pediatric Research Foundation, and the National Advisory Council of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Clinical Scholars Program. In 2010, Dr. Fuentes-Afflick was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. Dr. Fuentes-Afflick obtained her undergraduate education and medical degree at the University of Michigan. She completed her residency training at UCSF, where she served as chief resident, followed by a research fellowship at the Phillip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies. She also completed an M.P.H. at the University of California, Berkeley.
Iheoma U. Iruka
University of Nebraska

Iheoma U. Iruka, Ph.D., is the Director of Research and Evaluation at the Buffet Early Childhood Institute, University of Nebraska. Dr. Iruka's research focuses on determining how early experiences impact poor and ethnic minority children's learning and development (ages 0-8) and the role of the family and education environments and systems in this process. She is engaged in projects and initiatives focused on how evidence-informed policies, systems, and practices in early education can support the optimal development and experiences of low-income and ethnic minority children, such as through quality rating and improvement systems, home visiting programs, and high-quality preschool programming. She has extensive publications, including a textbook and short-format book geared towards early care and education practitioners working with diverse populations. In addition to being a former Scientist and Associate Director at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, she has served on numerous boards, including North Carolina's Child Care Services Association and Durham County's Workforce Development Board.
Samuel L. Odom
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Samuel L. Odom, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, is Director of the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina-Chapil Hill (UNC) and a Professor in the School of Education at UNC. He is the author or co-author of many journal articles and editor or co-editor of five published and two in press books on early childhood intervention and developmental disabilities. He was previously a member of the National Academy of Science Committee on Educational Inteventions for Children with Autism, which published a report on effective educational programs for young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). He also was a member of the committee that developed the 10 Year Roadmap for Autism Research coordinated by the National Institute on Mental Health and the Interagency Autism Research Committee. Currently his is working with the National Standards Project, which will identify evidence-based practices for children and youth with autism spectrum disorder, and the state of California, which will use this information to identify practices that can be used by teachers and service providers. His recent articles with his doctoral students have addressed the efficacy of a variety of focused intervention approaches (e.g., peer-mediated interventions, sibling-mediated interventions, parent-child intervention to promote joint attention, independent work systems approach to promote learning) for children with ASD. He is currently also the Principal Investigator of a multi-site randomized control study of an intervention to promote preschool readiness. In 2007, Dr. Odom received the Outstanding Research Award from the Council for Exceptional Children.
Barbara Rogoff
University of California, Santa Cruz

Barbara Rogoff, Ph.D., is the UC Santa Cruz Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of California-Santa Cruz. She received the 2013 Award for Distinguished Lifetime Contributions to Cultural and Contextual Factors in Child Development. She is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the American Anthropological Association, the American Psychological Association, and the American Educational Research Association. Dr. Rogoff’s research focuses on cultural aspects of learning, with special interest in Indigenous-heritage, Mexican, Guatemalan, and other communities of the Americas. Her research has included cultural aspects of learning, including collaboration, learning through observation, children’s interest in and attention to ongoing events, roles of adults as guides or instructors, and children’s opportunities to participate in cultural activities and age-specific child-focused settings. She has held the University of California Presidential Chair and has been a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, a Kellogg Fellow, a Spencer Fellow, and an Osher Fellow of the Exploratorium. She served as Editor of Human Development and of the Newsletter of the Society for Research in Child Development, Study Section member for the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and committee member on the Science of Learning for the National Academy of Science. She was selected to give the 2004 UC Santa Cruz Faculty Research Lecture. Her recent books have received major awards: Learning Together: Children and Adults in a School Community (Oxford, 2001, Finalist for the Maccoby Award of Division 7 of the American Psychological Association); The Cultural Nature of Human Development (Oxford, 2003; William James Book Award of Division 1 of the American Psychological Association); and Developing Destinies: A Mayan Midwife and Town (Oxford, 2011; Maccoby Award of Division 7 of the American Psychological Association).
Mark A. Schuster
Harvard Medical School

Mark Schuster, M.D., Ph.D., is William Berenberg Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Chief of General Pediatrics and Vice Chair for Health Policy in the Department of Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital. He conducts research on child, adolescent, and family issues, and has studied the role of parents in influencing and addressing their children’s health. He currently leads the Center of Excellence for Pediatric Quality Measurement, which develops quality measures for national use. He has also conducted research on family leave for parents with chronically ill children, adolescent sexual health, obesity prevention, children with HIV-infected parents, and health disparities. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and is serving as president of the Academic Pediatric Association for 2014-2015. He has served on two Institute of Medicine committees, one on health care for adolescents and the other on LGBT health issues. Dr. Schuster received his B.A. (summa cum laude) from Yale, M.D. and M.P.P. from Harvard, and Ph.D. in public policy analysis from the Pardee RAND Graduate School.
Selcuk R. Sirin
New York University

Selcuk R. Sirin, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Applied Psychology at New York University (NYU). Dr. Sirin’s research primarily focuses on the lives of immigrant and minority children and their families and ways to increase professionals' ability to better serve them. Dr. Sirin conducted a major meta-analytical review of research on socioeconomic status and he co-produced the Racial and Ethical Sensitivity Test (REST) and accompanying training program for school professionals. He also served as the Research Coordinator for the Partnership for Teacher Excellence project at NYU in collaboration with New York City School of Education. His most recent research focused on immigrant youth in general and Muslim American children and adolescents in particular. He has authored a book entitled "Muslim American Youth: Understanding Hyphenated Identities through Multiple Methods" and co-edited a special issue of Applied Developmental Science focusing on immigrant Muslim youth in the West. Dr. Selcuk is the recipient of a Teaching Excellence Award from Boston College, Young Scholar Award from the Foundation for Child Development for his project on immigrant children, and Review of Research Award from the American Educational Research Association given in recognition of an outstanding article published in education.
Kasisomayajula Viswanath
Harvard School of Public Health

K. “Vish” Viswanath, Ph.D., is a Professor of Health Communication in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and in the McGraw-Patterson Center for Population Sciences at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI). He is also the Faculty Director of the Health Communication Core of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC). Dr. Viswanath is also the Leader of the Cancer Risk and Disparities (CaRD) Program of the DF/HCC. He is the founding Director of DF/HCC’s Enhancing Communications for Health Outcomes (ECHO) Laboratory. He chairs the Steering Committee for the Health Communication Concentration (HCC) at HSPH and teaches health communication courses within this concentration. Dr. Viswanath’s work, drawing from literatures in communication science, social epidemiology, and social and health behavior sciences, focuses on translational communication science to influence public health policy and practice. His primary research is in documenting the relationship between communication inequalities, poverty and health disparities, and knowledge translation to address health disparities. He has written more than 170 journal articles and book chapters concerning communication inequalities and health disparities, knowledge translation, public health communication campaigns, e-health and digital divide, public health preparedness and the delivery of health communication interventions to underserved populations. He is the Co-Editor of three books: Mass Media, Social Control and Social Change (Iowa State University Press, 1999), Health Behavior and Health Education: Theory, Research & Practice (Jossey Bass, 2008), and The Role of Media in Promoting and Reducing Tobacco Use (National Cancer Institute, 2008). Dr. Viswanath was also the Editor of the Social and Behavioral Research section of the 12-volume International Encyclopedia of Communication (Blackwell Publishing, 2008). He was the Chair of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Center for Health Marketing at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta from 2007-2010. He has served as a member on three Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committees: Committee on Gulf War and Health: Treatment of Chronic Multisymptom Illness (CMI), the Committee on Sports-Related Concussions in Youth, and the Committee on Health and Safety of Youth. He is a member of the National Vaccine Advisory Committee of the U. S. Department of Health & Human Services and Chairs its Working Group on Vaccine Acceptance, and a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Public Health Preparedness, CDC. His research is supported by funding from private and public agencies including the National Institutes of Health and the CDC.
Michael S. Wald
Stanford University

Michael S. Wald, J.D., M.A., is the Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law, Emeritus, at Stanford Law School. He is a frequent expert advisor on youth and children’s legal issues nationwide, academic researcher, and teacher focused on children’s rights and welfare. He is one of the leading national authorities on legal policy toward children, and he drafted the American Bar Association’s Standards Related to Child Abuse and Neglect, as well as major federal and state legislation regarding child welfare. Professor Wald has served as deputy general counsel for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services during the Clinton administration, Director of the San Francisco Department of Human Services, and senior advisor to the president of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. He also has served as chair of the San Francisco Youth Council, chair of the Faculty Scholars Program of the William T. Grant Foundation, and as a Guggenheim Fellow.

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Stacey Smit
Contact Email:  parenting@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1417

Agenda
This meeting will be closed in its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Vivian Gadsden (Chair)
Clare Anderson
Oscar Barbarin
William Beardslee
Kimberly Boller
Natasha Cabrera
Greg Duncan
Iheoma Iruka
Samuel Odom
Barbara Rogoff
Mark Schuster
Michael Wald


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Committee's draft report and potential conclusions and recommendations.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Committee's draft report.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
January 13, 2016
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Stacey Smit
Contact Email:  ssmit@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1417

Agenda
This meeting will be closed in its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Vivian Gadsden (Chair)
Clare Anderson
Oscar Barbarin
William Beardslee
Kimberly Boller
Natasha Cabrera
Greg Duncan
Norma Finkelstein
Elena Fuentes-Afflick
Iheoma Iruka
Samuel Odom
Barbara Rogoff
Mark Schuster
Selcuk Sirin
Michael Wald

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Committee's draft report and potential conclusions and recommendations.


The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Committee's draft report.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
November 16, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

J. Erik Jonsson Woods Hole Center
314 Quissett Ave.
Woods Hole, Massachusetts
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Stacey Smit
Contact Email:  ssmit@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1417

Agenda
This meeting will be closed in its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Vivian Gadsden (Chair)
Clare Anderson
Oscar Barbarin
William Beardslee
Kimberly Boller
Natasha Cabrera
Eric Dearing
Greg Duncan
Norma Finkelstein
Elena Fuentes-Afflick
Iheoma Iruka
Samuel Odom
Barbara Rogoff
Mark Schuster
Selcuk Sirin
Vish Viswanath
Michael Wald

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Committee's draft report and potential conclusions and recommendations.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Committee's draft report.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 22, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Stacey Smit
Contact Email:  ssmit@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1417

Agenda
The committee will hold an open session from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. PDT on June 29, 2015 at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center in Irvine, California. The open session agenda is below.

Committee on Supporting the Parents of Young Children

OPEN SESSION

June 29, 2015

Huntington Room
Arnold & Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Drive, Irvine, CA

AGENDA

8:30 a.m. Welcome and Introductory Remarks

Vivian L. Gadsden, William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education, School of Education, University of Pennsylvania; Committee Chair

8:35 a.m. Panel 1: Perspectives from Practitioners

Panelists will discuss their perspectives on how parents and families use supports and services across various organizations to meet diverse needs; how policies and programs relevant to families may affect parenting practices, with a particular focus on hard-to-reach families; and the trajectory of policies and programs in the near future and possible implications for families.

Moderator: Kim Boller, Senior Fellow, Mathematica Policy Research; Committee Member

Tammy Mann, President and Chief Executive Officer, The Campagna Center (via WebEx)
Albert Pooley, Founder and President, Native American Fatherhood and Families Association
Christina Altmayer, Executive Director, Children and Families Commission of Orange County
Charles Avila, Executive Director, Yes2Kids; Founder, MENFOLK

9:35 a.m. Behavioral Insights and Parenting Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices

Ariel Kalil, Professor and Director of the Center for Human Potential and Public Policy, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago (15 minutes)

Discussion with Committee
Moderator: Clare Anderson, Policy Fellow, Chapin Hall; Committee Member

10:10 a.m. BREAK


10:20 a.m. Panel 2: Perspectives from Parents

Panelists will discuss their perspectives on the challenges that parents of young children experience, the types of services for parents of young children that should receive more support, and how services can be improved for families and parents.

Moderator: Elena Fuentes-Afflick, Professor and Vice Chair of Pediatrics; University of California, San Francisco; Committee Member

Clarissa Doutherd, Executive Director, Parent Voices Oakland
Sergio Hinojosa, Jr., Parent with Native Dads Network (NDN)
Maria Rosales, National Trainer for Abriendo Puertas/Opening Doors
Stacy Williamson, State President, Missouri State Teachers Association (MSTA)

11:35 a.m. Lessons on Home Visiting Program Implementation from a Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network

Mary Catherine Arbour, Associate Physician for Research, Division of Global Health Equity, Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Senior Research Associate, Center on the Developing Child, Harvard Medical School (15 minutes)

Discussion with Committee
Moderator: William R. Beardslee, Gardner/Monks Professor of Child Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School; Committee Member

12:10 p.m. Parenting in the Context of Culture: Insights from Health Research

Marjorie Kagawa-Singer, Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences and Department of Asian American Studies, University of California, Los Angeles (15 minutes)

Discussion with Committee
Moderator: Vish Viswanath., Professor of Health Communications, Harvard School of Public Health; Director, Health Communication Core, Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center; Committee Member

12:45 p.m. Public Comment Session

Moderator: Vivian L. Gadsden, William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education, School of Education, University of Pennsylvania; Committee Chair

1:00 p.m. Final Remarks and Adjourn

Vivian L. Gadsden, William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education, School of Education, University of Pennsylvania; Committee Chair
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Vivian Gadsden (chair)
Clare Anderson
Oscar Barbarin
Richard Barth
William Beardslee
Kim Boller
Natasha Cabrera
Eric Dearing
Greg Duncan
Norma Finkelstein
Elena Fuentes-Afflick
Samuel Odom
Barbara Rogoff
Mark Schuster
Vish Viswanath
Michael Wald

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

-Committee's draft report
-Commissioned papers
-Potential additional information gathering strategies

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

-Draft report materials
-Commissioned papers

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 06, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Stacey Smit
Contact Email:  parenting@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1417

Agenda
The committee held an open session on April 9, 2015 in room 120 of the National Academy of Sciences building located at 2101 Constitution Ave, N.W., in Washington, DC. The open session was held from 9 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. The agenda is below.

Committee on Supporting the Parents of Young Children

OPEN SESSION AGENDA
April 9, 2015
Room 120
National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave, N.W., Washington, DC

9:00 a.m. Welcome and Introductory Remarks

Vivian L. Gadsden, Ed.D., William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education, School of Education, University of Pennsylvania; Committee Chair

9:05 a.m. General and Specific Positive Parenting: Effects on Child Development

Marc Bornstein, Ph.D., Senior Investigator, Section on Child and Family Research, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (20 minutes)

Discussion and Q & A
Facilitated by: William R. Beardslee, M.D., Gardner/Monks Professor of Child Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School; Committee Member

9:45 a.m. Effect of Changes in U.S. Policy on Parents and Parenting

Kathryn Edin, Ph. D., Bloomberg Distinguished Professor, Department of Sociology, Zanvyl Krieger School; Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University (20 minutes)

Discussion and Q & A
Facilitated by: Iheoma Iruka, Ph.D., Director of Research and Evaluation, Buffet Early Childhood Institute, University of Nebraska; Committee Member

10:25 a.m. Break

10:40 a.m. Panel: Addressing the Needs of Specific Populations

Moderator: Selcuk R. Sirin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Applied Psychology, New York University; Committee Member

Supporting Parents of Young Children in Native American Communities: Cultural Contexts, Evidence Gaps, and the Way Forward
Nancy Rumbaugh Whitesell, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Community and Behavioral Health; Associate Director, Tribal Early Childhood Research Center; Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus (20 minutes)

Fragility in Affluent Families and Implications for Parenting Research and Practice
Suniya Luthar, Ph.D., Foundation Professor of Psychology, Arizona State University; Professor Emerita, Teachers College, Columbia University (20 minutes)

Strategies for Supporting Low-Income and Welfare-Dependent Parents of Young Children
Aurora Jackson, Ph.D., Professor of Social Welfare, Lustin School of Public Affairs, University of California, Los Angeles (20 minutes)

Discussion and Q & A

12:10 p.m. Implementing Evidence-Based Parenting Programs at Scale

Kenneth Dodge, Ph.D., Founding Director, Center for Child and Family Policy; William McDougall Professor of Public Policy and Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University (20 minutes)

Discussion and Q & A
Facilitated by: Michael Wald, J.D., M.A., Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law, Emeritus, School of Law, Stanford University; Committee Member

12:50 p.m. Public Comment (as needed)
Facilitated by: Vivian L. Gadsden, Ed.D., William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education, School of Education, University of Pennsylvania; Committee Chair

1:10 p.m. Concluding Remarks

Vivian L. Gadsden, Ed.D., William T. Carter Professor of Child Development and Education, School of Education, University of Pennsylvania; Committee Chair

1:15 p.m. Adjourn Open Session





Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. Vivian Gadsden
2. Oscar Barbarin III
3. Richard Barth
4. William Beardslee
5. Kimberly Boller
6. Natasha Cabrera
7. Eric Dearing
8. Greg Duncan
9. Norma Finkelstein
10. Elena Fuentes-Afflick
11. Iheoma Iruka
12. Barbara Rogoff
13. Mark Schuster
14. Selcuk Sirin
15. Kasisomayajula Viswanath
16. Michael Wald

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

- Study statement of task
- Draft report
- Open session presentations
- Topics and speakers for meeting 3 open session
- Commissioned papers

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

- Committee membership information
- Study statement of task and timeline
- Draft report items
- Guidelines for report findings, conclusions, and recommendations

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
April 13, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Stacey Smit
Contact Email:  ssmit@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1417

Agenda
OPEN SESSION

January 29, 2015

Room 120
National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave, N.W., Washington, DC

Draft Agenda

1:00 p.m. Welcome and opening remarks
Vivian Gadsden, Committee Chair

1:05 p.m. Remarks on study statement of task from sponsors (5 minutes each)

Linda Smith, Administration for Children and Families

Bezos Family Foundation

Sarah Weber, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Jennifer Kaminski, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Bernadette Sangalang, David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Carlos Martinez, Department of Education (Office of English Language Acquisition)

Steven Hicks, Department of Education (Office of Elementary and Secondary Education)

Jacqueline Jones, Foundation for Child Development

David Willis, Health Resources and Services Administration

Holly Kreider, Heising-Simons Foundation

Larke Huang, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

2:00 p.m. Committee discussion with sponsors

2:40 p.m. Public comment

3:10 p.m. Concluding remarks
Vivian Gadsden, Committee Chair

3:15 p.m. Adjourn open session
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Vivian Gadsden (chair)
Clare Anderson
Oscar Barbarin
Richard Barth
William Beardslee
Kimberly Boller
Natasha Cabrera
Eric Dearing
Norma Finkelstein (by phone)
Elena Fuentes-Afflick
Iheoma Iruka
Samuel Odom
Barbara Rogoff
Mark Schuster
Selcuk Sirin
Vish Viswanath
Michael Wald

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

- Study statement of task
- Report outline, key issues, and audiences
- Topics and speakers for meeting 2 open session
- Ideas for commissioned papers

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

- Committee membership information
- Study statement of task and timeline
- Working report outline
- Guidelines for IOM findings, conclusions, and recommendations
- Working literature search strategy
- Selected background readings

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
February 02, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office