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Project Information

Project Information


Pathways to Urban Sustainability: Challenges and Opportunities


Project Scope:

An ad hoc committee will conduct a study by using examples from metropolitan regions to understand how sustainability practices could contribute to the development, growth and regeneration of major metropolitan regions in the United States.  The study will provide a paradigm that incorporates the social, economic, and environmental systems that exist in metropolitan regions that are critical in the transition to sustainable metropolitan regions.  This paradigm could then serve as a blueprint for other regions with similar barriers to and opportunities for sustainable development and redevelopment.  As part of its evidence-gathering process, the committee will organize a series of public data-gathering meetings in different metropolitan regions to examine issues relating to urban sustainability. Likely topics to be addressed include: path dependencies, biophysical constraints, energy, natural resource management, climate adaptation, economic development, hazard mitigation, public health, social equity, and land use considerations. The committee will develop an agenda for each meeting in consultation with regional stakeholders (e.g. academia, industry, city/county governments), so that the invited presentations and discussions can reflect place-based knowledge and approaches to sustainability.

The committee will focus on:

·         How national, regional, and local actors are approaching sustainability, and specifically, how they are maximizing benefits and managing tradeoffs among social, environmental, and economic objectives;

·         How stakeholders (e.g. industry, city/county governments, universities, public groups) can better integrate science, technology, and research into catalyzing and supporting sustainability initiatives;

·         The commonalities, strengths, and gaps in knowledge among rating systems that assess the sustainability of metropolitan regions; and

·         A paradigm that would incorporate the critical systems needed for sustainable development in metropolitan regions.

In carrying out this charge and preparing its report with findings and recommendations, the study committee will:

·         Describe and assess the linkages among research and development, hard and soft infrastructure, and innovative technology for sustainability in metropolitan regions;

·         Describe the countervailing factors that inhibit or reduce regional sustainability and resilience and identify steps that can be taken to reverse or mitigate the factors;

·         Describe and assess the future economic drivers, as well as the assets essential to and barriers that hinder sustainable development and redevelopment; and

·         Examine how federal, state and local agency and private sector efforts and partnerships can complement/leverage the efforts of key stakeholders and assess of the role of public and private initiatives that may serve as a model for moving forward.

 

Status: Completed

PIN: PGA-STS-12-04

Project Duration (months): 18 month(s)

RSO: Miller, Jerry L

Topic(s):

Behavioral and Social Sciences
Earth Sciences
Energy and Energy Conservation
Engineering and Technology
Environment and Environmental Studies
Transportation and Infrastructure
Policy for Science and Technology



Geographic Focus:
Global
North America

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 12/05/2014

Linda P. Katehi - (Chair)
University of California, Davis

Linda P.B. Katehi (NAE) is chancellor of the University of California, Davis. Previously, she served as provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; the John Edwardson Dean of Engineering and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University; and associate dean for academic affairs and graduate education in the College of Engineering and professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. Dr. Katehi led the effort to establish the Purdue School of Engineering Education, the first department at a U.S. university focused explicitly on engineering education, particularly on K-12 engineering curricula, standards, and teacher education. The author or coauthor of 10 book chapters, she has published more than 600 articles in refereed journals and symposia proceedings and owns 16 patents. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), a fellow and board member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, chair of the Nominations Committees for the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation, and a member of the Kauffman National Panel for Entrepreneurship. She is currently a member of a number of NAE/National Academy of Sciences committees and the Advisory Committee for Harvard Radcliffe College and a member of the Engineering Advisory Committees for Caltech, the University of Washington, and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She earned her bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, in 1977, and her master’s and doctoral degrees in electrical engineering from UCLA in 1981 and 1984, respectively.
Charles Branas
University of Pennsylvania

Charles Branas is a Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Branas works to improve health and healthcare and is recognized for his efforts to reduce violence and enhance emergency care. Much of his work incorporates human geography and place-based change. His studies have taken him to cities and small towns across the US and numerous other countries. Dr. Branas has served on boards and offered scientific expertise for numerous groups including the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control, the Canadian National Research Council, the South African Medical Research Council, the Institute of Medicine, the National Research Council, and the American Public Health Association. His work has been cited by the US Supreme Court and Congress. He is a past President of the Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research, an elected member of the American Epidemiological Society, and affiliated faculty at the University of San Carlos in Guatemala and the University of Otago in New Zealand. Dr. Branas received his B.A. in Mathematics from Franklin and Marshall College (1990), his M.S. from Drexel University (1993), his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (1997), and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University California, Berkeley School of Public Health (2000).
Marilyn A. Brown
Georgia Institute of Technology

Marilyn A. Brown is a Brook Byers Professor of Sustainable Systems in the Georgia Institute of Technology’s School of Public Policy. Previously she held leadership positions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and is a Presidential appointee to the Board of Directors of the Tennessee Valley Authority. She has authored more than 250 publications and several books including Climate Change and Global Energy Security (MIT Press, 2011). Her research focuses on the design and impact of policies aimed at accelerating the development and deployment of sustainable energy technologies, with an emphasis on the electric utility industry, climate adaptation, and the integration of energy efficiency, demand response, and solar resources. Among her honors and awards, she is a co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for co-authorship of the report on Mitigation of Climate Change, she has served on six committees of the National Academies of Sciences, and she currently serves on the DOE Electricity Advisory Committee. Dr. Brown has a B.A. in political science from Rutgers University, a M.R.P. in Regional Planning from the University of Massachusetts, and a Ph.D. in geography from the Ohio State University.
John W. Day
Louisiana State University

John W. Day, JR. is Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences at Louisiana State University, where he has taught since 1971. He has published extensively on the ecology and management of coastal and wetland ecosystems and has over 200 peer-reviewed publications. He has conducted extensive research on the ecology and management of the Mississippi Delta region and for the last 30 years, he has studied coastal ecosystems in Mexico. He was a visiting professor in the Institute of Marine Sciences of the National University of Mexico in 1978-1979, at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands during 1986, at the Laboratoire d’Ecologie, Unversité Claude Bernard in Arles France during 1992-1993, and in the Department of Geography at Cambridge University in 2000-2001. Over the past three decades, Dr. Day has focused on deltas and the impacts of human activities and climate change on deltaic sustainability. He served as chair of the National Technical Review Committee reviewing the restoration program for the Mississippi delta and is currently active in delta restoration. He is the recipient of the Estuarine Research Federation Cronin Award for excellence in teaching in coastal sciences. Dr. Day received his Ph.D. in marine sciences and environmental sciences from the University of North Carolina in 1971.
Paulo Ferrao
Technical University of Lisbon

Paulo Ferrão is a professor at Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST) at University of Lisbon, where he is cofounder and current President of the Scientific Council of IN+, Center for Innovation, Technology and Policy Research. He is currently the national director of the MIT-Portugal Program, the major international partnership on science and technology in Portugal, in the field of engineering systems. He also coordinates the IST energy initiative. Dr. Ferrão developed his academic career at IST in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He has been a professor since 1985, when he joined as a trainee assistant in the Systems Section of the Department; he became assistant professor in the Applied Thermodynamics Section in 1988, associate professor in 2001, and full professor in 2010. His teaching activity spans disciplines such as thermodynamics; energy systems analysis; environment, energy and development policies. He currently teaches the disciplines of industrial ecology and energy and environment and has the responsibility for coordinating the group of subjects on “Planning and Sustainable Development” in the scientific area of “Environment and Energy.” Dr. Ferrão received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering (1993) and his master in energy transfer and conversion (1998) from IST.
Susan Hanson
Clark University

Susan Hanson (NAS) is Distinguished University Professor Emerita and longtime professor of geography at Clark University. She is an urban geographer with interests in gender and economy, transportation, local labor markets, and sustainability. Her research has examined the relationship between the urban built environment and people’s everyday mobility within cities; within this context, questions of access to opportunity, and how gender affects access, have been paramount. Her books include Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World; Gender, Work, and Space (with Geraldine Pratt); and The Geography of Urban Transportation. Dr. Hanson has been the editor of several academic journals including The Annals of the Association of American Geographers, Urban Geography, and Economic Geography and has been the geography editor of the International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences, 1st and 2nd editions. She has led the School of Geography at Clark and is a past president of the Association of American Geographers (AAG), a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a former Guggenheim Fellow, a former fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Social and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, and a recipient of the Honors Award and of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the AAG and of the Van Cleef Medal from the American Geographic Society. In 2000 she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is currently Division Chair of the Transportation Research Board of the National Research Council (NRC), is on the Advisory Board of the NRC’s Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, and is on the editorial board of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Her B.A. is from Middlebury College, and before earning the M.S. and Ph.D. at Northwestern University, she was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Kenya.
Chris T. Hendrickson
Carnegie Mellon University

Chris Hendrickson (NAE) is the Hamerschlag University Professor of Engineering, Co-Director of the Green Design Institute at Carnegie Mellon University, member of the National Academy of Engineering and Editor-in-Chief of the ASCE Journal of Transportation Engineering. His research, teaching and consulting are in the general area of engineering planning and management, including design for the environment, system performance, construction project management, finance and computer applications. He has co-authored five books, including Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Goods and Services: An Input-Output Approach (Resources for the Future, 2006), and published numerous articles in the professional literature. Dr. Hendrickson has been the recipient of the 2009 Faculty Award of the Carnegie Mellon Alumni Association (2009), Turner Lecture Award of the American Society of Civil Engineers (2002), the Fenves Systems Research Award from the Institute of Complex Engineering Systems (2002), and AT&T Industrial Ecology Fellowships (2000-2002). He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2007), a Distinguished Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (2007) and an Emeritus Member of the Transportation Research Board (2004). His professional career includes research contributions in computer-aided engineering, transportation systems, construction project management and environmental systems. He has contributed software tools and methods for sustainable construction, pollution prevention and environmental management, including life cycle analysis software (http://www.eiolca.net) and a widely cited analysis of the life cycle consequences of lead acid battery powered vehicles. His education includes Bachelor and Master of Science degrees from Stanford University, a Master of Philosophy degree in economics from Oxford University, and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Suzanne Moomaw
University of Virginia

Suzanne Morse Moomaw is Associate Professor of Urban and Environmental Planning at the University of Virginia School of Architecture, where she also directs the Community Design Research Center and is the academic lead for the Appalachian Prosperity Project. Specializing in community and economic development at the neighborhood, community, and regional levels, Dr. Moomaw has had a distinguished career in the nonprofit and philanthropic worlds as well as academia. She was president of the Pew Partnership for Civic Change from 1992 to 2007. She chairs the Board of Trustees of the Kettering Foundation (Dayton, OH) and is past chair of the Piedmont Virginia Community College Board (Charlottesville, VA). She has been a fellow at the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the Institute for Advanced Learning and Research at Virginia Tech. Dr. Moomaw holds a Ph.D. from The University of Alabama. She is the author of Smart Communities: How Citizens and Local Leaders Can Use Strategic Thinking to Build a Brighter Future, Second Edition (2014).
Amanda Pitre-Hayes
City of Vancouver

Amanda Pitre-Hayes is the Director of Sustainability for the city of Vancouver. She leads a team of 16 to achieve the Council directive to become the world’s greenest city by 2020. She has 20 years of experience in leadership roles at Vancity, the Pembina Institute, Accenture, and The Body Shop Canada. At Vancity, Ms. Pitre-Hayes managed the organization’s climate change strategy, led its successful effort to be the first carbon neutral financial institution in North America. As Director of Climate Change Consulting with the Pembina Institute, Ms. Pitre-Hayes worked with organizations, such as TD Bank, to become greener by measuring and managing carbon dioxide emissions. As a Manager at Accenture, she managed major projects for North American government, energy, telecom, and financial services organizations. At the Body Shop Canada, Ms. Pitre-Hayes served as assistant to the President, supporting the organization with a variety of sustainability initiatives. Ms. Pitre-Hayes is an alumnus of Harvard University’s Global Change Agent program and holds an M.B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley.
Karen C. Seto
Yale University

Karen Seto is Professor of Geography and Urbanization and Associate Dean of Research at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. Prior to joining Yale University, she was on the faculty at Stanford University for eight years. Dr. Seto’s research is on the human transformation of land and the links between urbanization, global change, and sustainability. She is an expert in urbanization dynamics, forecasting urban growth, and examining the environmental consequences of urban expansion. She has pioneered methods using satellite remote sensing to reconstruct historical patterns of urbanization and to develop projections of future urban expansion. She specializes in China and India, where she has conducted urbanization research for more than fifteen years. Dr. Seto serves on a number of international and national scientific advisory committees, including as Coordinating Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report, Coordinating Lead Author for the United Nations Convention on Biodiversity Cities and Biodiversity Outlook, and Co-Chair of the International Human Dimension Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP) Urbanization and Global Environmental Change Project. She also currently serves on the U.S. National Research Council (NRC) Committee to Advise the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), the NRC Geographical Sciences Committee, and the U.S. Carbon Cycle Scientific Steering Group. She is the Executive Producer of “10,000 Shovels: Rapid Urban Growth in China,” a documentary film that integrates satellite imagery, historical photographs, and contemporary film footage to examine the urban changes occurring in China. Dr. Seto is a recipient of a NASA New Investigator Program (Career) Award, an NSF CAREER Award, and a National Geographic Research Grant. She was named an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow in 2009. Dr. Seto received her B. A. in Political Science from University of California, Santa Barbara (1991) and her M.A. in International Relations & Resource and Environmental Management (1995) and Ph.D., Geography (2000) from Boston University.
Ernest Tollerson
Nathan Cummings Foundation, Inc.

Ernest Tollerson rejoined the Nathan Cummings Foundation (NCF) as interim President and CEO in August 2014. From 2003 to 2013, he served as a NCF trustee, including one three-year term as chair of the board of trustees. Prior to joining NCF as interim President and CEO, Mr. Tollerson worked for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) as Director of Environmental Sustainability & Compliance. During seven and a half years at the MTA, he organized and oversaw the work of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Sustainability & the MTA (its final report is available at http://www.mta.info/sustainability). In 2010, he co-chaired the Transportation & Land Use Technical Working Group of the New York State Climate Action Plan Interim Report (available at www.nyclimatechange.us/InterimReport.cfm). Currently, he is a trustee of the Hudson River Foundation and the New-York Historical Society. He is also a former member of the management board of the Environmental Grantmakers Association, the affinity group for U.S.-based foundations that fund environmental NGOs and projects, and a former member of the board of Demos, a nonpartisan hub for research, ideas and action to promote the common good. A graduate of Princeton and Columbia’s Graduate School of Journalism, Mr. Tollerson spent nearly 25 years as a journalist. He worked as a reporter and editor for a number of newspapers including the Philadelphia Inquirer, where he was a political reporter, New York Newsday, where he was the editorial page editor, and the New York Times, where he was first a national correspondent and later a member of the Times’ editorial board.
Rae Zimmerman
New York University

Rae Zimmerman is Professor of Planning and Public Administration at New York University’s Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and since 1998, Director of the Institute for Civil Infrastructure Systems. In 2011-2013 she directed Wagner’s Urban Planning Program for the fifth time. Her teaching and research focus on infrastructure, the environment, climate change, natural hazards, social equity, and security in the context of the quality of life in urban areas and how innovations can be used to adapt to extreme conditions. She has participated in close to 50 grants, serving as Principal Investigator on about three dozen of those and co-Principal Investigator or participating researcher on a dozen others funded by government agencies, such as the National Science Foundation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. DOT Region 2 Urban Transportation Research Center, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (through university research centers), state and local government agencies, and other sponsorship. In 2013-2014 she has been part of the New York State-funded NYS Resiliency Institute for Storms and Emergencies. She authored Transport, the Environment and Security: Making the Connection (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2012), authored Governmental Management of Chemical Risk (Lewis/CRC), co-produced Beyond September 11th (University of Colorado at Boulder), co-edited Digital Infrastructures (Routledge) and Sustaining Urban Networks (Routledge), and authored or co-authored over one hundred other publications. She has been active on numerous advisory boards and committees, including U.S. EPA and National Academy committees, was appointed to the 2010 NYC Panel on Climate Change, is on the Transportation Research Board’s Critical Transportation Infrastructure Protection committee through 2017, and is an expert for the U.S. GCRP National Climate Assessment Infrastructure Indicators Technical Team. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), a Fellow and past president of the Society for Risk Analysis, and is on editorial boards of several risk and technology journals. Dr. Zimmerman received a B.A. in Chemistry from the University of California (Berkeley), a Master of City Planning from the University of Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in planning from Columbia University.

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mark Lange
Contact Email:  mlange@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
The meeting is closed it its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Linda Katehi (NAE) (Chair)
Paulo Ferrão
Karen Seto
John Day
Suzanne Morse Moomaw
Charles Branas
Rae Zimmerman
Ernest Tollerson
Chris Hendrickson (NAE)
Marilyn A. Brown
Susan Hanson (NAS)
Amanda Pitre-Hayes


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Reviewed statement of task and finalized report outline.
Draft report.
Finalizing findings and recommendations.


The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
December 01, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jen Saunders
Contact Email:  jsaunders@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
The meeting is closed it its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Linda Katehi (NAE) (Chair)
Paulo Ferrão
Karen Seto
John Day
Suzanne Morse Moomaw
Charles Branas
Rae Zimmerman
Ernest Tollerson
Chris Hendrickson (NAE)
Marilyn A. Brown


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Reviewed statement of task and draft report outline.
Report outline and drafting of chapters.
Presentation of case studies and discussion of case study findings.
Planning for next meeting.


The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
October 02, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Chattanooga, TN
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Emi Kameyama
Contact Email:  ekameyama@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
Pathways to Urban Sustainability: Challenges and Opportunities

Third Committee Meeting

Marriott Chattanooga Downtown
2 Carter Plaza
Plaza A (Second Level)
Chattanooga, TN 37402

July 28, 2015

Open Session

10:15 am Welcome and Introductions
Linda Katehi, University of California, Davis, Committee Chair
Jerry Miller, Science and Technology for Sustainability Program, The National Academies

Urban Sustainability in the City of Chattanooga: A Case Example

10:30 am Overview of Sustainability Challenges in the City of Chattanooga
Erik Schmidt, Chief Sustainability Officer, Chattanooga

11:00 am Panel 1: Key Environmental Sustainability Challenges in the City of Chattanooga (each speaker will present for 15 minutes with time for Q&A following the presentations)
• Harold DePriest, CEO, Electric Power Board
• Blythe Bailey, Administrator, Chattanooga Department of Transportation
• David Crockett, former Director of Sustainability for the City of Chattanooga
• Michael Walton, Executive Director, Green Spaces

12:00 pm Q&A

12:30 pm Lunch

1:00 pm Department of Energy Urban Sustainability Initiatives
Charlie Catlett, Argonne National Laboratory

1:30 pm Panel 2: Key Social and Economic Sustainability Issues in the City of Chattanooga (each speaker will present for 15 minutes with time for Q&A following the presentations)
• Donna Williams, Administrator, Chattanooga Office of Economic and Community Development
• Benic (“Bruz”) Clark, Vice President and Treasurer, Lyndhurst Foundation
• Rick Wood, Tennessee State Director, The Trust for Public Land
• Lisa Darger, Sustainability Coordinator, University of Tennessee

2:30 pm Q&A

3:00 pm BREAK

Key Urban Sustainability Issues

3:15 pm Cities and Climate Change, Urban Development and Resilience
Stephen A. Hammer, Manager, Climate Policy, The World Bank Group

3:45 pm Urban Design and Planning
Philip Enquist, Oak Ridge National Laboratory – University of Tennessee Governor's Chair

4:15 pm Overview of the Urban Sustainability Directors Network Activities
Garrett Fitzgerald, Strategic Partnerships Advisor, Urban Sustainability Directors Network

4:45 pm Sustainability and Public Health
Charles Branas, University of Pennsylvania

5:15 pm Open Microphone Session: Brief Comments from Interested Parties
Comments will be limited to 5 minutes, if you would like to address the committee please send an email to sustainability@nas.edu

5:30 pm Open Session Concludes
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Linda Katehi (NAE) (Chair)
Charles Branas
Marilyn Brown
John Day
Paulo Ferrao
Susan Hanson (NAS)
Christopher Hendrickson (NAE)
Suzanne Morse Moomaw
Amanda Pitre-Hayes
Karen Seto
Ernest Tollerson
Rae Zimmerman


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Review of open session
Review of report outline and case study cities
Review of schedule


The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Draft Report Outline; Draft Report Text

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
August 03, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Aquarium of the Pacific, Long Beach, CA
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Emi Kameyama
Contact Email:  ekameyama@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
Second Committee Meeting

Aquarium of the Pacific
100 Aquarium Way
Long Beach, CA 90802

If you are interested in attending, be advised that space is limited so please email sustainability@nas.edu prior to Tuesday, April 21, 2015.

OPEN SESSION

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

10:00 am
Welcome and Introductions
Linda Katehi, University of California, Davis, Committee Chair
Jerry Miller, Science and Technology for Sustainability Program, The National Academies

Urban Sustainability in the Los Angeles Metropolitan Region: A Case Example

10:15 am
Sustainability Challenges in the Los Angeles Metropolitan Region
Matt Petersen, Mayor Garcetti's Chief Sustainability Officer, City of Los Angeles

10:45 am
Panel 1: Key Environmental Sustainability Challenges in the Los Angeles Metropolitan Region
• Water Issues [Nancy Sutley, Chief Sustainability and Economic Development Officer, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power]
• Transportation Issues [Martin Wachs, Professor of Urban Planning, University of California, Los Angeles
• Climate Change [Jonathan Parfrey, Executive Director, Climate Resolve]

11:45 am Q&A

12:15 pm Working Lunch

1:00 pm
Panel 2: Key Social and Economic Sustainability Issues in the Los Angeles Metropolitan Region
• Urban Design [Ted Bardacke, Mayor Garcetti's Deputy Director of Sustainability, City of Los Angeles]
• Social and Community Justice [Christine Margiotta, Vice President of Community Investment, United Way of Greater Los Angeles]

1:45 pm Q&A

2:15 pm Break

2:30 pm
Sustainable LA Grand Challenge Project
Mark Gold, Acting Director and Adjunct Professor, University of California, Los Angeles

3:00 pm
Panel 3: Urban Sustainability in Long Beach, California: Challenges and Opportunities
• Introduction by Jerry R. Schubel, President and CEO, Aquarium of the Pacific
• Kevin Wattier, General Manager, Long Beach Water Department; TBD, Water Replenishment District
• Heather Tomley, Director of Environmental Planning, Port of Long Beach
• Brian Ulaszewski, Executive Director, City Fabrick

4:00 pm Q&A

4:30 pm
Open Microphone Session: Brief Comments from Interested Parties
Comments will be limited to 5 minutes, if you would like to address the committee please send an email to sustainability@nas.edu

5:00 pm
Meeting Adjourns/Pre-Dinner Break (Tour the Aquarium)

6:00 pm
Reception and Committee Dinner at Aquarium of the Pacific
(Reception at Ocean Science Center; Dinner in Great Hall)
100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach, CA 90802

6:30 pm
Introductory Remarks
Jerry Miller, Director, Science and Technology for Sustainability Program, The National Academies
Jerry Schubel, President and CEO, Aquarium of the Pacific

6:40 pm
Overview of Sustainability Efforts in Long Beach, CA
Mayor Robert Garcia, City of Long Beach

7:20 pm Dinner Program Concludes

Thursday, April 30, 2015

9:00 am
Welcome and Introductions
Linda Katehi, University of California, Davis, Committee Chair
Jerry Miller, Science and Technology for Sustainability Program, The National Academies

9:15 am
Policy Frameworks for Urban Transportation Sustainability—Assessing California’s Experience
Dan Sperling, Professor of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis

9:45 am
Private Sector Perspectives on Urban Sustainability
John Mahoney, Chief Executive Officer, OpTerra Energy Services

10:15 am
Impact of Global Biophysical Constraints on Human Systems
James Brown, Distinguished Professor of Biology, University of New Mexico

10:45 am
Open Microphone Session: Brief Comments from Interested Parties
Comments will be limited to 5 minutes, if you would like to address the committee please send an email to sustainability@nas.edu

11:15 am Open Session Concludes

11:30 am - 4:30 pm
CLOSED SESSION (Committee and NRC staff only)
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Linda Katehi (NAE) (Chair)
Charles Branas
Marilyn Brown
John Day
Paulo Ferrao
Susan Hanson (NAS)
Suzanne Morse Moomaw
Amanda Pitre-Hayes
Karen Seto
Ernest Tollerson
Rae Zimmerman


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Discussion of statement of task
Discussion of bias and conflict of interest
Review of open session
Review of report outline and case study cities
Review of schedule


The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Draft Report Outline

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 04, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center of the National Academies
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Emi Kameyama
Contact Email:  ekameyama@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
First Committee Meeting

Keck Center of the National Academies
500 Fifth Street NW, Room 201
Washington, DC

Thursday, February 12, 2015

1:00 pm
Welcome and Introductions
Linda Katehi, University of California, Davis, Committee Chair

1:15 pm
Charge from Sponsors (each sponsor will be provided 20 minutes, with 10 minutes for questions, to provide input on the study and discuss areas of interest to their agency or organization)
• Alan Hecht, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
• Mijo Vodopic, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
• Elisabeth Larson, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

2:45 pm
How Sustainability Contributes to Urban Regeneration
Suzanne Morse Moomaw, University of Virginia

3:15 pm BREAK

3:30 pm
Implementing Urban Sustainability
Amanda Pitre-Hayes, City of Vancouver

4:00 pm
Systems Critical to Urban Sustainability
Karen Seto, Yale University

4:30 pm
Open Microphone Session: Brief Comments from Interested Parties
Comments will be limited to 5 minutes, if you would like to address the committee please send an email to sustainability@nas.edu

5:00 pm Open Session Concludes

5:00-5:15 pm
CLOSED SESSION (Committee and NRC staff only)

Friday, February 13, 2015

9:00 am - 1:00 pm
CLOSED SESSION (Committee and NRC staff only)
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Linda Katehi (NAE) (Chair)
Charles Branas
Marilyn Brown
John Day
Paulo Ferrao
Susan Hanson (NAS) (teleconference)
Chris Hendrickson (NAE)
Suzanne Morse Moomaw
Amanda Pitre-Hayes
Karen Seto
Ernest Tollerson
Rae Zimmerman

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Discussion of statement of task
Discussion of bias and conflict of interest
Review of open session
Review of report outline
Review of schedule

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Draft Report Outline

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
February 17, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office