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Project Information

Project Information


Genetically Engineered Crops: Past Experience and Future Prospects


Project Scope:

Building on and updating the concepts and questions raised in previous NRC reports addressing food safety, environmental, social, economic, regulatory, and other aspects of genetically-engineered (GE) crops, and with crops produced using conventional breeding as a reference point, an ad hoc committee will conduct a broad review of available information on genetically-engineered (GE) crops in the context of the contemporary global food and agricultural system. The study will:

 --examine the history of the development and introduction of GE crops in the United States and internationally, including GE crops that were not commercialized, and the experiences of developers and producers of GE crops in different countries. 

 --assess the evidence for purported negative effects of GE crops and their accompanying technologies, such as poor yields, deleterious effects on human and animal health, increased use of pesticides and herbicides, the creation of “super-weeds,” reduced genetic diversity, fewer seed choices for producers, and negative impacts on farmers in developing countries and on producers of non-GE crops, and others, as appropriate. 

--assess the evidence for of purported benefits of GE crops and their accompanying technologies, such as reductions in pesticide use, reduced soil loss and better water quality through synergy with no-till cultivation practices, reduced crop loss from pests and weeds, increased flexibility and time for producers, reduced spoilage and mycotoxin contamination, better nutritional value potential, improved resistance to drought and salinity, and others, as appropriate.  

--review the scientific foundation of current environmental and food safety assessments for GE crops and foods and their accompanying technologies, as well as evidence of the need for and potential value of additional tests.  As appropriate, the study will examine how such assessments are handled for non-GE crops and foods.

--explore new developments in GE crop science and technology and the future opportunities and challenges those technologies may present, including the R&D, regulatory, ownership, agronomic, international and other opportunities and challenges, examined through the lens of agricultural innovation and agronomic sustainability.

In presenting its findings, the committee will indicate where there are uncertainties and information gaps about the economic, agronomic, health, safety, or other impacts of GE crops and food, using comparable information from experiences with other types of production practices, crops, and foods, for perspective where appropriate. The findings of the review should be placed in the context of the world’s current and projected food and agricultural system. The committee may recommend research or other measures to fill gaps in safety assessments, increase regulatory clarity, and improve innovation in and access to GE technology.

The committee will produce a report directed at policymakers that will serve as the basis for derivative products designed for a lay audience.

Status: Completed

PIN: DELS-BANR-13-06

Project Duration (months): 24 month(s)

RSO: Laney, Kara N.

Topic(s):

Agriculture
Biology and Life Sciences
Environment and Environmental Studies
Food and Nutrition
Policy for Science and Technology



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 11/18/2014

Fred L. Gould - (Chair)
North Carolina State University

Fred Gould is a University Distinguished Professor of Entomology and codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center at North Carolina State University. He studies the ecology and genetics of insect pests to improve food production and human and environmental health. Dr. Gould’s research on the application of evolutionary biology and ecological genetics to sustainable insect-pest management has influenced management of insect pests of crops on a global scale and promises to do the same for arthropod vectors of human disease. He has been a leader in shaping the science-based regulatory framework for the deployment of Bt crops in the United States and globally. His research and major contributions have earned him numerous national and international awards, including the Alexander von Humboldt Award in 2004, which is presented annually to the person judged to have made the most significant contribution to American agriculture during the previous 5 years. In 2011, he was elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Dr. Gould has served on several NAS–National Research Council committees studying effects of the commercialization of genetically engineered crops. He currently serves on the National Research Council’s Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. He is a fellow of the Entomological Society of America and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Gould is the author or a coauthor of more than 180 refereed publications. He received his BS in biology from Queens College and a PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

https://vimeo.com/117282676
Richard M. Amasino
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Richard M. Amasino is a professor with the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His work focuses on how plants perceive seasonal cues such as changing day-length and temperature and how they use such cues to determine when to initiate flowering. His most recent focus has been on understanding the biochemical pathway through which perception of winter cold leads to flowering in the spring–a process known as vernalization. Dr. Amasino is also a member of the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, which is one of the three bioenergy research centers established by the U.S. Department of Energy. His work with the center involves studying the biochemical basis of plant biomass accumulation as well as directing the education and outreach program of the center. Dr. Amasino is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) professor, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His teaching and research have resulted in several national and international awards, including the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Award in 1999. He has served both as president and chair of the board of trustees of the American Society of Plant Biologists. Dr. Amasino received his BS in biology from Pennsylvania State University and his MS and PhD in biology/biochemistry from Indiana University.

https://vimeo.com/117532880

Dominique Brossard
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dominique Brossard is a professor in and chair of the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison). She is an affiliate of UW-Madison Robert and Jean Holtz Center for Science and Technology Studies, the UW-Madison Center for Global Studies and the Morgridge Institute for Research. Dr. Brossard teaches courses in strategic communication theory and research with a focus on science and risk communication. Her research program concentrates on the intersections between science, media, and policy. A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a former board member of the International Network of Public Communication of Science and Technology, Dr. Brossard is an internationally known expert in public-opinion dynamics related to controversial scientific issues, such as genetically engineering crops. She has published numerous research articles on the topic in such outlets as Science, Science Communication, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the International Journal of Public Opinion Research, Public Understanding of Science, and Communication Research and was coeditor of the book The Media, the Public, and Agricultural Biotechnology (2007). Dr. Brossard has a varied professional background, including experience in the laboratory and in the corporate world. She spent 5 years at Accenture in its Change Management Services Division. She was also the communication coordinator for the Agricultural Biotechnology Support Project II (ABSPII), a position that combined public relations with marketing communication and strategic communication. Dr. Brossard earned her MS in plant biotechnology from the Ecole Nationale d’Agronomie de Toulouse and her MPS and PhD in communication from Cornell University.

https://vimeo.com/117282672
C. Robin Buell
Michigan State University

C. Robin Buell joined the Department of Plant Biology of Michigan State University in October 2007 after spending 9 years at The Institute for Genomic Research. She studies plant genome biology and deciphers the genomes of their pathogens. Her research also uncovers how components of the genome confer function and phenotype on both a plant and the microorganisms that feed on it. Dr. Buell has published extensively on plant genomics and bioinformatics. She has worked on the genomes of Arabidopsis, rice, potato, maize, switchgrass, and medicinal plants. Dr. Buell earned her BS from the University of Maryland, her MS from Washington State University, and her PhD from Utah State University. Dr. Buell has an active research group composed of postdoctoral research fellows, research assistants, graduate students, undergraduate students and high school interns and collaborates with scientists across the United States and throughout the world. She has served as an editor at Plant Physiology, the Plant Genome, Crop Science, Frontiers in Plant Genetics and Genomics, and Plant Cell. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement for Science and the American Society of Plant Biologists, a Michigan State University Foundation Professor and a Michigan State University William J Beal Distinguished Faculty.

https://vimeo.com/117332600
Richard A. Dixon
University of North Texas

Richard A. Dixon is Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences of the University of North Texas. He was previously Distinguished Professor and Samuel Roberts Noble Research Chair, senior vice president, and founding director of the Plant Biology Division of the Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation in Ardmore, Oklahoma, where he worked from 1988 to 2013. Dr. Dixon’s research centers on the biochemistry, molecular biology, and metabolic engineering of plant natural-product pathways and their implications for agriculture and human health. He is also interested in engineering of lignocellulosic biomass for the improvement of forage and bioenergy feedstocks. He has published over 460 papers and chapters on those and related topics in international journals. He is a member of the editorial Boards of five international journals and has been named by the Institute for Scientific Information as one of the 10 most-cited authors in the plant and animal sciences. Dr. Dixon is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received his BS and PhD in biochemistry and botany from the University of Oxford, UK, and postdoctoral training in plant biochemistry at the University of Cambridge. He was awarded the doctor of science degree for his research achievements by the University of Oxford in 2004.

https://vimeo.com/117510008
Jose B. Falck-Zepeda
International Food Policy Research Institute

José B. Falck-Zepeda joined the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in 2004 as a research fellow. He is now a senior research fellow and leader of the Policy Research Team of the Program for Biosafety Systems. His work at IFPRI focuses on the economics and impact assessment of agricultural biotechnology, biosafety, and other emerging technologies. Dr. Falck-Zepeda also conducts research on agricultural R&D and science policy, investments, and technical innovation capacity in developing countries. His research has examined such diverse topics as the socioeconomic impact of Bt and Roundup Ready cotton and maize and other genetically modified technologies, the cost of compliance with biosafety regulations and their impact on investment flows, biotechnology capacity in Latin America and Africa, and the determinants of technology adoption in developing and developed countries. Before joining IFPRI, Dr. Falck-Zepeda worked as a research officer at the International Service for National Agricultural Research (ISNAR) in The Hague, the Netherlands. He also was a postdoctoral research fellow at Auburn University and assistant professor and an instructor at the Panamerican Agricultural School (Zamorano University) in Honduras. Dr. Falck-Zepeda is the author of multiple books, journal articles, and other publications and has been an invited speaker in high-level policy dialogues and professional conferences globally. A citizen of Honduras, he holds an agronomy degree from the Panamerican Agricultural School (Zamorano University), a BS in animal science from Texas A&M University, and an MS and a PhD in agricultural economics from Auburn University.

https://vimeo.com/117332601
Michael A. Gallo
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Michael A. Gallo is Emeritus Professor (Environmental and Occupational Medicine) at Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He is also an adjunct professor in the School of Public Health and the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology of the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy of Rutgers. He was the founding (interim) director of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey , and a founder of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute at Rutgers. In addition he served as the Senior Associate Dean for Research of the the medical school. His expertise includes dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), experimental models in pharmacology and toxicology, cytoplasmic and cell-surface receptors, hormone biology, and mechanisms of hormonal and environmental carcinogenesis. Dr. Gallo has served on several National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council committees, such as the Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine; the Committee on Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children; the Committee on Risk Assessment Methodology; and on the Drinking Water and Health Committee. He was granted the Society of Toxicology Education Award, chaired the Hormonal Carcinogenesis as well as the Mechanisms of Toxicity Gordon Research Conference, and served as ambassador of toxicology of the Mid-Atlantic Society of Toxicology. Dr. Gallo received his BA in biology and chemistry from Russell Sage College and received his PhD in toxicology and experimental pathology and did postdoctoral work in pathology from Albany Medical College of Union University.

https://vimeo.com/117814039
Ken Giller
Wageningen University and Research Centre

Ken Giller is a professor of plant production systems in the Wageningen Centre for Agroecology and Systems Analysis (WaCASA) of Wageningen University. He leads a group of scientists who have profound experience in applying systems analysis to explore future scenarios for land use with a focus on food production. Dr. Giller’s research has focused on smallholder farming systems in sub-Sahara Africa, particularly problems of soil fertility and the role of nitrogen fixation in tropical legumes, with emphasis on the temporal and spatial dynamics of resources in crop–livestock farming systems and their interactions. He is the author of the standard text, Nitrogen Fixation in Tropical Cropping Systems, whose second edition was published in 2001. He leads a number of initiatives, such as N2Africa (Putting Nitrogen Fixation to Work for Smallholder Farmers in Africa), NUANCES (Nutrient Use in Animal and Cropping Systems: Efficiencies and Scales), and Competing Claims on Natural Resources. Dr. Giller joined Wageningen University as chair of plant production systems in 2001 after holding professorships at Wye College, University of London, and the University of Zimbabwe. He holds a PhD in ecology from Sheffield University.

https://vimeo.com/117282673
Leland Glenna
Pennsylvania State University

Leland L. Glenna is an associate professor of rural sociology and science, technology, and society in the Agricultural Economics, Sociology, and Education Department at The Pennsylvania State University. His research and teaching fit into three areas of emphasis: 1) the social and environmental impacts of agricultural science and technology, 2) the role of science and technology in agricultural and environmental policy making, and 3) the social and ethical implications of democratizing science and technology research. His domestic research focuses on how research funding for and research outputs from university-industry research collaborations in agricultural and food science change over time, especially in the area of genetic engineering technology. His current international research projects focus on agricultural and community development and on international comparative analyses of agricultural research funding and innovations. Prior to his time at Penn State, he served as a postdoctoral associate and lecturer at Cornell University, a research sociologist at the University of California at Davis, and an assistant professor at Washington State University. Dr. Glenna received his bachelor’s degree in history from Hamline University, his masters of divinity from Harvard University School of Divinity, and his doctorate of philosophy in rural sociology from the University of Missouri.

https://vimeo.com/117807624
Timothy S. Griffin
Tufts University

Timothy S. Griffin is an associate professor in the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy of Tufts University. He directs the interdisciplinary graduate program Agriculture, Food and the Environment and teaches classes on U.S. agriculture, agricultural science and policy, and the intersection of ecology and technology. He also serves on the steering committee for the university-wide graduate program Water: Systems, Science and Society and is a faculty codirector of the Tufts Institute for the Environment, and is a faculty affiliate at the Center for International Environment and Resource Policy at Tufts. His current research focuses on barriers to and incentives for regional food systems, environmental effects of agriculture, climate change, and conservation practices in agricultural systems. Before coming to the Friedman School in 2008, Dr. Griffin was research agronomist and lead scientist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service in Orono, Maine, from 2000 to 2008. He conducted research on many aspects of agricultural production in the northeastern United States, including nutrient cycling and grain production on organic dairy farms, crop management, and long-term sustainability of high-value production systems. He also initiated research on greenhouse-gas emissions, soil carbon and nitrogen cycling, and soil conservation in these systems. From 1992 to 2000, Dr. Griffin was an extension sustainable agriculture specialist with the University of Maine, the first such position in the United States. He developed and delivered a wide-ranging educational and applied-research program on crop production, nutrient availability, and crop–livestock integration. He received his BS in forage and range management and his MS in agronomy from the University of Nebraska and his PhD in crop and soil science from Michigan State University.

https://vimeo.com/117524596
Bruce R. Hamaker
Purdue University

Bruce R. Hamaker is Distinguished Professor of Food Science, director of the Whistler Center of Carbohydrate Research, and holder of the Roy L. Whistler Chair in Carbohydrate Science in the Department of Food Science of Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana. He obtained his undergraduate degree in biological sciences from Indiana University; his graduate studies, at Purdue, were in human nutrition (MS) and food chemistry (PhD); and he did postdoctoral study at the Instituto de Investigacion Nutricional in Lima, Peru (supervisor, George Graham, Johns Hopkins University). He was in the U.S. Peace Corps in Liberia, West Africa, from 1977 to 1979. Dr. Hamaker has over 170 refereed journal publications in food science, human nutrition, biochemistry, and broad-spectrum journals and numerous book chapters. He has advised over 50 MS and PhD students and nearly 20 postdoctoral scientists. Dr. Hamaker’s research program is known for its focus on food carbohydrates and proteins with applications related to health and wellness. In that regard, he has a number of clinical and nutrition science collaborations with research experience in protein and carbohydrate digestion patterns related to quality and physiological response, and dietary fiber effect on the gut microbiome. Dr. Hamaker works with ingredient and processed-food companies principally to assist in improving nutritional or health quality of processed products. He is active in international research collaborations in Africa and Asia. In Africa, he has worked for over 20 years on public and foundation-funded projects on improvement of utilization and nutritional properties of cereal grains and on setting up technology-based incubation centers to work with local entrepreneurs.

https://vimeo.com/117496866
Peter M. Kareiva
The Nature Conservancy

Peter M. Kareiva is the Director of The Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at UCLA and the Chair of the Science Cabinet at The Nature Conservancy. Dr. Kareiva is also cofounder (with Gretchen Daily and Taylor Ricketts) of the Natural Capital Project, a pioneering partnership among The Nature Conservancy, Stanford University, and WWF. The Natural Capital Project develops models that quantify nature’s assets (or ecosystem services) with the aim of informing the choices that people make on the scale of local communities and regions, all the way up to nations and global agreements. He is the author of more than 150 scientific publications in such journals as Nature, Science, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. He has published on gene-flow issues and environmental risk analysis related to genetically engineered crops. He was named a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 2011. He is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Ecological Society of America and the Society for Conservation Biology. Dr. Kareiva received his BA in zoology from Duke University, his MS in environmental biology from the University of California, Irvine, and his PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology from Cornell University.

https://vimeo.com/117496950
Daniel B. Magraw
Johns Hopkins University

Daniel Magraw is Professorial Lecturer and Senior Fellow of the Foreign Policy Institute of Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He has extensive experience in international law, institutions, processes and policies, particularly in relation to environmental protection, dispute settlement, and human rights. He has worked in government, nongovernmental organizations, intergovernmental organizations, business, and academe. Mr. Magraw was a member of the National Research Council Committee on the Biological Confinement of Genetically Engineered Organisms and a member of the U.S. government’s Trade and Environment Policy Advisory Committee. While in the U.S. government during 1992–2001, he cochaired a White House assessment of the regulation of genetically engineered organisms and was director of the International Environmental Law Office and acting principal deputy assistant administrator in the Office of International Activities of the Environmental Protection Agency. He has taught at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Colorado, the University of Miami, and the Georgetown University Law Center. He worked as an economist and business consultant in India as a Peace Corps volunteer. Mr. Magraw has a JD from the University of California, Berkeley, where he was editor-in-chief of the California Law Review, and a BA (magna cum laude) in economics from Harvard University.

https://vimeo.com/117507810
Carol Mallory-Smith
Oregon State University

Carol Mallory-Smith is a professor of weed science in the Department of Crop and Soil Science of Oregon State University. She earned her BS in plant protection and her PhD in plant science from the University of Idaho. Her main research interests are gene flow and hybridization between crops and weeds (including genetically engineered and conventionally bred), herbicide resistance, weed management in agronomic crops, and weed biology. She is the author or coauthor of more than 120 journal articles, eight book chapters, and numerous extension and popular-press articles. Dr. Mallory-Smith visited Australia and Korea as an invited expert on gene flow and other weed issues. She has been an invited speaker in Australia, France, Korea, and Thailand to address the potential risks and benefits of introducing genetically engineered crops. Dr. Mallory-Smith served as a Fulbright Scholar lecturer in Argentina. She is a fellow of the Western Society of Weed Science and the Weed Science Society of America and served as president and treasurer of the Weed Science Society of America and secretary–treasurer of the International Weed Science Society. Dr. Mallory-Smith awards include the Alumni Achievement Award from the University of Idaho’s College of Agriculture in 2007, the Excellence in Graduate Mentoring Award from Oregon State University in 2009, the Western Society of Weed Science Outstanding Weed Scientist in 2009, the Distinguished Service Award for Individual Contribution to the Agricultural Industry by the Oregon Department of Agriculture in 2014, and the Weed Science Society of America Outstanding Researcher Award in 2016.

https://vimeo.com/117282669
Kevin Pixley
CIMMYT

Kevin Pixley is the director of the Genetic Resources Program of the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), a position he has held since 2011. Dr. Pixley joined CIMMYT as a postdoctoral fellow in 1990 and served as a maize breeder (1993) and then also as team leader (1997) at the center’s Harare, Zimbabwe, research station. After 11 years in Africa, he returned to CIMMYT headquarters in Mexico to serve in directing positions in the Global Maize Program with primary responsibilities in Asia and Latin America while leading CIMMYT’s breeding program and a multidisciplinary global network of scientists developing nutritionally enhanced maize. His current responsibilities include oversight of research to characterize and facilitate use of genetic resources, as well as biosafety related to transgenic maize and wheat research at CIMMYT. Dr. Pixley is also an adjunct associate professor at the University of Wisconsin, where he teaches about agriculture, health, and nutrition and their roles in household livelihoods and international development. His accomplishments include mentoring 12 undergraduate and 12 graduate students and their thesis projects, being the author of more than 50 refereed journal articles and book chapters, and leading international collaborative maize-breeding projects for enhanced disease resistance and nutritional quality. Dr. Pixley received his BS from Purdue University, his MS in crop physiology from the University of Florida, and his PhD in plant breeding from Iowa State University.

https://vimeo.com/120418903
Elizabeth P. Ransom
University of Richmond

Elizabeth P. Ransom is an associate professor of sociology in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Richmond. Her research focuses on international development and globalization, the sociology of agriculture and food, and social studies of science and technology. Specifically, she concentrates on the intersection of science and technology policy within agriculture and food systems, with particular emphasis on analyzing the ways in which policy changes impact producers and production practices in both the United States and sub-Saharan Africa. Her previous research has focused on agricultural biotechnologies and cross-national pesticide regulations. Currently, she has two ongoing research programs. The first program studies the linkages between Southern Africa (South Africa, Botswana, and Namibia) red meat industries and global agriculture and food systems governance. The second analyzes international agricultural development assistance in developing countries, with an emphasis on the ways in which agricultural assistance targets women and focuses on gender empowerment. She has published articles focusing on agricultural biotechnologies, the patterns and problems surrounding modern food consumption practices, the global red meat trade, and gender and agricultural development assistance. Dr. Ransom was a 2005-2006 American Association for the Advancement of Science policy fellow where she focused on Codex Alimentarius agrifood standards as an international trade specialist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In addition to her position at the University of Richmond, she is currently a research associate with the Institute of Theory and Practice of International Relations at the College of William and Mary. Dr. Ransom received her BA in sociology and political science from Western Carolina University and her MA and PhD in sociology from Michigan State University.

https://vimeo.com/117814412
Michael Rodemeyer
University of Virginia

Michael Rodemeyer completed his adjunct professorship in 2015 in the Department of Engineering and Society of the University of Virginia, where he taught and directed the Science and Technology Policy Internship Program. Mr. Rodemeyer founded the Pew Initiative on Food and Biotechnology and served as its executive director from 2000 to 2005. Before that, he spent nearly 25 years in the federal government. In 1998 and 1999, he was the assistant director for environment in the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the Executive Office of the President. He served for 15 years on the staff of the House of Representatives Committee on Science, including 7 years as the Chief Democratic Counsel. From 1976 through 1984, Mr. Rodemeyer was a staff attorney with the Federal Trade Commission. He also taught congressional and environmental policy-making as an adjunct professor of the Johns Hopkins University School of Arts and Sciences from 2000 through 2004. Mr. Rodemeyer graduated with honors from Harvard Law School in 1975 and received his undergraduate degree in sociology with honors from Princeton University in 1972.

https://vimeo.com/117501313
David M. Stelly
Texas A&M University

David M. Stelly holds joint appointments with Texas A&M University and Texas A&M AgriLife Research. He is a professor in the Department of Soil and Crop Sciences and has over 30 years of professional experience in breeding of diploid and polyploid crops, germplasm introgression, reproductive biology and cytology, cytogenetics, genetics, and genomics. The research, breeding, and graduate-education programs under Dr. Stelly’s guidance have emphasized use of naturally occurring germplasm for crop improvement. Common elements of the research are wild-species germplasm introgression, chromosome manipulations and substitution, ploidy manipulations, conventional and molecular cytogenetics, genetic analysis, marker development, marker-assisted selection, reproductive cytology and genetics, and various types of genome mapping (linkage, BAC physical, and radiation hybrid mapping), sequencing, and their integration. Most of his work has been devoted to genetic improvement of Upland cotton, but some of it is devoted to developing a platform for wide hybridization of sorghum and creation of new energy crops. Dr. Stelly has served Texas A&M through its Council for Principal Investigators (CPI), helping to spawn and now serving on the Texas A&M Institute for Genome Sciences and Society (TIGSS) and codirecting his department’s faculty-driven core AgriGenomics Laboratory. He served a number of years ago as the first elected chair of the International Cotton Genome Initiative (ICGI) and also served as president of the National Association of Plant Breeders (NAPB). He was re-elected and now serving again as Chair of ICGI. Dr. Stelly received his MS in Plant Breeding and Cytogenetics from Iowa State University and his BS in Genetics and PhD in Plant Breeding and Plant Genetics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

https://vimeo.com/117282671
C. N. Stewart, Jr.
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

C. Neal Stewart is a professor of plant sciences at the University of Tennessee and holds the Ivan Racheff Chair of Excellence in plant molecular genetics. He is also the co-director of the Tennessee Plant Research Center. After a postdoctoral position at the University of Georgia, Dr. Stewart joined the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro as an assistant-, then associate professor in biology, prior to moving to the University of Tennessee and assuming the Racheff Chair. He teaches courses on plant biotechnology and research ethics. The laboratory’s research spans plant biotechnology, synthetic biology, genomics, and ecology with an interest in understanding and manipulating systems relative to agricultural production and environmental function. Dr. Stewart earned his BS in horticulture and agricultural education from North Carolina State University and an MA in education from Appalachian State University. He then received an MS in biology and ecology and a PhD in biology and plant physiology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Dr. Stewart is also a singer and songwriter.

https://vimeo.com/117316623
Robert J. Whitaker
Produce Marketing Association

Robert Whitaker received his PhD in biology from the State University of New York at Binghamton in 1982. On graduating, he joined DNA Plant Technology Corporation as a postdoctoral research scientist and eventually served as both vice president for vegetable research and development and vice president for product development for the company. During his tenure there, Dr. Whitaker had responsibility for plant tissue culture, breeding, food science, chemistry, and genetic-engineering functions related to vegetable products. In 1998, he joined NewStar as vice president of product development and quality; there, he developed corporate food safety programs and spearheaded product-development activities. In April 2008, he became the chief science and technology officer of the Produce Marketing Association, overseeing food safety and technology efforts from field to fork. He has served as a volunteer leader for the United Fresh Produce Association and as chairman of the International Fresh-cut Produce Association (IFPA) board and has been directly involved on a number of industry and government food safety and technology initiatives. In 2006, Dr. Whitaker was awarded IFPA’s Technical Achievement Award for his work in food safety and product development. He also received NSF Food Safety Leadership award in 2015. Bob was named to the Executive Committee for the Center for Produce Safety (CPS) in 2007 and served as chairman of the CPS Technical Committee until 2013. He still serves as a member of the CPS Technical Committee, which oversees the solicitation and awarding of funds for produce food safety research and on the Executive Committee of the CPS Board of Directors.

https://vimeo.com/117503300

Committee Membership Roster Comments

August 19, 2014: The committee membership has changed due to the resignation of Karen Hokanson.
September 18, 2014: The committee membership has changed due to the resignation of Lawrence Busch.
November 18, 2014: The committee members has changed due to the additions of Drs. Amasino, Ransom, and Glenna to the committee.

Events


Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

Report Release Presentation of Genetically Engineered Crops: Experiences and Prospects

This consensus report examines a range of questions and opinions about the economic, agronomic, health, safety, or other effects of genetically engineered (GE) crops and food. Claims and research that extol both the benefits and risks of GE crops have created a confusing landscape for the public and for policy makers. This report is intended to provide an independent, objective examination of what has been learned since the introduction of GE crops, based on current evidence.

 

Watch webcast recordings below:

Presentation by Committee Chair Fred Gould, North Carolina State University

Q&A with Committee Chair Fred Gould and committee members, Richard Amasino (University of Wisconsin-Madison), Dominique Brossard (University of Wisconsin-Madison) and Michael Rodemeyer

 

More release information:

View presentation slides from release event here

View the National Academies press release here

 

More report information:

Download PDF of the report

View report in brief

Search findings and recommendations

Search responses to public comments

 

Download the Spanish translation of the summary

Download the Japanese translation of the summary

 

Learn more about the National Academies study process

View the National Academies conflict of interest policy


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  BANR Staff
Contact Email:  banr@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1954

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Michael Rodemeyer
Mike Gallo
Rick Amasino
Neal Stewart
Kevin Pixley
Tim Griffin
Dominique Brossard
Fred Gould
Elizabeth Ransom
Dan Magraw
Rick Dixon
Bob Whitaker
Bruce Hamaker
Robin Buell
Leland Glenna

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Report launch

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 25, 2016
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1954

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Bob Whitaker
Carol Mallory-Smith
Dan Magraw
David Stelly
Dominique Brossard
Elizabeth Ransom
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Ken Giller
Leland Glenna
Michael Rodemeyer
Neal Stewart
Rick Amasino
Rick Dixon
Tim Griffin
Fred Gould
Peter Kareiva

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Report summary

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Report summary

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 25, 2016
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1954

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
David Stelly
Dan Magraw
Michael Rodemeyer
Mike Gallo
Leland Glenna
Neal Stewart
Elizabeth Ransom
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Rick Amasino
Rick Dixon
Kevin Pixley

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Report draft and preparation for report launch

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Report draft

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 25, 2016
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1954

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Bob Whitaker
David Stelly
Dominique Brossard
Dan Magraw
Michael Rodemeyer
Mike Gallo
Robin Buell
Leland Glenna
Neal Stewart
Elizabeth Ransom
Carol Mallory-Smith
Bruce Hamaker

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Chapter 5 report draft

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Chapter 5 report draft

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 25, 2016
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Carol Mallory-Smith
Elizabeth Ransom
Rick Amasino
David Stelly
Dominique Brossard
Dan Magraw
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Kevin Pixley
Michael Rodemeyer
Rick Dixon
Tim Griffin
Peter Kareiva
Leland Glenna
Neal Stewart
Bruce Hamaker

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Report draft

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Report draft

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 25, 2016
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Rick Amasino
Bob Whitaker
David Stelly
Dominique Brossard
Dan Magraw
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Kevin Pixley
Michael Rodemeyer
Mike Gallo
Rick Dixon
Robin Buell
Tim Griffin
Peter Kareiva
Leland Glenna
Neal Stewart

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Report draft

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Report draft

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 25, 2016
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1954

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1954

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Michael Rodemeyer
David Stelly
Dan Magraw
Dominique Brossard
Elizabeth Ransom
Mike Gallo
Rick Amasino
Neal Stewart
Bruce Hamaker
Ken Giller
Kevin Pixley
Rick Dixon

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Chapter 8

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Chapter 8 draft

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
December 17, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Bob Whitaker
Dan Magraw
Rick Amasion
Carol Mallory-Smith
Elizabeth Ransom
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Mike Gallo
Neal Stewart
Rick Dixon
Robin Buell
David Stelly

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Chapters 6 and 7

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Drafts of Chapters 6 and 7

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
December 17, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1954

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Bob Whitaker
Dominique Brossard
Elizabeth Ransom
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Kevin Pixley
Leland Glenna
Michael Rodemeyer
Mike Gallo
Neal Stewart
Rick Amasino
Tim Griffin
Carol Mallory-Smith
Robin Buell
Rick Dixon
David Stelly
Leland Glenna
Dan Magraw

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Chapter 4 draft

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Chapter 4 draft

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
December 09, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1954

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Bob Whitaker
Dominique Brossard
Bruce Hamaker
Elizabeth Ransom
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Ken Giller
Kevin Pixley
Leland Glenna
Michael Rodemeyer
Mike Gallo
Neal Stewart
Rick Amasino
Tim Griffin
Peter Kareiva
Robin Buell
Rick Dixon
Dan Magraw

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Chapters 1-3 drafts

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Chapters 1-3 drafts

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
December 09, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Carol Mallory-Smith
Michael Rodemeyer
Dan Magraw
Neal Stewart
Leland Glenna
Elizabeth Ransom
Tim Griffin
Rick Dixon
Robin Buell
David Stellly
Rick Amasino
Bruce Hamaker
Mike Gallo
Bob Whitaker

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Chapter 1

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Chapter 1 draft

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 16, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Dan Magraw
Leland Glenna
Elizabeth Ransom
Michael Rodemeyer
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Dominique Brossard

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Report draft

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Report draft

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 25, 2016
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Richard Amasino
Dominique Brossard
Robin Buell
Richard Dixon
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Ken Giller
Leland Glenna
Tim Griffin
Bruce Hamaker
Peter Kareiva
Dan Magraw
Carol Mallory-Smith
Kevin Pixley
Elizabeth Ransom
Michael Rodemeyer
David Stelly
Neal Stewart
Bob Whitaker

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Report draft

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Report draft

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 13, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Wednesday, May 13, 2015 to gather information from invited speakers.

Watch the webinar recording here

  • Samuel Timpo, Associate Director, African Biosafety Network of Expertise, New Partnership for Africa’s Development. 

Samuel Timpo is the associate director of the African Biosafety Network of Expertise (ABNE) and the socioeconomics specialist. ABNE is an initiative of the New Partnership for African Development. Previously, Mr. Timpo worked as a socioeconomist with the Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute (BNARI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for almost 7 years. His areas of interest include biotechnology and biosafety, entrepreneurship, and transformational development. During his time with BNARI, Mr. Timpo served as the Ghana team leader for the USAID Program for Biosafety Systems and also as secretary to both the Country Advisory Group on Biosafety and the National Biosafety Committee. He was instrumental in the development of Ghana’s national biosafety frameworks and directly contributed to the development of a national biosafety communications strategy and biotechnology policy. Mr. Timpo earned a masters degree in agricultural economics from the University of Ghana, Legon. He also previously taught various courses including entrepreneurship, micro-enterprise development and management, agricultural economics, and agricultural finance and marketing at the University of Ghana, the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration, and the School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences.

  • Matin Qaim, Professor of International Food Economics and Rural Development, University of Goettingen. 

Matin Qaim is an agricultural economist and professor of international food economics and rural development at the University of Goettingen in Germany. Previously he was a professor at the University of Hohenheim (Stuttgart), a research team leader at the Center for Development Research (Bonn), and a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Qaim holds a doctoral degree from the University of Bonn. He has extensive research experience related to the economics of agricultural biotechnology with a focus on analyzing impacts in developing countries. Dr. Qaim has published widely in international scientific journals, including in Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Nature Biotechnology. He is member of several scientific and policy advisory committees, including for the German Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture and the Life Science Commission of the German Academy of Sciences (Leopoldina). He has also served on the boards of various international organizations and projects, including CIMMYT, Africa Harvest, and the Golden Rice Project.

  • Justus Wesseler, Professor of Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy, Wageningen University.

Justus Wesseler holds the chair in Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy at Wageningen University, The Netherlands. He has a Ph.D. in agricultural, environmental and natural resource economics from the University of Göttingen, Germany. His research work is on the economics of biotechnology, value chain economics, and regulatory economics including issues related to coexistence. The major focus is on the contribution of value chains to improve sustainability and the impact of new technologies and regulations on the value chain in this respect. He was professor of agricultural and food economics and head of the Research Department of Agricultural Economics at the Center of Life and Food Sciences Weihenstephan from 2011 to 2013 and is member of the International Consortium of Applied Bioeconomy Research (ICABR), co-editor of AgBioForum, and coordinator of the EU-funded project Practical Implementation of Coexistence in Europe (PRICE). His research work on the economics of the bioeconomy has been published in more than 100 contributions to peer reviewed journals and books.

Presentations for each speaker start at the below timestamps:

  • Samuel Timpo: 00:05:38
  • Matin Qaim: 00:40:44
  • Justus Wesseler: 01:21:05

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3062

Agenda
Webinar on Socioeconomic Issues in Developing Countries

The committee held a webinar on Wednesday, May 13 at 10 am – 12 pm EDT to gather information from invited speakers:

Samuel Timpo, Associate Director, African Biosafety Network of Expertise of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development
Matin Qaim, Professor of International Food Economics and Rural Development, University of Goettingen
Justus Wesseler, Professor of Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy, Wageningen University

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Richard Amasino
Dominique Brossard
Robin Buell
Richard Dixon
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Mike Gallo
Ken Giller
Leland Glenna
Tim Griffin
Dan Magraw
Carol Mallory-Smith
Kevin Pixley
Elizabeth Ransom
Michael Rodemeyer
David Stelly
Neal Stewart

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Report draft status
Committee assignments

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Report draft

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 20, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Webinar
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a Public Webinar on Thursday, May 7, 2015, to gather information about RNAi technology.

Watch the webinar recording here

  • Stephen Chan, Harvard Medical School, provided an introduction to RNAi technology and discussed research investigating the biological effects of consuming small RNA molecules found in crops. 

Stephen Chan graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and received his MD and PhD from the University of California, San Francisco. He then completed an internship and residency in Internal Medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and fellowship training in Cardiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital. His postdoctoral research was performed in the laboratory of Joseph Loscalzo, MD, PhD, and Dr. Chan joined the faculty at BWH and Harvard Medical School in July 2010 where he is an Assistant Professor of Medicine. Dr. Chan devotes a primary focus on basic research coupled with a clinical practice in general cardiology and pulmonary vascular medicine. Specifically, Dr. Chan’s scientific work has focused on the study of the fundamental biology of non-coding RNAs including microRNAs and their importance in cardiovascular and pulmonary vascular health and disease. In regard to plant biology, Dr. Chan has studied and published on the potential for transfer of non-coding RNAs from ingested dietary substances in mammals and insects. Dr. Chan has held research grants from the National Institutes of Health, the American Heart Association, the Pulmonary Hypertension Association, Gilead Sciences, and the Cardiovascular Medical Research and Education Fund. He has been the recipient of a number of philanthropic awards at BWH, including the Lerner Scholarship, the Watkins Discovery Award, the Harris Family Research Prize, and the McArthur-Radovsky Research Scholarship. Dr. Chan has been invited to present his research at both national and international venues, and he has received international research awards from the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, and the American Society of Microbiology.

  • David Heckel, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, discussed strategies for using plant-mediated RNAi in crop protection. 

David G. Heckel received his Ph.D. at Stanford University in 1980 and from 1980 to 1999 served as assistant, associate, and full professor in biological sciences at Clemson University. He moved to the Genetics Department at the University of Melbourne in Australia from 1999 to 2003. In 2004 he joined the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, as director and head of the Entomology Department. Research interests include the genetic analysis of resistance to chemical insecticides and Bacillus thuringiensis toxins, comparative digestive and detoxicative strategies of host-plant generalist vs. specialist herbivorous insects, reproductive isolating mechanisms in sympatric speciation, the genetics and evolution of sex pheromone communication systems in moths, the role of horizontal gene transfer in conferring novel metabolic functions in herbivorous insects, and the application of RNA interference in pest control.

More information about RNAi Technology:

  • What is RNAi? RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process that cells use to turn down, or silence, the activity of specific genes. Inside every cell of every organism is DNA, the double helix that holds instructions for making the protein building blocks of life. RNA is a messenger that transports the instructions encoded in DNA to the protein factories of the cell. When interfering RNA binds to a specific messenger RNA, no protein is produced because the interfering RNA can either block translation or target the messenger RNA for degradation. This process turns down or silences the expression of specific genes.
  • Why did the committee hear about RNAi? Some researchers are investigating the possibility of using RNAi in agriculture for applications such as improving resistance to drought and pests or boosting the nutritional value of crops. Scientists can introduce interfering RNA via genetic-engineering techniques to trigger RNAi silencing within plants and regulate a specific gene of their choice. This has been used to develop slow-browning apples and potatoes and to reduce lignin in alfalfa.
  • Inside every cell of every organism is DNA, the double helix that holds instructions for making the protein building blocks of life. RNA is a messenger that transports the instructions encoded in DNA to the protein factories of the cell.

  • RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process that cells use to turn down, or silence, the activity of specific genes. Scientists can introduce interfering RNA via genetic-engineering techniques. When interfering RNA binds to a specific messenger RNA, no protein is produced because the interfering RNA either blocks translation or targets the messenger RNA for degradation. This process turns down or silences the expression of specific genes.

  • Crop breeders have an array of tools to help improve crop traits, from traditional breeding to transgenic techniques. RNAi is another such tool.

  • Crop breeders have already put RNAi to use as a tool to turn down or silence the expression of certain genes, for example to create non-browning varieties of apples and potatoes and reduced-lignin alfalfa.

  • RNAi has been used to create non-browning varieties of apples and potatoes. Slicing potatoes or biting into an apple releases the plant enzyme polyphenol oxidase. This leads to the production of melanin, a compound that causes browning. RNAi turns down the expression of the genes that produce polyphenol oxidase, so browning is reduced.

  • RNAi has been used to create a reduced-lignin variety of alfalfa. Alfalfa—a plant that is a key component of hay—is particularly high in lignin. Lignin makes plant stems strong, but ruminants find it essentially indigestible. RNAi is used to target genes that control lignin content, creating a variety of reduced-lignin alfalfa that cows find easier to digest.

  • Crop breeders could use RNAi as a tool to turn down or silence the expression of certain genes, for example to improve crops’ resistance to pests or drought or to boost nutritional value.

  • RNAi could target genes that are essential for pests’ survival. The corn rootworm is a destructive pest. RNAi could target genes essential to the corn rootworm’s survival. Rootworms that feed on the GE-corn plants would be eliminated. Because the RNAi would be specific to corn rootworm genes, it would not affect other insects feeding on the same corn plants.

  • RNAi could target genes involved in drought resistance. The plant hormone abscisic acid triggers plant defenses to drought, such as closing stomata and repressing growth and photosynthesis until more water is available. RNAi could target genes that regulate levels of abscisic acid, allowing the hormone to accumulate and trigger drought response. This could boost crops’ resistance to drought conditions.

  • RNAi could target genes that regulate nutrient content. Lysine is an amino acid that people must get from the food they eat. RNAi could target crop genes that regulate levels of lysine, allowing more lysine to accumulate and creating high-lysine varieties.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
RNAi Technology

The committee held a webinar on Thursday, May 7 at 11 am – 1 pm EDT to gather information from invited speakers:

Stephen Chan, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical
David Heckel, Professor, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Webinar
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Wednesday, May 6, 2015 to gather information from invited speakers.

Watch the webinar recording here

  • Alan Bennett, Executive Director, Public Intellectual Property Resource for Agriculture, and Distinguished Professor, University of California-Davis. 

Alan Bennett is Distinguished Professor at the University of California, Davis where he has been an active researcher, educator, policy advisor, and technology transfer advocate. He also serves as the founding Executive Director of the “Public Intellectual Property Resource for Agriculture” (PIPRA), a not-for-profit organization that provides commercialization strategy advice and intellectual property rights analysis to support the commercialization of public sector innovations. Dr. Bennett earned B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in plant biology at UC Davis and Cornell University, respectively, has published over 160 scientific research papers in the area of plant molecular biology, and is recognized as an “ISI Most Cited Author”. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and a Senior Fellow of the California Council for Science and Technology (CCST), a science policy advisory council for the State of California. From 2000 to 2004, Dr. Bennett served as the Executive Director of the University of California Systemwide Office of Research Administration and Technology Transfer where he was responsible for research policy and the management of a portfolio of over 5,000 patented inventions, 700 active licenses, and revenue in excess of $350MM. From 2004 to 2008, Dr. Bennett served as the Associate Vice Chancellor for Research at UC Davis where he founded and managed InnovationAccess, an organization responsible for technology transfer, business development, and support for technology-based economic development in the Sacramento/Davis region. He also serves on several corporate research advisory boards and is the founding CEO of the UC Davis-Chile Life Science Innovation Center.

  • Diana Horvath, President, Two Blades Foundation. 

Diana Horvath helped to establish the Two Blades Foundation (2Blades), a charitable organization engaged in the development and delivery of durable disease resistance for agriculture, and currently serves as the Foundation’s President. Trained in biochemistry and molecular biology, her professional experience has focused on research on biotic constraints on agriculture in developing countries and the molecular mechanisms of plant disease resistance and on establishing companies with innovative agricultural biotechnologies. Since 2004, Dr. Horvath has worked with her 2Blades colleagues to build development programs for resistance to significant diseases of important commercial and subsistence crops. 2Blades’ efforts are aimed at practical outcomes for real-world disease problems, such as major diseases of wheat, citrus, and tomato. Strategic deployment of resistant crops includes the management of intellectual property in order to ensure responsible stewardship of genetic resources and the delivery of the broadest benefits to farmers.

  • Richard Jefferson, Founder and CEO, Cambia, and Professor of Science, Technology & Law, Queensland University of Technology. bio

Richard Jefferson is a prominent molecular biologist, social entrepreneur and open innovation systems strategist. He is founder and CEO of Cambia and a Professor of Science, Technology & Law at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT). Richard is a graduate of the University of California’s College of Creative Studies, with a Ph.D. in molecular biology from University of Colorado. As a National Institutes of Health postdoc in Cambridge, UK, he conducted the world’s first field release of a biotech crop and developed the most widely cited and licensed enabling biotechnology and distributed it under open source principles. After becoming the first molecular biologist for the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization, he founded Cambia in 1991, an independent, global nonprofit social enterprise to bring efficiency, effectiveness, and equity to science-enabled innovation, based in Canberra, Australia. At Cambia, Richard developed the landmark hologenome theory of evolution, continued inventing, distributing, and supporting enabling technologies and created the BiOS (Biological Open Source) Initiative, the first open patent-based commons for science. Fifteen years ago, Cambia launched the Patent Lens, the most popular open global full-text resource for patent transparency. This work has culminated in the current vision of a global digital public good — ‘The Lens’ — to disrupt and democratize the innovation system, through ‘Innovation Cartography’. Richard is an ‘Outstanding Social Entrepreneur’ of the Schwab Foundation and a regular panelist at the World Economic Forum’s Davos annual meetings and summits. He served four years on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Intellectual Property and is now on the Global Agenda Council on the Economics of Innovation. He is the recipient of the American Society of Plant Science’ ‘Leadership in Science’ award, was named to Scientific American’s list of the world’s 50 Most Influential Technologists, and is the inaugural Medalist of the Center for Science & Policy Outcomes. His work has featured in media in dozens of countries, and includes profiles in The Economist, New York Times, Newsweek, Red Herring, Nature, Science, Nature Biotechnology and many others.

Presentations for each speaker start at the below timestamps:

  • Alan Bennett: 00:08:20
  • Diana Horvath: 00:42:04
  • Richard Jefferson: 01:18:17

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3062

Agenda
The committee held a webinar on Monday, April 13 at 3:30pm – 5:30pm EDT to gather information from invited speakers:

Richard Jefferson, Chief Executive Officer, Cambia, and Professor of Science, Technology and Law, Queensland University of Technology
Alan Bennett, Executive Director, Public Intellectual Property Resource for Agriculture, and Distinguished Professor, University of California-Davis

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Webinar
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Thursday, April 30, 2015 to gather information from invited speakers.

Watch the webinar recording here

  • Rob Horsch, Deputy Director, Global Development, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. 

Rob Horsch, deputy director, leads the Agricultural Research and Development team of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which manages a portfolio of grants aimed at improving agricultural productivity, reducing farmer risk, and developing more nutritious versions of the staple crops grown and consumed by farm families, including varieties that thrive in different soil types and are resistant to disease, pests, and environmental stresses such as drought. Prior to joining the foundation in 2006, Rob was the leader of International Development Partnerships at Monsanto Company and involved in a number of public private partnerships for agricultural development. Rob is a plant biologist and has served on the editorial boards of several leading journals in the plant sciences and as an advisor to the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy. He was awarded the 1998 National Medal of Technology by President Clinton for contributions to the development of agricultural biotechnology. Rob received his Ph.D. in genetics at the University of California, Riverside, in 1979, and then conducted postdoctoral work in plant physiology at the University of Saskatchewan.

  • John McMurdy, International Research Advisor & Scaling Team Leader, Bureau of Food Security, U.S. Agency for International Development. 

John McMurdy is an international research and biotechnology advisor in the Bureau for Food Security at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) where he manages several of the agencies investments in plant biotechnology R&D across Africa and South Asia. These investments support technology transfer, product development of new crop varieties, and training for developing country scientists to more fully utilize biotechnology. John additionally manages USAID’s investments in biosafety capacity development, which provide technical assistance to policymakers in developing science-based regulatory systems and increase the technical literacy of the international biotechnology regulatory community. Before coming to USAID, John served as the Chief Technology Officer at Corum Medical, a medical device company he co-founded with physician and engineering colleagues in Providence, Rhode Island. He received his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Brown University and his B.S./M.S. from the University of Rochester.

  • Brian Dowd-Uribe, Assistant Professor, UN-Mandated University for Peace. 

Brian Dowd-Uribe is the department chair and an assistant professor in the Department of Environment and Development at the UN-mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) in Costa Rica. He holds an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Environment Studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz. Brian served as a postdoctoral research scientist in the Centre for Research on Environmental Decisions in Columbia University’s Earth Institute, where he continues to hold the title of adjunct research scientist. His doctoral research took place in Burkina Faso, where he examined the introduction of transgenic cotton among smallholder farmers. Prior to his doctoral studies, Brian served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Togo, West Africa.

Presentations for each speaker start at the below timestamps:

  • Rob Horsch: 00:07:07
  • John McMurdy: 00:43:20
  • Brian Dowd-Uribe: 01:11:09

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3062

Agenda
The committee held a webinar on Thursday, April 30 at 11am – 1pm EDT to gather information from invited speakers:

Rob Horsch, Deputy Director, Global Development, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
John McMurdy, International Research Advisor & Scaling Team Leader, Bureau of Food Security, U.S. Agency for International Development
Brian Dowd-Uribe, Assistant Professor, UN-Mandated University for Peace

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Webinar
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 to gather information from invited speakers.

Watch the webinar recording here

 

  • Neal Carter, President, Okanagan Specialty Fruits, discussed the development of the Arctic® Apple, which is engineered to not brown when sliced, bitten, or bruised. 

Neal Carter is president and founder of Okanagan Specialty Fruits (OSF), a grower-led biotechnology company specializing in the creation of novel tree fruit varieties. Outside of OSF, he and his wife Louisa grow and pack apples and cherries from their orchard in British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley. For over 30 years, Neal has worked with numerous crops as a bioresource engineer around the globe, ranging from maize to mango, from growing to harvesting, packing, storage, processing and packaging. It was through this firsthand experience that Neal was persuaded that biotechnology can help agriculture meet ever-expanding global food demand. Neal and Louisa founded OSF in 1996 in order to explore opportunities to utilize biotechnology to boost fruit consumption and growers’ sustainability. OSF’s flagship project is the development of nonbrowning Arctic® apples, which have been engineered to resist enzymatic browning by silencing the genes that produce polyphenol oxidase, the enzyme that drives the browning reaction. The first two Arctic® apple varieties, Arctic® Granny and Arctic® Golden, have recently received regulatory approval in both Canada and the United States, and it is expected they will be available in grocery stores within a few years. With apple consumption flat-to-declining for the past couple decades, Neal believes that Arctic® apples will provide a consumption trigger for the industry by making apples more convenient as well as providing numerous other benefits throughout the supply chain, including reducing food waste.

  • Mark McCaslin, Vice President-Research, Forage Genetics International, discussed genetically engineered traits in alfalfa that reduce lignin content and extend the harvest window. 

A California native, Mark McCaslin attended the University of California at Davis, where he received B.S. and M.S. degrees in agronomy. Mark earned a Ph.D. in plant breeding from Cornell University in 1981. Mark has worked in alfalfa breeding for over 30 years and has been responsible for developing over 250 alfalfa cultivars. He was a co-founder and currently serves as Vice President–Research of Forage Genetics International. Forage Genetics International (a wholly owned subsidiary of Land O’Lakes, Inc.) is a global leader in alfalfa and corn silage biotechnology, breeding, seed production, sales and marketing. Mark and his wife Jessica live in Minneapolis, MN.

  • Craig Richael, Director of Research and Development, Simplot Plant Sciences, discussed the development of the Innate™ potato, engineered to be less prone to bruising and to contain less asparagine, which reduces the potential for acrylamide to form when the potatoes are cooked at high temperatures. 

Craig Richael obtained a B.S. degree in plant sciences from Cornell University and a Ph.D. in molecular and cellular biology from the University of California-Davis. In 2001, he joined the Simplot Plant Sciences team as a scientist working to develop genetic transformation systems for potato and other crops. His responsibilities evolved into supervising greenhouse and field testing of transgenic potato plants for trait efficacy and line selection. Since 2013, he has acted as Director of R&D, guiding the development of Innate™ GM potato products. Craig enjoys putting into practice the J. R. Simplot Company’s motto, “Bringing Earth’s Resources to Life”.

More information about quality traits:

  • What are quality traits? Quality traits are crop characteristics valued by consumers and retailers. Quality traits can be introduced to crops through conventional plant breeding, but they can also be incorporated through genetic-engineering techniques that more precisely select and insert the genes that code for desirable characteristics. Examples include apples that are more resilient to bruising and rice that has increased levels of vitamin A.
  • Why did the committee hear about quality traits? To consider the future prospects for genetically engineered crops, the committee was interested in hearing about projects underway to enhance quality traits using genetic-engineering technologies.
  • Quality traits are developed to increase the desirability of a product to consumers. For example, extending the shelf life of a tomato or making an apple more resilient against bruising may increase the product’s value to retailers and consumers.

  • Quality traits can be developed by conventional plant-breeding techniques, where plants are crossed to obtain offspring with desired quality traits, or by genetic-engineering technologies, which allow scientists to more precisely select and insert the genes that code for certain desirable traits.

  • Why use genetic engineering to change quality traits? Genetic-engineering techniques enable scientists to incorporate traits into plants that they would not be able to breed into the plant through conventional plant-breeding methods. For example, through genetic engineering scientists can transfer genes that are particularly difficult to access or even transfer genes between different species. Genetic engineering also has the potential to alter expression of native genes in a plant to optimize quality traits like nutrient content or shelf life.

  • GE crops with enhanced quality traits have been or may soon be approved for commercial production. For example, Golden rice is a variety of rice that has been engineered to improve nutrition. It is designed to be grown and consumed in developing countries with low levels of dietary vitamin A, which can lead to blindness in children. Genetic engineering has also been used to produce fruits and vegetables that bruise less easily and last longer after harvest. Different chemical reactions that occur once a fruit or vegetable has been removed from the plant can lead to bruising or spoiling. Genetic-engineering techniques have been used to reduce or silence these reactions in apples and potatoes. Alfalfa genetically engineered to have less lignin is another example of a quality trait. The reduction of lignin content in the alfalfa makes it easier for cows to digest.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3062

Agenda
The committee will hold a webinar on Tuesday, April 21 at 2pm – 4pm EDT to gather information from invited speakers:

Neal Carter, President, Okanagan Specialty Fruits
Mark McCaslin, Vice President-Research, Forage Genetics International
Craig Richael, Director of Research and Development, Simplot Plant Sciences

The webinar is an information-gathering meeting for the committee in which the speakers are invited to provide input to the committee.

Members of the public are welcome to register to listen to the webinar and view the presentations. The webinar will also be recorded and posted on the study’s website.

To learn more about the webinar, visit: http://nas-sites.org/ge-crops/2015/03/20/webinar-april-21-ge-quality-traits/
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Webinar
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Monday, April 6, 2015, to gather information on the microbiome.

Watch the webinar recording here

  • Jonathan Eisen, University of California, Davis, provided an introduction to the microbiome, discussed lateral gene transfer from microbes to other organisms, and examined whether there is evidence that the herbicide glyphosate affects the human microbiome. 

Jonathan Eisen is an evolutionary biologist and a professor at the University of California-Davis. His research focuses on mechanisms underlying the origin of novelty (how new processes and functions originate). His work involves the use of high throughput DNA sequencing methods to characterize microbes and then the use and development of computational methods for analysis. The computational work has focused on integrating evolutionary analysis with genome analysis – so called “phylogenomics.” He previously applied the phylogenomic approach to cultured organisms, such as those from extreme environments and those with key properties as they relate to evolution or global climate cycles. He currently uses sequencing and phylogenomic methods to study microbes directly in their natural habitats (that is, without culturing). In particularly, he focuses on how communities of microbes interact with each other and with plant and animal hosts to create new functions. Prior to his position at UC-Davis, Dr. Eisen was on the faculty of The Institute for Genomic Research. He is a fellow of the American Society of Microbiology and the academic editor in chief for PLoS Biology. Dr. Eisen received his A.B. in biology from Harvard College and his Ph.D. in biological sciences from Stanford University, where he studied the evolution of DNA repair processes.

More information about the microbiome:

  • What is the microbiome? Microbiomes are communities of microbes—bacteria, viruses, and fungi—that live in, on, and around us.
  • Why did the committee hear about the microbiome? From the moment we were born, microbes began living in and on our bodies. Beneficial microbes contribute to human health by defending against pathogens, helping digest food, and boosting our immune systems. Plants also have microbiomes; distinct microbial communities live on leaves, within flowers, and on roots and the soil around them. Farmers and scientists alike think microbes play many roles in crop growth and development. Some scientists are now interested in investigating those roles and determining if GE traits or treatment with herbicides could influence the plant, soil, or human microbiome.
  • From the moment we were born, microbes began living in and on our bodies. Although some microbes can be harmful to human health, beneficial microbial communities help keep us healthy by defending against pathogens, helping digest food, and boosting our immune systems.
  • Many of the foods we eat would be indigestible without the trillions of microbes living within our guts. For example, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron lives in our intestines and helps our bodies process sugars.

  • Plants also have microbiomes! Distinct microbial communities live inside roots, on leaves, and within flowers. Farmers and scientists alike think these microbiomes play many roles in crop growth and development.

  • Legumes (plants such as soybeans, peanuts, alfalfa, and peas) live in a mutually beneficial relationship with nitrogen-fixing microbes called Rhizobia. The microbes convert nitrogen in the air to a form that the plants can take up through their roots. In exchange, the plants provide the microbes with a place to live , a supply of carbon, and root secretions that protect the bacteria from oxygen.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3062

Agenda
The committee held a webinar on Monday, April 6 at 2pm-3pm EDT to gather information from invited speaker:

Johnathan Eisen, Professor, University of California – Davis

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Carol Mallory-Smith
Ken Giller
Leland Glenna
Michael Rodemeyer
Dan Magraw
Rick Amasino
Elizabeth Ransom
Tim Griffin
Dominique Brossard
Kevin Pixley
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Robin Buell
Peter Kareiva
Rick Dixon
Neal Stewart
Mike Gallo
David Stelly

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

New reports in the literature
Report draft

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
April 03, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

via WebEx
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Friday, March 27, 2015 to gather information from invited speakers. The speakers’ presentations addressed the state of the science regarding GE traits in development for tree species and governance issues related to the commercialization of GE trees.

Watch the webinar recording here

  • Steve Strauss, Professor, Oregon State University, discussed the economic and environmental benefits that genetic engineering could bring to tree species and the current state of the U.S. regulatory system with regards to trees. 

Steve Strauss is a distinguished professor of forest biotechnology in the Department of Forest Science at Oregon State University (OSU). He also has joint appointments in the Genetics and the Molecular and Cellular Biology Programs. He is the director of the Tree Biosafety and Genomics Research Cooperative at OSU, a university-public agency-industry consortium conducting research and education on the biosafety and physiology of genetically engineered trees used in plantation forestry and horticulture. Dr. Strauss directs the OSU Program for Outreach in Resource Biotechnology, aimed at promoting public understanding and facilitating science-based public debates in food and natural resources biotechnology. He was a 2005 Leopold Leadership Fellow, part of a program aimed at training environmental scientists to be more effective at influencing public policy and presenting science to news media. Dr. Strauss has earned a bachelor of science degree in ecology from Cornell University, a master of science degree in forest science from Yale University, and a doctorate degree in genetics from the University of California at Berkeley. He has published more than 160 scientific papers, given more than 170 invited lectures on biotechnology and genetics of trees, and obtained 16 million dollars of competitive grant support. He has also advised governments and written in scientific journals about national and international regulations on field research and commercial development of genetically engineered crops and trees. Dr. Strauss’ current research focuses on genetic engineering of flowering, stature, and transformation-based “functional genomics” using poplar trees as model organisms.

  • Les Pearson, Director of Regulatory Affairs, ArborGen, discussed the use of genetic engineering in ArborGen’s development of tree varieties and the advantages that genetic engineering may offer to challenges such as invasive insects and diseases that threaten forests and commercially produced trees. 

Les Pearson began with ArborGen in 2003 as Director of Regulatory Affairs responsible for the regulatory oversight of and commercial approvals for biotechnology tree seedlings. In January 2013 he took on additional responsibilities of managing the biotechnology science R&D program. Prior to joining ArborGen, Dr. Pearson served in a number of positions at Westvaco Corporation from 1989 to 2003, including most recently as the leader of Westvaco’s Forest Biotechnology Group, where he was responsible for managing research teams in growth genes, flowering control, and stress resistance as well as the regulatory oversight of Westvaco’s biotechnology tree research and development. He started his career at the University of Georgia, where he worked as a post-doctoral associate in plant gene expression research. Dr. Pearson received his Ph.D. in plant molecular biology from the John Innes Institute at the University of East Anglia where he did breakthrough research on the control of gene expression in transgenic plant cells. He also has a B.S. in biochemistry from the University of East Anglia in England where he graduated magna cum laude.

  • Bill Powell, Professor, State University of New York’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry, discussed his research to genetically engineer an American chestnut resistant to a fungal blight that killed the extensive chestnut forest in the eastern United States after it was introduced from Asia in the late 1800s. 

William Powell received his B.S. in biology in 1982 at Salisbury University, Maryland, and his Ph.D. in 1986 at Utah State University studying the molecular mechanisms of hypovirulence in the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica. He spent over two years as a postdoctoral associate at University of Florida researching transformation techniques using the fungal pathogen, Fusarium oxysporum. In 1989 he became a faculty member at the State University of New York’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF) at Syracuse, New York, where he began collaborating with his colleague, Dr. Charles Maynard, researching methods to develop a blight-resistant American chestnut (Castanea dentata) tree. He has also worked with American elm and hybrid poplar. In addition to being a professor at SUNY-ESF, Dr. Powell is the director of SUNY-ESF’s Council on Biotechnology in Forestry and the co-director of The American Chestnut Research and Restoration Program. Dr. Powell currently has over 50 peer-reviewed publications and one patent. He teaches courses in Principles of Genetics, Plant Biotechnology, and Biotechnology Freshman orientation. His most significant accomplishment is the enhancement of blight resistance in American chestnut by his research team and collaborators.

More information on genetically engineered trees:

  • What are genetically engineered trees? Trees have been transformed using genetic engineering to introduce novel traits such as disease resistance and increased biomass. Genetic engineering is used instead of or in addition to conventional plant breeding because it can speed the breeding process, which is time-consuming in long-lived species like trees. Genetic engineering can be used to incorporate traits that may be difficult to introduce through conventional plant-breeding techniques or that may not exist in the genetic variation of the species of interest.
  • Why did the committee hear about genetically engineered trees? Only a few tree species with GE traits are currently available. However, researchers are incorporating GE traits into many tree species, and these trees may be available in the near future. The committee wanted to hear about these developments.
  • Unlike annual crops like corn, which produce seeds in one growing season, trees take many years to reach maturity. For example, it takes a young loblolly tree about 5 years before it is old enough to produce seeds. To introduce a novel trait with conventional plant breeding, a tree with a favorable trait would be crossed with a sexually compatible tree with a different favorable trait and then backcrossed for several life cycles. Because of a tree’s long life span, it would take many years before the offspring trees were old enough for the plant breeder to tell which of them might have the favorable traits. This process of selection for favorable traits would need to be performed for several life cycles; therefore, introducing a novel trait into a tree with conventional plant breeding would take many years, even decades.
  • Genetic engineering allows scientists to introduce novel traits without disturbing other traits. For instance, imagine that a new disease is destroying Macintosh apple trees, and a plant breeder wants to introduce a trait for disease resistance. There are no Macintosh trees with resistance traits, but a variety of crabapple tree is completely resistant to the disease. What are the options for introducing the crabapple disease-resistant trait to the Macintosh apple tree?

    Introducing the trait for disease resistance by conventional breeding would involve crossing and then backcrossing for several generations to restore the properties of a Macintosh apple and therefore would require decades to complete.

    With genetic engineering, the plant breeder can identify the disease resistance gene in crabapple and transfer it to the Macintosh tree without disturbing other traits in the Macintosh. With genetic engineering, it would take only a few years to produce disease-resistant Macintosh apple trees. 

  • In many cases, scientists can rely on naturally occurring genetic variation within a plant species as the source for genes that confer valuable traits, such as the disease-resistant trait in the crabapple as a source of resistance for the Macintosh apple. However, in some cases, there is no gene within the species that confers the desired trait.

    For example, there are no known cultivated or wild varieties of papaya that have disease resistance to the papaya ringspot virus. To save papaya cultivation in Hawaii from the virus, a trait for resistance had to be found from another species.

    Plant scientists introduced the gene for the coat protein of the ringspot virus into the genome of papaya trees. The concept is similar to how vaccines for humans use part of a virus to build immunity to a disease. The GE papaya trees were created through a collaboration of scientists between university scientists and the U.S. Department of Agriculture and are grown in Hawaii. Papaya is the only GE tree crop currently sold on the market in the United States.

  • Several species of trees have been transformed using genetic engineering by scientists in the private sector or in public institutions, such as universities and government organizations. Some have been approved for commercialization but are not yet sold. Others are still in development.

  • The regulatory agencies in the United States, China, and Brazil have approved some trees to be grown commercially. In China, poplar with genetically engineered insect resistance is grown on a small numbers of acres. In Brazil, eucalyptus trees that will grow larger than their non-GE counterparts have been approved. Beside papaya, GE varieties of apple and plum have cleared the regulatory process in the United States. However, as of March 2016, GE apple and plum trees were not commercially available.

  • Genetically engineered varieties of other tree species are in development. Some are being engineered to overcome introduced fungal or insect pests that are not native to the trees’ habitat. These pests can threaten a species survival. Other types of trees are being engineered to withstand more extreme climates and to have more desirable characteristics for commercial markets.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
Genetically Engineered Trees

The committee held a webinar on Friday, March 27, 2015 at 11am – 1pm EST to gather information from invited speakers:

Steve Strauss, Professor, Oregon State University
Lex Pearson, Director of Regulatory Affairs, ArborGen
Bill Powell, Professor, SUNY-ESF

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

webex
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

On Thursday, March 19, the committee held a webinar in which invited speakers addressed adoption trends of GE crops in the United States, GE research and development investments in the public and private sectors, and public policy aspects of genetic engineering in agriculture. 

Watch the webinar recording here

  • Keith Fuglie, Research Economist, USDA Economic Research Service. 

Keith Fuglie works with the Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), in Washington, DC, where he has served as branch chief and research economist specializing in the economics of technological change and science policy. In 2012 Dr. Fuglie was recognized with the USDA Secretary’s Honor Award for Professional Service, and in 2014 he received the Bruce Gardner Memorial Prize for Applied Policy Analysis from the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association. During 1997-1998 Dr. Fuglie served as senior staff economist on the White House Council of Economic Advisers. He also spent ten years with the International Potato Center (CIP) stationed in Southeast Asia and North Africa. Dr. Fuglie received an M.S. and Ph.D. in agricultural and applied economics from the University of Minnesota and a B.A. from Concordia College, Moorhead, Minnesota.

  • Lorraine Mitchell, Agricultural Economist, USDA Economic Research Service. 

Lorraine Mitchell has been an agricultural economist at the USDA’s Economic Research Service since 1998. Her research has focused on the effect of consumer demand issues on international agricultural trade as well as general trade modeling. She received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1998.

  • Seth Wechsler, Agricultural Economist, USDA Economic Research Service.

Seth Wechsler is a recent graduate from the University of Maryland’s Agricultural and Resource Economics department. His tenure as an agricultural economist for the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service began in late 2014. Dr. Wechsler’s research interests include pest control, pest resistance management, biotechnology, and technology adoption. His current work focuses on quantifying the extent to which rootworms have adapted to the toxins produced by genetically modified, insect-resistant corn. Dr. Wechsler received an M.S. and a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of Maryland. He earned a B.A. and an M.A. in economics from Duke University.

  • Peter Phillips, Distinguished Professor, University of Saskatchewan. 

Peter Phillips is Distinguished Professor in the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy (JSGS) at the University of Saskatchewan. He earned his MScEcon and Ph.D. at the London School of Economics (LSE) and practiced for 13 years as a professional economist and advisor in industry and government. At the University of Saskatchewan, he has held the Van Vliet Research Chair, created and held an NSERC-SSHRC Chair in Managing Technological Change, was a founding member and director of the virtual College of Biotechnology, and was founding director of the JSGS. He has had appointments at the LSE, the OECD, the European University Institute, Edinburgh, and the University of Western Australia. He was a founding member of the Canadian Biotechnology Advisory Committee and has been on many company boards, including CAPI, Pharmalytics and Ag West Bio Inc. (which operates a biotech venture fund). He has held more than15 peer reviewed grants worth over $150 million and is the author or editor of 13 books, more than 40 journal articles and over 50 book chapters, including Innovation in Agri-food Clusters (CABI 2012).

Presentations for each speaker start at the below timestamps:

  • Keith Fuglie: 00:06:24
  • Seth Wechsler: 00:32:40
  • Lorraine Mitchell: 00:50:58
  • Peter Phillips: 01:07:05

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
Socioeconomics Issues Related to Genetically Engineered Crops

The committee held a webinar on Thursday, March 19, 2015 at 11am – 1pm EST to gather information from invited speakers:

Keith Fuglie, Research Economist, USDA Economic Research Service
Lorraine Mitchell, Agricultural Economist, USDA Economic Research Service
Seth Wechsler, Agricultural Economist, USDA Economic Research Service
Peter Phillips, Distinguished Professor, University of Saskatchewan

Watch Webinar Recordings Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

The meeting was held on Thursday, March 5, from 12:30 pm-6:15 pm Eastern at the National Academy of Sciences Keck Center.

The committee heard about the current state of knowledge on the safety of foods made with genetically engineered ingredients. Speakers represented the Food and Drug Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the European Food Safety Authority. Experts also presented on the evaluation of risks of allergy and potential effects on the gastrointestinal tract of GE foods.

View agenda here

Meeting Recap: This Storify collects the tweets and online discussion that took place at the meeting.

Click the links below to view videos of the presentations and discussions.

Welcome and Intro to the Study Process of the National Research Council

Fred Gould, Committee Chair, University Distinguished Professor of Entomology and Codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, North Carolina State University and Kara Laney, Study Director, National Research Council

Panel on Food Safety: Regulatory Perspectives

Jason Dietz, Policy Analyst, Office of Food Additive Safety, Food and Drug Administration–Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. bio

William L. Jordan, Deputy Director for Programs, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency– Office of Pesticide Programs. bio

John Kough, Senior Scientist, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency–Office of Pesticide Programs. bio

Anna Lanzoni, Senior Scientific Officer, European Food Safety Authority–GMO Unit 2:25. bio

Committee Discussion with Presenters

Panel on Food Safety: Potential Health Outcomes

Evaluating GE food sources for risks of allergy: Methods, gaps, and perspectives

Richard Goodman, Research Professor, Food Allergy Research and Resource Program, University of Nebraska–Lincoln. bio

Potential perturbances of gastrointestinal tract mucosa of GE foods

Alessio Fasano, Vice Chair of Basic, Clinical and Translational Research and Chief of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, MassGeneral Hospital for Children. bio

Metabolomic analysis to confirm effects of transgenesis in plants

Timothy Tschaplinski, Distinguished Research Scientist and Group Leader, Metabolomics and Bioconversion, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. bio

Committee Discussion with Presenters

Public Comment Session


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
Watch Meeting Recordings Here

12:30 Welcome
-Fred Gould, Committee Chair, University Distinguished Professor of Entomology and Codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, North Carolina State University
Study Process of the National Research Council
-Kara Laney, Study Director, National Research Council
Committee Introductions

12:45 Panel on Food Safety: Regulatory Perspectives
-Jason Dietz, Policy Analyst, Office of Food Additive Safety, Food and Drug Administration–Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition
-William L. Jordan, Deputy Director for Programs, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency–Office of Pesticide Programs
-John Kough, Senior Scientist, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency–Office of Pesticide Programs
-Anna Lanzoni,* Senior Scientific Officer, European Food Safety Authority–GMO Unit

2:25 Committee Discussion with Presenters

3:00 Break

*Speaker participation will be through web conference.

3:15 Panel on Food Safety: Potential Health Outcomes
Evaluating GE food sources for risks of allergy: Methods, gaps, and perspectives
-Richard Goodman, Research Professor, Food Allergy Research and Resource Program, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Potential perturbances of gastrointestinal tract mucosa of GE foods
-Alessio Fasano, Vice Chair of Basic, Clinical and Translational Research and Chief of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, MassGeneral Hospital for Children
Metabolomic analysis to confirm effects of transgenesis in plants
-Timothy Tschaplinski, Distinguished Research Scientist and Group Leader, Metabolomics and Bioconversion, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

4:45 Committee Discussion with Presenters

5:15 Break

5:30 Introduction to the Public Comment Session
-Fred Gould, Committee Chair, University Distinguished Professor of Entomology and Codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, North Carolina State University

5:45 Public Comment

6:15 Public Meeting Adjourns
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Richard Amasino
Dominique Brossard
C. Robin Buell
Richard A. Dixon
José B. Falck-Zepeda
Michael A. Gallo
Leland Glenna
Fred Gould
Timothy S. Griffin
Bruce R. Hamaker
Peter M. Kareiva
Daniel Magraw
Carol Mallory-Smith
Kevin Pixley
Elizabeth Ransom
Michael Rodemeyer
David M. Stelly
C. Neal Stewart
Robert J. Whitaker

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Topics and speakers for webinars
Report draft status

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Report draft

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 20, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Event Type :  
Workshop

Description :   

The workshop was held on Wednesday, March 4, 2015 at the National Academy of Sciences Keck Center.

The major goals of the workshop were to examine trade-offs in pest management approaches for weeds, insects, and diseases and compare environmental effects between different cropping systems, including GE and non-GE systems.

A panel of experts presented on a variety of topics, including: growth of organic, traditional, and genetically engineered (GE) crops; integrated pest management (IPM) practices; cover cropping; weed management and herbicide-resistant weeds; insect ecology in agro-ecosystems; and disease-resistant GE crops. The workshop is related to a separate, ongoing study being conducted by the National Research Council summarizing GE crops.

 

View agenda here.

Workshop Recap: This Storify collects the tweets and online discussion that took place at the workshop.

Click the links below to view videos of the presentations and discussions.

 

Welcome

Norman Scott, Chairman, National Research Council Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, Workshop Moderator

 

Keynote: Examining the Environmental Effects of Practices for Controlling Agricultural Pests

May BerenbaumUniversity of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Professor and Department Chair of Entomology. 

Topic: Broad discussion of environmental issues surrounding agricultural production systems. Topics include pesticide residues; biodiversity; emergence of weed resistance and consequences for the environment and production; soil health; soil and nutrient losses; water quality and quantity; energy use; air quality; tradeoffs in yield; scale effects.

 Discussion

 Panel I: Contemporary Practices for Suppressing Weeds

Jay Hill, New Mexico Farmer. 

Topic: Pest management in corn and vegetable production

Steven Mirsky, USDA-ARS, Research Ecologist. 

Topic: Ecologically-based weed management in long-term cropping studies

David Mortensen, Pennsylvania State University, Professor of Weed and Applied Plant Ecology. 

Topic: Sustainable weed management in herbicide-resistant cropping systems

Jennifer Schmidt, Maryland Farmer and Registered Dietitian. 

Topic: Integrating weed, pest, and disease management across crops within farming

Discussion of Environmental Effects, Trade-Offs, and Synergies

 

Panel II: Insect Management Across Production Systems

Galen Dively, University of Maryland, Professor Emeritus and IPM Consultant. 

Topic: Regional suppression of the European corn borer and its impacts on other host crops due to the Bt corn technology

Jonathan Lundgren, USDA-ARS, Research Entomologist. 

Topic: Managing insect communities in the agro-ecosystem

John Tooker, Pennsylvania State University, Associate Professor of Entomology, Extension Specialist. 

Topic: Complex ecological effects of pest management approaches

Frank Shotkoski, Cornell University, Director of the Agriculture Biotechnology Support Project II. 

Topic: Examination of Bt eggplant release in Bangladesh

Discussion of Environmental Effects, Trade-Offs, and Synergies

 

Panel III: Managing Pests in Tree Crops

 Harold BrowningChief Officer of the Citrus Research and Development Foundation, Inc. 

Topic: Pest management in citrus: Past, present and future

Marc Fuchs, Cornell University, Associate Professor. 

Topic: Virus-Resistance: Lessons and Prospects

Discussion of Environmental Effects, Trade-Offs, and Synergies

Conclusions

Topic: Discussion summarizing information gaps and research needs across different pest management practices and agricultural production systems


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  BANR Staff
Contact Email:  banr@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

via WebEx
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Thursday, February 26, 2015 to gather information from two members of the 2004 report committee.

Watch the webinar recording here

  • Lynn Goldman, Professor, George Washington University 

Lynn R. Goldman, a pediatrician and an epidemiologist, is the Michael and Lori Milken Dean of George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health. Formerly she was a Professor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health Department of Environmental Health Sciences. In 1993, Dr. Goldman was appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate to serve as Assistant Administrator (AA) for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where she directed the Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (OCSPP) from 1993 through 1998. As AA for OCSPP she was responsible for the nation’s pesticide, toxic substances, and pollution prevention laws. Under her watch, EPA overhauled the nation’s pesticides laws to assure that children would be protected by pesticide regulations. Prior to joining the EPA, from 1985 until 1993, Dr. Goldman served in several positions at the California Department of Public Health, most recently as chief of the Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control. Dr. Goldman was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine in 2007. She has received several awards including the Woodrow Wilson Award for Distinguished Government Service from the Johns Hopkins University Alumni Association (1999), Alumna of the Year from the UC Berkeley School of Public Health (2002), National Library of Medicine, Changing the Face of Women in Medicine (2003), election to the Delta Omega Honor Society (2007), and the Heinz Award for Global Change, (2010). She serves as a member of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Science Board and the Advisory Council to the Director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Environmental Defense Fund. Dr. Goldman has a B.S. in conservation of natural resources, an M.S. in health and medical sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and an M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco. She completed pediatric training at Children’s Hospital, Oakland, California and is board-certified in pediatrics.

  • Bettie Sue Masters, Distinguished Professor, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio 

Bettie Sue Masters holds the Robert A. Welch Foundation Distinguished Chair in Chemistry at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas. A native Virginian, she received her undergraduate degree in chemistry at Roanoke College. She was awarded her Ph.D. in biochemistry, with a minor in chemistry, from Duke University in 1963, and continued her training there as a postdoctoral fellow supported sequentially by the American Cancer Society and the American Heart Association. In 1968, Dr. Masters received an Established Investigatorship from the American Heart Association under which she began her academic career at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. There, she became a Full Professor in 1976 and left in 1982 to become Chair of Biochemistry at the Medical College of Wisconsin. She was recruited to the U.T. Health Science Center in 1990. Currently, her research centers on the structure-function relationships of flavoproteins and heme proteins involved in major monooxygenation pathways as well as the regulation of their respective activities. Dr. Masters has received the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Excellence in Science Award (1992) and the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics Bernard B. Brodie Award in 2000 and she served on the Advisory Committee to the Director of the National Institutes of Health through 2004, followed by service on the National Advisory Research Resources Council from 2004 to 2009. She was President of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from 2002 to 2004. She was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 1996 and was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2001.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
Refresher on the 2004 NRC Report, Safety of Genetically Engineered Foods: Approaches to Assessing Unintended Health Effects.

The committee will hold a webinar on Thursday, February 26, 2015 at 11am – 1pm EST to gather information from invited speakers:

Lynn Goldman, Professor, George Washington University
Bettie Sue Masters, Distinguished Professor, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

via WebEx
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Wednesday February 4, 2015 at 2pm – 4pm EST to gather information from invited speakers. The speakers’ presentations addressed how farmers and consumers participate in local food systems, the debate over the potential of GE crops to improve yields and livelihoods in Sub-Saharan Africa, and the compatibility of GE crop production with social objectives.

Watch the webinar recording here

  • Mary Hendrickson,  Assistant Professor, University of Missouri. 

Mary Hendrickson is an assistant professor in the Department of Rural Sociology at the University of Missouri. As a food systems researcher, she focuses on understanding the changes taking place in the global food system and helping farmers, eaters, and communities create profitable alternatives. Her research projects include examining the economic impacts of local food systems on remote rural communities and addressing the competitive nature of current agricultural systems from a network perspective. From 2012 to 2015, Dr. Hendrickson was part of a team participating in a Community of Practice to assess the way smallholders use genetically engineered crops in South Africa. Dr. Hendrickson currently serves as the Undergraduate Advisor Chair in Sustainable Agriculture and teaches courses on sustainable food and farming systems. She previously spent 15 years working to create local food systems across Missouri as a state extension specialist for the University of Missouri. She has served as president of the Agriculture, Food and Human Values Society and of the Community Food Security Coalition. Dr. Hendrickson is the recipient of the 2012 Meritorious Service Award presented by the National Farmers Union for her service to agriculture. She holds a B.S. in agribusiness from the University of Nebraska and a M.S. and Ph.D. in rural sociology from the University of Missouri.

  • Matthew Schnurr,  Associate Professor, Dalhousie University. 

Matthew Schnurr is an associate professor in the Department of International Development Studies at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. He is an environmental geographer with research and teaching interests in environment and development, political ecology, and agricultural biotechnology, with regional interests in east and southern Africa. His current research investigates efforts to develop genetically engineered versions of staple crops in Uganda, with a particular focus on evaluating farmer perspectives on these soon-to-be-released technologies. Dr. Schnurr earned his B.S. from Queen’s University, his M.A. from the School of Oriental and African Studies, and his Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia.

  • Abby Kinchy,  Associate Professor, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 

Abby Kinchy is an associate professor in the Science and Technology Studies Department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and specializes in the study of political controversies surrounding changes in the systems that produce food and energy. She is the author of Seeds, Science, and Struggle: The Global Politics of Transgenic Crops (MIT, 2012) and numerous articles on science, technology, the environment, and social protest. Her current research, the Watershed Knowledge Mapping Project, looks at civil society organizations that are attempting to monitor the impacts of shale gas development on surface water quality and how these efforts are transforming what is known and unknown about this controversial new form of energy production.

*Audio with the presenter was lost at 01:22:18. The presentation resumes at 01:27:14.

Presentations for each speaker start at the below timestamps:

  • Mary Hendrickson: 00:08:30
  • Matthew Schnurr: 00:37:10
  • Abby Kinchy: 01:15:55

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
Social Science Research on GE Crop Adoption and Acceptance

The committee will hold a webinar on Wednesday February 4, 2015 at 2pm – 4pm EST to gather information from invited speakers:

Mary Hendrickson, Assistant Professor, University of Missouri
Matthew Schnurr, Associate Professor, Dalhousie University
Abby Kinchy, Assistant Professor, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

The speakers’ presentations will address how farmers and consumers participate in local food systems, the debate over the potential of GE crops to improve yields and livelihoods in Sub-Saharan Africa, and the compatibility of GE crop production with social objectives.

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

via WebEx
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at 11:00am-1:00pm Eastern, to gather information from invited speakers:

Watch the webinar recording here

  • Jim Holland discussed how corn breeders in the public sector, those in universities and government agencies, have been involved in research and development of new varieties over the past several decades. 

Jim Holland is a USDA-ARS research geneticist and a professor in the Department of Crop Science, North Carolina State University. Dr. Holland studies maize breeding and genetics, with emphasis on the study of genetic diversity in maize, its impact on quantitative traits, and its use for improving temperate corn. He was an associate and technical editor for Crop Science for nine years and is currently an associate editor for G3: Genes, Genomes, and Genetics. He received his B.A. from Johns Hopkins University, M.S. from University of Wisconsin, and Ph.D. from North Carolina State University.

  • Jane Dever discussed the nuances of identifying and using valuable crop traits in cotton breeding, from both commercial and public breeder perspectives.

Jane Dever is a professor and cotton breeder at Texas A&M AgriLife Research in Lubbock. She has been Project Leader for the Cotton Improvement Program since September 2008. The focus of her research is the development of public cultivars and the screening of exotic collections for relevant native traits to be used in breeding cotton. She has been Principal Investigator for the project, “Development of Cultivars and IPM Systems for Organic Cotton Production,” funded by an integrative grant through the USDA National Institute of Food Agriculture’s Organic Agriculture Research and Extension Initiative. She is also Technical Advisor to a development project with Catholic Relief Services in Burkina Faso, “Revenue through Cotton Livelihoods, Trade, and Equity,” funded by USDA Foreign Agricultural Service. Dr. Dever received a B.S. in textile engineering (1983), M.S. in crop science (1986) and Ph.D. in agronomy (1989), all from Texas Tech University. After completing her degree, she held the following career appointments: coordinator, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service AgriPartners program; Senior Research Scientist, BioTex; Textile Engineer, Plains Cotton Cooperative Association; and Head of Materials Evaluation, Fiber and Biopolymer Research Institute at Texas Tech University. She was Bayer CropScience Global Cotton Breeding and Development Manager for 10 years prior to returning to Texas A&M. Dr. Dever is the Plains and Western chair of the National Cotton Variety Testing Committee and secretary of the CottonGEN database steering committee and of National Association of Plant Breeder’s communication committee. She served as Associate Editor for Cotton, Journal of Plant Registrations. She was appointed a scientific member of the National Genetic Resources Advisory Council in 2011 and has served on the Joint Cotton Breeding Policy Committee. Dr. Dever is a recipient of the 2007 Bayer CropScience Gold Laureate Award, 2012 Cotton Genetics Research Award, and 2012 “Golden Hoe” award presented by the Texas Organic Cotton Marketing Cooperative. She lives on a cotton, grain sorghum, soybean, and wheat farm northeast of Lubbock, Texas, where she grew up.

  • Irwin Goldman discussed the role of genetic diversity in crop breeding and the regulations that modern breeders encounter when developing new crop varieties. 

Irwin L. Goldman is a professor and the chair of the Department of Horticulture at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he has worked for 23 years. His expertise is in breeding and genetics of cross-pollinated vegetable crops, including carrot, onion, and table beet. He has developed and co-developed numerous inbred lines and open pollinated populations of these crops, many of which are in use in cultivars around the world. His program has over 70 active licenses for this germplasm. He has been active in training graduate and undergraduate students in plant breeding and horticulture. Dr. Goldman teaches two courses in plant breeding and plant genetics as well as a course on vegetable crops, a course in evolutionary biology, and a course in plants and human wellbeing. He is a co-founder of the Open Source Seed Initiative and was a faculty advisor to the founding members of the Student Organic Seed Symposium. Dr. Goldman served from 2004–2010 as an Associate Dean, Vice Dean, and Interim Dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at UW–Madison. He is a fellow of the American Society for Horticultural Science. He serves as a Technical Editor for the journal Crop Science and on the editorial board of Plant Breeding Reviews. He received a B.S. degree from the University of Illinois, an M.S. from North Carolina State University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin.

More information on plant breeding:

  • What is Plant Breeding? For thousands of years, humans have been choosing the plants they like to eat and use. In doing so, we have changed plants in remarkable ways–physiologically, morphologically, reproductively, and chemically. Unlike their wild relatives, domesticated small grains like wheat and barley no longer shatter. Strawberries flower constantly and are larger. Carrots are tasty, orange, and uniform in shape, unlike their woody, gnarly, and white progenitors. These few examples illustrate how human preferences have driven genetic changes in domesticated plants. Humans have preferentially propagated plants with the most desirable characteristics in the field or saved their seed. With improved comprehension of life cycles and heredity, we became better at recognizing which crop varieties were good parents and started cross-pollinating them to develop new ones. This process—intentionally identifying, hybridizing, selecting, and propagating plants with desirable traits and genes—is known as plant breeding.
  • Why did the committee hear about plant breeding? Plant breeders are the scientists and researchers who develop new crop varieties used by farmers and other consumers. They and their supporting teams use diverse techniques and technologies to increase productivity, quality, and other traits of economically important plant species. For the past several decades, plant breeders have used genetic information (DNA) to help guide decisions about which parents to use, crosses to make, and offspring to select in the next generation. If a desirable trait or gene is lacking from naturally existing plant taxa or is exceptionally difficult to access, genetic engineering is a technology that sometimes enables the creation of genetic variation that may otherwise be difficult or impossible to generate using traditional plant-breeding practices.
  • Did you know that the wild relatives of carrots were white? Over many generations, humans saved seed from wild carrots that had desirable characteristics or traits, such as yield, tender flesh, resistance to disease, tasty flavor, and appearance, including size, shape, color, and uniformity.

  • Plant breeding began with domestication, a process that occurred slowly over time. For many generations, people saved the seeds of wild relatives with a desirable trait to plant the next season. This eventually made the trait more uniform when compared to wild ancestors. In this example, seed was saved from a purple carrot, a stubby yellow carrot, and a thin, slightly red carrot.

  • After many generations, the domestication process created early crop varieties known as “landraces.” Landraces are varieties which are locally adapted to the environment in which they are grown and to the preferences of the farmers who developed them. These early varieties have more uniform traits that wild ancestors, are less genetically diverse, and more productive than wild relatives. Landraces of many crops still exist today and are maintained in large collections of plant varieties know as “gene banks.”

  • Today, plant breeding is more targeted and intense at propagating desirable traits. By using new tools that provide more specific information about plant genes, such as DNA sequencing and molecular markers, plant breeders can help guide decisions about which parents to use, crosses to make, and offspring to select in the next generation. This process is much faster than domestication and increases the uniformity of valuable traits and the productivity of the crop even further. However, when compared to landraces or wild relatives, crop varieties have lower overall genetic variation.

  • By performing crosses, plant breeders can reintroduce genetic variation into a crop variety. If a desirable gene(s) controlling a trait, such as insect resistance, was lost during domestication or breeding, a plant breeder can sometimes cross wild relatives or landraces with crop varieties to try to reincorporate the genetic variation responsible for the trait. However, this can be a difficult process. If the trait is from a distant relative too far back in time, it may be impossible to perform crosses with wild relatives due to reproductive incompatibility. Additionally, valuable characteristics of the crop variety, such as yield performance or color, may be lost or disturbed while performing crosses.

  • The life cycle of plants determines how quickly a plant breeder can make and evaluate a cross between two crop varieties. In loblolly pine, a valuable lumber crop, a seed can take years to grow into a tree mature enough to begin producing flowers and pollen, which are necessary for a plant breeder to perform a cross. Even after performing one cross, it takes roughly 2 years for pine seed to reach maturity so it can be planted! In contrast, a corn plant can be grown from seed to seed in the span of a summer.

  • Plant breeding is a long-term commitment. Developing a new variety can require decades because it takes many crosses to create a new crop variety. Although the life cycle of corn is much quicker than loblolly pine, it still takes an average of 10 to 15 years to generate a new corn variety. The use of new tools that provide more specific information about plant genes, such as DNA sequencing and molecular markers, are substantially improving the speed and efficiency at which breeders can develop new varieties.


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
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Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
Plant Breeding at Public Institutions

Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at 11am-1pm EST
Jim Holland, Professor, North Carolina State University
Jane Dever, Professor, Texas A&M AgriLife Research
Irwin Goldman, Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Topics: -the effects of gene patents on plant breeders’ access to genetic material
-the balance in plant breeding efforts between private and public entities

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1954

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Elizabeth Ransom
Michael Rodemeyer
Kevin Pixley
Mike Gallo
Leland Glenna
Richard Dixon
Carol Mallory-Smith
Bruce Hamaker
David Stelly
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Dominique Brossard
Dan Magraw
Tim Griffin
Richard Amasino

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Report draft
Upcoming public meeting agendas

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Report outline

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
January 29, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

These are the archived videos of the presentations, discussions, and public comment periods from the public meeting of the committee on December 10, 2014.

View Agenda

Meeting Recap: This Storify collects the tweets and online discussion that took place at the meeting.

 

Click the links below to view videos of the presentations and discussions.

Welcome: Fred Gould, Committee Chair, University Distinguished Professor of Entomology and Codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, North Carolina State University

Study Process of the National Research Council: Kara Laney, Study Director, National Research Council

Committee Introductions

 

Session One:

Michael Schechtman, Biotechnology Coordinator, Office of Pest Management Policy, U.S. Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service. 

Statement from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (delivered by Kara Laney)

Dan Voytas, Professor of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development and Director, University of Minnesota Center for Genome Engineering. 

Andreas Weber, Head of the Institute of Plant Biochemistry, University of Düsseldorf. 

Committee Discussion with Presenters

 

Session Two:

John Turner, Director, Environmental Risk Analysis Programs, Biotechnology Regulatory Services, U.S. Department of Agriculture–Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. 

William L. Jordan, Deputy Director for Programs, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency– Office of Pesticide Programs. 

Chris A. Wozniak, Biotechnology Special Assistant, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency–Office of Pesticide Programs. 

Jason Dietz, Policy Analyst, Office of Food Additive Safety, Food and Drug Administration–Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. 

Committee Discussion with Presenters

 

Session Three:

Sandy Endicott, Senior Agronomy Manager, DuPont Pioneer. 

Ray Shillito, Research and Development Fellow, Bayer CropScience Impact on Production Agriculture. 

Robb Fraley, Monsanto New Technologies. 

Steve Webb, External Technology and Intellectual Property Portfolio Development Leader, Dow AgroSciences. 

Committee Discussion with Presenters

Public Comment


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3062

Agenda
Study Website: http://nas-sites.org/ge-crops/2014/09/22/second-public-meeting-december-10-11/

Wednesday, December 10, 10:30AM-6:00PM
The National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW
Washington, DC

10:30 Welcome
Fred Gould, Committee Chair, University Distinguished Professor of Entomology and Codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, North Carolina State University

Study Process of the National Research Council
Kara Laney, Study Director, National Research Council
Committee Introductions

10:45 Study Sponsors
Michael Schechtman, Biotechnology Coordinator, Office of Pest Management Policy, U.S. Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service

Statement from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

11:00 Emerging Technologies and Synthetic Biology Approaches to GE Crops
Dan Voytas, Professor of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development and Director, University of Minnesota Center for Genome Engineering
Andreas Weber, Head of the Institute of Plant Biochemistry, University of Düsseldorf

11:40 Committee Discussion with Presenters

12:00 Break

1:00 Representatives from U.S. Regulatory Agencies
John Turner, Director, Environmental Risk Analysis Programs, Biotechnology Regulatory Services, U.S. Department of Agriculture–Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
William L. Jordan, Deputy Director for Programs, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency–Office of Pesticide Programs
Chris A. Wozniak, Biotechnology Special Assistant, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency–Office of Pesticide Programs
Jason Dietz, Policy Analyst, Office of Food Additive Safety, Food and Drug Administration–Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

2:05 Committee Discussion with Presenters

2:45 Break

3:00 Representatives from Companies Producing GE Crops
Product Development
Sandy Endicott, Senior Agronomy Manager, DuPont Pioneer
TBD
Ray Shillito, Research and Development Fellow, Bayer CropScience
Impact on Production Agriculture
Robb Fraley, Monsanto
New Technologies
Steve Webb, External Technology and Intellectual Property Portfolio Development Leader, Dow AgroSciences

4:15 Committee Discussion with Presenters

4:45 Break

5:00 Introduction to the Public Comment Session
Fred Gould, Committee Chair, University Distinguished Professor of Entomology and Codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, North Carolina State University

5:15 Public Comment

6:00 Public Meeting Adjourns
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Richard Amasino
Dominique Brossard
Robin Buell
Richard Dixon
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Mike Gallo
Ken Giller
Leland Glenna
Tim Griffin
Bruce Hamaker
Dan Magraw
Carol Mallory-Smith
Kevin Pixley
Elizabeth Ransom
Michael Rodemeyer
David Stelly
Neal Stewart
Bob Whitaker

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Speakers for future meetings
Committee writing assignments

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Draft report outline

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
January 06, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1954

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Bruce Hamaker
Mike Gallo
Dan Magraw
Bob Whitaker
Michael Rodemeyer

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

March meeting agenda

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Draft agenda for March meeting

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
November 20, 2014
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1954

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Carol Mallory-Smith
David Stelly
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Ken Giller
Kevin Pixley
Michael Rodemeyer
Mike Gallo
Neal Stewart
Robin Buell
Tim Griffin
Dan Magraw

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Next committee meeting
Chapter responsibilities
Future webinars

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Draft meeting agenda
Report outline
Statement of Task

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
November 12, 2014
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Online
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Thursday, November 6, 2014 from 2-4pm Eastern to gather information from invited speakers on genetically engineered traits for disease resistance. The webinar featured:

  • Richard Sayre, Senior Research Scientist, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the New Mexico Consortium. 

Dr. Richard T. Sayre is currently a senior research scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the New Mexico Consortium (NMC). Dr. Sayre’s research interests include: characterization of primary processes in photosynthesis, algal and plant biotechnology, and nutritional biofortification of crop plants. Dr. Sayre completed his undergraduate degree in biology at Humboldt State University and his PhD at the University of Iowa and did postdoctoral work at Harvard University. From 1986 to 2008, Dr. Sayre was a faculty member and later chairman of the Department of Plant Cellular and Molecular Biology at Ohio State University. Prior to coming to LANL/NMC, Dr. Sayre was the director (2008-2011) of the Enterprise Rent-A-Car Institute for Renewable Fuels at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in St Louis. From 2005 to 2010, Dr. Sayre directed the BioCassava Plus Program funded by the Grand Challenges in Global Health Program of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The BioCassava Plus program focused on engineering cassava to provide complete nutrition for subsistence farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. Dr. Sayre has also served as Principle Investigator and Director of the Center for Advanced Biofuel Systems, a DOE Energy Frontier Research Center, and he was the scientific director of the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels from 2010 to 2013. He is currently the scientific director of the Realization of Algae’s Potential (REAP) algal biomass program managed by the DOE. Dr. Sayre has received several honors including: Distinguished Professor in the College of Biological Sciences, Ohio State University (2005-2008); honorary member of Phi Beta Kappa (2006); Fulbright Scholar at the Inst. Quimica, University Sao Paulo, Brazil (2007); selected by Nature as one of “Five Crop Researchers Who Could Change the World” (Nature 456: 563-569 [2008]); invited attendee at Google/Nature/O’Reilly SciFoo Camp for Innovators (2009); and was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences (2011). Dr. Sayre is an associate editor for Frontiers in Plant Sciences, founding editor of Algal Research, and co-organizer of the International Conference on Algal Biomass, Biofuels and Bioproducts.

  • Anton HaverkortResearcher, Wageningen University and Research Center. 

Dr. Anton J. Haverkort coordinates potato research projects at Plant Research International – Wageningen University and Research Centre in the Netherlands and is extra-ordinary professor of crop and soil science at the University of Pretoria (South Africa). After graduation with a degree in ecology (MSc, cum laude), he worked for many years for the International Potato Centre in Turkey, Rwanda, Peru, and Tunisia to improve potato production through agronomy, breeding, and crop protection. He obtained his PhD at University of Reading (UK) on mathematical modelling of the influence of temperature and solar radiation on potato development and growth in tropical highlands. At Wageningen University he presently coordinates research on the development of a cisgenic marker-free late blight potato. He also carries out research on data management (ontology) in the French fries supply chain and leads sustainable potato production projects in eight countries on four continents aimed at the efficient use of resources (land, water, energy) and value creation through trade and processing. He has published over 90 scientific papers, five books, and hundreds of conference papers, book chapters, columns, and articles for professional journals. He is chairman or member of various potato committees in the Netherlands dealing with seed certification and genetic modification and was secretary general of the European Association of Potato Research. He travels frequently for potato research and consultancy for the industry and (inter)national governmental and non-governmental organizations.

  • Ralph Scorza, Research Horticulturist, USDA Appalachian Fruit Research Station. 

Ralph Scorza is a research horticulturist and lead scientist for the Genetic Improvement of Fruit Crops Research Unit at the USDA-ARS Appalachian Fruit Research Station in Kearneysville, West Virginia. He received his BS and MS degrees agronomy and plant physiology, respectively, from the University of Florida and received his PhD in plant genetics and breeding from Purdue University. The broad objectives of his research program at USDA are to develop stone fruits with improved fruit quality, disease resistance, improved adaptability to climate change, and tree growth habits suitable for high yielding, mechanically integrated orchard systems. His breeding program combines classical and molecular-breeding approaches. Dr. Scorza and colleagues developed the genetically engineered plum Pox virus resistant plum cultivar ‘HoneySweet’. This plum variety is approved for commercialization in the United States and is the only temperate fruit variety in the world to have received such an approval. ‘HoneySweet’ has been field tested in Europe for almost two decades, and Dr. Scorza leads an international team that is working to submit ‘HoneySweet’ for cultivation approval in the European Union. Dr. Scorza is the recipient of the Flemming Award for “Exceptionally creative and useful research and leadership in the area of stone fruit breeding and genetics” and an ARS Senior Research Scientist of the Year Award, and has been co-recipient of three Secretary of Agriculture Honor Awards. He is a recipient of the Foreign Agricultural Service Distinguished International Service Award and the National Peach Council Carroll R. Miller Award. He has released 12 stone fruit varieties, is the co-inventor of four biotech utility patents, has authored over 200 research publications, and is a Fellow of the American Society for Horticultural Science.

  • Dennis Gonsalves, Director, USDA Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center (retired). 

Dennis Gonsalves was born and raised on a sugar plantation in Kohala, Hawaii. He received his BS and MS degrees from University of Hawaii and his PhD in Plant Pathology in 1972 from University of California at Davis. He started his career at the University of Florida and joined Cornell University in 1977 and was appointed to one of the endowed Liberty Hyde Bailey Professor positions in 1995. Dr. Gonsalves led the research team that developed the transgenic papaya that saved Hawaii’s papaya industry from the papaya ringspot virus, for which they received the Alexander Von Humbolt Award in 2002 for the most significant agriculture accomplishment in the last five years. In 2002 he moved
to Hilo, Hawaii, to direct the USDA/ARS center and led the successful deregulation of the transgenic papaya in Japan in December 2011 and retired at the end of 2012. Prior to retiring, he started the effort by ARS and University of Hawaii to deregulate the Hawaiian transgenic papaya in China. He has extensive experiences in risk assessment and development of transgenic crops.

Watch the webinar recording here

Presentations for each speaker start at the below timestamps:

  • Richard Sayre: 00:07:03
  • Anton Haverkort: 00:45:20
  • Ralph Scorza: 01:33:00
  • Dennis Gonsalves: 02:02:25

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2068

Agenda
Thursday, November 6, 2014
2-4pm Eastern

Webinar: Information-gathering session

2:10 PM Richard Sayre, New Mexico Consortium
2:40 PM Anton Haverkort, Wageningen University
3:20 PM Ralph Scorza, USDA Agricultural Research Service
3:50 PM Dennis Gonsalves, USDA Agricultural Research Service (retired)

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Online
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Wednesday, October 22, 2014 from 2-4pm Eastern to gather information from invited speakers. The webinar featured:

  • Russel Higgins, Extension Educator, Northern Illinois Agronomy Research Center, University of Illinois Extension. 

Russ Higgins is a commercial agriculture educator at the Northern Illinois Agronomy Research Center in DeKalb County. Mr. Higgins has applied research and outreach responsibilities for the commercial production and management of field crops (emphasis on corn and soybeans) in Northern Illinois. He collaborates closely with campus-based specialists and other faculty in the planning and implementation of research projects with local relevance to stakeholders. He cooperates with campus faculty in conducting pest surveys and the dissemination of these findings to clientele. Mr. Higgins holds a master of science degree from the University of Illinois in agronomy and a bachelor of science degree in agricultural sciences from Western Illinois University. His professional affiliations include the National Association of County Agricultural Agents, Illinois Extension Agricultural Association, and American Society of Agronomy. He is an American Society of Agronomy Certified Crop Advisor and a graduate of the Illinois Agricultural Leadership and the National Extension Leadership Programs.

  • Jeff Lannom, Weakley County Extension Director, University of Tennessee Extension. 

Jeff Lannom grew up on a row-crop farm in Gibson County, Tennessee. He graduated from the University of Tennessee-Martin in 1982 with a bachelor’s degree in agriculture and a concentration in agricultural business. He served as the 4-H agriculture agent in Weakley County for the University of Tennessee Extension before returning to UT-Martin for a master of science degree in education. Mr. Lannom transferred from 4-H to adult agriculture extension in 1994 and was appointed the Weakley County Extension Director in 1998. This year marks Mr. Lannom’s 25th year in UT Extension based in Weakley County. In 2014, Weakley County planted 67,000 acres of corn, 85,000 acres of soybeans, and 27,000 acres of wheat with minor acreage of cotton and grain sorghum. The county is annually ranked in the top 5 grain-producing counties in the state of Tennessee.

  • Diana Roberts, Regional Extension Specialist, Washington State University Extension. 

Diana Roberts has worked as a regional agronomist for Washington State University Extension since 1991. Dr. Roberts plans, conducts, and evaluates a research- and experience-based educational program consistent with clientele needs and Extension policy in agricultural crop production, with the goal of increasing agricultural sustainability. She works primarily with large-scale grain farmers across the dryland region of eastern Washington. Soft white wheat is the principal crop in the area, and most of it is grown for export markets. Increasing numbers of growers in the region use no-till farming systems. She works closely with farmers on producer-initiated, on-farm testing projects of direct-seeding systems. Washington State also has a large number of organic producers. Dr. Roberts has worked on a number of integrated crop production system projects, including biological control of cereal leaf beetle, trials of cover crops in the region, and integrated pest management strategies for the wheat midge. Dr. Roberts earned a BS in agricultural genetics from the University of Natal (South Africa), an MS in agronomy at North Dakota State University, and a PhD in agronomy at Washington State University.

  • Dallas Peterson, Professor and Extension Weed Specialist, Kansas State University. 

Dallas Peterson is a professor and extension weed specialist at Kansas State University. He grew up on a small diversified crop and livestock farm in north central Kansas and received his BS and MS degrees in agronomy from Kansas State University. Dr. Peterson completed his PhD degree at North Dakota State University and worked as an assistant professor and extension weed specialist in North Dakota from 1987 to 1989 before returning to Kansas State. Dr. Peterson conducts applied weed management research and provides educational programming and weed management information to Kansas farmers and crop advisors. Dr. Peterson has served as president and been recognized as a fellow of the North Central Weed Science Society. He has also has received the Outstanding Extension Award and is currently serving as President-Elect for the Weed Science Society of America.

Watch webinar recording here

Presentations for each speaker start at the below timestamps:

  • Russel Higgins: 00:06:15
  • Jeff Lannom: 00:36:08
  • Diana Roberts: 00:51:55
  • Dallas Peterson: 01:23:10

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3062

Agenda
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
2-4pm Eastern

Webinar: Information-gathering session with extension specialists

2:00 Russ Higgins, University of Illinois Extension
2:30 Jeff Lannom, University of Tennesee Extension
3:00 Diana Roberts, Washington State University Extension
3:30 Dallas Peterson, Kansas State University

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Conference Call
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Kara Laney
Contact Email:  klaney@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-1954

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Richard Dixon
Mike Gallo
Kevin Pixley
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Carol Mallory-Smith
Michael Rodemeyer
Robin Buell
Tim Griffin
David Stelly
Bob Whitaker
Ken Giller
Kevin Pixley

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Report Outline

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Report Outline

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
October 23, 2014
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Online
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Wednesday, October 8, 2014 from 2-4pm Eastern to gather information from invited speakers. The webinar featured:

  • Lee Ann JacksonCounsellor, World Trade Organization. 

Lee Ann Jackson is a counsellor in the Agriculture and Commodities Division at the World Trade Organization and Secretary to the Committee on Agriculture. At the WTO she has worked in a variety of areas including agricultural negotiations, implementation of the SPS Agreement, and dispute settlement activities. Prior to this position she served as a Research Fellow in the School of Economics at the University of Adelaide in South Australia where she conducted quantitative economic research on agricultural trade policy. She also worked for several years in the Environment Division of the International Food Policy Research Institute. She completed her Ph.D. in applied economics at the University of Minnesota and has a joint masters’ degree in public policy and environmental studies from Yale University.

  • Randal Giroux, Vice President – Food Safety, Quality and Regulatory, Cargill, Incorporated. 

Randal Giroux currently holds the position of Vice President at Cargill Incorporated at the World Headquarters in Wayzata, Minnesota. Dr. Giroux leads the areas of Food Safety, Quality, and Regulatory with overall global responsibility in Cargill’s Agricultural Supply Chain businesses, specifically Cargill’s Grain and Oilseeds businesses, World Trading, Sugar, and Palm. He is involved professionally with both science and trade organizations across the supply chain and recognized for expertise in both Food Safety and the integration of Agricultural Biotechnology in global food and feed supply chains. He holds a number of leadership positions in the trade and has served on several advisory committees. Before joining Cargill, Dr. Giroux was a Program Manager with the Canadian Grain Commission and, prior to his public service, he was a National Needs Fellow with USDA. Dr. Giroux graduated with a PhD in Agriculture from the University of Guelph (OAC). With his background in the Life Sciences and extensive experience with Cargill’s global supply chain businesses, Dr. Giroux possesses unique skill sets that allow him to operate at a highly technical level and effectively identify and manage Food Safety, Quality, and Regulatory opportunities for Cargill’s agricultural businesses and stakeholders.

  • Lynn Clarkson, President, Clarkson Grain.

Lynn Clarkson serves as president of Clarkson Grain and managing director of Clarkson Soy Products. Founded in 1974 in Cerro Gordo, Illinois, Clarkson Grain contracts with farmers across Illinois, several other states, and a few foreign countries to produce selected grains and oilseeds. It selects hybrids, varieties, and production protocols to optimize farm income, processor yield, and market access. It supplies crops throughout the year to clients in North and South America, Asia, and the EU. It offers products cleaned, sized, raw, or processed, identity preserved as to hybrid/variety/characteristics, and traceable back to the supplying farm for organic, non GMO, and conventional markets. The company owns and operates elevators, commercial preparation facilities for corn and soybeans, several commercial storage facilities, and a barge station on the Illinois River. It receives by truck and rail and ships by truck, rail, barge, and ocean vessel.

Watch webinar recording here

Presentations for each speaker start at the below timestamps:

  • Lee Ann Jackson: 00:05:45
  • Lynn Clarkson: 00:53:03
  • Randal Giroux: 01:35: 33

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3062

Agenda
Wednesday, October 8, 2014
2-4pm Eastern

Webinar: Information-gathering session

2:10 PM Lee Ann Jackson, World Trade Organization
2:50 PM Lynn Clarkson, President, Clarkson Grain
3:30 PM Randal Giroux, Vice President – Food Safety, Quality and Regulatory, Cargill, Incorporated

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Online
Event Type :  
Webinar

Description :   

The committee held a webinar on Wednesday, October 1, 2014 from 2-4pm Eastern to gather information from invited speakers. The webinar featured:

  • Dominic Reisig, Associate Professor & Extension Specialist, North Carolina Cooperative Extension.

Dominic Reisig has been an assistant professor in the North Carolina State University Department of Entomology since 2009, serving with an extension/research split. He is assigned extension responsibilities for insect pests of field crops throughout the state. Most of the field crop acreage is located in the eastern part of the state, and Dr. Reisig is housed two hours east of campus at the Vernon James Research and Extension Center. He keeps growers in other parts of the state informed through face-to-face meetings and a large web presence, focused on blogging and social media platforms such as Twitter. His research program is focused on the biology and ecology of Heliothines, especially in relation to Bt crops. Piercing sucking insect pests (i.e., stink bugs, thrips, and kudzu bug) have become an increased problem in the reduced-spray environment created by Bt. Other areas of his research program are focused on the distribution, movement, ecology, and management of these piercing sucking insect pests in farmscapes.

  • Mohamed Khan, Professor & Extension Sugarbeet Specialist, North Dakota State University and University of Minnesota.

Dr. Mohamed Khan is the Extension Sugarbeet Specialist for North Dakota State University and the University of Minnesota. He is responsible for developing, conducting, and evaluating educational programs that will improve sugarbeet production practices in North Dakota and Minnesota. Dr. Khan research is aimed at improving management of diseases such as Cercospora leaf spot, Rhizoctonia crown and root rot, Rhizomania and Fusarium yellows, and agronomic practices such as optimum plant populations and nitrogen management. Dr. Khan is the secretary of the Sugarbeet Research and Education Board of Minnesota and North Dakota (SBREB). The SBREB is responsible for funding and promoting research and educational programs in sugarbeet production. Dr. Khan is also the Chairman of the International Sugarbeet Institute which organizes an annual 2-day trade show. About 3,000 growers and allied industry personnel participate in the exposition that involves over 120 exhibitors who showcase more than $3 million worth of machinery and equipment involved in sugarbeet production. Dr. Khan received his BS from the University of Guyana, MS from the University of Bath, UK, and his PhD from Clemson University. He is also experienced in managing tropical crops including coconut, oil palm and sugar cane.

  • Rick Kersbergen, Extension Professor, University of Maine Cooperative Extension.

Rick Kersbergen has been active in conducting research and Extension activities related to sustainable dairy and forage systems in Maine since 1987. He is currently an Extension Professor with the University of Maine and a Certified Crop Adviser through the American Society of Agronomy. Rick conducts educational programing and research on a wide variety of topics, including organic dairy production, no-till corn silage production, cover crops, and organic grain production. Rick received a Trustee Professorship from the University of Maine in 2005 and has been the PI or co-PI on numerous research grants to the University of Maine, University of Vermont, and University of New Hampshire. He has recently worked on several projects including a project from the National Institute for Food and Agriculture entitled “Assisting Organic Dairy Producers to Meet the Demands of New and Emerging Milk Markets” and a Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) project on “Reducing Fuel and Fertilizer in Corn Silage Using No-till and Cover Crops.” Rick works with numerous commodity organizations including the Maine Grass Farmers Network, Maine Dairy Industry Association, Maine Organic Milk Producers, Northeast Pasture Consortium, Maine Sustainable Ag. Society, and the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association.

  • Ben Beale, Extension Educator-Agricultural Sciences, University of Maryland Extension. 

Ben Beale currently serves as the Extension Educator for Agricultural Sciences with the University of Maryland Extension office in St. Mary’s County. His main programming efforts include assisting growers with vegetable and small fruit production, grain and tobacco production, and alternative crop development. Most recently, he has been involved in the establishment of a local produce auction, transition from MD type to Burley type tobacco production, and establishing a USDA/NIFA Beginning Farmer program in Maryland. His current research projects include grape variety evaluation trials, blueberry cultivar evaluation trials, and investigation of soybean vein necrosis virus. Beale holds a BS degree in Agricultural Sciences; a MS degree in Management and Marketing and is a Certified Crop Advisor. Beale grew up on a tobacco and vegetable farm in Southern Maryland and enjoys working on the family farm in his spare time.

Watch the webinar recording here

Presentations for each speaker start at the below timestamps:

  • Dominic Reisig: 00:04:03
  • Mohamed Khan: 00:33:45
  • Rick Kersbergen: 01:01:55
  • Ben Beale: 01:20:30

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-2068

Agenda
Wednesday, October 1, 2014
2-4pm Eastern

Webinar: Information-gathering session with extension specialists

2:00 Dominic Reisig, North Carolina Cooperative Extension
2:30 Mohamed Khan, Extension, North Dakota State University and University of Minnesota
3:00 Rick Kersbergen, University of Maine Cooperative Extension
3:30 Ben Beale, University of Maryland Cooperative Extension

Watch Webinar Recording Here
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
Meeting

Description :   

These are the archived videos of the presentations, discussions, and public comment periods from the two-day public meeting of the committee on September 15-16, 2014.

 

View Agenda

View Speaker Bios

Click the links below to view videos of the presentations and discussions.

Day 1

Welcome: Fred Gould, Committee Chair, University Distinguished Professor of Entomology and Codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, North Carolina State University

Study Process of the National Research Council: Kara Laney, Study Director, National Research Council

Committee Introductions

Session One:

Major Goodman, Member of the National Academy of Sciences and William Neal Reynolds and Distinguished University Professor of Crop Science, Statistics, Genetics, and Botany. bio

R. James Cook, Member of the National Academy of Sciences and Professor Emeritus, Washington State University. bio

Ian Baldwin, Member of the National Academy of Sciences and Professor, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology. bio

Committee Discussion with Presenters

Session Two:

Chuck Benbrook, Research Professor, Center for Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resources, Washington State University. bio

Glenn Stone, Professor of Anthropology and Environmental Studies, Washington University in St. Louis. bio

Hope Shand, Independent Consultant and Senior Advisor, Erosion, Technology and Concentration (ETC) Group. bio

Committee Discussion with Presenters

Public Comment

Day 2

Welcome: Fred Gould, Committee Chair, University Distinguished Professor of Entomology and Codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, North Carolina State University

Study Process of the National Research Council: Kara Laney, Study Director, National Research Council

Committee Introductions

Session Three:

Dietram Scheufele, Co-chair, National Research Council Roundtable on Public Interfaces of the Life Sciences and John E. Ross Professor in Science Communication, University of Wisconsin, Madison. bio

Jennifer Kuzma, Goodnight-Glaxo Wellcome Distinguished Professor and Codirector of the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, North Carolina State University. bio

Carmen Bain, Associate Professor of Sociology, Iowa State University. bio

Session Four:

Gilles-Éric Séralini, Professor of Molecular Biology, University of Caen, France, and Director of the Network on Risks, Quality, and Sustainable Environment. bio

Jeffrey Smith, Founding Executive Director, Institute for Responsible Technology. bio

Janet Cotter, Senior Scientist, Greenpeace International. bio

Committee Discussion with Presenters

Session Five:

Greg Jaffe, Director of the Project on Biotechnology, Center for Science in the Public Interest. bio

Jon Entine, Executive Director, Genetic Literacy Project, and Senior Fellow, World Food Center Institute for Food and Agricultural Literacy, University of California-Davis. bio

Doug Gurian-Sherman, Director of Sustainable Agriculture and Senior Scientist, Center for Food Safety. bio

Bill Freese, Science Policy Analyst, Center for Food Safety

Tamar Haspel, Journalist, The Washington Post. bio

Session Six:

Tim Schwab, Senior Researcher, Food & Water Watch. bio

Michael Hansen, Senior Staff Scientist, Consumers Union. bio

Lisa Griffith, Outreach Director, National Family Farm Coalition

Committee Discussion with Presenters

Public Comment


Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Jenna Briscoe
Contact Email:  jbriscoe@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3062

Agenda
Committee on Genetically Engineered Crops: Past Experience and Future Prospects

Public Meeting

2101 Constitution Ave NW, Room 125, Washington, DC

Monday, September 15, 2014
1:00 pm

Welcome
Fred Gould, Committee Chair, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Entomology and Codirector of the Center on Genetic Engineering and Society, North Carolina State University

Study Process of the National Research Council
Kara Laney, Study Director, National Research Council

Committee Introductions

1:20 To Be Announced

1:40 R. James Cook, Member of the National Academy of Sciences and Professor Emeritus, Washington State University

2:00 Ian Baldwin, Member of the National Academy of Sciences and Professor, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology

2:20 Amy Harmon,* Reporter, The New York Times

2:40 Break

3:00 Chuck Benbrook, Center for Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resources, Washington State University

3:20 Glenn Stone, Professor of Sociocultural Anthropology, Washington University in St. Louis

3:40 Hope Shand, Independent Researcher4:00 Committee Discussion with Presenters

4:45 Break

5:00 Introduction to the Public Comment Session
Fred Gould, Committee Chair, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Entomology and Codirector of the Center on Genetic Engineering and Society, North Carolina State University

Study Process of the National Research Council
Kara Laney, Study Director, National Research Council

5:15 Public Comment

6:15 Public Meeting Adjourns

* Presentation will be made via web conference.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

9:00 Welcome
Fred Gould, Committee Chair, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Entomology and Codirector of the Center on Genetic Engineering and Society, North Carolina State University

Study Process of the National Research Council
Kara Laney, Study Director, National Research Council

Committee Introductions

9:30 Dietram Scheufele, Co-chair, National Research Council Roundtable on Public Interfaces of the Life Sciences and John E. Ross Professor in Science Communication, University of Wisconsin, Madison

9:50 Jennifer Kuzma, Goodnight-Glaxo Wellcome Distinguished Professor and Codirector of the Center on Genetic Engineering and Society, North Carolina State University

10:10 Carmen Bain, Associate Professor of Sociology, Iowa State University

10:30 Break

10:50 Gilles-Éric Séralini,* Professor of Molecular Biology, Université de Caen

11:10 Jeffrey Smith, Founder, Institute for Responsible Technology

11:30 Tamar Haspel, Reporter, The Washington Post

11:50 Committee Discussion with Presenters

12:30 Break

1:30 Greg Jaffe, Director of Biotechnology, Center for Science in the Public Interest

1:50 Jon Entine, Executive Director, Genetic Literacy Project

2:10 Doug Gurian-Sherman, Director of Sustainable Agriculture and Senior Scientist, Center for Food Safety

2:30 Break

2:50 Tim Schwab, Researcher, Food & Water Watch

3:10 Michael Hansen, Senior Staff Scientist, Consumers Union

3:30 National Family Farm Coalition

3:50 Committee Discussion with Presenters

4:45 Break

5:00 Introduction to the Public Comment Session

Fred Gould, Committee Chair, William Neal Reynolds Distinguished Professor of Entomology and Codirector of the Center on Genetic Engineering and Society, North Carolina State University

Study Process of the National Research Council
Kara Laney, Study Director, National Research Council

5:15 Public Comment

6:15 Public Meeting Adjourns

* Presentation will be made via web conference.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fred Gould
Dominique Brossard
Robin Buell
Larry Busch
Richard Dixon
Jose Falck-Zepeda
Michael Gallo
Ken Giller
Tim Griffin
Bruce Hamaker
Peter Kareiva
Dan Magraw
Carol Mallory-Smith
Kevin Pixley
Michael Rodemeyer
David Stelly
Neal Stewart
Bob Whitaker

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Statement of Task
Committee Composition
Report Structure

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Draft Report Outline

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
October 09, 2014
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office