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Project Information

Project Information


Continuing Innovation in Information Technology: A Workshop


Project Scope:

An ad hoc committee will plan and conduct a public workshop that would highlight additional examples of the impacts of computing research using the framework established in the “tiretracks” figure published in CSTB's 2012 report Continuing Innovation in Information Technology and explore further uses of the figure and framework.  The committee will develop the agenda for the workshop, select and invite speakers and discussants, and moderate the discussions. Invited technical leaders and researchers (primarily from industry) would use the framework to make presentations describing how academic and industry research has underpinned innovation in information technology with significant economic or other societal impact. Workshop participants would engage in discussions that build on these presentations to consider how the framework can be used to collect, display, and analyze what is known about the interplay between academic and industry research; the multi-directional flows of ideas, technologies, and people; and the impacts of research. To engage a wider range of experts than would be available on any given date, the in-person workshop event may be extended virtually through teleconferences in which several additional speakers would make presentations and they and participants would engage in discussion.  A summary report will be prepared of the presentations and discussions at the workshop and would contain the examples presented by speakers (appended as signed papers).

Status: Completed

PIN: DEPS-CSTB-13-02

Project Duration (months): 12 month(s)

RSO: Eisenberg, Jon

Topic(s):

Computers and Information Technology
Policy for Science and Technology



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 05/20/2014

Peter Lee - (Chair)
Microsoft Research Redmond

Peter Lee is the Corporate Vice President and Head of Microsoft Research. Dr. Peter Lee oversees operations for an organization encompassing more than 1,150 scientists and engineers across 13 labs worldwide. Under Lee’s leadership, Microsoft Research conducts both basic and applied research across disciplines that include algorithms and theory; human-computer interaction; machine learning; multimedia and graphics; search; security; social computing; and systems, architecture, mobility and networking. Microsoft Research collaborates with the world's foremost researchers in academia, industry and government on initiatives to expand the state of the art across the breadth of computing and to help ensure the future of Microsoft's products. Lee joined Microsoft in 2010 as Distinguished Scientist and Managing Director of the Microsoft Research Redmond Lab, and later took on leadership of Microsoft’s U.S.-based research operations, comprising seven laboratories and over 500 researchers, engineers, and support personnel. Prior to joining Microsoft, Lee has held key positions in both government and academia. His most recent position was at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), where he founded and directed a major technology office that supported research in computing and related areas in the social and physical sciences. One of the highlights of his work at DARPA was the DARPA Network Challenge, which mobilized millions of people worldwide in a hunt for red weather balloons — a unique experiment in social media and open innovation that fundamentally altered the thinking throughout the Department of Defense on the power of social networks. Before DARPA, Lee served as head of Carnegie Mellon University's nationally top-ranked computer science department. He also served as the university's vice provost for research. At CMU, he carried out research in software reliability, program analysis, security, and language design. He is well-known for his co-development of proof-carrying code techniques for enhanced software security, and has tackled problems as diverse as programming for large-scale modular robotics systems and shape analysis for C programs. Lee is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and serves the research community at the national level, including policy contributions to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and membership on both the National Research Council’s Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and the Advisory Council of the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate of the National Science Foundation. He was the former chair of the Computing Research Association and has testified before both the US House Science and Technology Committee and the US Senate Commerce Committee. Lee holds a Ph.D. in computer and communication sciences from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and bachelor's degrees in mathematics and computer sciences, also from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.
Mark E. Dean
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Mark Dean (NAE) is a John Fisher Distinguished Professor at the University Of Tennessee College Of Engineering. His research focus is in advanced computer architecture (beyond Von Neumann systems), data centric computing and computational sciences. Prior to joining UT, Dr. Dean was Chief Technology Officer of the Middle East and Africa for IBM and an IBM Fellow. In this role he was responsible for technical strategy, technical skills development and exploring new technology based solutions for the region. These responsibilities include the development of solutions specific for the emerging needs of the businesses and cultures in industry segments such as mobile services (banking, healthcare, education, government), natural resource management (oil, gas, mining, forest, water), cloud based business services, and security (fraud protection, risk management, privacy, cybersecurity). Dr. Dean was also vice president World Wide Strategy and Operations for IBM Research. In this role, he was responsible for setting the direction of IBM’s overall Research Strategy across eight worldwide labs and leading the global operations and information systems teams. These responsibilities include management of the division’s business model, research strategy, hiring, university relations, internal/external recognition, personnel development, innovation initiatives and the division’s operations. During his career, Dr. Dean has developed all types of computer systems, from embedded systems to supercomputers, including testing of the first gigahertz CMOS microprocessor, and establishing the team that developed the Blue Gene supercomputer. He was also chief engineer for the development of the IBM PC/AT, ISA systems bus, PS/2 Model 70 & 80, the Color Graphics Adapter in the original IBM PC, and holds three of the nine patents for the original IBM PC. One invention -- the Industry Standard Architecture (ISA) "bus," which permitted add-on devices like the keyboard, disk drives and printers to be connected to the motherboard -- would earn election to the National Inventors Hall of Fame for Dean and colleague Dennis Moeller. Dr. Dean’s most recent awards include: National Institute of Science Outstanding Scientist Award, member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, member of the National Academy of Engineering, IEEE Fellow, Black Engineering of the Year, the University of Tennessee COE Dougherty Award, member of the National Inventor’s Hall of Fame, and recipient of the Ronald H. Brown American Innovators Award. Dr. Dean received a BSEE degree from the University of Tennessee in 1979, an MSEE degree from Florida Atlantic University in 1982, and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 1992.
Edward H. Frank
Brilliant Lime and Cloud Parity

Edward Frank is co-founder and CEO of Brilliant Lime and Cloud Parity, both social/mobile software firms. Previously, Frank was a vice president at Apple, Inc. and corporate vice president research and development at Broadcom. Prior to becoming Corporate VP of R&D, Dr. Frank co-founded and led the engineering group for Broadcom's Wireless LAN business, which is now one of Broadcom's largest business units. Dr. Frank joined Broadcom in May 1999 following its acquisition of Epigram, Inc., where he was the founding CEO and Executive Vice President. From 1993 to 1996, he was a co-founder and Vice President of Engineering of NeTpower Inc., a computer workstation manufacturer. From 1988 to 1993, Dr. Frank was a Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems, Inc., where he co-architected several generations of Sun's SPARCstations and was a principal member of Sun's Green Project, which developed the precursor to the Java(tm) cross-platform web programming language. Dr. Frank holds over 40 issued patents. He is a University Life Trustee of Carnegie Mellon University and a member of its Board's Executive Committee. Dr. Frank received a B.S.E.E. and an M.S.E.E. from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University.


Yann A. LeCun
New York University

Yann LeCun is Director of AI Research at Facebook and Silver Professor of Computer Science at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. He is the founding director of the NYU Center for Data Science, and holds appointments of Professor of Neural Science with the Center for Neural Science, and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering with the ECE Department at NYU/Poly.
In 1987, Dr. Lecun joined Geoff Hinton's group at the University of Toronto as a research associate.
He then joined the Adaptive Systems Research Department at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Holmdel, NJ in 1988. In 1991, he spent six months with the Laboratoire Central de Recherche of Thomson-CSF in Orsay, France. Upon his return to the United States, he returned to Bell Labs.
Shortly after AT&T's second breakup in 1996, he became head of the Image Processing Research Department, part of Larry Rabiner's Speech and Image Processing Research Lab at AT&T Labs-Research in Red Bank, NJ. In 2002, he became a Fellow of the NEC Research Institute in Princeton, NJ. Dr. LeCun joined the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University as a Professor of Computer Science in 2003. He was named Silver Professor in 2008. In 2013, he became the founding director of the NYU Center for Data Science. Dr. LeCun has been associate editor of PLoS ONE (2008-2011), IJCV (2003-2007), IEEE Trans. PAMI (2003-2005), Pattern Recognition and Applications, Machine Learning Journal (1996-1998), IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks (1990-1991). Since 1997, he has served as general chair and organizer of the "Learning Workshop” held every year since 1986 in Snowbird, Utah. He is also a member of the Science Advisory Board of the Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics, UCLA. Dr. LeCun has given numerous invited talks at various international conferences and workshops. He has published over 180 technical papers and book chapters on machine learning, computer vision, robotics, pattern recognition, neural networks, handwriting recognition, image compression, document understanding, image processing, VLSI design, and information theory. His handwriting recognition technology is used by several banks around the world, and his image compression technology called DjVu is used by hundreds of web sites and publishers and millions of users to access scanned documents on the Web. An image recognition model he devised, convolutional network, is used by such companies as Facebook, Google, Microsoft, NEC, Baidu, AT&T/NCR, for products and services such as image
recognition and tagging, document recognition, intelligent kiosk, and other applications. Dr. LeCun is the recipient of the 2014 IEEE Neural Network Pioneer Award, awarded by the Computational Intelligence Society. Dr. LeCun received a Diplôme d'Ingénieur from the Ecole Superieure d'Ingénieur en Electrotechnique et Electronique (ESIEE), Paris in 1983, a Diplôme d'Etudes Approfondies (DEA) fromUniversité Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris in 1984, and a PhD in Computer Science from the same university in 1987.

Barbara H. Liskov
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Barbara Liskov is an Institute Professor at MIT. Her research interests include distributed systems, replication algorithms to provide fault-tolerance, programming methodology, and programming languages. Her current research projects include Byzantine-fault-tolerant storage systems and online storage systems that provide confidentiality and integrity for the stored information. Liskov is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Inventors Hall of Fame. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Association for Computing Machinery, and a charter fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. She received the ACM Turing Award in 2009, the ACM SIGPLAN Programming Language Achievement Award in 2008, the IEEE Von Neumann medal in 2004, a lifetime achievement award from the Society of Women Engineers in 1996, and in 2003 was named one of the 50 most important women in science by Discover Magazine. She was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2012.

Elizabeth Mynatt
Georgia Institute of Technology

Elizabeth Mynatt is the Executive Director of the Institute for People and Technology (IPaT), a College of Computing Professor, and the Director of the Everyday Computing Lab. Themes in her research include supporting informal collaboration and awareness in office environments, enabling creative work and visual communication, and augmenting social processes for managing personal information. She is also one of the principal researchers in the Aware Home Research Initiative; investigating the design of future home technologies, especially those that enable older adults to continue living independently as opposed to moving to an institutional care setting. Mynatt is an internationally recognized expert in the areas of ubiquitous computing and assistive technologies. Her research contributes to ongoing work in personal health informatics, computer-supported collaborative work and human-computer interface design. Mynatt is a member of the SIGCHI Academy, a Sloan and Kavli research fellow, and serves on Microsoft Research's Technical Advisory Board. Mynatt is also a member of the Computing Community Consortium, an NSF-sponsored effort to engage the computing research community in envisioning more audacious research challenges. She has published more than 100 scientific papers and chaired the CHI 2010 conference, the premier international conference in human-computer interaction. Prior to joining the Georgia Tech faculty in 1998, she was a member of the research staff at Xerox PARC, working with the founder of ubiquitous computing, Mark Weiser. Her research is supported by multiple grants from NSF including a five-year NSF CAREER award. Other honorary awards include being named the Top Woman Innovator in Technology by Atlanta Woman magazine in 2005 and the 2003 College of Computing’s Dean’s Award. Mynatt earned her Bachelor of Science summa cum laude in computer science from North Carolina State University and her Master of Science and Ph.D. in computer science from Georgia Tech.

Events



Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Shenae A. Bradley
Contact Email:  sbradley@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202/334-2293

Agenda
8:00 – 8:30 AM Introduction and Welcome
Peter Lee, Chair, Microsoft Research

8:30 – 9:00 Robotics, Automation, and the Future of Transportation
Gill Pratt, DARPA [Invited]

9:00 – 10:30 Usability, Human Factors, and Social Computing
Duncan Watts, Microsoft Research
Scott Hudson, Carnegie Mellon University
Moderator: Beth Mynatt, Georgia Institute of Technology

10:30
Break
11:00-11:30 History of Wearables
Thad Starner, Georgia Institute of Technology

11:30 Lunch

12:30 – 1:30 PM Computer architecture, hardware, and systems
Margaret Martonosi, Princeton University
Bob Colwell, Intel (retired)
Moderator: Barbara Liskov, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1:30 – 2:30 Machine Learning and AI
Jamie Carbonell, CMU
Eric Horvitz, Microsoft Research
Moderator: Peter Lee, Microsoft Research

2:30 -2:45 Break

2:45 – 4:00 Communications
Vint Cerf, Google
David Culler, University of California, Berkeley
Andrea Goldsmith, Stanford
Moderator: Mark Dean, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

4:00 – 4:30
Cybersecurity/privacy/critical infrastructure
Stefan Savage, University of California, San Diego

4:30 – 5:30 Value of Research Funding for Innovation
Deborah Estrin, Cornell Tech
Farnam Jahanian, Carnegie Mellon University
Moderator: Peter Lee, Microsoft Research

5:30 Reception

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Shenae Bradley
Contact Email:  sbradley@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2293

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Peter Lee
Mark Dean
Elizabeth Mynatt
Yann LeCun


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

A review of possible workshop speakers was conducted in preparation for the October 8-9, 2014 Continuing Innovation in Information Technology Workshop.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

none

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 29, 2014
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Teleconference
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Shenae Bradley
Contact Email:  sbradley@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2293

Agenda
12:20 - 12:45: Sponsor Charge, Sylvia Spengler, National Science Foundation
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Peter Lee
Mark Dean
Edward Frank
Yann LeCun
Barbara Liskov
Elizabeth Mynatt

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

A bias/conflict discussion was performed with the committee. The project goals and scoped were discussed in closed session by the committee. Committee availability and possible workshop dates were also discussed.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
June 02, 2014
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office