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Project Information

Project Information


A Survey of the Active Scientific Use of the Radio Spectrum


Project Scope:

The committee will prepare a report exploring the scientific uses of the radio spectrum by radio frequency transmissions and the measurement thereof.  In carrying out the study, the committee will:

- Describe the science that is currently being conducted using the radio spectrum for transmission and measurement of these active signals and identify the spectrum requirements necessary to conduct this research;
- Identify the anticipated future spectrum requirements necessary to continue to conduct and expand this research for the next 10-20 years, taking into account trends in overall active use of the spectrum;
- Discuss the value to the nation of accommodating the active scientific use of the spectrum, recognizing the need to balance the needs of multiple communities;
- Assess the active science communities’ current and anticipated future access to the spectrum required for research; and
- Recommend strategies to accommodate the continued active use of the spectrum for scientific purposes in order to maintain the needed science capabilities identified above.

The committee will comment on the spectrum use by the relevant scientific communities for applications such as active microwave remote sensing (i.e., airborne and space-based radars) of Earth to observe environmental phenomena, incoherent scatter radar studies of the Earth's ionosphere and radar astronomy of Solar System objects, but will not make recommendations on the allocation of specific frequencies.  The committee will not make recommendations on communications operations (i.e., transmission of data) that support the scientific uses of the spectrum described above.  The committee should consider proven and potential unilateral and cooperative mitigation techniques, including sharing, in its analysis of access to spectrum.

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-BPA-10-04

Project Duration (months): 24 month(s)

RSO: Lang, David

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Board on Physics & Astronomy DEPS

Topic(s):

Earth Sciences
Engineering and Technology
Math, Chemistry, and Physics
Policy for Science and Technology


Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 07/25/2013

Dr. Fawwaz Ulaby - (Chair)
University of Michigan

FAWWAZ T. ULABY is the Emmett Leith Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Arthur Thurnau Professor of Engineering at the University of Michigan. He attended the American University of Beirut, from which he received the B.S. degree in physics. He later received the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Ulaby’s research is focused on the science and technology of radar remote sensing and its applications. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of AAAS, and a member of several scientific boards and commissions. Between 1999-2005 Dr. Ulaby was the R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan, where he had also served as Vice President for Research (1999–2005). Between 2000 and 2006 he also served as Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Proceedings, Dr. Ulaby then became the founding Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), a graduate research university under development in Saudi Arabia. Prior to assuming this position, In April of 2009, he returned to the University of Michigan as the Arthur Thurnau Professor of EECS. Since joining the University of Michigan faculty in 1984, Professor Ulaby has directed large, interdisciplinary NASA projects aimed at the development of high-resolution satellite radar sensors for mapping earth’s terrestrial environment. He also served as the founding Director of a NASA-funded Center for Space Terahertz Technology. His involvement with the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society extends over a period exceeding three decades, including service as the first President of the Society (1979-1981), Editor of its Transactions, General Chairman of its first and seventh IGARSS (1981 and 1987), and in other capacities. He also served on several IEEE-wide boards and committees. Professor Ulaby has authored 14 books and published some 700 scientific papers and reports. His undergraduate textbook on Applied Electromagnetics has been adopted by some 150 universities across the United States and by a comparable number of universities in other countries. Several of his books have been translated into Chinese, Korean, Portuguese and other languages. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the NASA Group Achievement Award (1990), the University of Michigan Regents Medal for Meritorious Service (1996), and the IEEE Millennium Medal (2000). Over his 30-year academic career, he has supervised 115 M.S. and Ph.D. graduate students. In 2002 he received the William Pecora Award, a joint recognition by NASA and the Department of the Interior, and in 2006 he received the IEEE Thomas Edison Medal, the Distinguished Alumni Award from the American University of Beirut, the Distinguished Educator Award from the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society, and the EECS Professor of the Year Award from EKN.
Dr. Susan K. Avery
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

SUSAN K. AVERY is the President and Director of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. Dr. Avery earned a doctorate in atmospheric science from the University of Illinois in 1978. Her research interests include studies of atmospheric circulation and precipitation, climate variability and water resources, and the development of new radar techniques and instruments for remote sensing. She is the author or co-author of more than 80 peer-reviewed articles and has directed the University of Colorado's Center for Limb Atmospheric Sounding. She also has an interest in scientific literacy and the role of science in public policy. Dr. Avery also holds an appointment at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), of which she has been a fellow since 1982. From 1994-2004, she served as director of CIRES, the first woman and first engineer to hold that position. As director of CIRES, she facilitated new interdisciplinary research efforts spanning the geosciences while bringing them together with social and biological sciences. She also spearheaded a reorganization of the institute and helped establish a successful K-12 outreach program and a Center for Science and Technology Policy Research—efforts to make CIRES research more applicable, understandable, and accessible to the public. Since August 2004, she has served in interim positions as vice chancellor for research and dean of the graduate school, as well as provost and executive vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Colorado at Boulder. She has been a member of its university faculty since 1982, most recently holding the academic rank of professor of electrical and computer engineering. Dr. Avery helped form an integrated science and assessment program that examines the impacts of climate variability on water in the American West. She also worked with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Climate Change Science Program to help formulate a national strategic science plan for climate research. Dr. Avery has served on a number of NRC committees. She is a fellow of both the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and of the American Meteorological Society, for which she also served as president. She is chair of the Climate and Weather of the Sun-Earth System program; chair-elect for the Council on Research Policy and Graduate Education; chair of the science policy board for the Center for Sustainability of Semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas; and a member of the advisory board for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She is a past chair of the board of trustees of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research.
Dr. Coleman D. Bazelon
The Brattle Group

COLEMAN D. BAZELON is a Principal at The Brattle Group in Washington, DC. He received his PhD in Agricultural and Resource Economics from University of California at Berkeley in 1995. Dr. Bazelon is an expert in regulation and strategy in the wireless, wireline, and video sectors. He has consulted and testified on behalf of clients in numerous telecommunications matters, ranging from wireless license auctions, spectrum management, and competition policy, to patent infringement, wireless reselling, and broadband deployment. He frequently advises regulatory and legislative bodies, including the U.S. Federal Communications Commission and the U.S. Congress. He also has expertise in the federal government’s use of discount rates for policy and regulatory analysis, intellectual property valuation, and antitrust and damages analysis. Prior to joining Brattle, Dr. Bazelon was a vice president with Analysis Group, an economic and strategy consulting firm. During that time, he expanded the firm’s telecommunications practice area. He also served as a principal analyst in the Microeconomic and Financial Studies Division of the Congressional Budget Office where he researched reforms of radio spectrum management; estimated the budgetary and private sector impacts of spectrum-related legislative proposals; and advised on auction design and privatization issues for all research at the CBO.
Dr. William A. Bristow
University of Alaska, Fairbanks

WILLIAM A. BRISTOW is a Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF). He earned his Ph.D. in Space Physics from the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 1992. Dr. William Bristow's current research interests include radar systems, studies of winds in the upper atmosphere, studies of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling, and space-weather effects on radio propagation, which directly impacts radio communications in high-latitude regions. Dr. Bristow is the principle investigator for the SuperDARN network which consists of two radar systems in Alaska. He also studies high latitude ionospheric plasma processes using the Goose Bay HF Coherent Radar. He spent 1992-1998 at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory as a Post-Doctoral Fellow and then a Senior Professional Staff Physicist before returning to UAF in 1998.
Dr. Donald B. Campbell
Cornell University

DONALD B. CAMPBELL is a Professor of Astronomy at Cornell University. Dr. Campbell received his PhD from Cornell. His research work is in the general area of planetary studies with a concentration on the radio- wavelength-scattering properties of planets, planetary satellites and small bodies. He makes extensive use of the high powered radar systems on the Arecibo telescope. Recently, working with past and present Cornell graduate students, he has explored remotely the polar regions of the Moon looking for evidence of ice deposits, studied the radar scattering properties of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, Titan, and Iapetus, and used the polarization properties of the reflected radar signals to investigate surficial deposits on the surface of Venus and to look for regoliths on near earth asteroids. He was previously Director of Cornell’s National Astronomy and Ionsphere Center (NAIC). The NAIC manages the Arecibo Observatory, in Arecibo, Puerto Rico, on behalf of the National Science Foundation. Dr. Campbell has been Professor of Astronomy at Cornell since 1987. Prior to coming to the Cornell campus he was Director of the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico for seven years. He served on the NRC Panel on Radio and Submillimeter-wave Astronomy for the 2000 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey and was a member of the U.S. National Committee for the International Astronomical Union in 1995-1997.
Dr. Marie Colton
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

MARIE COLTON is the Director of the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL). She earned her Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography from the Naval Postgraduate School in 1989. Her research interests are in active remote sensing of water bodies. During her career she has been an aerospace engineer at NASA, a physicist at the Naval Research Laboratory, an oceanographer at the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center, and center director of NOAA’s satellite service. While serving as acting director of GLERL, Colton also worked as technical director for NOAA’s Ocean Service, where she oversaw all of the science and technology enterprise from hydrographic mapping to ecology.
Dr. Sandra L. Cruz-Pol
University of Puerto Rico - Mayaguez

SANDRA CRUZ-POL is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez. She obtained her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Pennsylvania State University. Her research interests include microwave remote sensing of natural phenomena, modeling of the microwave atmospheric absorption and microwave sea surface emissivity, and stratus cloud studies using W and Ka-Bands. She is currently working on several microwave remote sensing projects sponsored by NSF (Engineering Research Center for Subsurface Sensing and Image Systems in collaboration with Northeastern University), NASA (Tropical Center for Earth and Space Sciences), IBM and IAP. She is also working in the retrieval of multidimensional cloud liquid water content images using a dual-frequency millimeter-wave Cloud Profiling Radar System in a joint project with the University of Massachusetts’ Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory. Dr. Cruz-Pol is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS), and the Tau Beta Pi and Phi Kappa Phi Honor Societies. She is currently the Associate Editor for University Affairs for the IEEE GRSS Newsletter. She was the counselor for the student chapter of the IEEE in UPRM, the largest in IEEE Region 9. She has been a recipient of NASA, GEM, NSF-GEE and GTE Fellowships. She has also spent time as a researcher at AT&T Laboratories, Lincroft, NJ, and Middletown, NJ. She is a member of the NRC Committee on Radio Frequencies.
Dr. Lennard A. Fisk
University of Michigan

LENNARD A. FISK is the Thomas M. Donahue Distinguished University Professor of Space Science in the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences at the University of Michigan. Dr. Fisk was previously the associate administrator for space science and applications (the predecessor to the current Heliophysics and Earth Science divisions) and chief scientist at NASA. He has served as a professor of physics and as vice president for research and financial affairs at the University of New Hampshire. He is a member of the board of directors of the Orbital Sciences Corporation and co-founder of the Michigan Aerospace Corporation. He is an active researcher in both theoretical and experimental studies of the solar atmosphere and its expansion into space to form the heliosphere. Dr. Fisk received his Ph.D. in applied physics from the University of California, San Diego. He was a member of the 2012 NRC Committee on a Decadal Strategy for Solar and Space Physics (Heliophysics). Other relevant NRC service includes chair of the Committee on the Role and Scope of Mission-Enabling Activities in NASA’s Space and Earth Science Missions, co-vice chair of the Committee on the Rationale and Goals of the U.S. Civil Space Program, chair of the Space Studies Board, chair of the Planning Committee for Workshop on U.S. Civil Space Policy, chair of the Planning Committee for Decadal Science Strategy Surveys: A Workshop, chair of the Committee on an Assessment of Balance in NASA's Science Programs, and current member of the Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space.
Dr. Albin J. Gasiewski
University of Colorado Boulder

ALBIN GASIEWSKI is a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Colorado at Boulder (CU) and is the Director of the NOAA-CU Center for Environmental Technology (CET). He received his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1989. His technical interests include passive and active remote sensing, radiative transfer theory and applications, electromagnetics, antennas and microwave circuits, electronic instrumentation, airborne sensors, meteorology, and oceanography. From 1989 to 1997 he was faculty member within the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. As an associate professor at Georgia Tech, he developed and taught courses on electromagnetics, remote sensing, instrumentation, and wave propagation theory. From 1997 through 2005 he worked at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), in Boulder, Colorado, where he was Chief of the Microwave Systems Development Branch of the ESRL Physical Science Division. In 2006 he joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at CU. Dr. Gasiewski was the 2005-2006 President of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society and is also a member of the International Union of Radio Scientists (URSI), where he served as Vice Chair of the United States National Committee of URSI (USNC/URSI) Commission F. He served on the U.S. National Research Council's Committee on Radio Frequencies (CORF) from 1989-1995 and on the USNC/ URSI from 1996-1997 and again from 2009-2011. He co-chaired the previous NRC spectrum study on passive science.
Dr. Jeffrey Herd
Massachusetts Institute of Technology Corporation

JEFFREY HERD is the Associate Group Leader of the Radiofrequency and Quantum Systems Technologies Group at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. In this role, he is responsible for the leadership of Advanced RF Technology efforts. The Laboratory’s activities in this area include significant programs in developing future radars for air traffic control, weather surveillance, and airborne collision avoidance. Before joining Lincoln Laboratory in 1999, Dr. Herd worked in the Sensors Directorate of the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory. From 1992-1994, he was a visiting scientist at the Institute for High Frequency Physics at the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) in Munich, Germany. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees, all in Electrical Engineering, from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst; he received his Ph.D. in 1989.
Dr. Linwood Jones
University of Central Florida

LINWOOD JONES is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Director of the Central Florida Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Central Florida. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute in 1971, his MEE from University of Virginia in 1965, and his BSEE from Virginia Polytechnic Institute in 1962. Dr. Jones is an internationally recognized expert on microwave remote sensing for Earth Science applications. He has played an active role in every NASA scatterometer mission flown in space from SkyLab S-193 to the present QuikSCAT. Also, he has extensive experience in space technologies with over forty years experience in NASA, DOD and commercial space programs with strong background in satellite systems engineering, and microwave remote sensing physics and instrument design and development. He has been a developer of geophysical algorithms for passive (radiometry) and active (scatterometry) microwave remote sensors for earth observations. In 1999 he was elected Fellow of IEEE for contributions to the development and application of active microwave remote sensing technology for satellite oceanography.
Dr. Paul Kolodzy
Kolodzy Consulting, LLC

PAUL KOLODZY is a private consultant with Kolodzy Consulting. He provides wireless communications consultation services to Government (DoD and Civilian) and commercial customers. He received his PhD and MS in Chemical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University and his BS in Chemical Engineering from Purdue University. Prior to his work as a private consultant, he was the senior technology advisor and consultant to M2Z Networks. Before M2Z Networks he was the Director of the Center for Wireless Network Security (WiNSeC) at Stevens Institute of Technology. Prior to that, he was the Senior Spectrum Policy Advisor at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and Director of the Spectrum Policy Task Force charged with developing the next generation spectrum policy. Dr. Kolodzy has also been a Program Manager at the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) in the Advanced Technology Office managing R&D for communications programs developing generation-after-next capabilities. Before DARPA, he was the Director of Signal Processing and Strategic Initiatives at Sanders (now BAE Systems), a premier electronic warfare company. Dr. Kolodzy got his start as the Group Leader and Staff Member at MIT Lincoln Laboratory working on Optical Systems for Laser Radars, Signal Processing, and Target Recognition for Acoustics, RF (SAR), and Optical signatures. Dr. Kolodzy has 20 years of experience in technology development for advanced communications, networking, electronic warfare, and spectrum policy for government, private sector and academic groups. He participated in the NRC Computer Science and Telecommunications Board’s Forum on Spectrum Management Policy Reform and the 2010 spectrum study which focused on passive uses.
Dr. Robert Palmer
University of Oklahoma

ROBERT PALMER is the Tommy C. Craighead Chair in the School of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma (OU). He is also an Adjunct Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at OU. Dr. Palmer has a PhD in electrical engineering from the University of Oklahoma (1989). Dr. Palmer began his career as a postdoctoral fellow at the Radio Atmospheric Science Center of Kyoto University, Japan, from 1989 to 1991. His major accomplishments were the development of novel interferometric radar techniques for studies of the lower and middle atmosphere. After his time in Japan, Dr. Palmer held the position of research associate in the Physics and Astronomy Department of Clemson University where he continued his work with atmospheric radar. From 1993 to 2004, he was a member of the faculty of the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where his interests broadened into areas including wireless communications, remote sensing, and pedagogy. While in Nebraska, he received several awards for both his teaching and research accomplishments. Currently, Dr. Palmer serves as Associate Vice President for Research and Director of OU's interdisciplinary AdvancedRadar Research Center (ARRC), which is the focal point for radar research and educational activities on the Norman campus. Since coming to OU, his research interests have been focused primarily on the application of advanced radar signal processing techniques to observations of severe weather, especially related to phased array radars and other innovative system designs. Dr. Palmer has published widely in the area of radar remote sensing of the atmosphere with over 80 peer-reviewed journal publications and 200 conference presentations. Common themes throughout this body of work include an emphasis on generalized imaging problems, spatial filter design, and clutter mitigationusing advanced array/signal processing techniques. Dr. Palmer served on the NRC Committee on Evaluation of the Multifunction Phased Array Radar Planning Process.
Mr. Dean Paschen
FIRST RF Corporation

DEAN PASCHEN is the Director of Advanced Programs for FIRST RF Corporation. Mr. Paschen received a BSEE and MSEE from the University of Illinois in 1981 and 1982, respectively. At FIRST RF, Mr. Paschen is responsible for engineering development tasks on government R&D contracts relating to aerospace and defense applications and development of advanced radio frequency (RF) and antenna technologies. These areas include: broadband antennas, conformal antennas, and phased array antenna systems. The systems engineering supports radar, communications, electronic warfare (EW), threat neutralization, algorithms, navigation, identification, guidance, antenna pointing, seekers and fuzing, telemetry, and remote sensing. His first employment following graduate school was an antenna engineering position at Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation. After nearly 26 years leading to the Chief Technologist position in the antenna group at Ball, Mr. Paschen moved to FIRST RF Corporation in Boulder, Colorado. He has 15 issued patents and 11 published papers.
Dr. Michael W. Spencer
Jet Propulsion Laboratory

MICHAEL W. SPENCER is the Deputy Manager for Radar Science and Engineering Section at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from Brigham Young University. His research interests are in radar systems engineering, modeling and simulation of advanced remote sensing systems, and stochastic signal processing. Dr. Spencer came to JPL in 1990 and initially worked on modeling and simulation for the NASA scatterometer (NSCAT) instrument, a Ku-band radar launched in 1996 to measure sea-surface winds from space. He was involved as a lead systems engineer for the SeaWinds instrument (a follow-on to NSCAT) from the early conceptual design phase through launch, calibration, and operations on the QuikSCAT satellite in 1999 and again on the ADEOS-2 satellite in 2002. He continues to be interested in wind sensing from space, and has developed concepts for future high-resolution systems. More recently, Dr. Spencer has been lead payload system engineer for the development of an advanced radar for the measurement of soil moisture. For the Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission, he has been responsible for the design of a unique L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), which utilizes a large rotating mesh reflector antenna to achieve a very wide measurement swath. In addition to the above activities, Dr. Spencer has held system engineering and management roles on the Aquarius and GeoSAR projects. Previous to coming to JPL, Dr. Spencer was with the Aerospace Corporation, where he was involved with the modeling and simulation of advanced sensor systems.

Events



Location:

J. Erik Jonsson Conference Center
314 Quissett Ave.
Woods Hole, Massachusetts
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  david lang
Contact Email:  dlang@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  2023342395

Agenda
NRC ACTIVE SENSING COMMITTEE
June 11-12, 2014
J. Erik Jonsson Woods Hole Center, 314 Quissett Ave, Woods Hole, Massachusetts


Wednesday, June 11, 2014

CLOSED SESSION

8:30 am ‘Working’ breakfast

9:00 Welcome and meeting introduction Fawwaz Ulaby, Chair

9:15 Summary of previous meetings David Lang, Study Director

9:45 Day 1 format, objectives, and approach Jeff Herd

10:15 Spectrum Allocation and Access Issues Paul Kolodzy

10:45 Break

11:00 Radio Frequency Interference Mike Spencer

11:30 Technologies & Opps for Spectrum Sharing Dean Paschen

12:00 pm ‘Working’ lunch

1:00 Breakout sessions

1. Spectrum Allocation and Access:
Lead: Paul Kolodzy
Team: Coleman Bazelon, Len Fisk, Marie Colton, and Don Campbell

2. RFI:
Lead: Mike Spencer
Team: Linwood Jones, Bill Bristow, Sandra Cruz-Pol, Jeff Herd

3. Spectrum Sharing
Lead: Dean Paschen
Team: Fawwaz Ulaby, Al Gasiewski, Susan Avery, and Bob Palmer

2:30 Discussion and synthesis of findings and recs All

3:30 Break and carpool to Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI)
86 Water St, Woods Hole, MA 02543

4:00 Begin tour of WHOI

5:45 Conclude tour of WHOI and return to Jonsson Center for dinner

6:15 Dinner at meeting site



Thursday, June 12, 2014

CLOSED SESSION

8:30 am ‘Working’ breakfast

9:00 Review of previous day’s discussions Fawwaz Ulaby, Chair

9:15 Report Gaps and inconsistencies Len Fisk

9:45 Findings and Recommendations David Lang

10:15 Break

10:30 Continued discussion or writing All

11:30 Report completion plan Fawwaz Ulaby, Chair

12:00 pm Lunch available and adjourn
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

All members present except Robert Palmer.

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Report; schedule; findings and recommendations; NRC process.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

none

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
June 18, 2014


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  david lang
Contact Email:  dlang@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  2023342395

Agenda
Monday, February 10, 2014

Location: Room 101, Keck Center of the National Academies, 500 5th St, NW, Washington, DC


CLOSED SESSION
8:30 a.m. Breakfast available
9:00 Welcome and Opening Remarks Fawwaz Ulaby, Chair

OPEN SESSION
9:15 Summary of the observations and conclusions from the last meeting David Lang, NRC
10:45 Break
11:00 Another perspective on the future of wireless communications networking Paul Kolodzy,
Committee member
12:00 p.m. Working lunch

CLOSED SESSION
1:00-5:15 Committee discussion

5:15 Break for working dinner
6:00 Working dinner
8:00 Adjourn for the day


Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Location: Room 101, Keck Center of the National Academies, 500 5th St, NW, Washington, DC

CLOSED SESSION
8:30 am Committee discussion
10:20 Break
10:30 Committee discussion
12:00 pm Working lunch
1:00 Adjourn meeting
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fawwaz Ulaby
Susan Avery
Coleman Bazelon
William Bristow
Marie Colton
Sandra Cruz-Pol
Lennard Fisk
Albin Gasiewski
Jeffrey Herd
Linwood Jones
Paul Kolodzy
Robert Palmer
Dean Paschen
Michael Spencer


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

NRC study process; statement of task; schedule; data gathering; draft report

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Passive science study. CORF Handbook. Draft report sections.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
February 11, 2014


Location:

Day 1: Beckman Center
Day 2: Hyatt Regency Irvine
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  david lang
Contact Email:  dlang@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  2023342395

Agenda
NOTE (9/12/2013): This is a preliminary, draft agenda and is subject to change.


NRC ACTIVE SENSING COMMITTEE

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Location: Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center, 100 Academy Dr, Irvine, CA 92617

All presentation titles below are provisional and only intended to be placeholders
* speaker to be confirmed

CLOSED SESSION
8:30 a.m. Breakfast available
9:00 Welcome and Opening Remarks Fawwaz Ulaby, Chair
9:15 Summary of the observations and conclusions from the last meeting (45 min)
David Lang, NRC
10:00 Summary of the RFI Workshop
(including discussion) (45 min) Al Gasiewski and Mike Spencer, Committee members

OPEN SESSION
10:45 Break
11:00 European perspective on user requirements and associated applications for future spaceborne SAR systems
(including discussion) Kostas Papathanassiou,
German Aerospace Center (DLR)
12:00 p.m. Working lunch
1:00 Polarimetric radar: science applications, frequency usage, interference issues
(including discussion) Kurt Hondl, NOAA
1:45 Atmospheric radar: science applications, frequency usage, interference issues
(including discussion) Bob Palmer,
Committee member
2:30 Break
2:45 Ionospheric radar: science applications, frequency usage, interference issues
(including discussion) Bill Bristow,
Committee member
3:30 Radar astronomy: science applications, frequency usage, interference issues
(including discussion) Don Campbell,
Committee member
4:15 General discussion
5:00 Break for working dinner
6:00 Working dinner Location TBD
8:00 Adjourn for the day


Friday, November 15, 2013
Location: Hyatt Regency Irvine, 17900 Jamboree Rd, Irvine, CA 92614

OPEN SESSION
8:30 am Breakfast
9:00 The economic issues of spectrum sharing
(including discussion) Coleman Bazelon,
Committee member

CLOSED SESSION
9:45 Discussion of the meeting’s talks and
implications for the study
10:30 Break
10:45 Discussion of the report outline and report writing assignments
11:30 Discussion of the next meeting: topics and speakers
12:00 pm Working lunch
1:00 Adjourn meeting

Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fawwaz Ulaby
University of Michigan
Susan Avery
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (remotely)
Coleman Bazelon
The Brattle Group
William Bristow
U. Alaska-Fairbanks
Donald Campbell
Cornell University
Marie Colton
NOAA /GLERL
Sandra Cruz-Pol
U. Puerto Rico-Mayaguez
Lennard Fisk
U. Michigan
Albin Gasiewski
U. Colorado-Boulder
Jeffrey Herd
MIT Lincoln Lab
Paul Kolodzy
Kolodzy Consulting
Robert Palmer
U. Oklahoma
Dean Paschen
First RF Co.
Michael Spencer
JPL

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Summary of the observations and conclusions from the last meeting; Summary of the RFI Workshop; Discussion of the meeting’s talks and implications for the study; Discussion of the report outline and report writing assignments; Discussion of the next meeting: topics and speakers; Discussion of the fourth meeting: timing.


The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

none

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
November 21, 2013


Location:

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  david lang
Contact Email:  dlang@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  2023342395

Agenda
NOTE: This agenda is a draft and is subject to change.

9:00 a.m. Welcome and Goals for the Workshop
Fawwaz Ulaby, Workshop Co-organizer and NRC Committee Chair

9:15 a.m. Perspective from the European Space Agency
Pierluigi Silverstin, ESA (by WebEx)

9:45 a.m. Perspective from the Canadian Space Agency
Dean Sangiorgi, CSA (by WebEx)

10:15 a.m. Perspective from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
Masanobu Shimada, JAXA

10:45 a.m. Break

11:00 a.m. Frequency Allocation Challenges for UWB Radars
Mark Davis, Consultant

11:30 a.m.
Bryan Huneycutt, JPL

12:00 p.m. Working Lunch

1:00 p.m.
Frank Sanders, NTIA

1:30 p.m. JPL RFI Experience (30 minutes per speaker)
Steve Durden, JPL
Leif Harcke, JPL
Scott Hensley, JPL
Mike Spencer, JPL

3:30 p.m. Break

3:45 p.m. RFI in P-Band and X-Band seen by the GeoSAR system
Jim Reis, Fugro EarthData

4:15 p.m.
Group discussion; conclusions

5:30 p.m. Adjourn

6:30 p.m. Working dinner at [Location to be determined]
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  david lang
Contact Email:  dlang@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  2023342395

Agenda

NRC ACTIVE SENSING COMMITTEE

August 15-16, 2013
Room 201 Keck Center of the National Academies
500 Fifth Street, NW - Washington, D.C. 20001


Thursday, August 15, 2013

CLOSED SESSION

8:30 – 12:30

OPEN SESSION

12:30 – 1:00 Working lunch continues, guests arrive

1:00 – 1:20 Opening remarks on the study
Badri Younes, NASA, Associate Administrator for Space Communications and Navigation

1:20 – 3:00 Active Earth remote sensing: NASA perspective
Tom vonDeak, NASA
Bryan Huneycutt, JPL
Betsy Edwards, NASA Earth Sciences

3:00 – 3:15 Break

3:15 – 4:30 Spectrum management for active radio science Andrew Clegg and Glen Langston, NSF ESM

4:30 – 5:15 RFI mitigation techniques under study at DARPA
John Chapin, DARPA Strategic Technology Office


CLOSED SESSION

5:15 – 8:30 Adjourn for the day



Friday, August 16, 2013

OPEN SESSION

8:30 – 9:00 am ‘Working’ breakfast

9:00 – 9:30 FCC Perspective
Julie Knapp, FCC, Chief, Office of Engineering and Technology

9:30 – 10:00 NTIA Perspective *Karl Nebbia, NTIA, Associate Administrator, Spectrum Management

10:00 – 10:30 OSTP Perspective *Tom Power, OSTP, Deputy CTO, Telecommunications

10:30 – 10:45 Break

10:45 – 11:15 *Perspective from Congress *TBD Hill Staff

11:15 am – 11:45 General discussion & Public comment session


CLOSED SESSION

11:45 – 3:00 Discussion

3:00 Adjourn meeting


* = Not yet confirmed
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Fawwaz Ulaby
University of Michigan
Susan Avery
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute
Coleman Bazelon
The Brattle Group
William Bristow
U. Alaska-Fairbanks
Donald Campbell
Cornell University
Marie Colton
NOAA /GLERL
Sandra Cruz-Pol
U. Puerto Rico-Mayaguez
Lennard Fisk
U. Michigan
Albin Gasiewski
U. Colorado-Boulder
Jeffrey Herd
MIT Lincoln Lab
Linwood Jones
U. Central Florida
Paul Kolodzy
Kolodzy Consulting
Robert Palmer
U. Oklahoma
Dean Paschen
First RF Co.
Michael Spencer
JPL

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

committee composition; introduction to the study; NRC study process; FACA section 15; passive science study; statement of task; topics and speakers for second meeting; report structure; study schedule; data gathering.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Passive science study. CORF Handbook. Presidential memos on spectrum (2010 and 2013). GAO report on receiver standards. Study proposal. NTIA fast track report on wireless broadband. Earth science decadal survey and midterm reports. FCC National Broadband Plan. PCAST spectrum report.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
August 16, 2013

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office