Public Access Records Office
The National Academies
500 5th Street NW
Room KECK 219
Washington, DC 20001
Tel: (202) 334-3543
Email: paro@nas.edu
Project Information

Project Information


Panel on Human Factors Science at the Army Research Laboratory


Project Scope:

This panel will annually review the scientific and technical quality of the Army Research Laboratory's (ARL) programs of research and development related to its human factors science technical area. The panel will provide notes to the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board (ARLTAB), a committee that will prepare the biennial report summarizing its assessment of the ARL. 

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-LAB-12-03

Project Duration (months): 72 month(s)

RSO: Mozhi, Arul

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Laboratory Assessments Board
ARLT

Topic(s):

Behavioral and Social Sciences
Engineering and Technology



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 02/21/2018

Moshe Kam
MOSHE KAM is professor and dean of the Newark College of Engineerinng at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. He is the former Robert Quinn Professor and department head of electrical and computer engineering at Drexel University. He is also a former president and CEO of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and past member of the boards of directors of the accreditation agency ABET, Inc., and the United Engineering Foundation (UEF). Dr. Kam’s research interests include detection and estimation; data, decision, and sensor fusion; robotics and navigation; and engineering education. He has published extensively in these areas. Dr. Kam received a B.Sc. from Tel Aviv University and an M.S. and PH.D. from Drexel University.
William S. Marras - (Chair)
WILLIAM S. MARRAS (NAE) is the Honda Chair Professor in the Department of Integrated Systems Engineering at Ohio State University, and holds joint appointments in the Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Physical Medicine, and Neurosurgery. Dr. Marras is also executive director and scientific director of the Spine Research Institute and the executive director of the Institute for Ergonomics. His research is centered on understanding the role of biomechanics in spine disorder causation and its role in the prevention, evaluation, and treatment of spine disorders. His research includes epidemiologic studies, laboratory biomechanics studies, mathematical modeling, and clinical studies. His findings have been published in over 200 peer-reviewed journal articles, and have been cited over 15,000 times. He also has written numerous books and book chapters including his most recent book entitled The Working Back: A Systems View. He holds Fellow status in six professional societies including the American Society for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and has been widely recognized for his contributions through numerous national and international awards including two Volvo Awards for Low Back Pain Research. Professor Marras has been active in the National Research Council (NRC) having served on over a dozen boards and committees and has served as Chair of the Board on Human Systems Integration for multiple terms. He has also served as Editor-in-Chief of Human Factors and is currently Deputy Editor of Spine and is the immediate past President of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Dr. Marras recorded a TEDx talk entitled “Back Pain and your Brain” and was recently featured on NPR’s All Things Considered. He received a B.S. in engineering from Wright State University, an M.S.in industrial engineering from Wayne State University, a Ph.D. in bioengineering and ergonomics from Wayne State University, and a D.Sc. Honoris Causa from the University of Waterloo.
Henny Admoni
HENNY ADMONI is an assistant professor in the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), where she leads the Human and Robot Partners (HARP) Laboratory. Dr. Henny studies how to develop intelligent robots that can assist and collaborate with humans on complex tasks like preparing a meal. She is most interested in how natural human communication, like where someone is looking, can reveal underlying human intentions and can be used to improve human-robot interactions. Dr. Henny's research has been supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR), the Paralyzed Veterans of America Foundation, and Sony Corporation. Her work has been featured by the media such as National Public Radio's (NPR) Science Friday, Voice of America News, and WESA radio. Previously, Dr. Henny was a postdoctoral fellow at CMU with Siddhartha Srinivasa in the Personal Robotics Laboratory. Dr. Henny completed her Ph.D. in computer science at Yale University in 2016 with Professor Brian Scassellati. Her Ph.D. dissertation was about modeling the complex dynamics of nonverbal behavior for socially assistive human-robot interaction. Dr. Henny holds an M.S. in computer science from Yale University, and a B.A./M.A. joint degree in computer science from Wesleyan University.
Monica Anderson
MONICA ANDERSON (HERZOG) is associate professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Alabama. Dr. Anderson directs the university’s Distributed Autonomy Laboratory, which focuses on multiagent/multirobot coordination and user interfaces. Her research projects study multiagent/multirobot autonomy, teaming with humans, and user interfaces and their effect on trust. Major research thrusts include Operator Multiagent Teaming for Safety applications (OMTS) and Pervasive Systems for Elder Care (PSEC). Dr. Anderson received a. B.S., in computer science from Chicago State University in 1990 and a Ph.D. in computer science and engineering from the University of Minnesota in 2006.
Ellen J. Bass
ELLEN J. BASS is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Systems and Sciences Research in the College of Nursing and Health Professions at Drexel University. She holds a joint appointment in the Department of Information Science in Drexel University’s College of Computing and Informatics. She also holds affiliate status in Drexel University’s School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems. Bass has over 30 years of human-centered systems engineering research and design experience in multiple domains. Early in her career, Dr. Bass was a systems engineering practitioner, specifying and testing the human-automation interaction for real-time, complex systems. Since then, she has established a research program in cognitive systems engineering and human factors. The focus of her research is to develop theories of human performance, quantitative modeling methodologies, measures, and associated experimental designs that can be used to evaluate human-automation interaction and human-human coordination in the context of total system performance. The outcomes of the research can be used in the systems engineering process: to inform system requirements, procedures, display designs and training interventions and to support system evaluation. She has published over 150 peer-reviewed publications. Her research program is currently funded by AHRQ, the Department of Education, the FAA, and PCORI and has been funded by federal agencies including NASA, the National Institute of Nursing Research, the National Library of Medicine, the NSF, the Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Air Force, and the U.S. Navy. Bass is a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and a senior member of the IEEE and of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Dr. Bass is a member of the Executive Council of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. She is a member of the editorial board for the journals Human Factors and IIE Transaction on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors. She was the inaugural editor of the IEEE Trans. on Human-Machine Systems. Bass holds a Ph.D. in Systems Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, an M.S. in Advanced Technology from the State University of New York at Binghamton, a B.S. Engineering in Bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania, and a B.S. Economics in Finance from the University of Pennsylvania.
Frederick R. Chang
FREDERICK (FRED) R. CHANG (NAE) is the chair of the Computer Science Department in the Lyle School of Engineering at Southern Methodist University (SMU). He is also the executive director of the Darwin Deason Institute for Cyber Security, the Bobby B. Lyle Endowed Centennial Distinguished Chair in Cyber Security, and professor in the Department of Computer Science. He is a senior fellow in the John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies in SMU’s Dedman College. Additionally, Dr. Chang’s career spans service in the private sector and in government including as the former director of research at the National Security Agency (NSA). Dr. Chang was elected as a member of the U.S. NAE in 2016. He is currently the co-chair of the Intelligence Community Studies Board of the National Academies and he is also a member of the ARLTAB of the National Academies. He has served as a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies and as a member of the Commission on Cybersecurity for the 44th Presidency. He is the lead inventor on two U.S. patents and has appeared before Congress as a cybersecurity expert witness on multiple occasions. Dr. Chang received his B.A. degree from the University of California, San Diego and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Oregon. He has also completed the Program for Senior Executives at the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has been awarded the NSA Director’s Distinguished Service Medal.
Erin K. Chiou
ERIN K. CHIOU is an assistant professor of human systems engineering in the Polytechnic School, part of The Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, at Arizona State University (ASU). Dr. Chiou is an expert in industrial and systems engineering, human factors and ergonomics, human-automation interaction, health systems engineering, field research methods, microworld laboratory studies, and has industry experience in product design and testing. Dr. Chiou’s recent research focuses on the design of technologies to support people working in complex work environments, including projects on human-machine teaming in emergency response and national security, as well as projects involving patients at the center of healthcare delivery work. Dr. Chiou’s goals are to develop the science of measuring and evaluating human-technology systems in complex work environments, as well as to advance practical knowledge of system design for sustained, societal value. Prior to graduate school Chiou worked in various industries, including at a medical device company and an education startup company. She received her B.S. in Psychology and Philosophy from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). While there, she received the Asian American Leadership Award in 2006, and from 2006 – 2007 she was a Freeman Fellow exchange student at Fudan University in Shanghai, China. She received her Ph.D. in 2016 and M.S. in 2013, from the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her graduate degrees were funded by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program and the Graduate Engineering Research Scholars Advanced Opportunity Fellowship.
Matthew C. Gombolay
MATTHEW C. GOMBOLAY joined the Georgia Institute of Technology faculty in the fall of 2018 as an Assistant Professor in the School of Interactive Computing. He is also currently the Catherine M. and James E. Allchin Early-Career Chair. Between defending his dissertation in 2017 and joining the faculty at Georgia Tech, Dr. Gombolay served as a technical staff member at Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT) Lincoln Laboratory, a federally-funded research and development center. Dr. Gombolay’s research interests span robotics, artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), human factors engineering, human-robot interaction (HRI), planning and scheduling, queueing theory, real-time systems, and operations research. His research has been highlighted in domestic and international media outlets such as CNN, PBS, NBC, CBS, Harvard Business Review, Gizmodo, and NPR. Dr. Gombolay received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 2011, a S.M. in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT in 2013, and a Ph.D. in autonomous systems from MIT in 2017.
Michael A. Goodrich
MICHAEL (MIKE) A. GOODRICH is a professor of computer science and the director of the Human Centered Machine Intelligence (HCMI) Research Laboratory at Brigham Young University. His research interests include human-robot interaction, human-vehicle interaction, multi-agent learning, artificial intelligence, and decision theory. At HCMI the research is based on the belief that the ultimate purpose of intelligent machines (robots and AI systems) is to serve humans. Therefore, it is important for machines to fit in with human environments and human procedures / processes / models. A well-designed and task-appropriate Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) method can improve task performance and allows intelligent machines to better support/facilitate human tasks. Sponsors of current and previous work include the NSF, DARPA, ARL, ONR, and INL. Dr. Goodrich is a senior member of the IEEE, and a member of the ACM, AAAI, and AIAA. He received his Ph.D. at Brigham Young University in 1996 from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. Following graduation, he completed a two-year postdoctoral research associate position at Nissan CBR in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Wayne D. Gray
WAYNE D. GRAY is a professor of cognitive science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. At Rensselaer he founded the CogWorks Laboratory (CWL) where research focuses on detailed studies of longitudinal changes in individual human performance, especially performance in dynamic, real-time tasks -- tasks in which even hesitating requires a decision to hesitate. These types of tasks require focus on the mind’s eye and the mind’s hand (that is, the interaction of perception, action, and cognition) within dynamic, externally-paced, task environments. CWL has invested in collecting massive amounts of data from individuals in the lab and harvesting massive amounts of data from individuals and teams from the web and elsewhere. Over the past five years, the lab has (a) trained people, in the lab, for 31 hours on a novel video game (Space Fortress), (b) “sampled expertise” by collecting data from people with vastly different amounts of prior experience playing the game “Tetris” (sampling individuals in the lab and at regional and international tournaments), and (c) accessed public APIs to download data from millions of the people who have played one to several thousands of hours of the game League of Legends. These studies have led to the formulation of the “Plateau, Dips, and Leaps” framework that focuses on identifying -- for individual humans - periods in which no progress is being made (plateaus), periods in which people discover or invent new methods (sometimes signaled by “dips” in performance), and periods in which new methods are implemented and performance soars (“leaps”) over what would have been expected by those slow and gradual forces postulated by the log-log law of learning. After earning his Ph.D., Dr. Gray’s first position was with the U. S. Army Research Institute where he worked on tactical team training (at the Monterey Field Unit) and later on the application of artificial intelligence (AI) technology to training for air-defense systems (HAWK) (at ARI-HQ Alexandria, VA). He spent a post-doctoral year with Professor John R. Anderson's lab at Carnegie Mellon University before joining the AI Laboratory of NYNEX' Science and Technology Division. At NYNEX he applied cognitive task analysis and cognitive modeling to the design and evaluation of interfaces for large, commercial telecommunications systems. His academic career began at Fordham University and then moved to George Mason University. He joined the Cognitive Science Department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2002. Dr. Gray is a fellow of the Cognitive Science Society, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES), and the American Psychological Association (APA). In 2008, APA awarded him the Franklin V. Taylor Award for Outstanding Contributions in the Field of Applied Experimental and Engineering Psychology. He is a past chair of the Cognitive Science Society and the founding chair of the Human Performance Modeling technical group of HFES. At present, he is the executive editor for the Cognitive Science Society’s first new journal in 30 years, Topics in Cognitive Science (topiCS). In 2012, he was elected a fellow by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and spent his sabbatical in research at the Max Planck Institute Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition (ABC) in Berlin. Most recently, he received an IBM Faculty Award from IBM's Cognitive Systems Institute. Dr. Gray earned his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California, Berkeley in 1979.
Margaret L. Loper
MARGARET L. LOPER is the chief scientist for the Information and Communications Laboratory at the Georgia Tech Research Institute. She is currently involved in projects related to trust in machine to machine systems in the Internet of Things, and uncertainty quantification in modeling and simulation. Her research contributions are in the areas of temporal synchronization, simulation testing, and simulation communication protocols. She is a senior member of the IEEE and ACM, and member of the Society for Modeling and Simulation. She is a founding member of the Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization (SISO) and received service awards for her work with the distributed interactive simulation (DIS) and high level architecture (HLA) standards and the DIS/SISO transition. She teaches the core modeling and simulation (M&S) course for Georgia Tech’s professional masters in applied systems engineering degree program, as well as three M&S professional education courses. She recently edited a book on modeling and simulation in the systems engineering lifecycle. She holds a Ph.D. in computer science from the Georgia Institute of Technology (2002), a M.S. in computer engineering from the University of Central Florida, and a B.S. in electrical engineering from Clemson University.
Arnold M. Lund
ARNOLD (ARNIE) M. LUND is the Computing and Software Systems (CSS) Professor of Practice in the School of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics at the University of Washington, Bothell. His personal research has focused on emerging natural user interface technologies, and on new methods to drive the adoption of innovative products. Dr. Lund began his career at AT&T Bell Laboratories, and helped build the science and technology organization at Ameritech where the work transformed the corporate branding and culture and was responsible for a rich set of innovative new products. He has managed user experience and exploratory software development teams (including senior leadership teams shaping communities of practice) at US West Advanced Technologies, Sapient, Microsoft and Amazon. As a Technology Leader at GE Global Research, he managed their first set of labs devoted to human-computer interaction research, and their work on natural user interaction and intelligent agents has been covered widely in the press. He has 30 patents and patents pending, and has authored and co-authored many articles and book chapters on a variety of topics in human-computer interaction emerging experience technologies and team management. He has been an accessibility advocate across the companies where he has worked, and has received a variety of awards and recognition for the work. He also wrote the widely used book User Experience Management: Essential Skills for Leading Effective UX Teams, and has spent his career mentoring students entering their careers, young professionals across the software industry, and more senior professionals and managers building HCI teams in their companies. He was inducted into the ACM SIGCHI Academy in 2010, and received the ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Practice Award in 2018 and the ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Service Award in 2011. He co-chaired the SIGCHI CHI Conferences in 1998 and 2008. He is a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES), and served on the HFES Executive Council. He chaired the HFES Institute (which included responsibility for human-computer interaction standards), served on ANSI and ISO standards committees and oversaw the approval of the first ANSI ergonomics standard in the software area. He also served as the president of the board of directors for the Board of Certification in Professional Ergonomics (BCPE) as it went through redefining the body of knowledge for the human factors field to better reflect current software design practices. He has a B.A. in chemistry from the University of Chicago, and a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from Northwestern University.
Nathan J. McNeese
NATHAN J. MCNEESE is an assistant professor and director of the Team Research Analytics in Computational Environments (TRACE) Research Group within the Division of Human-Centered Computing in the School of Computing at Clemson University, with a secondary appointment in Clemson’s Human Factors Institute. He is a faculty scholar in Clemson’s School of Health Research, and a Watt Family Faculty Fellow. For over 10 years, Dr. McNeese has conducted research mainly focused on teamwork (multiple variations) and collaborative technology within a variety of different contexts (command and control, emergency crisis management, and healthcare). His current research interests span the study of better understanding the relationship of team cognition and technology, human-agent teaming, the development/design of human-centered collaborative tools and systems, and human-centered artificial intelligence. He currently serves on multiple international/societal program and technical committees, in addition to multiple editorial boards including Human Factors. His research has received multiple best paper awards/nominations and has been published in peer-reviewed venues over 50 times. In addition, he has acquired over $8M in research funding from agencies such as NSF, ONR, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR). Dr. McNeese received a Ph.D. in information sciences and technology with a focus on team decision-making and collaborative technology from the Pennsylvania State University in the fall of 2014.
Katherine L. Morse
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory

KATHERINE L. MORSE is a member of the Principal Professional Staff at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory where she researches technologies for improving distributed simulation. She was previously a Technical Fellow and Assistant Vice President of Technology at SAIC. She received her B.S. in mathematics (1982), B.A. in Russian (1983), M.S. in computer science (1986) from the University of Arizona, and M.S. (1995) and Ph.D. (2000) in information & computer science from the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Morse has worked in the computer industry for over 30 years, more than 15 of them contributing to open international standards. She has performed research and development in the fields of modeling and simulation, narrative engagement, systems and software engineering, computer security, online instruction, voice recognition, and compilers. Dr. Morse has made significant contributions to nearly a dozen international standards, including leading the development of the Federation Engineering Agreements Template (FEAT) standard. She has served in multiple leadership positions in the Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization (SISO). Her Ph.D. dissertation is on dynamic multicast grouping for data distribution management, a field in which she is widely recognized as a foremost expert. She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Dobro Slovo, ACM, and a senior member of IEEE. Dr. Morse was the 2007 winner of the IEEE Hans Karlsson Award.
Nadine B. Sarter
NADINE B. SARTER (NAE) is a professor in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, a member of the core faculty at the Robotics Institute, and the director of the Center for Ergonomics at the University of Michigan. She is also the director of the Occupational Safety Engineering and Ergonomics Program at the University of Michigan Center for Occupational Health and Safety. Her research in cognitive systems engineering focuses on the design and evaluation of tasks, protocols and interfaces that support safe and effective human-automation/robot interaction and human-machine teaming. Specific research interests include (1) contributors to and performance effects of system complexity, (2) haptic and multimodal display design, (3) transparency and operator trust in highly autonomous systems, (4) adaptive function allocation, (5) attention and interruption management, and (6) the design of decision aids for high-tempo operations. She has conducted her work in a wide range of application domains, most notably commercial and military aviation (both manned and unmanned operations), space, medicine, military operations, and the automotive industry. Professor Sarter serves as associate editor for Human Factors and is a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making and the International Journal of Aviation Psychology. She is a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, and a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the Society for Human Performance in Extreme Environments. She is an affiliate member of the American Psychological Association (APA) - Division 21 (Applied Experimental and Engineering Psychology). Professor Sarter is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), a member of the 2017-2018 Cohort of the UM Rudi Ansbacher Women in Academic Medicine Leadership Scholars Program, and a member of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES) fellow selection committee. She was a participant in the Human Performance Expert Panel to Inform the Air Force Strategy 2030 and a member of the National Academies (Board on Human-Systems Integration) Expert Panel on FAA Staffing Issues. She received an M.S. in applied and experimental psychology and a B.S. in psychology from the University of Hamburg in Germany in 1983 and 1981 respectively. She received a Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering from Ohio State University in 1994.
Carolyn M. Sommerich
CAROLYN M. SOMMERICH is an associate professor of industrial and systems engineering in the Department of Integrated Systems Engineering at The Ohio State University (OSU). She also holds graduate faculty status in OSU’s Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences within OSU’s College of Medicine. She is the director of the OSU Engineering Laboratory for Human Factors/Ergonomics/Safety. She is also the director of OSU’s NIOSH-sponsored Training Project Grant in Occupational Safety and Ergonomics. Her research and teaching efforts are focused on addressing occupational safety and health concerns of workers in various sectors of the economy. Her research efforts have focused on ergonomics, biomechanics, and safety issues in office, industrial, healthcare, distribution center and school/ education sectors and environments, as well as basic research exploring the etiology of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and spine biomechanics. Several recent and/or current research projects have employed participatory processes and mixed methods designs in the exploration of needs and the development of concepts for administrative and engineering interventions, as well as intervention assessment in controlled and field settings. Dr. Sommerich currently serves as the immediate past-secretary-treasurer of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES), as well as the faculty advisor for OSU’s student chapters of HFES and Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers (IISE). She is a member of American Society of Biomechanics (ASB); the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE), the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA), the Board of Certification in Professional Ergonomics (BCPE), the Chartered Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors (CIEHF), the HFES and the IISE. She has an M.S. and Ph.D. in industrial and Systems Engineering, from the Ohio State University, and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Cincinnati.
Laura D. Strater
LAURA D. STRATER is a Raytheon Engineering Fellow, and Chief Engineer for User Experience, Raytheon IIS at Raytheon in Dallas/Fort Worth. She is working to define improvements in processes and methodologies that will lead to improved HMI designs that deliver more effective and efficient human machine interfaces to the end user. She received a B.S. in industrial engineering from Texas Tech University in 1982 and a Ph.D. in human development and communication sciences from the University of Texas at Dallas in 1993.
Mohan M. Trivedi
MOHAN M. TRIVEDI is head of the University of California, San Diego’s (UCSD) Computer Vision and Robotics Research Laboratory. Dr. Trivedi oversees projects such as a robotic, sensor-based traffic-incident monitoring and response system (sponsored by Caltrans). Dr. Trivedi's projects typically integrate active perception and machine vision; interactive graphical interfaces for human-machine interaction; distributed video networks; and, increasingly, wireless connectivity and remote sensing. He is knowledgeable about the use of mobile robots in hazardous situations such as disaster response, having consulted on their use in nuclear environments. Dr. Trivedi is also leading an interdisciplinary effort, as UCSD layer leader for intelligent transportation and telematics for the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology. He has published extensively and has edited over a dozen volumes including books, special issues, video presentations, and conference proceedings. Dr. Trivedi is a recipient of the Pioneer Award and the Meritorious Service Award from the IEEE Computer Society; and the Distinguished Alumnus Award from Utah State University. He is a fellow of the International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE). He is a founding member of the Executive Committee of the University of California System-wide Digital Media Innovation Program (DiMI). Dr. Trivedi is also editor-in-chief of Machine Vision and Applications. Dr. Trivedi received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Utah State University in 1979, after completing undergraduate work in India.
Douglas J. Weber
DOUGLAS J. WEBER is an associate professor in the Department of Bioengineering and holds secondary appointments in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Electrical Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. He is also a faculty member in the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, the University of Pittsburgh Brain Institute, and the McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine. He also established and currently directs the Rehab Neural Engineering Lab. His current list of research interests includes bioengineering, neural coding, neuroprosthetics, functional electrical stimulation, and neuromuscular control and rehabilitation. He recently completed a 4-year term as a program manager in the Biological Technologies Office (BTO) at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in Arlington, Virginia, where he created and managed a portfolio of neurotechnology programs, including DARPA’s Hand Proprioception and Touch Interfaces (HAPTIX), Electrical Prescriptions (ElectRx), and Targeted Neuroplasticity Training (TNT) programs. Dr. Weber is a member of the Society for Neuroscience, the American Physiological Society, and the Biomedical Engineering Society. Dr. Weber completed his undergraduate studies as a presidential scholar at the Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, earning a B.S. in biomedical engineering. He continued his academics with a graduate academic scholarship at the Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, finishing both his M.S. and Ph.D. (2001) in bioengineering. Dr. Weber received a post-doctoral fellowship in rehabilitation neuroscience from the University of Alberta Centre for Neuroscience, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Arul Mozhi - (Staff Officer)
ARUL MOZHI is study director at the Laboratory Assessments Board (LAB). Since 1999, Dr. Mozhi has been directing projects in the areas of defense science and technology, including those carried out by numerous study committees of the LAB, the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board (ARLTAB), the Naval Studies Board, and the National Materials and Manufacturing Board. Prior to joining the National Academies, Dr. Mozhi held technical and management positions in systems engineering and applied materials research and development at UTRON, Roy F. Weston, and Marko Materials. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees (the latter in 1986) in materials engineering from the Ohio State University and then served as a postdoctoral research associate there. Dr. Mozhi received his B.Tech. in metallurgical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, in 1982.

Events



Location:


Army Research Laboratory
Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, USA

Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Eva Labre
Contact Email:  elabre@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  -

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Some sessions are open and some sessions are closed

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Army Research Laboratory
Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Eva Labre
Contact Email:  elabre@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3311

Agenda
2

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

William S. Marras
Charles A. Czeisler
Jeanne F. Duffy
William W. Lytton
Barbara A. Dosher
David A. Heeger
Stephen F. Sands
Katherine L. Morse
Shrikanth S. Narayanan
Anita Williams Woolley
Frederick R. Chang
Lorrie Faith Cranor

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Review of the agenda and criteria and plan for the review.
Discussion of findings from the review.
Plan for the preparation of the interim report.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
June 30, 2017
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

at SFC Paul Ray Smith Simulation & Training Technology Center
Orlando, FL
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Eva Labre
Contact Email:  elabre@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3311

Agenda
2

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Kenneth R. Boff
Margaret L. Loper
Katherine L. Morse
Herbert H. Bell
Michael L. Boninger
Barbara Dosher
Shrikanth S. Narayanan
John H. (Jack) Hammond
Stephen C. Merriman
Francis T. Durso
Ralph R. Etienne-Cummings
Moshe Kam
Mary C. Whitton

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Review of the agenda and criteria and plan for the review.
Discussion of findings from the review.
Plan for the preparation of the final report.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
June 20, 2016
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Eva Labre
Contact Email:  elabre@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3311

Agenda
2

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Kenneth R. Boff
Linda Ng Boyle
Barrett S. Caldwell
Francis T. Durso
Moshe Kam
Margaret L. Loper
Howard Egeth
Barbara G. Shinn-Cunningham
Mary C. Whitton
King-Hay Yang
Michael L. Boninger
John H. (Jack) Hammond
John Lach
Stephen C. Merriman
Katherine L. Morse
Bruce G. Berg
Barbara A. Dosher
William W. Lytton
Shrikanth S. Narayanan

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

- Review of potential sources of perception of bias and conflict of interest
- Review of the scope of task for the panel
- Review of the meeting agenda
- Deliberation of findings from the materials presented during the review

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 20, 2015
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Army Research Laboratory
Aberdeen, Maryland
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Eva Labre
Contact Email:  elabre@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3311

Agenda
2

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Kenneth Boff
Chair
Linda Ng Boyle
Jean MacMillan
Nancy Cooke
Howard Egeth
Matthew S Peterson
Pamela H Dalton
King-Hay Yang
Jerome Busemeyer

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Discussion of potential perceptions of possible sources of bias and conflict of interest
Discussion of process for the assessment of the ARL human sciences discipline
Discussion of impressions formed from review of persentations, posters, tours, and demonstrations

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 10, 2014
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Orlando, Florida
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Eva Labre
Contact Email:  elabre@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3311

Agenda
2

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Kenneth Boff (Chair)
Carolina Cruz-Neira
Barbara Dosher
Jean MacMillan
Mary Whitton
Pamela Dalton
Howard Egeth
Robert Lutfi
Matthew Peterson
Barbara Shinn-Cunningham
Peter Cherry
Nancy Cooke
Margaret Loper
George Lukes

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

- Review of potential sources of perception of bias and conflict of interest
- Review of the scope of task for the panel
- Review of the meeting agenda
- Deliberation of findings from the materials presented during the review

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

The Internet link ( https://www.gifttutoring.org/projects/gift/documents) was provided to access the following reports of the Army Simulation and Training Technology Center:

2012_12_I/ITSEC - A Modular Framework to Support the Authoring and Assessment of Adaptive Computer-Based Tutoring Systems (CBTS)

2012_12_I/ITSEC - A Modular Framework to Support the Authoring and Assessment of Adaptive Computer-Based Tutoring Systems (CBTS)


2011_12_I/ITSEC - Understanding the Impact of Intelligent Tutoring Agents on Real-Time Training Simulations


2012_12_I/ITSEC - Recommendations for Modern Tools to Author Tutoring Systems


2012_12_I/ITSEC - Use of Evidence-based Strategies to Enhance the Extensibility of Adaptive Tutoring Technologies


2012_12_I/ITSEC - Effective Learner Modeling for Computer-Based Tutoring of Cognitive and Affective Tasks


2012_12_Journal of Educational Technology - Passively Classifying Student Mood and Performance within Intelligent Tutors


2012_10_HFES - Efficacy of Measuring Engagement during Computer-Based Training


2012_10_GIFT Overview


2012_09_DHSS - Considerations in the Development of an Ontology for a Generalized Intelligent Framework for Tutoring


2012_09_DHSS - Adaptive Game-Based Tutoring: Mechanisms for Real-Time Feedback and Adaptation


2012_07_AHFE - Cognitive and Affective Modeling in Intelligent Virtual Humans for Training and Tutoring Applications


2012_06_ITS - Semi-Supervised Classification of Realtime Physiological Sensor Datastreams for Student Affect Assessment in Intelligent Tutoring


2012_06_ITS - The Interaction Behavior of Agents’ Emotional Support and Competency on Learner Outcomes and Perceptions


2012_06_ITS - Real-Time Monitoring of ECG and GSR Signals during Computer-Based Training


2012_05_FDG - Automated Scenario Generation: Toward Tailored and Optimized Military Training in Virtual Environments


2011_12_I/ITSEC - Enhancing Performance through Pedagogy and Feedback: Domain Considerations for ITSs


2011_12_I/ITSEC - Challenges and Emerging Concepts in the Development of Adaptive, Computer-based Tutoring Systems for Team Training


2011_12_I/ITSEC_Understanding the Impact of Intelligent Tutoring Agents on Real-Time Training Simulations


2011_10_ACII - Predicting Learner Engagement during Well-defined and Ill-defined Computer-Based Intercultural Interactions


2011_09_DHSS - Realtime Clustering Of Unlabelled Sensory Data For Trainee State Assessment


2011_09_DHSS - Research Gaps For Adaptive And Predictive Computer-Based Tutoring Systems


2011_09_DHSS - The Impact Of Student Expectations And Tutor Acceptance On Computer-Based Learning Environment Acceptance And Future Usage Intentions


2011_06_AIED - Considerations for adaptive tutoring within serious games: authoring cognitive models and game interfaces


2011_05_ITEC - Human Interaction in Embedded Virtual Simulations


2009_10_NATO HFM Workshop - Making a Case for Machine Perception of Trainee Affect to Aid Learning and Performance in Embedded Virtual Simulations

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
June 22, 2013
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Aberdeen Proving Ground
Event Type :  
Meeting

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Eva Labre
Contact Email:  elabre@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3311

Agenda
2

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Kenneth Boff
J. Anthony Movshon
Brian Wandell
Ann McKee
Paul Glimcher
John Lach
Nico Hatsapoulos
Stephen Sands

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

- Review of potential sources of perception of bias and conflict of interest
- Review of the scope of task for the panel
- Review of the meeting agenda
- Deliberation of findings from the materials presented during the review

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

- Printout of EEG readings from an EEG recording device

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
June 14, 2013
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.