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Project Information

Project Information


Toward Integrated STEM Education: Developing A Research Agenda


Project Scope:

An ad hoc committee will conduct a consensus study whose goal is to develop a strategic research agenda for determining the approaches and conditions most likely to lead to positive outcomes of integrated science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (iSTEM) education at the K-12 level.  Specifically, the committee will

 

  • identify and characterize existing approaches to iSTEM education, in formal, afterschool, and informal settings,
  • review the evidence for their impact on various parameters of interest, including increasing student awareness, interest, motivation, and achievement in STEM subjects; improving college-readiness skills; and boosting the number and quality of students who may consider a career in a STEM-related field,
  • determine a set of priority research questions to advance understanding of the impacts of iSTEM education,
  • propose methodological approaches for addressing these questions, and
  • identify potential parties who could carry out the research.

Status: Completed

PIN: NAE-NAE-10-15

Project Duration (months): 30 month(s)

RSO: Pearson, Greg



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 10/12/2011

Margaret A. Honey - (Chair)
New York Hall of Science

Margaret A. Honey, Chair, joined the New York Hall of Science as president and CEO in November of 2008. Among her current interests at the museum is the role of design-based learning in promoting student interest and achievement in STEM subjects. She is widely recognized for her work using digital technologies to support children’s learning across the disciplines of science, mathematics, engineering and technology. Prior to joining the New York Hall of Science, she was vice president of Wireless Generation, an education technology company. Earlier, she spent 15 years as vice president of the Education Development Center (EDC) and director of EDC’s Center for Children and Technology. There, she directed numerous large-scale research projects funded by the National Science Foundation, the Institute for Education Sciences, the Carnegie Corporation, and other organizations. As a member of the Educational Advisory Board of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, she worked closely with business representatives to define 21st century skills and consider how to teach and assess them. Her activities have included collaborations with public television, investigations of data-driven decision-making tools and practices, and creation of one of the first internet-based professional development programs in the country. She currently serves on the NRC Board on Science Education and as a committee member for the NRC study, Defining Deeper Learning and 21st Century Skills, and recently chaired the Committee on Learning Science: Computer Games, Simulations, and Education. Earlier, she chaired the steering committee for the workshop on IT Fluency and High School Graduation Outcomes. She received her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Columbia University.


Linda M. Abriola
Tufts University

Linda M. Abriola is the Dean of the School of Engineering. She also holds a position as Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Adjunct Professor in Chemical and Biological Engineering. Dean Abriola is a member of both the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS) and is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union. Prior to her appointment at Tufts, Dean Abriola was the Horace Williams King Collegiate Professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan. Dr. Abriola's primary research focus is the integration of mathematical modeling and laboratory experiments for the investigation and prediction of the transport and fate of reactive contaminants in the subsurface. She is particularly known for her work on the characterization and remediation of aquifers contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Dr. Abriola's numerous professional activities have included service on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board, the National Research Council (NRC) Water Science and Technology Board, and the U.S. Department of Energy's NABIR (Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research) Advisory Committee. Dr. Abriola served on the NRC's Committee on Ground Water Cleanup Alternatives, which was the first NRC committee to investigate the efficacy of pump and treat technologies, the NRC Committee on Gender Differences in Careers of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Faculty, and the NAE Offshoring Engineering Workshop Committee. She is currently an elected member of the NAE Council, the governing board of the NAE. An author of more than 120 refereed publications, Dr. Abriola has been the recipient of a number of awards, including the Association for Women Geoscientist's Outstanding Educator Award (1996), the National Ground Water Association's Distinguished Darcy Lectureship (1996), and the SERDP Project of the Year Award in Environmental Restoration (2006). Dean Abriola received her Ph.D. and master's degrees in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Princeton University and a Bachelor's Degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Drexel University.
Sybilla Beckmann
University of Georgia

Sybilla Beckmann is Josiah Meigs Distinguished Teaching Professor of Mathematics at the University of Georgia. She has a PhD in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania and taught at Yale University as a J. W. Gibbs Instructor of Mathematics. Beckmann has done research in Arithmetic Geometry, but her current main interests are the mathematical education of teachers and mathematics content for students at all levels, but especially for PreK through the middle grades. Beckmann developed mathematics content courses for prospective elementary school teachers at the University of Georgia and wrote a book for such courses, Mathematics for Elementary Teachers, now in a third edition. She is interested in helping college faculty learn to teach mathematics content courses for elementary and middle grades teachers and she works with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows toward that end. As part of this effort, Beckmann directs the Mathematicians Educating Future Teachers (MEFT) component of the University of Georgia Mathematics Department's VIGRE II grant. Beckmann was a member of the writing team of NCTM's Curriculum Focal Points for Prekindergarten through Grade 8 Mathematics, was a member of Committee on Early Childhood Mathematics of the National Research Council and co-author of its report, Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood: Paths Toward Excellence and Equity, has worked on the development of several state mathematics standards, and was a member of the mathematics writing team for the Common Core State Standards Initiative. Several years ago Beckmann taught an average 6th grade mathematics class every day at a local public school in order to better understand school mathematics teaching.
Susan Hackwood
California Council on Science and Technology

Susan Hackwood is currently Executive Director of the California Council on Science and Technology (CCST), and Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of California, Riverside. Dr. Hackwood received a Ph.D. in Solid State Ionics in 1979 from DeMontfort University, UK. Before joining academia, she was Department Head of Device Robotics Technology Research at AT&T Bell Labs, where amongst other things, she invented and named the electrowetting effect, now used in many micro devices and continuing to be researched and utilized in an increasing number of applications. In 1984 she joined the University of California, Santa Barbara as Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and was founder and Director of the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Robotic Systems in Microelectronics (CRSM). In 1990, Dr. Hackwood became the founding Dean of the Bourns College of Engineering at the University of California, Riverside. Dr. Hackwood's current research interests include science and technology policy, innovation mechanisms, distributed asynchronous and cellular robotic systems. Dr. Hackwood has published over 150 technical publications and holds seven patents. She is a Fellow of the IEEE and the AAAS and holds honorary degrees from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (PhD) and DeMontfort University, UK (DSc). From 2003-5 she was a Visiting Scholar at the Anderson School of Management, University of California, Los Angeles. In 2005 she was a visiting scholar at the California Institute of Technology.Dr. Hackwood has worked extensively with industry, academia and government partnerships to identify policy issues of societal importance. She is also an active participant in regional and state economic development. With a strong interest in science and technology policy, Dr. Hackwood is involved with science and technology development in California, the U.S., Mexico, Taiwan, Vietnam and Costa Rica. She is the past Chair of the AAAS Committee on Science Engineering and Public Policy and was Chair of the Section on Societal Impacts of Science and Engineering. She has been the AAAS Engineering Delegate and is currently a Member of the AAAS Committee on Nominations. Since 2006 she has been a member of the IEEE Spectrum Editorial Board. She serves on the Board of Directors and consults on new product development for several technology companies. She co-founded and co-edited the Journal of Robotic Systems from 1984 to 2005.
Alfred L. Hall, II
University of Memphis

Alfred Hall is a visiting professor of instruction and curriculum leadership at the University of Memphis. Prior to thi sposition, Dr Hall was chief of staff for the Memphis City Schools system in Memphis, TN. He has also served as Chief Academic Officer and Associate Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction for the district of more than 106,000 students and 7,000 teachers. He received a Ph.D. in Education (Science Education) from George Mason University in Fairfax, VA. Hall began his educational career as a high school teacher of biology and physics, as well as an Instructor of Biology and Program Director for minority STEM majors at Delta State University in Cleveland, MS. He has also worked as program evaluator and science education specialist for the Eisenhower Mathematics and Science Consortium at AEL which supported state education agencies and school districts in Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. In 1999, Hall was selected to serve as Project Director of the Delta Rural Systemic Initiative, a systemic reform program funded by the National Science Foundation that supported poor, rural school districts in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. In 2001, he began directing the Memphis Urban Systemic Program and provided leadership for mathematics and science education, professional development, and student support programs for the Memphis City Schools. He has served as a member of the National Science Advisory Board for Macmillan/McGraw Hill Publishing Company and the National Taskforce for Recruiting, Retaining, and Supporting Teachers of Mathematics for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
Jennifer Hicks
ISTEM Resource Network

Jennifer Hicks is a K-12 science program manager, at the I-STEM Resource Network, Purdue University. Prior to this position, Dr. Hicks served as science curriculum specialist in the Office of Curriculum and Instruction for the Indiana Department of Education. Dr. Hicks is responsible for the managing the development of science standards, supporting curriculum resources for science, and promoting innovation in science teaching throughout Indiana. She is a lead team member for the Indiana Science Initiative, a K-8 systemic science initiative that has engaged 2,000 teachers and 125 schools in Indiana in research-developed science curriculum and professional development. Prior to joining the Department, Jenny was a high school teacher in California and received a Life Sciences Single Subject Credential from San Francisco State University. She also holds a Professional Educator’s License in the State of Indiana in Chemistry and Life Sciences. She has taught biology, chemistry, marine biology and earth sciences at the high school level. Prior to teaching high school, she was an NIH postdoctoral fellow in the Biology Department at Washington University in St. Louis, where she performed research on proteins in fruit flies. She has also taught science coursework at the college and graduate level at Webster University in St. Louis and at Indiana University in Bloomington. She received a B.S. in Biology and a Ph.D. in Visual Sciences from Indiana University.
Steve Krak
Ohio STEM Learning Networ

Mr. Stephen Krak is a Program Manager and twenty-year veteran of Battelle, an international science and technology enterprise that explores emerging areas of science, develops and commercializes technology, and manages laboratories for customers. Steve’s career at Battelle began with an internship while completing his Masters Degree in Electrical Engineering at The Ohio State University. His area of specialty is integrated optical circuits, including fiber optics, for sensing and communication applications. Throughout most of his career, Steve worked on and managed projects, Cleanroom laboratories, and the Optics and Microfabrication groups at Battelle. He served on the core business development team that opened Battelle offices in Japan and South Korea. Steve is a long-time volunteer in the classroom and for over three years has served as the Program Manager of the Ohio STEM Learning Network (OSLN), a public/private collaborate that endeavors to change the relationship between economic development, education and personal prosperity in Ohio. For more information, please visit www.olsn.org . In addition to Program Management for the OSLN, Steve managed the proposal process for Ohio’s winning Race to the Top submission, is Relationship Manager to New York in Battelle’s new Multi-state STEM Network program, and is assisting an Ohio team pursuing Community College Learn & Earn grant opportunities designed to prepare post-secondary students for STEM careers.
Bill Kurtz
Denver School of Science and Technology (DSST)

Bill Kurtz is CEO of DSST Public Schools. DSST is a charter school management organization that is opening ten secondary schools on five campuses in Denver. Bill was the Founding Head of School of the Denver School of Science and Technology (DSST), the flagship school of DSST Public Schools. The school has become an exemplar for high school reform and a leader in STEM education nationwide. The combination of the school's highly significant year-to-year student learning growth, extraordinarily diverse student population, innovative school culture, and 100% college acceptance rate for its graduates has made DSST a change agent for local public schools and a destination for school reformers from all over the country. Bill was recognized as the 2010 Entrepreneur of the Year by the New Schools Venture Fund at their national summit in Washington D.C. Bill was named one of 25 champions of public education in Denver over the last 25 years in 2008 by the Public Education Business Coalition. He currently serves on the Advisory Council of the University of Southern California’s Rossier School of Education MAT program. Prior to joining DSST, Bill served as Principal of Link Community School, an independent middle school located in Newark, New Jersey. Before his career in education, he worked as an investment banker at JP Chase in New York City. He graduated Magna Cum Laude from Princeton University with a B.A. and earned an M.A. from Columbia University’s Teachers College in educational administration and leadership.


Richard Lehrer
Peabody College of Vanderbilt University

Richard Lehrer is the Frank W. Mayborn Professor of Education at Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College. Previously, he worked at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he was associate director of the National Center for Improving Student Learning and Achievement in Mathematics and Science. He collaborates with teachers to craft, implement, and assess modeling approaches to mathematics and science education in the elementary and middle school grades. He has also formulated innovative geometry instruction for primary- and elementary-grade students that is guided by longitudinal study of student thinking about space. He is a former high school science teacher and has pioneered classroom research that investigates cognitive technologies as tools for thought in mathematics and science. He has served as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Foundations of Assessment, the National Research Council Committee on Systems of Statewide Science Assessment and the NAE/NRC Committee on Engineering in K-12 Education. He has a Ph.D. in educational psychology and statistics from the University of New York, Albany.


Beth McGrath
Stevens Institute of Technology

Beth McGrath is Chief of Staff in the Office of the President at Stevens Institute of Technology. Previously she was Executive Director of the Center for Innovation in Engineering and Science Education (CIESE) and Senior Research Associate in the Schools of Engineering & Science and Systems & Enterprises at Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ. Since 2005, under McGrath’s leadership, CIESE was honored with the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics, Science, and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM) award and has garnered more than $26 million in STEM education and research projects sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the US Department of Defense, the NJ Department of Education, and the US Department of Education, mainly in the areas of K-12 engineering and science education, 21st century skills, and STEM scale-up and capacity building in K-12 and higher education. McGrath played a key role in several national Internet-in-K-12 science education curriculum development and teacher training initiatives that impacted more than 35,000 teachers in 23 states and 8 countries. Her research interests include: organizational development and capacity-building in K-12 education, diffusion of technology innovations in K-12, and engineering’s role in 21st century skill development. McGrath serves on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Technology and Engineering Literacy (TEL) Assessment Standing Committee, and several advisory boards of science and engineering education development projects. She holds a B.S. degree in Mass Communications from Virginia Commonwealth University and a M.Ed. from the University of Maryland.


Barbara M. Means
SRI International

Barbara Means is Co-Director of the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International. Her research focuses on ways in which technology can support students' learning of advanced skills and the revitalization of classrooms and schools. She is regarded as a leader in defining issues and approaches for evaluating the implementation and efficacy of technology-supported educational innovations. Currently, she is involved in research on STEM-focused secondary schools that target under-served populations and do not use selective admissions processes. In addition, she is directing SRI's evaluation of the first cohort of grants awarded under the Next Generation Learning Challenges initiative for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Her published works include the edited volumes Evaluating Educational Technology, Technology and Education Reform, and Teaching Advanced Skills to At-Risk Students as well as the jointly authored volumes Using Technology Evaluation to Advance Student Learning, The Connected School, and Comparative Studies of How People Think. A Fellow of the Arerican Educational Research Association, Dr. Means serves on the boards of the Oracle Education Foundation and CADRE, the Community for Advancing Discovery Research in Education (the resource network for the National Science Foundation’s DRK-12 program). Previously, she has served as a member of the NRC/BOSE Committee on Highly Successful Schools or Programs for K-12 STEM Education, the NRC Board on Testing and Assessment, and the NRC committee that produced the report, How People Learn. Dr. Means earned her bachelor's degree in psychology from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in educational psychology at the University of California, Berkeley.


Donna Migdol
Oceanside School District, New York

Donna Migdol is a teacher in Oceanside Schools’ (New York) elementary gifted and talented program and is a former grades K-6 mathemtics lead teacher for Oceanside Schools. Ms. Migdol has presented her classroom engineering design work and math lessons to the Peer Review Panel in Albany, as well as to the National Science Foundation in Washington D.C. As a third grade teacher, Donna’s classroom was filmed by WNET Teacher Net, where engineering design coupled with inquiry based mathematics and science instruction was highlighted. Donna co-developed and facilitated the Math, Science, and Technology Summer Institute at Hofstra University. She has served as an adjunct professor at Hofstra University, teaching graduate elementary mathematics, science and technology courses. She has professionally developed teachers at the SUNY OLD Westbury Mathematics Problem Solving Institute as well as served as an elementary math consultant for many school districts on Long Island. Donna has published several articles and her work as a teacher has been cited in Alfie Kohn’s book, The Schools Our Children Deserve. Donna’s work with students was also cited in chapter one of “Exemplary Science in Grades 5-8: Standards-Based Success Stories, edited by Robet E. Yager. Her students are passionately engaged in STEM learning. She is also presently partnered with Hofstra University’s Center for Technological Literacy as a curriculum writer for two grant-funded projects geared to grades 6-8.


Mitchell Nathan
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Mitchell J. Nathan is a professor of learning sciences in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Prof. Nathan received his Ph.D. in experimental (cognitive) psychology. He also holds a B.S. in electrical and computer engineering, mathematics and history. He has worked in research and development in artificial intelligence, computer vision and robotic mobility, including: design and development of autonomous robotic arms and vehicles; the development of expert systems and knowledge engineering interview techniques; and the representation of perceptual and real-world knowledge to support inference-making in dynamic environments. Nathan also has worked on computer-based tutoring environments for mathematics education that rely heavily on students' own comprehension processes for self-evaluation and self-directed learning (so-called unintelligent tutoring systems). Prof. Nathan directed the IERI-funded STAAR Project, which studied the transition from arithmetic to algebraic reasoning. He is currently Co-PI for the AWAKEN Project, which documents how people learn and use engineering, and Co-PI for the National Center for Cognition and Mathematics Instruction. He has affiliate appointments in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction, the Department of Psychology, the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, and the Center on Education and Work.
Mark Sanders
Virginia Tech

Mark Sanders, Virginia Tech Professor Emeritus of Integrative STEM Education / Technology Teacher Education is most recently known for his two decades of work in Integrative STEM Education. As PI and co-Director of the Technology, Science Mathematics Integration Project (NSF, 1991-1996) he co-authored the TSM Connection Activities (1996, McGraw-Hill) and Engineering & Design Applications (2008, McGraw-Hill). In 2003, he conceptualized Virginia Tech’s Integrative STEM Education graduate program, which he co-founded in 2005. By 2010, this unique graduate program enrolled more than 50 S, T, E, & M teachers / administrators from 10 states, including two dozen PhD candidates and a comparable number of EdS & master’s students. From 1980-2005, he pioneered / disseminated new graphic communication instruction, including electronic publishing (1981), digital multimedia (1983); interactive video (1984); digital video / holography (1992); and Web-based portfolios (1995). His Communication Technology text, the first to address “cross-media publishing” technologies (McGraw-Hill, 1991, 1996) quickly became the most-used text in the field. He was Founding Editor of the internationally recognized Journal of Technology Education (1989-1997) and pioneered free global access to the JTE (1992-present) before the Web was launched. He envisioned, established, and directed Graphic Comm Central (1997-2009), the Web portal and professional network for graphic communication educators. He earned a PhD in Education (U of Maryland, 1980) and began his career as a high school Technology teacher in upstate NY.
Michael Town
Redmond High School

Mike Town is a 2010-2011 Einstein Fellow working on STEM education policy issues for the National Science Board Office. For the past 25 years, Michael has taught numerous integrated high school STEM courses in Redmond, Washington including Advanced Placement Environmental Science and Environmental Engineering and Sustainability Design. Both courses are dual credited and Career and Technical Education (CTE) certified. Mike has work on committees in Washington State to design standards for a state certified CTE course in Environmental Science and Sustainability and an endorsement certification in Environmental and Sustainability Education for pre-service teachers. Mike has written significant environmental curriculum. The most notable is the Cool School Challenge (CSC) which enables students to conduct energy audits and develop action plans to measure and reduce the carbon footprint in schools across the United States. The CSC has won the EPA Clean Air Award, and Mike’s CSC students received the Presidents Environmental Youth Award from President Bush. He also helped develop and design an environmental education center and serves as a board member for the Environmental Education Association of Washington. Mike had won numerous awards including the National Education Association Foundation Green Prize for the United States, Environmental Educator of the Year from the North American Association of Environmental Educators and the Conservation Fund Environmental Educator Award for the United States. Mike earned degrees in Environmental Science and/or Science Education from Huxley College of The Environment, Western Washington University and the University of Washington. Mike will be returning to teaching at Redmond High School in Redmond, Washington in September 2011.

Committee Membership Roster Comments

NAE Member Linda Abriola was added to the committee on 10/07/2011.

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
This meeting is closed in its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Linda Abriola
Sybilla Beckmann
Alfred Hall
Jennifer Hicks
Margaret Honey
Steve Krak
Bill Kurtz
Richard Lehrer
Beth McGrath
Barbara Means
Donna Migdol
Mitchell Nathan
Mark Sanders
Michael Town

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Draft of the final report, findings, and recommendations

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Draft of the final report and commissioned papers from previous meetings.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
November 19, 2012
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Greg Pearson
Contact Email:  gpearson@nae.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2282

Agenda
Committee on Integrated STEM Education
Fourth Meeting

Keck Center, Room 109
Washington, D.C.

July 11-12, 2012

DAY 1

CLOSED SESSION

8:00 a.m.

9:45 a.m. Break

OPEN SESSION

10:00 a.m. iSTEM Implementation: Overview of the Issues
TBD (Margaret Honey)

School-Level Perspective: Creating an “iSTEM Culture”
Hans Meeder, The Meeder Consulting Group (Study of PLTW Schools) [CONFIRMED]
Steven Zipkes, Manor New Tech High School, TX [CONFIRMED]

Respondent: Bill Kurtz, DSST; Mike Town, Redmond High School

KEY QUESTIONS
• What are the characteristics likely to support a culture of integrated STEM education within a school and what are the challenges to developing such a culture?
• How are schools and school leaders addressing these challenges?



11:00 a.m. Large-Scale STEM Reform Initiatives (Panel)
David Burns, Battelle, or person TBD, New Multi-State STEM Action Network [INVITED]
Linda Rosen, Change the Equation [CONFIRMED]
Terri Nikole Baca, Innovate+ Educate [CONFIRMED]
Mary Ann Rankin, National Math Science Initiative [INVITED]

Respondents: Steve Krak, Battelle; and Susan Hackwood, CCST

KEY QUESTIONS
• What is the degree of interest and awareness of integrated STEM education in these large-scale reform efforts?
• What are the main challenges facing large STEM-education-focused networks?
• Is STEM integration likely to advance or hinder development of these reforms?

12:30 p.m. Lunch

1:15 p.m. Assessment and Accountability
Edys Quellmalz, WestEd [CONFIRMED]

KEY QUESTIONS
• TBD

2:00 p.m. BREAK

2:15 p.m. Building Educator Expertise in iSTEM
Gillian Roehrig, University of Minnesota [WILLING TO SPEAK VIA SKYPE]
Louis Nadelson, Boise State University [CONFIRMED]
Patrick Duhon, Providence Public Schools/Providence After School Alliance [CONFIRMED]

Respondents: Donna Migdol, Oceanside School District, NY; Alfred Hall, University of Memphis

KEY QUESTIONS
• What are the challenges to developing expertise related to integrated STEM education in classroom teachers and in community educators?
• What does the research say about the approaches most effective in developing expertise in both types of educators?
• What additional research is needed to better understand the expertise needs and approaches for developing it in teachers and other educators who deliver iSTEM content?

3:15 p.m. Implementing iSTEM in Informal/Out-of-School Settings
TDB

KEY QUESTIONS
• What is the degree of interest and awareness of integrated STEM education in informal/out-of-school settings?
• What are the advantages, disadvantages, and challenges of implementing integrated STEM activities in these settings?
• What additional research is needed to better understand issues related to implementation?

4:00 p.m. Adjourn Public Session

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Linda Abriola
Sybilla Beckmann
Susan Hackwood
Alfred Hall
Jennifer Hicks
Margaret Honey
Steven Krak
Bill Kurtz
Rich Lehrer
Beth McGrath (7-12 by phone)
Batbara Means (by phone)
Donna Migdol
Mitchell Nathan
Mark Sanders
Michael Town

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Contents of the final report, definitions of iSTEM, directions for research, findings

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

iSTEM definition with committee comments
directions for research document
findings with committee comments

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 16, 2012
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Greg Pearson
Contact Email:  gpearson@nae.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2282

Agenda
NATIONAL ACADEMY OF ENGINEERING
NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL—BOARD ON SCIENCE EDUCATION

Committee on Integrated STEM Education
Third Meeting

Keck Center, Room 101
Washington, D.C.

April, 25-26, 2012

DAY 1
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25

CLOSED SESSION

8:30 a.m. Overview of meeting

9:45 a.m. Break

OPEN SESSION

10:00 a.m. Welcome and Goals of the Meeting
Margaret Honey, Chair

10:15 a.m. Social and Situated Cognition (commissioned paper)
Mary Gauvain, UC Riverside

10:45 a.m. Discussion (1st 20 minutes with committee, last 10 with audience)

11:15 a.m. Making connections across learning contexts: Implications for integrated STEM
Christine Massey, University of Pennsylvania

11:35 a.m. Discussion (1st 10 minutes with committee, last 10 with audience)

11:55 p.m. Lunch

1:00 p.m. Example of Learning in Integrated Context
Richard Lehrer

1:30 pm. Discussion of research on learning and implications for iSTEM
Mary Gauvain, Christine Massey, Richard Lehrer

2:00 p.m. Motivation and Interest (Commissioned paper)
Ann Renninger, Swarthmore

2:30 p.m. Discussion (1st 20 minutes with committee, last 10 with audience)

3:00 p.m. Break

CLOSED SESSION

3:15 p.m.
5:15 p.m. Break


DAY 2
THURSDAY, APRIL 26

CLOSED SESSION

8:00 a.m. Overview of Day 2


9:15 a.m. Break

OPEN SESSION

9:30 a.m. Supporting learning in iSTEM with technology: School settings
Nancy Butler Songer, University of Michigan

9:50 a.m. Discussion (1st 10 minutes with committee, last 10 with audience)

10:10 a.m. Supporting learning in iSTEM with technology: Informal settings-TBD

10:30 a.m. Discussion (1st 10 minutes with committee, last 10 with audience)

11:00 a.m. Break

11:10 a.m. Example of Learning in Integrated Context -TBD

11:30 a.m. Discussion (1st 10 minutes with committee, last 10 with audience)

11:50 a.m. Common Core Standards in Mathematics - TBD

12:10 a.m. Discussion (1st 10 minutes with committee, last 10 with audience)

12:30 p.m. Adjourn public sessions

CLOSED SESSION

1:00 p.m.

4:00 p.m. Adjourn
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Linda Abriola
Barbara Means
Alfred Hall
Mike Town
Jennifer Hicks
Mitchell Nathan
Steve Krak
Donna Migdol
Elizabeth McGrath
Mark Sanders
Sybilla Beckmann
Susan Hackwood on April 26 p.m.

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Committee working group on Taxonomy update, discuss of the speaker presentations, Literature committee working group update, report outline, committee working group introduction chapter, discussion of next steps

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Drafts from committee working groups and drafts of early stages of report.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
April 26, 2012
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Greg Pearson
Contact Email:  gpearson@nae.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2282

Agenda
Second Meeting
Keck Center, Room 204
Washington, D.C.
January, 10-12, 2012

DAY 1
TUESDAY, JANUARY 10

CLOSED SESSION

9:00 a.m.
9:45 a.m. Break

OPEN SESSION

10:00 a.m. Welcome and Goals of the Workshop
Margaret Honey, Chair

10:15 a.m. Defining iSTEM

Jeanne Century
University of Chicago

Alan Friedman
The Museum Group

Committee Respondent: Mark Sanders, University of Virginia

11:25 a.m. Discussion

12:00 p.m. Lunch

1:00 p.m. Goals of iSTEM

1:00 p.m. iSTEM and Preparing the Workforce of the Future
Nicole Smith
Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce

1:20 p.m. Discussion

1:40 p.m. iSTEM and Learning Outcomes
Anthony Petrosino
Univeristy of Texas, Austin

2:00 p.m. Discussion

2:20 p.m. iSTEM and Diversity
Tirupalavanam Ganesh
Arizona State University

2:40 p.m. Discussion

3:00 p.m. Break

3:15 p.m. Approaches to Integrated STEM Education: Schools

Aimee Kennedy
Metro Early College High School, Columbus, OH

Rick Sandlin and Ronda Jameson
Morriss Mathematics and Engineering Elementary School and Texarkana Independent School District, TX

Committee Respondents: Bill Kurtz and Donna Migdol

4:05 p.m. Discussion

4:25p.m. Approaches to Integrated STEM Education: Out-of-School Experiences
Person TBD (invited)
FIRST Lego League

5:00 p.m. Reception (to 6:30 p.m.)


DAY 2
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11

CLOSED SESSION

8:30 a.m.
9:15 a.m. Break

OPEN SESSION

9:30 a.m. Approaches to Integrated STEM Education: Curriculum Examples

Integrated Mathematics, Science, and Technology Program
William Hunter and Brad Christensen
Illinois State University

A World in Motion
Chris Ciuca
SAE International

Committee Respondents: Michael Town and Alfred Hall

10:30 a.m. Discussion

11:00 a.m. Approaches to Integrated STEM: Teacher Education

M/S/T Elementary Education Degree Program
Steve O’Brien
The College of New Jersey

Engineering is Elementary In-service Professional Development Program
Christine Cunningham
Museum of Science, Boston

Committee Respondents: Jennifer Hicks and Susan Hackwood

12:00 p.m. Discussion

12:30 p.m. Adjourn public sessions

CLOSED SESSION

12:30 p.m.
8:00 p.m. Adjourn for the Day


DAY 3
THURSDAY, JANUARY 12

CLOSED SESSION

9:00 a.m.

12:00 p.m. Adjourn
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Linda Abriola
Sybilla Beckmann
Susan Hackwood
Alfgred Hall
Jennifer Hicks
Margaret Honey
Steve Krak
Bill Kurtz
Beth McGrath
Barbara Means
Donna Migdol (except 1-12-12)
Mitchell Nathan
Mark Sanders Michael Town

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Discussed the workshop and what questions and clarifications were needed each day, conflict and bias, draft outline of the report, the literature review and possible future commissioned papers.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Conflict and bias forms. Literature review compiled by our hired consultants.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
January 12, 2012
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Greg Pearson
Contact Email:  gpearson@nae.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2282

Agenda
Sept. 27-28, 2011

Keck Center of the National Academies
Washington, D.C.

Draft Agenda

DAY 1 (Room Keck 110)

8:00 a.m. Breakfast

8:30 a.m. Welcome and Introductions
Margaret Honey and Committee

9:30 a.m. Overview of the Project and Statement of Task
Greg Pearson, NAE; Heidi Schweingruber, NRC

10:00 a.m. Break

10:15 a.m. The Project in Context

Michael Feder, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy: Update on study of federal STEM education efforts

Natalie Nielsen, NRC Board on Science Education: Summary of report on successful STEM education

Heidi Schweingruber, NRC Board on Science Education: Framework for K-12 Science Education

12:00 p.m. Lunch

1:00 p.m. Preliminary Report on the Literature Review
Susan Burger, David Heil and Associates

Panel

Ken Welty, University of Wisconsin-Stout (formal STEM education)
Cary Sneider, Portland State University (informal STEM education)
Christian Schunn and Eli Silk, University of Pittsburgh (cognitive/learning sciences)


2:30 p.m. Preliminary Communication and Outreach Plan
Greg Pearson, NAE; Mark St. John, Inverness Research

3:00 p.m. Break

******CLOSED SESSION*****

3:15 p.m. Conflict and Bias Discussion & Statement of Task

5:00 p.m. Adjourn


DAY 2 (Room Keck 105)

8:00 a.m. Breakfast

8:30 a.m. Welcome from NAE President Charles M. Vest

*****CLOSED SESSION*****

8:45 a.m. Key Issues/Questions Raised on Day 1 Discussion of First Workshop, consultants’ work, and next steps

12:00 p.m. Adjourn


Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Linda Abriola (day 1 only) Margaret Honey
Alfred Hall
Jennifer Hicks
Steve Krak
Bill Kurtz
Richard Lehrer
Beth McGrath
Barbara Means
Donna Migdol
Mitchell Nathan
Mark Sanders
Michael Town

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Conflict and Bias, Definition of STEM, possible workshop topics and speakers

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Confict and Bias paperwork, Committee generated definitions of STEM.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 28, 2011
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office