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Project Information

Project Information


A Decadal Strategy for Solar and Space Physics (Heliophysics) - Panel on Solar and Heliospheric Physics


Project Scope:

The Space Studies Board shall establish a Heliophysics Survey Committee to develop a comprehensive science and mission strategy for heliophysics research for a 10-year period beginning in approximately 2013.  The survey committee, informed by up to 5 study panels that will also be established by the Board, will broadly canvas the field of solar and space physics and:

  1. Provide an overview of the science and a broad survey of the current state of knowledge in the field, including a discussion of the relationship between space- and ground-based science research and its connection to other scientific areas;
  2. Identify the most compelling science challenges that have arisen from recent advances and accomplishments;
  3. Identify—having considered scientific value, urgency, cost category and risk, and technical readiness—the highest priority scientific targets for the interval 2013-2022, recommending science objectives and measurement requirements for each target rather than specific mission or project design/implementation concepts; and
  4. Develop an integrated research strategy that will present means to address these targets.

This panel will address research questions in solar physics and heliospheric physics and will report its findings to the Decadal Survey steering committee.

 

Scope 

This “decadal survey” follows the NRC's previous survey in solar and space physics, The Sun to the Earth--and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics, which was completed in 2002 and published in final form in 2003.  The scope of the study will include:

 

  • The structure of the Sun and the properties of its outer layers in their static and active states;
  • The characteristics and physics of the interplanetary medium from the surface of the Sun to interstellar space beyond the boundary of the heliosphere; and
  • The consequences of solar variability on the atmospheres and surfaces of other bodies in solar system, and the physics associated with the magnetospheres, ionospheres, thermospheres, mesospheres, and upper atmospheres of the Earth and other solar system bodies. 

 

In order to ensure consistency with other advice developed by the NRC for NASA, the following additional scope guidance is provided:

 

  • With the exception of interactions with the atmospheres and magnetospheres of solar system bodies, which are within scope, planetary phenomena are out of scope (these other topics are being addressed by an ongoing decadal survey in planetary science);
  • Basic or supporting ground-based laboratory and theoretical research in solar and space physics are within scope, noting that the findings and recommendations in the present survey should be harmonized with those developed and reported by the ongoing astronomy and astrophysics decadal survey; and
  • Consistent with the current astronomy and astrophysics decadal survey, recommendations related to ground-based implementations (e.g., ground-based solar observatories) will be directed to the NSF.

 

Without undertaking a detailed analysis of operational space weather user or provider requirements, the survey committee will describe the value of these services to society and examine the role of NASA and NSF research in underpinning and improving these services. 

In addition to an integrated review of the current state of scientific knowledge and recommendations for future basic research directions to advance our understanding, the survey will provide implementation recommendations separately for NASA and NSF.

 

For each science target, the committee will establish criteria on which its recommendations depend and identify developments of sufficient significance that they would warrant an NRC reexamination of the committee’s recommendations.  The Committee will also make recommendations to the agencies on how to rebalance programs within budgetary scenarios upon failure of one or more of the criteria.

Status: Current

PIN: DEPS-SSB-10-06

Project Duration (months): 24 month(s)

RSO: Charo, Art

Topic(s):

Space and Aeronautics


Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 10/29/2010

Richard A. Mewaldt - (Chair)
California Institute of Technology

RICHARD A. MEWALDT is a senior research associate in the Space Radiation Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Mewaldt's research interests cover spacecraft and balloon-borne measurements of energetic nuclei and electrons accelerated in solar energetic particle events, galactic cosmic rays, the heliosphere, and the Earth's magnetosphere. His work has focused specifically on studies of the elemental and isotopic composition and the implications of these measurements for energetic particle origin; acceleration, and transport, on solar particle and cosmic-ray impacts on space weather, and on the development of high-resolution instrumentation to extend these measurements. Dr. Mewaldt has been a co-investigator on the NASA missions IMP-7, IMP-8, ISEE-3 (ICE), a guest investigator on HEAO-3, and is currently a co-investigator on SAMPEX, STEREO, and mission scientist for the Advanced Composition Explorer. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from Washington University.
Spiro K. Antiochos - (Vice Chair)
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

SPIRO K. ANTIOCHOS is a research astrophysicist in the Heliophysics Division of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Antiochos is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences at the University of Michigan. His fields of expertise include theoretical solar physics and plasma physics. His work consists primarily of developing theoretical models to explain observations from NASA space missions. During his career he has worked on a number of problems related to the Sun and heliosphere, in particular, the physics of magnetic-driven activity and the structure of the Sun’s corona. Dr. Antiochos previously served as the head of the Solar Theory Section in the Space Science Division at the Naval Research Laboratory. He also served as a postdoctoral fellow at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and as a research associate at Stanford University. He served as chair of the Solar Physics Division for the American Astronomical Society (AAS). He has authored or coauthored over 100 refereed papers in archival journals. Dr. Antiochos is a co-investigator on NASA’s STEREO mission, part of the Solar Terrestrial Probes program. Dr. Antiochos is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, a recipient of the AAS George Ellery Hale Prize for outstanding contributions to the field of solar astronomy, and a recipient of the National Research Laboratory’s E.O. Hulburt Award, the Naval Research Laboratory’s highest honor for scientific achievement. He received his Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University.
Timothy S. Bastian
National Radio Astronomy Observatory

TIMOTHY S. BASTIAN is assistant director of the Office of Science and Academic Affairs at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), where he has been an astronomer since 1987. He also is an adjunct faculty member in the Astronomy Department at the University of Virginia. Dr. Bastian’s research interests include solar and stellar radiophysics. He is currently the principal investigator of the Solar Radio Burst Spectrometer Project and served on the faculty of the NCAR Summer School on Heliophysics. Dr. Bastian served as scientific editor of the Astrophysical Journal. Dr. Bastian received a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. in Astrophysics from the University of Colorado.
Joe Giacalone
University of Arizona

JOE GIACALONE is an associate professor of planetary sciences at the University of Arizona. Prior to coming to the University of Arizona, Dr. Giacalone was a research associate at Queen Mary and Westfield College, London. Dr. Giacalone’s core research interests include understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays, and other charged-particle species in the magnetic fields of space, and general topics in space plasma physics, and astrophysics. He develops physics-based theoretical and computational models which are used to interpret in situ spacecraft observations. He is a recipient of the NSF’s Early CAREER award. Dr. Giacalone currently serves as a member of NASA’s Living With a Star TR and T Steering Committee and as secretary for the SPA/SH subdivision of the American Geophysical Union. He has also served on a NASA senior review panel for NASA Data and Modeling Centers and on the Steering Committee for NSF’s SHINE Program. Dr. Giacalone earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Kansas.
George Gloeckler
University of Maryland, College Park

GEORGE M. GLOECKLER (NAS) is Distinguished University Professor, Emeritus, University of Maryland and research professor in the Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences Department at the University of Michigan. Dr. Gloeckler’s research focuses on space plasma physics, particularly the properties of the local interstellar medium, such as its magnetic field, density and composition of its gas, and its interaction with the solar system. He is known for developing a new experimental measurement technique based on observations of interstellar pickup ions and for pioneering discoveries and the invention of instruments carried on satellites and deep space probes, including the two Voyagers, Ulysses and Cassini. Elected to the NAS in 1997, Dr. Gloeckler is also a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Physical Society, and the recipient of the COSPAR Space Science Award. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago.
John W. Harvey
National Solar Observatory

JOHN W. (JACK) HARVEY is an astronomer at the National Solar Observatory, where he studies solar magnetic and velocity fields and helioseismology. His major efforts have been on design and development of instrumentation for community use in these research areas. His more recent research has focused on unambiguous observations of permanent magnetic field changes associated with solar flares, discovery that the quiet solar photosphere has a ubiquitous, rapidly-changing, mainly horizontal magnetic field, and solar chromospheric magnetic field structure associated with coronal holes and prominences. Dr. Harvey is a member of the NSO Scientific Personnel Committee, Instrument Scientist for the GONG project, and Project Scientist for the SOLIS project. In the outside community, he serves on NASA and NSF review panels and is a past co-Editor of the journal Solar Physics. He chaired recent reviews of solar programs in Japan and Switzerland. Dr. Harvey has served on the Committee on Solar and Space Physics, as well as other NRC panels and projects.
Russell A. Howard
U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

RUSSELL A. HOWARD is an astrophysicist at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory(NRL). Dr. Howard’s research has centered on understanding the physics of the solar corona and the coronal mass ejection phenomenon - its initiation, propagation, and eventual interplanetary effects. He is currently the principal investigator for the operating experiments SOHO/ LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI and two experiments under development - the Solar Orbiter/SoloHI and the Solar Probe Plus WISPR. He developed the CCDs and CCD cameras for LASCO and EIT for which he received an NRL Royalty Award and is currently developing the APS/CMOS sensor for SoloHI and WISPR. He was the project scientist for the development of the Solwind and LASCO coronagraphs, led the development of the LASCO/EIT flight software and ground system. He has been a co-investigator on numerous NASA projects, including an XUV CCD detector development program. He received the E.O. Hulburt Science Award, which is the highest award that NRL gives to a scientist, and the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Award. He has over 200 papers in the refereed literature. Dr. Howard received a B.S. from the University of Maryland in Mathematics and a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland in Chemical Physics.
Justin Kasper
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

JUSTIN KASPER is an astrophysicist in the in the Solar and Stellar X-Ray Group in the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and a lecturer in the Department of Astronomy at Harvard University. He is also a visiting scholar at the Boston University Center for Space Physics. He has worked on the development, construction, and analysis of instrumentation for the in-situ and remote measurement of particles and fields, including space-based plasma probes and particle telescopes such as the Faraday Cups on Wind, and ground based radio telescopes including the Mileura Wide-Field Array Low Frequency Demonstrator (MWA-LFD). Currently, he is leading the design and operation of the Faraday Rotation Subsystem for MWA-LFD and participating in the radio transients, sky survey, and ionospheric calibration efforts. Dr. Kasper studies the flow of energy in astrophysical plasmas, including the solar corona, the solar wind, and planetary magnetospheres. His research focuses on the role of non-thermal velocity distribution functions, plasma micro-instabilities, magnetic reconnection, turbulence, and dissipation in the physical processes of heating, bulk acceleration, collisionless shocks, energetic particle acceleration, and radio emission. He was a member of the US organizing and instrumentation committees for the 2007 International Heliophysical Year and the project scientist for the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER), on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Dr. Kasper received his Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Robert P. Lin
University of California, Berkeley

ROBERT P. LIN (NAS) is a professor in the Department of Physics at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Lin is a world-renowned experimentalist in space science. Through numerous, innovative instruments that have flown on NASA missions, he has revealed the behavior of electrons and ions accelerated by the Sun, and detected the accompanying x-ray and gamma-ray emissions. As an astrophysicist, his primary interest is in how particles are accelerated to high energies in nature. To study these processes, he has developed instruments to directly measure the plasma, fields, and energetic particles, and flown them on spacecraft into regions where acceleration is occurring. He is particularly interested in the Sun as the most powerful accelerator in our solar system, accelerating particles to the highest energies. He conducts imaging and spectroscopy of the x-rays and gamma-rays emitted by energetic particles at the Sun, as well as directly detect the accelerated particles that escape to the interplanetary medium. He studies the acceleration that occurs in transient events that involve the phenomena of magnetic reconnection or collisionless shock waves. He is the principal investigator on the Gamma Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) experiment, which will utilize high altitude balloons but is not funded by the NASA suborbital program but by the Supporting Research and Technology (SRT) program.
Glenn M. Mason
Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics

GLENN M. MASON is senior professional staff at The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. He is currently an investigator for the Remote Analysis Site for the Ultra Low Energy Isotope Spectrometer particle instrument in the Advanced Composition Explorer mission. Dr. Mason was a professor in the Department of Physics and the Institute for Physical Science and Technology at the University of Maryland, College Park. He has worked on the development of novel instrumentation that allows determination of the mass composition of solar and interplanetary particles in previously unexplored energy ranges. His research work has included galactic cosmic rays, solar energetic particles, and the acceleration and transport of particles both in the solar atmosphere and in the interplanetary medium. He is principal investigator on the NASA Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Explorer (SAMPEX) spacecraft mission and is co-investigator on energetic particle instruments for the NASA Wind spacecraft and the NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft. He was former chair of the NASA Sun-Earth Connections Advisory Subcommittee (SECAS), the NASA Space Science Advisory Committee (SScAC), and the Steering Committee of the Space Science Working Group of the Association of American Universities. He received his A.B. in physics from Harvard College and his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Chicago.
Eberhard Moebius
University of New Hampshire

EBERHARD MOEBIUS is a professor of physics at the University of New Hampshire. He worked as a research scientist at the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) in Garching, Germany, and has been on the Physics faculty at UNH. His research interests include the acceleration of ions in the Earth's magnetosphere, in interplanetary space, and in solar flares; interaction of interstellar gas with the solar wind and the study of the local interstellar medium. His group is finishing the PLASTIC instrument to measure the solar wind and suprathermal ion composition for NASA's STEREO mission and is involved in several studies for future missions to Earth's magnetosphere and the heliosphere. Dr. Möbius earned his degrees at the Ruhr-Universität in Bochum, Germany, in the field of laboratory plasma physics: Physics Diploma and Dr. rer. nat. habil.
Merav Opher
George Mason University

MERAV OPHER is an assistant professor of astronomy at Boston University. Her research interests are in the plasma effects in space physics and astrophysics. Prior to joining GMU, Dr. Opher was a research scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where she conducted research on the interaction between the solar and interstellar winds found at the edge of the solar system. As a postdoctoral associate with the Plasma Group in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of California, Los Angeles, she investigated the effect of electromagnetic fluctuations on nuclear reaction rates and how these plasma effects can influence stellar evolution and early universe calculations. She received a Ph.D. in plasma astrophysics from the Astronomy Department of the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Jesper Schou
Stanford University

JESPER SCHOU is currently a senior research scientist at Stanford University. Dr. Schou is the instrument scientist and co-investigator for the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). His research interests include solar variability, solar magnetic activity, and helioseismology. He has written over 70 refereed papers in journals including Nature, Science, ApJ, ApJ Letters, A&A, MNRAS and Solar Physics. Dr. Schou has been chairman of the GONG Data Management and Analysis Center Users Committee, a member of the NASA Solar and Heliospheric Management Operations Working Group, and a member of the Scientific Organizing Committees for SOHO14/GONG 2004, SDO 2008, and SOHO 24. Dr. Schou holds a BSc. (equivalent) in mathematics and physics from the University of Aarhus, a M.S. (equivalent) in astronomy from the University of Aarhus, and a Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Aarhus.
Nathan A. Schwadron
University of New Hampshire

NATHAN A. SCHWADRON is an associate professor of Astronomy at Boston University (BU) and the Science Operations Lead for the Interstellar Boundary Explorer Mission. Dr. Schwadron’s previous experience includes positions as a senior research scientist, a principal scientist and a staff scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas, an assistant research scientist at the University of Michigan, a senior research scientist at the International Space Science Institute in Bern, Switzerland, and a post-doctoral scholar at the University of Michigan’s Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Science Department. Dr. Schwadron’s research interests include heliospheric phenomena related to the solar wind, the heliospheric magnetic field, pickup ions, cometary X-rays, energetic particles, and cosmic rays. Professor Schwadron received a B. A. with honors in physics from Oberlin College and a PhD in physics from the University of Michigan.
Amy Winebarger
Alabama A&M University

AMY R. WINEBARGER is an assistant professor at Alabama A&M University. She previously worked as a research scientist at the Naval Research Laboratory and at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory as an astrophysicist. Her research interests include solar coronal heating, solar flare heating, energy growth and release in coronal mass ejections, comparison between simulation results and observables, analysis of spectroscopic and filter data, development and testing of filter response functions, and hydrodynamic code validation and verification. She is the recipient of a NSF CAREER Grant. Dr. Winebarger received a Ph.D. in physics from King College, and M.S. and Ph.D. in physics from the University of Alabama at Huntsville.
Daniel Winterhalter
Jet Propulsion Laboratory

DANIEL WINTERHALTER is a principal scientist with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. His research interests include the spatial evolution of the solar wind into the outer reaches of the heliosphere, as well as its interaction with, and influence on, planetary environments. He has published articles in refereed journals and edited two books on this subject. Most recently he has been interested in the low frequency radio emissions from the (presumed) magnetospheres of extrasolar planets, for which his team has carried out observations with the world's largest radio telescopes. As a member of several flight teams over the years, Dr. Winterhalter is and has been intimately involved with the planning, launching, and operating of complex spacecraft and space science missions. He has received the Achievement Awards for his participation on the Voyagers 1 & 2, Pioneer 11, and Mars Observer, Mars Global Surveyor, and Cassini interplanetary probes. He has received a NASA Special Recognition Certificate for his work on Mars Observer. Dr. Winterhalter is the experiment representative for the Mars Global Surveyor magnetometer team, and until recently was the investigation scientist for the Cassini Radio Science Experiment. He was the study scientist for the space science Mercury Orbiter effort in 1996, and is now the pre-project scientist for the new Mars Science and Telecom Orbiter (MSTO), which is planned for a 2011 or 2013 launch. Dr. Winterhalter received a M.S. and a Ph.D. in geophysics and space physics from the University of California, Los Angeles. Also, he received a M.A. in physics from the University of California, Irvine, and a B.A. in physics from the California State University, Fullerton.
Thomas N. Woods
University of Colorado at Boulder

THOMAS N. WOODS is the associate director for Technical Divisions at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He has previously held research scientist positions at LASP and the High Altitude Observatory. His research is focused primarily on solar ultraviolet irradiance and its effects on Earth’s atmosphere. Dr. Woods is the principal investigator for numerous experiments, including the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO); X-Ray Sensor (XRS) and EUV Sensor (EUVS) on NOAA GOES-R; Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) as mission for NASA Earth Observing System; and Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) on the Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) mission. Dr. Woods received a B.S. in physics from Southwestern at Memphis (now Rhodes College), an M.A. in physics from Johns Hopkins University, and a Ph.D. in physics from Johns Hopkins University.

Events



Location:

Boulder, CO
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Linda Walker
Contact Email:  lwalker@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3477

Agenda
This meeting is closed in it's entirety.
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Richard Mewaldt
Spiro Antiochos
Justin Kasper
Timothy Bastian
Joe Giacalone
George Gloeckler
John W. Harvey
Russell Howard
Robert Lin
NAS
Glenn Mason
Eberhard Moebius
Merav Opher
Jesper Schou
Nathan Schwadron
Amy Winebarger
Daniel Winterhalter
Thomas Woods

In addition to the committee
closed session attendees included (by telecon) steering cmte member Michael Hesse; theory and modeling working group co-lead Jon Linker; and
in person
steering cmte member Dan Baker.


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Topics for discussion:

o Significant Accomplishments of the Last Decade
o Science Goals for the Coming Decade
o Review Vision/Motivation/Actions template for panel report
o Aerospace cost and technical analyses of SH-related concepts
o Discussion of prioritization criteria to inform panel endorsements
o Discussion of NSF ground-based initiatives
o Discussion of NASA programs, with particular attention to the Explorer program
o Discussion of low-cost access to space
o Discussion of MO&DA, SR&T, R&A, and GI programs
o Discussion of SH connections to other disciplines


The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

No outside materials were distributed.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 21, 2011


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry Baker
Contact Email:  tbaker@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3477

Agenda
Monday, January 10, 2011
Room 109


OPEN SESSION

08:40
Introduction to Today’s Talks
Richard Mewaldt and Spiro Antiochos

08:45
IMAP
Dave McComas, SWRI

9:20
Interstellar Probe
Ralph McNutt, JHUAPL

9:55
Solar Orbiter
Chris St Cyr, NASA GSFC
Lika Guhathakurta, NASA HQ

10:30
Break

10:45
Solar-C (A)
Jonathan Cirtain, NASA MSFC

11:20
SPI
Paulett Liewer, NASA JPL

11:55
Telemachus
Ed Roelof, JHU/APL

12:30 pm
Lunch

1:10
Solar-C (B)
George Doschek, NRL

1:45
SMART
Pietro Bernasconi,
JHU/APL


2:20
RAM Leon Golub, Harvard CfA

2:55
SEE
Robert Lin, UC Berkeley

3:35
Break

3:55
L5
Angelos Vourlidas, NRL

4:30
PATH
Eric Christian, NASA GSFC

5:05
Solar Sentinels
Adam Szabo, NASA GSFC

5:35
HELIX
Robert Lin, UC Berkeley

6:05
Adjourn

6:30
Working Dinner


Tuesday, January 11, 2011
Room 109


OPEN SESSION

9:30
Solar Sail Status and Prospects
Les Johnson, MSFC

10:05 open session ends

Wednesday, January 12, 2011
Room 109

OPEN SESSION

08:30
ACCEHS
Amitava Bhattacharjee, Univ. of New Hampshire

09:05
CHIPS
John Dorelli, Univ. of New Hampshire

09:40
COSMO
Steve Tomczyk, HAO/NCAR

10:15
Lab Plasma Physics
Jim Drake, Univ. of Maryland

10:50
open session ends

Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Richard Mewaldt
Spiro Antiochos
Justin Kasper
Timothy Bastian
Joe Giacalone
George Gloeckler
John W. Harvey
Russell Howard
Robert Lin
NAS
Glenn Mason
Eberhard Moebius
Merav Opher
Jesper Schou
Nathan Schwadron
Amy Winebarger
Daniel Winterhalter
Thomas Woods


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Topics discussed in closed session:
o Plans for the meeting
o Overarching science questions for the discipline
o Criteria and goals for selecting missions to study
o Committee member reports on white papers of particular interest
o Updates (given by a panel member) of activities underway in the each of the 5 survey working groups


The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

No outside materials were distributed.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 21, 2011


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Linda Walker
Contact Email:  lwalker@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3477

Agenda
Tentative DRAFT Agenda as of 11/24/2010
Open and Closed sessions to be determined

Monday, November 29, 2010
Room XXXX

OPEN SESSION

10:30
NASA Heliophysics Division Briefing
Dick Fisher, NASA HQ, invited
-Status of the current program
-Missions in development
-Expectations for the survey
-Decadal budget forecast

11:00
NSF Briefing
Richard Behnke, NSF, invited

11:30
Briefing on Solar Probe Plus, TBD; Briefing on Solar Orbiter (tentative), TBD

12:15 pm
Working Lunch

12:45
Open Sesion Ends


Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Timothy Bastien

Joe Giacolone
John Harvey
Robert Lin
Richard Mewaldt
E Moebius
Jesper Shou
D Winterhalter
Thomas Woods

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

overvew of survey process
conflict and bias discussion
update from working groups
discussion of white papers
presentation of optical facilities
presentation of radio facilities
discussion of FASR COSMO Theory initiatives
other white papers
key science accomplishments/questions goals
committee discussion
NASA mission concepts we need speakers fornext meeting
facilities for next meeting
white paper discussions on solar and space physics version of the Bretherton wiring diagrahm
review of the 2003 survey SH panel report
Review of the 2013 SH report
Action items

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

white papers

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
December 07, 2010

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office
Publications

No data present.