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Project Information

Project Information


Sustainable Water and Environmental Management in the California Bay-Delta


Project Scope:

            At the request of Congress and the Departments of the Interior and Commerce, a committee of independent experts will be formed to review the scientific basis of actions that have been and could be taken to simultaneously achieve both an environmentally sustainable Bay-Delta and a reliable water supply. In order to balance the need to inform near-term decisions with the need for an integrated view of water and environmental management challenges over the longer-term, the committee will undertake two main projects over a term of two years resulting in two reports, subject to available funding throughout that period. 

First, within four months of receipt of funding or authorization to begin work, anticipated to be March 15, 2010, the committee will issue a report focusing on scientific questions, assumptions, and conclusions underlying water-management alternatives in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (FWS) Biological Opinion on Coordinated Operations of the Central Valley Project and State Water Project (Dec. 15, 2008) and the National Marine Fisheries Service’s (NMFS) Biological Opinion on the Long-Term Central Valley Project and State Water Project Operations Criteria and Plan (June 4, 2009). This review will consider the following questions:

·          Are there any “reasonable and prudent alternatives” (RPAs), including but not limited to alternatives considered but not adopted by FWS (e.g., potential entrainment index and the delta smelt behavioral model) and NMFS (e.g., bubble-curtain technology and engineering solutions to reduce diversion of emigrating juvenile salmonids to the interior and southern Delta instead of towards the sea), that, based on the best available scientific data and analysis, (1) would have lesser impacts to other water uses as compared to those adopted in the biological opinions, and (2) would provide equal or greater protection for the relevant fish species and their designated critical habitat given the uncertainties involved?  

  • Are there provisions in the FWS and NMFS biological opinions to resolve potential incompatibilities between the opinions with regard to actions that would benefit one listed species while causing negative impacts on another, including, but not limited to, prescriptions that:  (1) provide spring flows in the Delta in dry years primarily to meet water quality and outflow objectives pursuant to Water Board Decision-1641 and conserve upstream storage for summertime cold water pool management for anadromous fish species; and (2) provide fall flows during wet years in the Delta to benefit Delta smelt, while also conserving carryover storage to benefit next year’s winter-run cohort of salmon in the event that the next year is dry?
  • To the extent that time permits, the committee would consider the effects of other stressors (e.g., pesticides, ammonia discharges, invasive species) on federally listed and other at-risk species in the Bay-Delta.  Details of this task are the first item discussed as part of the committee’s second report, below, and to the degree that they cannot be addressed in the first report they will be addressed in the second.

Second, within 24 months of receipt of funding, the committee will issue a second report on how to most effectively incorporate science and adaptive management concepts into holistic programs for management and restoration of the Bay-Delta.  This advice, to the extent possible, should be coordinated in a way that best informs the Bay Delta Conservation Plan development process. The review will include tasks such as the following:

  • Identify the factors that may be contributing to the decline of federally listed species, and as appropriate, other significant at-risk species in the Delta. To the extent practicable, rank the factors contributing to the decline of salmon, steelhead, delta smelt, and green sturgeon in order of their likely impact on the survival and recovery of the species, for the purpose of informing future conservation actions.  This task would specifically seek to identify the effects of stressors other than those considered in the biological opinions and their RPAs (e.g., pesticides, ammonia discharges, invasive species) on federally listed and other at-risk species in the Delta, and their effects on baseline conditions.  The committee would consider the extent to which addressing stressors other than water exports might result in lesser restrictions on water supply.  The committee’s review should include existing scientific information, such as that in the NMFS Southwest Fisheries Science Center’s paper on decline of Central Valley fall-run Chinook salmon, and products developed through the Pelagic Organism Decline studies (including the National Center for Ecosystem Analysis and Synthesis reviews and analyses that are presently under way).  

·        Identify future water-supply and delivery options that reflect proper consideration of climate change and compatibility with objectives of maintaining a sustainable Bay-Delta ecosystem.  To the extent that water flows through the Delta system contribute to ecosystem structure and functioning, explore flow options that would contribute to sustaining and restoring desired, attainable ecosystem attributes, while providing for urban, industrial, and agricultural uses of tributary, mainstem, and Delta waters, including for drinking water.

·         Identify gaps in available scientific information and uncertainties that constrain an ability to identify the factors described above.  This part of the activity should take into account the Draft Central Valley Salmon and Steelhead recovery plans (NOAA 2009b), particularly the scientific basis for identification of threats to the species, proposed recovery standards, and the actions identified to achieve recovery. 

·         Advise, based on scientific information and experience elsewhere, what degree of restoration of the Delta system is likely to be attainable, given adequate resources.  Identify metrics that can be used by resource managers to measure progress toward restoration goals. 

The specific details of the tasks to be addressed in this second report will likely be refined after consultation among the departments of the Interior and Commerce, Congress, and the National Research Council, considering stakeholder input, and with the goal of building on, rather than duplicating, efforts already being adequately undertaken by others, and will be subject to available funding. 

Status: Current

PIN: DELS-WSTB-09-09

Project Duration (months): 31 month(s)

RSO: Policansky, David

Topic(s):

Agriculture
Biology and Life Sciences
Environment and Environmental Studies
Policy for Science and Technology



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 06/17/2010

Robert J. Huggett - (Chair)
College of William and Mary

ROBERT J. HUGGETT, Chair, is an independent consultant and professor emeritus and former chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences, Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences at the College of William and Mary, where he was on the faculty for over 20 years. He also served as Professor of Zoology and Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies at Michigan State University from 1997 to 2004. Dr. Huggett is an expert in aquatic biogeochemistry and ecosystem management whose research involved the fate and effects of hazardous substances in aquatic systems. From 1994 to 1997, he was the Assistant Administrator for Research and Development for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where his responsibilities included planning and directing the agency’s research program. During his time at the EPA, he served as Vice Chair of the Committee on Environment and Natural Resources and Chair of the Subcommittee on toxic substances and solid wastes, both of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Dr. Huggett founded the EPA Star Competitive Research Grants program and the EPA Star Graduate Fellowship program. He has served on the National Research Council’s (NRC) Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, the Water Science and Technology Board, and numerous study committees on wide ranging topics. Dr. Huggett earned an M.S. in Marine Chemistry from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California at San Diego and completed his Ph.D. in Marine Science at the College of William and Mary.
James J. Anderson
University of Washington

JAMES J. ANDERSON is a research professor the School of Aquatic and Fisheries Sciences at the University of Washington, where he has been teaching since 1983, and Co-Director of Columbia Basin Research. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Washington, he did research work at the University of Kyoto in Japan, the National Institute of Oceanography in Indonesia, and Institute of Oceanographic Sciences in Wormley, UK. Dr. Anderson's research focuses on models of ecological and biological processes from a mechanistic perspective, specifically: (1) migration of organisms, (2) decision processes, and (3) mortality processes. For three decades he has studied the effects of hydrosystems and water resource allocations on salmon and other fish species. He has developed computer models of the migration of juvenile and adult salmon through hydrosystems and heads the DART website, an internet database serving real-time environmental and fisheries data on the Columbia River. His other research interests include mathematical studies in ecosystems, biodemography, toxicology and animal behavior. He has served on a number of regional and national panels and has testified numerous times before Congress on the impacts of hydrosystems on fisheries resources. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Washington.
Michael E. Campana
Oregon State University

MICHAEL E. CAMPANA is Professor of Geosciences at Oregon State University and former Director of its Institute for Water and Watersheds. Prior to joining OSU in 2006 he held the Albert J. and Mary Jane Black Chair of Hydrogeology and directed the Water Resources Program at the University of New Mexico and was a research hydrologist at the Desert Research Institute and taught in the University of Nevada-Reno’s Hydrologic Sciences Program. He has supervised 68 graduate students. His research and interests include hydrophilanthropy, water resources management and policy, communications, transboundary water resources, regional hydrogeology, and surface water-groundwater interactions. He was a Fulbright Scholar to Belize and a Visiting Scientist at Research Institute for Groundwater (Egypt) and the IAEA in Vienna. Central America and the South Caucasus are the current foci of his international work. He has served on six NRC-NAS committees. Dr. Campana is founder, president, and treasurer of the Ann Campana Judge Foundation (www.acjfoundation.org), a 501(c)(3) charitable foundation that funds and undertakes projects related to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) in Central America. He operates the WaterWired blog and Twitter. He earned a BS in geology from the College of William and Mary and MS and PhD degrees in hydrology from the University of Arizona.
Thomas Dunne
University of California, Santa Barbara

THOMAS DUNNE (NAS) is a professor in the School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He is a hydrologist and a geomorphologist, with research interests that include alluvial processes; field and theoretical studies of drainage basin and hill-slope evolution; sediment transport and floodplain sedimentation; debris flows and sediment budgets of drainage basins. He served as a member of the WSTB Committee on Water Resources Research and Committee on Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1988. He has acted as a scientific advisor to the United Nations, the governments of Brazil, Taiwan, Kenya, Spain, the Philippines, Washington, Oregon, several U.S. federal agencies, and The Environmental Defense Fund. He is a recipient of the American Geophysical Union Horton Award. Dr. Dunne holds a B.A. from Cambridge University and a Ph.D. in geography from the Johns Hopkins University.
Jerome B. Gilbert
Independent Consultant

JEROME B. GILBERT, NAE, is a consulting engineer and founder of J. Gilbert, Inc. His interests include water supply and planning and water quality management. Mr. Gilbert has managed local and regional utilities, developed basin water quality plans and watershed protection plans, supervised water rights and water quality state regulatory activities, and led national and international water utility and research associations. Areas of recent experience include application of privatization contracting procedures to government projects, water treatment and watershed management for drinking water safety, groundwater remediation and conjunctive use, economic analysis of alternate water improvement projects, and the planning of multipurpose projects for water supply. Mr. Gilbert received a B.S. from the University of Cincinnati and a M.S. from Stanford University.


Albert E. Giorgi
BioAnalysts, Inc.

ALBERT E. GIORGI is president and senior fisheries scientist at BioAnalysts, Inc in Redmond, WA. He has been conducting research on Pacific Northwest salmonid resources since 1982. Prior to 1982, he was a research scientist with NOAA in Seattle, WA. He specializes in fish passage migratory behavior, juvenile salmon survival studies, biological effects of hydroelectric facilities and operation. His research includes the use of radio telemetry, acoustic tags, and PIT-tag technologies. In addition to his research, he acts as a technical analyst and advisor to public agencies and private parties. He regularly teams with structural and hydraulic engineers in the design and evaluation of fishways and fish bypass systems. He also has served on the NRC Committee on Water Resources Management, Instream Flows, and Salmon Survival in the Columbia River. He received his B.A. and M.A. in biology from Humboldt State University and his Ph.D. in fisheries from the University of Washington.
Christine A. Klein
University of Florida

CHRISTINE A. KLEIN the Chesterfield Smith Professor of Law at the University of Florida Levin College of Law, where she also served as Associate Dean for Faculty Development from 2006-2009. She teaches natural resources law, water law, and property. Prior to joining the Florida faculty, she chaired the Environmental Law program at Michigan State University College of Law; served in the Colorado Office of the Attorney General, Natural Resources Section, as an Assistant Attorney General specializing in water rights litigation; and served as a judicial law clerk to the Honorable Richard P. Matsch, United States District Court, District of Colorado. Her scholarship focuses on topics at the intersection of natural resources law and other legal disciplines including constitutional law, property law, and land use law. She is the lead author of one of the most prominent casebooks in Natural Resources Law. She holds an LL.M. from Columbia University Law School, a J.D. from the University of Colorado Law School, and a B.A. from Middlebury College in Vermont.
Samuel N. Luoma
U.S. Geological Survey

SAMUEL N. LUOMA is an emeritus senior scientist in the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, where he worked for 34 years. He also teaches at the John Muir Institute of the Environment, University of California, Davis. Dr. Luoma’s research centers on sediment processes, both natural and human-induced, particularly in the San Francisco Bay area. He served as the first lead on the CALFED Bay-delta program and is the Editor-in-Chief of San Francisco Estuary & Watershed Science. Since 1992, he has published extensively on the bioavailability and ecological effects of metals in aquatic environments. He has helped refine approaches to determine the toxicity of marine and estuarine sediments. In 1999, he was invited to discuss how chemical speciation influences metal bioavailability in sediments for the European Science Foundation. He has served multiple times on the EPA’s Science Advisory Board Subcommittee on Sediment Quality Criteria and on several NRC committees. Dr. Luoma received his B.S. and M.S. in Zoology from Montana State University, Bozeman, and his Ph.D. in Marine Biology from the University of Hawaii, Honolulu.
Thomas Miller
University of Maryland, Solomons

THOMAS MILLER is professor of fisheries and bioenergetics and population dynamics at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science where he has been teaching since 1994. Prior to UMCES-CBL, he was a postdoctoral fellow at McGill University, Montreal, Canada, and research specialist with the Center for Great Lakes Studies, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. His research focuses on population dynamics of aquatic animals, particularly in understanding recruitment, feeding and bio-physical interactions and early life history of fish and crustaceans. He has been involved in the development of a Chesapeake Bay fishery ecosystem plan, which includes detailed background information on fisheries, foodwebs, habitats and monitoring required to develop multispecies stock assessments. Most recently, he has developed an interest in the sub-lethal effects of contamination on Chesapeake Bay living resources using population dynamic approaches. He received his B.Sc. (hons) in human and environmental biology from the University of York, UK; his M.S. in ecology and Ph.D. in zoology and oceanography from North Carolina State University.
Stephen G. Monismith
Stanford University

STEPHEN G. MONISMITH is a professor of Environmental Fluid Mechanics and directs the Environmental Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at Stanford University. Prior to coming to Stanford, he spent three years in Perth (Australia) as a research fellow at the University of Western Australia. Dr. Monismith’s research in environmental and geophysical fluid dynamics involves the application of fluid mechanics principles to the analysis of flow processes operating in rivers, lakes, estuaries and the oceans. Making use of laboratory experimentation, numerical modelling, and field measurements, his current research includes studies of estuarine hydrodynamics and mixing processes, flows over coral reefs, wind wave-turbulent flow interactions in the upper ocean, turbulence in density stratified fluids, and physical-biological interactions in phytoplankton and benthic systems. He received his BS, MS, and PhD from the University of California at Berkeley.
Jayantha Obeysekera
South Florida Water Management District

JAYANTHA OBEYSEKERA directs the Hydrologic & Environmental Systems Modeling Department at the South Florida Water Management District, where he is a lead member of a modeling team dealing with development and applications of computer simulation models for Kissimmee River restoration and the restoration of the Everglades Ecosystem. Prior to joining the South Florida Water Management District, he taught courses in hydrology and water resources at Colorado State University, Fort Collins; George Washington University, Washington, DC; and at Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida. Dr. Obeysekera has published numerous research articles in refereed journals in the field of water resources. Dr. Obeysekera has over 20 years of experience practicing water resources engineering with an emphasis on both stochastic and deterministic modeling. He has taught short courses on modeling in the Dominican Republic, Colombia, Spain, Sri Lanka, and the U.S. He was a member of the Surface Runoff Committee of the American Geophysical Union and is currently serving as a member of a Federal Task Group on Hydrologic Modeling. He served as member of NRC’s Committee on Further Studies of Endangered and Threatened Fishes in the Klamath River. Dr. Obeysekera has a B.S. degree in civil engineering from University of Sri Lanka; M.E. in hydrology from University of Roorkee, India; and Ph.D. in civil engineering with specialization in water resources from Colorado State University.
Hans W. Paerl
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

HANS W. PAERL is Kenan Professor of Marine and Environmental Sciences, at the UNC-Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences, Morehead City. His research includes microbially-mediated nutrient cycling and primary production dynamics of aquatic ecosystems, environmental controls of harmful algal blooms, and assessing the causes and consequences of man-made and climatic (storms, floods) nutrient enrichment and hydrologic alterations of inland, estuarine and coastal waters. His studies have identified the importance and ecological impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition as a new nitrogen source supporting estuarine and coastal eutrophication. He is involved in the development and application of microbial and biogeochemical indicators of aquatic ecosystem condition and change in response to human and climatic perturbations. He heads up the Neuse River Estuary Modeling and Monitoring Program, and ferry-based water quality monitoring program, FerryMon, which employs environmental sensors and a various microbial indicators to assess near real-time ecological condition of the Pamlico Sound System, the nation’s second largest estuarine complex. In 2003 he was awarded the G. Evelyn Hutchinson Award by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography for his work in these fields and their application to interdisciplinary research, teaching and management of aquatic ecosystems. He received his PhD from the University of California-Davis.
Max J. Pfeffer
Cornell University

MAX J. PFEFFER is Senior Associate Dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at Cornell University and International Professor of Development Sociology in the Department of Development Sociology. His teaching concentrates on environmental sociology and sociological theory. His research spans several areas including farm labor, rural labor markets, international migration, land use, and environmental planning. The empirical work covers a variety of rural and urban communities, including rural/urban fringe areas. Research sites include rural New York and Central America. He has been awarded competitive grants from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Research Initiative and its Fund for Rural America, and the Social Science Research Council. Dr. Pfeffer has published a wide range of scholarly articles and has written or co-edited four books. He recently published (with John Schelhas) Saving Forests, Protecting People? Environmental Conservation in Central America. He also previously served as the Associate Director of both the Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station and the Cornell University Center for the Environment, and a chair of the Department of Development Sociology. He received his Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
Denise J. Reed
University of New Orleans

DENISE JANET REED is a University Research Professor at the University of New Orleans and is currently Interim Director of the Ponchartrain Institute for Environmental sciences. Her research interests include coastal marsh response to sea-level rise and how this is affected by human activities. She has worked on coastal issues on the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf coasts of the United States, as well as other parts of the world, and has published the results in numerous papers and reports. She is involved in ecosystem restoration planning both in Louisiana and in California. Dr. Reed has served on numerous boards and panels concerning the effects of human alterations on coastal environments and the role of science in guiding ecosystem restoration, including the Chief of Engineers Advisory Board, a number of NRC committees, and the Ecosystem Sciences and Management Working Group of the NOAA Science Advisory Board. She received her B.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
Kenneth A. Rose
Louisiana State University

KENNETH A. ROSE is a professor at the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. Prior to joining the faculty at LSU in 1998 he was a scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from 1987 to 1998. He also consulted with Martin Marietta Environmental Systems from 1983 to 1987. His research interests include mathematical and simulation models to better understand and forecast the effects of natural and anthropogenic factors on aquatic populations, community food webs, and ecosystems; and use of models in resource management and risk assessment. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and editor of the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Marine and Coastal Fisheries, and San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science. He received his B.S. from the State University of New York at Albany and his M.S. and Ph.D. in fisheries from the University of Washington.
Desiree D. Tullos
Oregon State University

DESIREE D. TULLOS is assistant professor in the Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis. Dr. Tullos also consulted with Blue Land Water Infrastructure and with Barge, Waggoner, Sumner, and Cannon before joining the faculty at Oregon State University. Her research areas include ecohydraulics, river morphology and restoration, bioassessment, and habitat and hydraulic modeling. She has done work on investigations of biological responses to restoration and engineered applications in riverine ecosystems; development and evaluation of targeted and appropriate bioindicators for the assessment of engineered designs in riverine systems; assessing effects of urban and agricultural activities and management practices on aquatic ecosystem stability in developing countries. She received her B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and her MC.E. in civil engineering and Ph.D. in biological engineering from North Carolina State University, Raleigh.
Henry J. Vaux, Jr.
University of California, Berkeley

HENRY J. VAUX, JR. is Professor Emeritus of Resource Economics at both the University of California in Berkley and Riverside. He is also Associate Vice President Emeritus of the University of California system. He also previously served as director of California's Center for Water Resources. His principal research interests are the economics of water use, water quality, and water marketing. Prior to joining the University of California, he worked at the Office of Management and Budget and served on the staff of the National Water Commission. Dr. Vaux has served on the NRC committees on Assessment of Water Resources Research, Western Water Management, and Ground Water Recharge, and Sustainable Underground Storage of Recoverable Water. He was chair of the Water Science and Technology Board from 1994 to 2001. He is a National Associate of The National Academies. Dr. Vaux received an A.B. from the University of California, Davis in Biological Sciences, an M.A. in Natural Resource Administration, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.


Committee Membership Roster Comments

Effective May 25, 2010, there has been a change in committee membership with the resignations of Dr. Patricia Glibert and Dr. Michael McGuire.

Effective June 17, 2010, three new members were nominated: John P. Connolly (NAE), Stephen G. Monismith, and Hans W. Paerl.

Events



Location:

Hotel Monaco Seattle
Seattle, Washington
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Sarah Brennan
Contact Email:  sbrennan@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  (202) 334-3856

Agenda
This meeting will be held entirely in closed session.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. Huggett
Robert
2. Campana
Michael
3. Dunne
Tom
4. Gilbert
Jerry
5. Giorgi
Al
6. Luoma
Sam
7. Miller
Tom
8. Monismith
Stephen
9. Obeysekera
Jayantha
10. Paerl
Hans
11. Pfeffer
Max
12. Reed
Denise
13. Rose
Ken
14. Tullos
Desiree
15. Vaux
Henry




The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

1. Phase II Task and Study Schedule
2. Reviewed Report Outline for Final Report in relation to Statement of Task
3. Discussed each Chapter of the report
4. Used meeting time to write in teams on report sections
5. Deliberated and debated conclusions and recommendations
6. Assigned taks to staff and committee members
7. Discussed expected final report relase schedlue

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
December 08, 2011
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Sacramento, CA
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ellen de Guzman
Contact Email:  edeguzma@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1704

Agenda
AGENDA FOR THE FIFTH MEETING OF THE
Committee on Sustainable Water and Environmental Management in the California Bay-Delta
Location: Le Rivage Hotel
4800 Riverside Boulevard. Sacramento, CA 95822 Phone 916.443.8400
Fax: 916.706.3384

Registration for this meeting is closed.

June 1st, 2011

Open Session (Lucca Room)

9:00 am-Welcome and Introduction R. Huggett

9:10 am-Progress on the BDCP and California’s related activities in restoring the Bay-Delta ecosystem; how the NRC committee can “best inform the development of the BDCP,” as required by its statement of task
Gerald Meral, Deputy Secretary, California Resources Agency

9:40 am-EPA’s Water Quality Programs in the Delta
Karen Schwinn, Associate Director, Water Division, EPA Region 9, U.S. EPA

10:25 am-Break

10:40 am-The art and science of integrated water resource planning under uncertainty David H. Blau, Senior Water Resource Planner

11:25 am-Changes in the lower trophic levels of the upper estuary (up to zooplankton) with some links to fish
Wim Kimmerer, San Francisco State University

12:25 pm-Lunch

1:25 pm-Updates on Scientific Activities in the Bay Delta DOI, NOAA, and California agencies

2:25 pm-Open microphone

3:15 pm-Adjourn open session
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. Huggett
2. Anderson
3. Campana
4. Dunne
5. Gilbert
6. Giorgi
7. Klein
8. Miller
9. Monismith
10. Obeysekera
11. Pfeffer
12. Reed
13. Rose
14. Tullos
15. Vaux

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

1. Discussion of Day 1 Open sessions.
2. Review of draft report.
3. Deliberation of findings and recommendations.
4. Make writing assignments and set deadlines.
5. Prepare for next meeting.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ellen de Guzman
Contact Email:  edeguzma@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3422

Agenda
Meeting is closed in its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. Robert Hugget
2. James Anderson
3. Michael Campana
4. Thomas Dunne
5. Jerry Gilbert
6. Albert Giorgi
7. Samuel Luoma
8. Thomas Miller
9. Stephen Monismith
10. Jayantha Obeysekera
11. Hans Paerl
12. Max Pfeffer
13. Denise Reed
14. Kenneth Rose
15. Desiree Tullos
16. Henry Vaux


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

1. Discuss status of panel report.
2. Discuss chapters of committee's final report.
3. Deliberate findings and recommendations.
4. Plan for next meeting.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
April 12, 2011
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Parc55 Wyndham San Francisco Hotel
Union Square
55 Cyril Magnin Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ellen de Guzman
Contact Email:  edguzman@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3422

Agenda
AGENDA
for the meeting of

Committee on Sustainable Water and Environmental Management in the California Bay-Delta and Panel to Review California's Draft Bay Delta Conservation Plan


Meeting Location: Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco Hotel Union Square
55 Cyril Magnin Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

Meeting Date: December 8th, 2010

Open Session
The Embarcadero Room (Level Three) of the Parc 55 Hotel

9.30 a.m. Welcome - Bob Huggett

9:40 - 11:30 The Bay Delta Conservation Plan (BDCP)

9:40 a.m. Opening Remarks - Dan Castleberry, Field Supervisor, Bay-
Delta Fish and Wildlife Office, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

10:00 a.m. Panel Discussion of the BDCP
Federico Barajas, Bureau of Reclamation
Campbell Ingram, The Nature Conservancy
Jerry Johns, California's Department of Water Resources Karla Nemeth, California Natural Resources Agency Roger Patterson, Metropolitan Water District Jason Peltier, Westlands Water District Maria Rae, National Marine Fisheries Service Richard Roos-Collins, American Rivers or National Heritage Institute Carl Wilcox, California's Department of Fish and Game

11:30 a.m. Discussion with members of the Independent Science Board

Noon Break

1:00 - 4:00 Climate Change, Modeling, and Stressors

1:00 p.m. Ecosystem Effects of Changes in the Hydrology and
Hydraulics of the San Francisco Bay-Delta- William Fleenor, Department of Civil and Environment Engineering, UC Davis

1:30 p.m. Review of Stressors on the Delta Ecosystem -Anke Müeller-
Solger, Lead Scientist, Interagency Ecology Program (IEP), Delta Stewardship Council

2:00 p.m. Estimation and simulation of water supply and demands for
water resources planning in the Bay-Delta system- Francis Chung, California Department of Water Resources

2:30 p.m. Break

3:00 p.m. Delta Risk Management Study- Dave Mraz, California
Department of Water Resources

3:30 p.m. Analysis of potential climate change effects for the BDCP -
Armin Munevar, CH2M HILL

4:00 p.m. Open Microphone--Sign up sheet will be available at the
registration desk in the beginning of the open session.

5:00 p.m. Adjourn
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. Huggett
2. Anderson
3. Dunne
4. Gilbert
5. Giorgi
6. Klein
7. Luoma
8. Miller
9. Monismith
10. Obeysekera
11. Paerl
12. Pfeffer
13. Reed
14. Rose
15. Tullos
16. Vaux

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

1. Conflict of interest and bias discussion for new committee members.
2. Discussion of December 8 presentations.
3. Discuss draft report.
4. Make writing assignments and deadlines.
5. Prepare for next meeting.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

1. Robert Pyke, Consulting Engineer. Turtles all the way down. Available online at http://onthepublicrecord.wordpress.com/2010/12/09/turtles-all-the-way-down/#comment-872.
2. Francis Chung. Applied water demands and precipitation.



Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
December 14, 2010
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Sacramento, CA
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ellen de Guzman
Contact Email:  edguzman@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3422

Agenda
AGENDA
Committee on Sustainable Water and Environmental Management
in the California Bay-Delta

Embassy Suites, 100 Capitol Mall
Sacramento, CA 95814

TUESDAY July 13th, 2010

Open Session

9:30 a.m. Welcome R. Huggett, S. Parker

9:45 a.m. Bay Delta Conservation Plan. Presentations by:
Letty Belin, U.S. Department of the Interior
Lester Snow, California Department of Natural Resources
Dan Castleberry, Fish and Wildlife Service

Break

Bay Delta Conservation Plan, continued
Federico Barajas, Bureau of Reclamation
Michael Tucker, National Marine Fisheries Service
Carl Wilcox, California Department of Fish and Game

11.30 a.m. Discussion

12:00 noon Lunch, Terrace 1
Committee, Staff, Invited Speakers

1:00 p.m. “Contaminants in the Delta and their Potential Role in Shaping Biological Communities”
Dr. Michael Johnson, Director, Aquatic Ecosystems Analysis Laboratory
University of California, Davis

1:45 p.m. “Historical Perspective on Human Disturbance in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Ecosystem”
Dr. James Cloern,Senior Research Scientist, U.S. Geological Survey

2:30 p.m. Break

2:45 p.m. “Nutrients and the Food Web”
Dr. Patricia Glibert, Professor, Horn Point Laboratory, University of Maryland

3:30 p.m. “A Summary of Recent Data on Pyrethroids and Other Pesticides in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta”
Dr. Donald Weston, Adjunct Professor, Department of Integrative Biology
University of California, Berkeley

4:15 p.m. Additional Discussion and Open Microphone

5:30 p.m. Adjourn


WEDNESDAY July 14th, 2010

Closed Session-Committee and NRC staff only.

THURSDAY July 15th 2010

Field Trip

Open Session
8:30 a.m. Tracy Fish Facility [Space limited]
Check-in at Reporting Area for security check (bring government-issued ID) and receive safety instructions. Only individuals who have provided security to Ellen de Guzman in advance will be granted access by the facility’s operators.

11:00 a.m. Rio Vista, boat to Cache Slough and Liberty Island [Transportation for the public not guaranteed due to severe space limitations and safety considerations on boat]

3:30 p.m. Delta Cross Channel

4:30 p.m. Depart Delta Cross Channel

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. Huggett
2. Anderson
3. Campana
4. Connolly
5. Dunne
6. Giorgi
7. Klein
8. Luoma
9. Miller
10. Monismith
11. Obeysekera
12. Paerl
13. Pfeffer
14. Reed
15. Rose
16. Tullos

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

1. Debriefing from previous day's public session.
2. Phase II Task and Schedule
3. Initial Report Outline for Final Report
4. Deliberate and debate conclusions and recommendations
5. Planning for next meeting.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
July 20, 2010
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Davis, California
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ellen de Guzman
Contact Email:  edguzman@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202/334-3422

Agenda
Please Register to attend at: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s/218342/6p4v2

NRC Committee on Sustainable Water and Environmental Management in the California Bay-Delta
Meeting 1

AGENDA


**Please note that the order and precise timing of breaks and presentations within the open sessions is subject to change based on presenters’ availabilities and schedule**

SUNDAY, JANUARY 24
Giedt Hall1001
University of California, Davis


Closed Session- Classroom at Giedt Hall, Room 1007
NRC Committee and Staff Only

2:00-4:00 pm


Open Session at Giedt Hall, Room 1001


4:00 pm Welcome, Introduction to the NRC,
The Committee and Its Task S. Parker, R. Huggett

4:10 pm The Honorable Representative Jim Costa

4: 30 pm Jeffrey Mount, Center for Wetland Sciences, U.C. Davis

5:30 pm Adjourn



MONDAY, JANUARY 25
ARC Ballroom
University of California, Davis

Open Session


9:00 am Welcome, introduction to the NRC,
the Committee, and its Task S. Parker, R. Huggett

9:30 am Briefings from DOI and NOAA

• Welcome and Introduction TBD


• Brief Overview of Sacramento San Joaquin Rivers and Delta Ecosystems and CVP–SWP Operations, and Role of Reclamation
and DWR Ron Milligan, Reclamation

• Endangered Species Act Section 7 Process Garwin Yip, NMFS

• Biological Opinions
o FWS Opinion
Delta Smelt status and conceptual model Matt Nobriga, CDFG
Project Effects upon Delta Smelt Mike Chotkowski, Reclamation
FWS RPA and Peer Review Cay Goude, FWS
o NMFS Opinion
Status of species Steve Lindley, NMFS-SWFSC
Approach to consultation Maria Rea , NMFS

12 noon Break

1:00 pm Continue briefings from DOI and NOAA
Consultation background and process,
analytic approach, baseline,
explanation of how effects are discussed by
hydrologic regions, summary of major effects,
and RPA overview and summary of elements Garwin Yip, NMFS

Shasta/Sacramento and American River divisions Bruce Oppenheim, NMFS
East Side/Stanislaus Division Rhonda Reed, NMFS
Delta Division Jeff Stuart, NMFS


o Coordinated Implementation of RPAs Dan Castleberry, FWS, and
Maria Rea, NMFS
o Endangered Species Act Case Law Melanie Rowland, NOAA-GC
o Summary Comments Dan Castleberry, FWS, and Maria Rea, NMFS

Discussion

3:30 pm Open microphone

5:00 pm Adjourn, end open session for the day


TUESDAY, JANUARY 26
ARC Ballroom
University of California, Davis

Open Session

8:30 am Welcome, Introductions S. Parker, R. Huggett
UC Davis Chancellor Linda Katehi

8:45 am Briefings from CA Resources Agency

• Longfin Smelt; Importance of New Tidal Habitat Carl Wilcox
(CA Department of Fish and Game)

• Overview of water supply impacts of the BiOps Jerry Johns (CA Department
o Alternative to the RPAs of Water Resources)
Potential Entrainment Index (PEI) for Delta Smelt
Non-Physical Barrier for San Joaquin River Salmonids
Fall X issues and benefits of New Tidal Habitat

10:15 am Break

10:30 am Continue briefings from CA Resources Agency

• CALFED Science Cliff Dahm (CALFED)
o Ongoing research and science needs
o Delta flows and the new legislation
o Ammonia and other stressors

11:30 am Presentations by outside experts

• Christina Swanson, Executive Director, The Bay Institute

12 noon Break


1 pm Presentations by outside experts (continued)
• Peter B. Moyle, Professor of fish biology, Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology, U.C. Davis
• Rick Deriso, Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (by WebEx)
• Greg Gartrell, Assistant General Manager for Delta Projects, Contra Costa Water District
• David Fullerton, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California
• BJ Miller, Consultant
• Scott Hamilton, Coalition for a Sustainable Delta (invited)

Discussion

4:15pm DeeDee D’Adamo, Senior Policy Adviser for Rep. Dennis Cardoza

4:30 pm Open microphone

6:00 pm Adjourn

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27

Closed Session
NRC Committee and NRC Staff only


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28

Closed Session
NRC Committee and NRC Staff only
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

1. Robert Huggett
2. James Anderson
3. Mike Campana
4. Al Giorgi
5. Pat Glibert
6. Tom Dunner
7. Christine Klein
8. Sam Luoma
9. Mike McGuire
10. Jayantha Obeysekera
11. Kenny Rose
12. Desiree Tullos
13. Max Pfeffer
14. Denise Reed
15. Tom Miller (via skype 1/24/10)

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

1. Bias and Conflict of Interest Discussion
2. Discussion of open session presentations
3. Study schedule and strategy to complete tasks
4. Deliberation of initial conclusions and recommendations for Phase I.
5. Future meetings

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

101. Milligan, Ron. NAS Request: Water Supply Effects. 1/26/2010.
106. Yip, Garwin. Clarification on use of DSM in delta modeling and analysis. 2/04/2010. (pdf and xls).
107. O’Laughlin, Tim. 2/1/2010. Stanislaus River Issues. Memo to the NRC Committee with 7 attachments.
108. Reed, Rhonda. 2/03/2010. Response to OID Testimony of 1-25-10.
112. Ford, Stephen. 1/27/2010. Information on Liberty Island Water Quality and Biological Monitoring Data. (with CD).
113. NMFS. 1/27/2010. Documents from NMFS on:
a. DVD of OCAP Biological Opinion Modeling Runs-2009
b. Economic Feasibility
i. 5/31/2009 Memo from Rhonda Reed on Documentation on the Development of the RPA to Avoid Jeopardy to CV steelhead in the Stanislaus River, Specifically as Relates to Flow and Temperature
ii. 5/2/2009 Memo from Maria Rea on Review of Information Related to Economic and Technological Feasibility of NOAA’s NMFS CVP/SWP Operations RPAs
iii. 4/28/2009 Memo from Katherine Kelly, CDWR to Ronald Milligan, Bureau of Reclamation on additional comments (specifically economic analyses) on NMFS’ draft Salmonid BioOp.
c. Alternative RPA considered but rejected
i. 5/19/2009 email from Rod McInnis, regarding trap and haul for Central Valley steelhead in the SJ River.
ii. 4/21/2005 email from Ron Ott, transmitting the South-Delta Fish Facilities Forum Co-Chair’s Report on the feasibility of fish screens in the South Delta.
115. Pool, R.B. 1/25/2010. Recommended industry actions for rebuilding fall-run. With CD.
116. Hilts’ Response to the “Stanislaus River Hydrology Analysis” submitted to the NAS on behalf of OID, SSJID & SEWD, dated February 18, 2010. This memo was prepared by Derek Hilts of FWS, who worked for NMFS in conducting the modeling for the Stan flow schedule.
120. Year type Inflow & Export Data 100129.xls. Source: Geimer, Teresa, Department of Water Resources, 1/28/2010. Electronic file located in Public Access File Folder.
121. DWR to NRC_Year type Delta Inflow Export Data 100127.xls Source: Geimer, Teresa, Department of Water Resources, 1/28/2010. Electronic file located in Public Access File Folder.
122. Delta Eutrophication Studies.pdf. Source: Thomas E. Lindemuth, President of the Board. Delta Science Center at Big Break
(Numbers correspond to internal study tracking number).



Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
February 08, 2010
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications