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Project Information

Project Information


Stabilization Targets for Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Concentrations


Project Scope:

The stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and the avoidance of serious or irreversible impacts on the earth’s climate system are a matter of critical concern in both scientific and policy arenas.  Using the most current science available, this study will evaluate the implications of different atmospheric concentration target levels and explain the uncertainties inherent in the analyses to assist policy makers as they make decisions about stabilization target levels for atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

 

 This study will:

 

  • Evaluate a range of greenhouse gas stabilization targets and describe the types and scales of impacts likely associated with different ranges, including discussion of the associated uncertainties, timescale of impacts, and potential serious or irreversible impacts.*

  

This study will focus on evaluating the implications of a range of GHG stabilization targets, but it will not involve the committee’s assessment of what stabilization targets are technically feasible nor their normative judgment on what targets are most appropriate.

 

* This study will consider cumulative emissions of the ‘basket’ of gases considered in the Kyoto protocol (CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, SF6).   Any particular overall stabilization target could include varying combinations of emissions targets for the different gases.

 

 

Status: Completed

PIN: DELS-BASC-09-01

Project Duration (months): 13 month(s)

RSO: Elfring, Chris



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 08/28/2009

Susan Solomon - (Chair)
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Dr. Susan Solomon (NAS) is widely recognized as one of the leaders in the field of atmospheric science. Since receiving her Ph.D. degree in chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley in 1981, she has been employed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as a research scientist. She made some of the first measurements in the Antarctic that showed that chlorofluorocarbons were responsible for the stratospheric ozone hole, and she pioneered the theoretical understanding of the surface chemistry that causes it. In March 2000, she received the National Medal of Science, the United States' highest scientific honor, for "key insights in explaining the cause of the Antarctic ozone hole." Her current research focuses on chemistry-climate coupling, and she served as co-chair of the science panel for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (2007) report. Solomon was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1992, and is a foreign member of the Academie des Sciences in France, the European Academy, and the Royal Society.
David S. Battisti
University of Washington

Dr. David Battisti is The Tamaki Endowed Chair of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Washington. Dr. Battisti's research is focused on understanding the natural variability of the climate system. He is especially interested in understanding how the interactions between the ocean, atmosphere, land and sea ice lead to variability in climate on time scales from seasonal to decades. He is also working on the impacts of climate variability and climate change on food production in Mexico, Indonesia and China. Dr. Battisti received a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences (1988) from the University of Washington.


Scott C. Doney
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Dr. Doney is a Senior Scientist in the Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). He graduated with a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Oceanography in 1991 and was a postdoctoral fellow and later a scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, before returning to Woods Hole in 2002. He was awarded the James B. Macelwane Medal from the American Geophysical Union in 2000, a Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow in 2004, and the WHOI W. Van Alan Clark Sr. Chair in 2007. His science interests span oceanography, climate and biogeochemistry. Much of his research focuses on how the global carbon cycle and ocean ecology respond to natural and human-driven climate change, which may act to either damp or accelerate climate trends. A current focus is on ocean acidification due to the invasion into the ocean of carbon dioxide and other chemicals from fossil fuel burning. He is currently the chair of the U.S. Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program and the U.S. Ocean Carbon and Climate Change Program.
Katharine Hayhoe
Texas Tech University

Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist and research associate professor in the Department of Geosciences at Texas Tech University. Her research focuses on quantifying the potential impacts of human activities at the regional scale, including evaluating the ability of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models to simulate real- world phenomena and developing new techniques to generate scientifically robust, high-resolution projections. She is the author of over 40 peer-reviewed publications, several book chapters, and numerous reports, including the U.S. Global Change Research Program's 2009 State of Knowledge report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States."
Isaac M. Held
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Dr. Isaac Held (NAS) majored in physics at the University of Minnesota, continued on in physics to obtain a Masters degree from the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and then started his career of research into climate dynamics at Princeton University, where he received his Ph.D. in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences in 1976. He has spent most of his career at NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, where he is currently a Senior Research Scientist and conducts studies on climate dynamics and climate modeling. He is also a lecturer with rank of Professor at Princeton University, in its Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, and is an Associate Faculty member in Princeton's Applied and Computational Mathematics Program and in the Princeton Environmental Institute. Dr. Held is a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society (1991) and the American Geophysical Union (1995), and a member of the National Academy of Sciences (2003). Governmental Awards include a Department of Commerce Gold Medal (1999) for “world leadership in studies of climate dynamics” and a NOAA Presidential Rank Award (2005). He recently received the AMS Carl Gustav Rossby Gold Medal (2008) for “fundamental insights into the dynamics of the Earth’s climate through studies of idealized models and comprehensive climate simulations”.
Dennis P. Lettenmaier
University of Washington

Dr. Dennis P. Lettenmaier is the Robert and Irene Sylvester Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Washington. Dr. Lettenmaier's interests include hydroclimatology, surface water hydrology, and hydrologic aspects of remote sensing. He was a recipient of ASCE's Huber Research Prize in 1990, the American Geophysical Union Hydrology Section Award in 2000, is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is the author of over 200 journal articles. He is the past Chief Editor of the American Meteorological Society’s Journal of Hydrometeorology, and is President-Elect of the American Geophysical Union Hydrology Section. Dr. Lettenmaier is a member of the NRC Committee on Hydrologic Science, and has served on other NRC committees and panels including the Committee on the National Ecological Observatory Network (2003-2004), the Committee for Earth Science and Applications from Space: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future (2005-2007), and the Committee on Scientific Bases of Colorado River Basin Water Management (2006-2007). Dr. Lettenmaier received his Ph.D. in Civil Engineering (1975) from the University of Washington.


David Lobell
Stanford University

Dr. David Lobell is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in Environmental Earth System Science, and a Center Fellow in Stanford’s Program on Food Security and the Environment. His research focuses on identifying opportunities to raise crop yields in major agricultural regions, with a particular emphasis on adaptation to climate change. His current projects span Africa, South Asia, Mexico, and the United States, and involve a range of tools including remote sensing, GIS, and crop and climate models. Prior to his current appointment, Dr. Lobell was a Senior Research Scholar at FSE from 2008-2009 and a Lawrence Post-doctoral Fellow at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 2005-2007. He received a PhD in Geological and Environmental Sciences from Stanford University in 2005, and a Sc.B. in Applied Mathematics, Magna Cum Laude from Brown University in 2000.
Damon Matthews
Concordia University

Dr. Damon Matthews is Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography Planning and Environment at Concordia University. He obtained a B.Sc. in Environmental Science from Simon Fraser University in 1999, and a Ph.D. in Earth and Ocean Sciences from the University of Victoria in 2004. Prior to joining Concordia University in January 2007, he held a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Calgary, and worked as a post-doctoral researcher at the Carnegie Institution at Stanford. Dr. Matthews currently teaches courses on the climate system, climate change and environmental modelling in the Department of Geography, Planning and Environment at Concordia University. His research is aimed at better understanding the many possible interactions between human activities, natural ecosystems and future climate change, and contributing to the scientific knowledge base required to promote the development of sound national and international climate policy. Dr. Matthews holds several current research grants for projects to investigate the uncertainties associated with current terrestrial carbon sinks in the context of expected future climate changes. He has published a number of research papers in the area of global climate modelling, with particular emphasis on human land-use change and the role of the global carbon cycle in the climate system. In addition, Dr. Matthews is a contributing author to the recent Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which was recognized with the award of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.
Raymond T. Pierrehumbert
The University of Chicago

Dr. Raymond T. Pierrehumbert is the Louis Block Professor in Geophysical Sciences and The College at the University of Chicago, having earlier served on the atmospheric science faculties of MIT and Princeton. As director of the Climate Systems Center, he has worked at bringing modern software design techniques to the problem of climate simulation. He has also collaborated with David Archer on the University of Chicago's global warming curriculum. He was a lead author of the IPCC Third Assessment Report, and a co-author of the National Research Council study on abrupt climate change. He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, and in recognition of his work on climate he has been named Chevalier de l'Ordre des Palmes Academiques by the Republic off France. Dr. Pierrehumbert is writing a book on comparative planetary climate, "Principles of Planetary Climate," to be published by Cambridge University Press. He received his Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Marilyn Raphael
University of California, Los Angeles

Dr. Marilyn Raphael is a Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research interests include, The Santa Ana Winds of California, Global Climate Change and Variability, Climate Modeling, Atmospheric Circulation Dynamics, Southern Hemisphere Atmospheric Circulation and Climate, and Antarctic Sea Ice Variability. Dr. Raphael received her Ph.D. in Geography from The Ohio State University.
Richard Richels
Electric Power Research Institute, Inc.

Dr. Richard Richels is Senior Technical Executive for global climate change research at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in Washington, DC. His current research focus is the economics of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, development and application of integrated assessment models for informing climate change policymaking, and the incorporation of uncertainty into climate-related decision making. Dr. Richels has served on a number of national and international advisory panels, including committees of the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Research Council. Dr. Richels has served as a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Second, Third and Fourth Scientific Assessments, contributing to chapters on mitigation, adaptation and integrated assessment. He also served on the Synthesis Team for the US National Assessment of Climate Change Impacts on the United States, was a lead author for the US Climate Change Science Program Study on Future Emissions and Atmospheric Concentrations and served on the Scientific Steering Committee for the US Carbon Cycle Program. He currently serves on the National Research Council’s Climate Research Committee; the Advisory Committee for Carnegie-Mellon University's Center for Integrated Study of the Human Dimensions of Global Change; and the US Government’s Climate Change Science Program Product Development Advisory Committee. In 2007, he received an Appreciation Award from the US Department of Energy’s Under Secretary of Science recognizing his contributions to the US Climate Science Program and was awarded the Electric Power Research Institute’s Life Time Achievement Award. Dr. Richels received a B.S. degree in Physics from the College of William and Mary in 1968. He was awarded an M.S. degree in 1973 and Ph.D. degree in 1976 from Harvard University's Division of Applied Sciences where he concentrated in Decision Sciences. While at Harvard he was a member of the Energy and Environmental Policy Center. He was coauthor of Buying Greenhouse Insurance (MIT Press) with Alan Manne. He has published numerous papers related to integrated assessment modeling and the economics of climate change policy making.


Terry L. Root
Stanford University

Dr. Terry L. Root is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Environmental Science and Policy in the Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. Dr. Root's work focuses on large-scale ecological questions investigating factors shaping the ranges and abundances of animals, primarily birds. Her small-scale studies have focused on possible mechanisms, such as physiological constraints, that may be helping to generate the observed large-scale patterns. Her work demonstrated that climate and/or vegetation are important factors shaping the ranges and abundances of birds and may help forecast the possible consequences of global warming on animal communities. In 1990, she received the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation and in 1992 was selected as a Pew Scholar in Conservation and the Environment and Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellow in 1999. She received her Bachelors degree in Mathematics and Statistics at the University of New Mexico, her Masters degree in Biology at the University of Colorado in 1982, and her Ph.D. in Biology from Princeton University in 1987. She has served on the National Research Council Committee on Environmental Indicators.

Konrad Steffen
University of Colorado at Boulder

Dr. Konrad Steffen is a professor at the Cooperative Institute for Environmental Research/University of Colorado at Boulder, teaching climatology and remote sensing since 1990. His research involves the study of processes related to climate variability and change, cryospheric interaction in Polar Regions, and sea-level rise based on in-situ measurements, satellite observations, and model approximations. He has lead field expeditions to the Greenland ice sheet and other Arctic regions for thirty-three consecutive years to measure the dynamic response of the ice masses under a warming climate. He is also the Director of the University of Colorado's Cooperative Institute for Environmental Research (CIRES), the largest research unit on the University of Colorado, Boulder campus. He earned his Ph.D. from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich in 1983.
Claudia Tebaldi
Climate Central

Dr. Claudia Tebaldi obtained her Ph.D. in Statistics from Duke University in 1997 and was a postdoc and then a project scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research between 1997 and 2007. From January 2008 she became a research scientist for Climate Central, headquartered in Princeton, NJ, but still working from NCAR. From September 2009 she will continue to work for Climate Central and take up a part time appointment in the Dept. of Statistics at UBC, Vancouver, CA. Her research focuses on the analysis and statistical characterization of climate change projections and their uncertainty, as derived from climate models, especially at the regional scale. She is a contributing author of IPCC AR4, for Chapter 10, Global Climate Projections, and Chapter 11, Regional Climate Projections, by Working Group I and Chapter 2, New Assessment Methods and the Characterization of Future Conditions, by Working Group II.
Gary W. Yohe
Wesleyan University

Dr. Gary W. Yohe is the Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics at Wesleyan University; he has been on the faculty at Wesleyan for more than 30 years. He was educated at the University of Pennsylvania, and received his PhD in Economics from Yale University in 1975. Most of his work has focused attention on the mitigation and adaptation/impacts sides of the climate issue. He is a senior member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Involved with the Panel since the mid 1990’s, he served as a Lead Author for four different chapters in the Third Assessment Report that was published in 2001 and as Convening Lead Author for the last chapter of the contribution of Working Group II to the Fourth Assessment Report. It that Assessment, he also worked with the Core Writing Team to prepare the overall Synthesis Report. Dr. Yohe is also a member of the New York City Panel on Climate Change and the standing Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change of the National Academy of Sciences. He has testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the “Hidden (climate change) Cost of Oil” on March 30, 2006, the Senate Energy Committee on the Stern Review on February 14, 2007, and the Senate Banking Committee on “Material Risk from Climate Change and Climate Policy” on October 31, 2007. In addition to accepting an invitation to join the Adaptation Subcommittee of the Governor’s Steering Committee on Climate Change (CT), he is serving on the Adaptation Panel of the National Academy of Sciences’ initiative on America’s Climate Choices.

Committee Membership Roster Comments

Note: There has been a change in committee membership with the appointment of Dr. Terry Root effective 08/13/2009.
Note: There has been a change in committee membership with the appointment of Dr. Konrad Steffen effective 08/28/2009.

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Shelly Freeland
Contact Email:  sfreeland@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2649

Agenda
This meeting was closed in it's entirety. review and the report dissemination plan
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Susan Solomon

Scott Doney

Katharine Hayhoe

Isaac Held

David Lobell

Koni Steffen

Claudia Tebaldi

Gary Yohe


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Committee discussed response to review and the report dissemination plan.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

none.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 25, 2010
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  -
Contact Email:  -
Contact Phone:  -

Agenda
This meeting was closed in it's entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Susan Solomon
David Battisti
Scott Doney
Katharine Hayhoe
Isaac Held
David Lobell
Damon Matthews
Raymond Pierrehumbert
Marilyn Raphael
Terry Root
Konrad Steffen
Claudia Tebaldi
Gary Yohe

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Draft Report

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

no materials

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
April 01, 2010
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Shelly Freeland
Contact Email:  sfreeland@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2649

Agenda
This meeting was closed in its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Susan Solomon
David Battisti
Katharine Hayhoe
Isaac Held
Dennis Lettenmaier
Damon Matthews
Raymond Pierrehumbert
Marilyn Raphael
Rich Richels
Terry Root
Konrad Steffen


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The committee reviewed the draft report and discussed the steps for going to review.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

NOne.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
March 01, 2010
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Seattle, Washington
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Shelly-Ann Freeland
Contact Email:  sfreeland@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2649

Agenda
OPEN SESSION: 10:00 A.M. – 12:45 P.M.


10:00 a.m. Some thoughts for the report David Battisti


10:45 a.m. Break

11:00 a.m. Impacts Across the Global Scale Nigel Arnell
University of Reading
Teleconference


11:45 A.M. TBA Eric Steig
University of Washington



12:30 p.m. Working Lunch: continued discussion

1:30 P.M. Committee members adjourn to closed session
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Susan Solomon
David Battisti
Isaac Held
Dennis Lettenmaier
David Lobell
Raymond Pierrehumbert
Rich Richels
Terry Root
Konrad Steffen
Claudia Tebaldi
Gary Yohe

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The committee discussed report structure and writing assignments. They developed plans for moving ahead and finishing the draft.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

No written materials passed out

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
January 25, 2010
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

CIRES
Boulder, CO
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Shelly Freeland
Contact Email:  sfreeland@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2649

Agenda
Stabilization Targets for Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Concentrations
Meeting #2 Agenda
November 19, 2009

CIRES (Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences)
University of Colorado, Boulder, Ekeley Hall S274


November 19, 2009 (Fellows’ Conference Room)


OPEN SESSION

Morning Session Expert Presentations (30 min. presentation and 15 min. discussion)
Climate Sensitivity, transient and steady state, earth system sensitivity, how to describe uncertainties, attribution
NOTE: Talk titles are tentative



8:45 A.M. Attribution Issues and Discussion of Uncertainties: Claudia Tebaldi
options and proposed approach for report Climate Central

9:30 A.M. Cumulative Carbon: proposed approach for report Damon Matthews
Concordia University

10:15 A.M. BREAK

10:45 A.M. Stabilization, concentrations, and treatment of uncertainty Reto Knutti
Institute for Atmospheric
and Climate Science, ETH Zurich
Teleconference

11:30 A.M. Earth System Sensitivity and Peak CO2 Frame Ray Pierrehumbert
University of Chicago

12:15 P.M. LUNCH BREAK



Second Session Expert Presentations
Concentrations, Emission RF, Cumulative Carbon, Carbon Feedbacks


1:30 P.M. Carbon Feedbacks/ Ocean impacts including pH, Scott Doney
corals, and related: proposed approach for report WHOI

2:15 P.M. Emissions, concentrations, and related issues Susan Solomon
NOAA

3:00 P.M. BREAK

3:15 P.M. Scenarios and Emissions phaseouts: proposed approach for report Leon Clarke, PNNL
Rich Richels, EPRI

4:45 P.M. Aerosol effects on choices: absorbing and reflecting aerosols, Ray Pierrehumbert
‘buying time or losing time’ with non-CO2 forcing agents University of Chicago


5:15 P.M. Summary and open discussion




Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Susan Solomon
Scott Doney
Katharine Hayhoe
Isaac M. Held
Dennis P. Lettenmaier
Damon Matthews
Raymond Pierrehumbert
Marilyn Raphael
Rich Richels
Konrad Steffen
Claudia Tebaldi


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The committee discussed the organization of the report, including areas to be covered. They developed plans (writing assignments, etc.) for moving ahead with report-writing efforts, and discussed remaining information-gathering needs.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
November 23, 2009
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Ricardo Payne
Contact Email:  rpayne@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-3892

Agenda
Stabilization Targets for
Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Concentrations

Meeting #1 Agenda
September 15-17, 2009

The National Academy of Sciences Building
2100 C St. N.W., Washington, D.C., 20001


Due to limited seating RSVP is required. Please contact Ricardo Payne, rpayne@nas.edu or 202-334-3982

Tuesday September 15, 2009 (NAS Building Room 250)


OPEN SESSION

2:45 P.M. Rationale for Requesting the Study David Tuft
(Program Officer, The Energy Foundation)


Presentations (30 min. with 15 min. for discussion)

3:30 P.M. Food Security David Lobell, Stanford University



5:00 P.M. Adjourn



Wednesday September 16, 2009 (NAS Building Room 250)

OPEN SESSION
8:00 A.M. Continental breakfast

8:30 A.M. Welcome and introductions Susan Solomon
NOAA, Committee Chair

Presentations (30 min. with 15 min. for discussion)


8:45 A.M. Quantifying Rainfall Change Isaac Held
NOAA

9:30 A.M. Ecosystem Impacts Terry Root
Stanford University
via conference call

10:15 A.M. BREAK

10:30 A.M. Health Impacts Jonathan Patz
University of Wisconsin
via video conference

11:15 A.M. Fire / Snowpack Impacts Dan Cayan
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
via video conference

12:00 P.M. LUNCH

1:00 P.M. Water Impacts Dennis Lettenmaier
University of Washington

1:45 P.M. Infrastructure Impacts Katharine Hayhoe
Texas Tech University


2:30 P.M. Impacts Assessment Gary Yohe
Wesleyan University

3:15 P.M. Break

Policy and Agency Presentations and Discussion(30 min.)
3:25 P.M. Presentation from the Hill Bettina Poiriere
Staff Director,
Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works

3:55 P.M. Presentation from EPA Rona Birnbaum (w/ Ben D’Angelo, Jason Samenow)
EPA Climate Change Division

4:25 P.M. Presentation from the Department of State Dan Reifsnyder,
Deputy Assistant Secretary of
State for Environment

4:55 P.M. General Discussion Committee & Staff

5:30 P.M. Adjourns

Thursday September 18, 2009 (NAS Building Room 250)

OPEN SESSION
8:30 A.M. Continental breakfast

9:00 A.M. TER NRC Logistics

9:10 A.M. Sea Ice Marilyn Raphael
UCLA

9:55 A.M. Ice Sheets/Glaciers Konrad Steffen
CIRES

10:40 A.M. Open Session Adjourns


Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Susan Solomon
Katharine Hayhoe
Isaac M. Held
Damon Matthews
Marilyn Raphael
Gary Yohe
Claudia Tebaldi
Dennis Lettenmaier
Konrad Steffen
Rich Richels

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:



The committee discussed the Statement of Task and information gathered from presentations.


The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 24, 2009
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Teleconference
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Shelly Freeland
Contact Email:  sfreeland@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-2649

Agenda
This meeting is closed session in its entirety
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Susan Solomon (Chair)
Scott Doney
Katharine Hayhoe
Isaac Held
Dennis Lettenmaier
David Lobell
Damon Matthews
Raymond Pierrehumbert
Marilyn Raphael
Rich Richels
Claudia Tebaldi

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

General orientation to the National Academies process, discussion of plans for subsequent meetings

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Word document containing basic background information about the National Academies and the 'Stabilization' activity

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
August 28, 2009
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office