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Project Information

Project Information


Addressing the Challenges of Climate Change Through the Behavioral and Social Sciences


Project Scope:

Background:  This activity (with PIN @HDGC-l-08-01-A) was previously approved by GBEC at its February 13, 2008 meeting as a Type 3 workshop activity that would result in an individually-authored summary of the two events.  We are now requesting GBEC's approval to scale up the activity from a type 3 to a Type 2 workshop that would result in a committee-authored report that summarizes the committee's assessment of what transpired at the workshops, but without any concensus views or analysis on the underlying subject matter of the workshops.

An ad hoc committee would plan and convene two public workshops.  The focus would be on two areas about which insufficient attention has been paid to the potential contributions of behavioral and social sciences.  The areas are incentives for mitigation (i.e., behavioral elements in a strategy to curb or reduce unwanted climate change) and facilitating adaptation (i.e., behavioral and social determinants of societal capacity to cope with unwanted climate change).  The workshops and workshop topics will be designed as much as possible to align and seamlessly initegrate this project with the on-going project on America's Climate Choices. 

 

The workshops would demonstrate how behavioral responses can combine with technological and economic strategies to more effectively mitigate the impacts of and reduce vulnerabilities to climate change.  The workshops would lay the foundation for further inquiries and concerted in-depth studies by panels of experts.  The workshops, commissioned papers, and publication of workshop report covering both events are planned over an 18-month period.

 

The workshop on incentives for mitigation will feature invited presentation that would examine selected past and current efforts to induce energy conservation and efficiency to identify the economic and behavioral assumptions underlying the policies.  Discussions would be held to evaluate those assumptions in light of policy results and other evidence, suggest more realistic models of energy-use behavior and ways in which they could lead to more effective policies, and identify opportunities for needed research and strategies for mitigation policy that reflect available knowledge.

 

The invited presentations and discussions at the workshop on facilitating adaptation would address such key topics as:   assessing costs, benefits, and limits to adapting to climate change (e.g., uncertainties; ethical, economic, and institutional issues); identifying key vulnerabilities relevant for prioritizing adaptation planning (i.e., common versus unique needs of different sectors and at different spatial scales; adaptation strategies for different lead times before impacts occur); and defining appropriate roles for local, state, and federal governments and other entities in making investments, meeting needs, and informing adaptation decisions and setting priorities (e.g., decision support).  

This project and the workshop topics will as much as possible be aligned and seamlessly integrated with the on-going project on America's Climate Choices.

 

Status: Current

PIN: DBASSE-CEGIS-09-03

Project Duration (months): 18 month(s)

RSO: Stern, Paul

Topic(s):

Behavioral and Social Sciences
Energy and Energy Conservation
Environment and Environmental Studies


Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 09/30/2009



Dr. Roger E. Kasperson - (Chair)
Clark University

ROGER E. KASPERSON is research professor and distinguished scientist at the George Perkins Marsh Institute at Clark University. He has taught at Clark University, the University of Connecticut, and Michigan State University. His expertise is in risk analysis, global environmental change, and environmental policy. Dr. Kasperson is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Society for Risk Analysis. He has served on numerous committees of the U.S. National Research Council. He chaired the International Geographical Commission on Critical Situations/Regions in Global Environmental Change and has served on EPA’s Science Advisory Board. He now serves on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change Committee of the U.S. National Research Council, is co-chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Change, and is on the Executive Steering Committee of the START Programme of the IGBH. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has authored or co-edited 22 books and monographs and more than 143 articles or chapters in scholarly journals or books and has served on numerous editorial boards for scholarly journals. From 2000 to 2004, Kasperson was Executive Director of the Stockholm Environment Institute in Sweden. He was a coordinating lead author of the vulnerability and synthesis chapters of the Conditions and Trends volume of the Millennium Ecosystems Assessment and a member of the core writing team for the Synthesis of the overall assessment. Kasperson has been honored by the Association of American Geographers for his hazards research and in 2006 he was the recipient of the Distinguished Achievement Award of the Society for Risk Analysis. In 2007, he was appointed as Associate Scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in the United States. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.
Dr. Richard N. Andrews
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

RICHARD N. ANDREWS is a professor of environmental policy in the Department of Public Policy, in the College of Arts and Sciences; the Carolina Environmental Program; and the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering in the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He also holds courtesy appointments in the Kenan Institute for Private Enterprise, the Curriculum in Ecology, and the Departments of City and Regional Planning and Health Policy and Administration. In 2000 he was appointed the first Parr Fellow in Ethics of the UNC Institute for the Arts and Humanities. Andrews directs the National Database on Environmental Management Systems. His research and teaching are on environmental policy in the United States and worldwide, including a recent book on the history of U.S. environmental policy and recent research grants on environmental policy innovations in the United States, the Czech Republic, and Thailand. Beyond the university, he has twice chaired the Section on Societal Impacts of Sciences and Engineering of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and is currently a member of its Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. He has chaired or served on study committees for the National Research Council, the Science Advisory Board of the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Academy of Public Administration, and the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment. He was principal environmental staff member for the 1984 The Future of North Carolina study, which was commissioned by the governor. A member of the UNC faculty since 1981, Andrews served as Chair of the UNC Faculty from 1997 to 2000. Before joining the Carolina faculty in 1981, he taught for nine years at the University of Michigan's School of Natural Resources, and served as a Peace Corps Volunteer and an analyst for the U. S. Office of Management and Budget. He earned his Ph.D. and a professional M.S. degree from UNC’s Department of City and Regional Planning.
Dr. Stewart J. Cohen
University of British Columbia

STEWART J. COHEN is senior researcher with the Adaptation and Impacts Research Division of Environment Canada, and an Adjunct Professor with the Department of Forest Resources Management of the University of British Columbia. Dr. Cohen’s research interests are in climate change impacts and adaptation at the regional scale, and exploring how climate change can affect sustainable development. Recent and ongoing studies include climate change and water management in the Okanagan region of British Columbia, climate change visualization, and methods for incorporating climate change adaptation into municipal planning and forest management. He is currently a member of the advisory committee for the Columbia Basin Trust program, Communities Adapting to Climate Change. Previously, he led the Mackenzie Basin Impact Study, a 7-year effort focused on climate change impacts in the western Canadian Arctic, completed in 1997. His earlier work included research on impacts in the Great Lakes and Saskatchewan River Basins, and advising the Canadian Climate Impacts and Adaptation Research Network (C-CIARN). He has been a Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Third and Fourth Assessment Reports, and the US Climate Change Science Program report, Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States, published in 2009. He will soon be publishing a textbook, Climate Change in the 21st Century, a study guide for promoting interdisciplinary collaboration. Dr. Cohen is a geographer having received his B.Sc., M.Sc. and Ph.D. from McGill University, University of Alberta, and University of Illinois, respectively.
Dr. Thomas Dietz
Michigan State University

THOMAS DIETZ is professor of sociology and of crop and soil sciences, director of the Environmental Science and Policy Program, and assistant vice president for Environmental Research at Michigan State University. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Danforth Fellow, past-president of the Society for Human Ecology and has received the Distinguished Contribution Award from the Section on Environment, Technology and Society of the American Sociological Association and the Sustainability Science Award of the Ecological Society of America. His research interests include the role of deliberation in environmental decision making, the human dimensions of global environmental change and cultural evolution. He holds a B.G.S. from Kent State University and a Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of California, Davis.
Dr. Andrew J. Hoffman
University of Michigan

ANDREW J. HOFFMAN is the Holcim (US) professor of sustainable enterprise; associate professor of management and organizations; associate professor of natural resources; and associate-director of the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise, at the University of Michigan. He studies organizational culture, values, and behavior, with a particular emphasis on corporate strategies for addressing climate change. Previously, he was Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Boston University School of Management; was a Senior Fellow at the Meridian Institute working on promoting discussion among senior industry, government and NGO representatives; and developing a training program for senior chemical industry executives on constructive engagement with external stakeholders. He also served previously as an analyst for the Amoco Oil Company, modeling the expected costs and potential strategies for dealing with the Clean Air Act Amendments and other environmental statutes. Dr. Hoffman has written numerous books and articles about corporate strategies for addressing climate change, and has organized and moderated conferences on Corporate Strategies that Address Climate Change; Reframing the Climate Change Debate; and Senior Level Dialogues on Climate Change Policy; bringing together senior executives from business, government and the environmental community to discuss the scientific, strategic and policy implications of controls on greenhouse gas emissions. He has a Ph.D. (interdepartmental degree) from MIT from the Alfred P. Sloan School of Management and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.


Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz
Yale University

ANTHONY LEISEROWITZ is director of the Yale Project on Climate Change and a research scientist at the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies at Yale University. He is also a principal investigator at the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions at Columbia University. He is an expert on American and international public opinion on global warming, including public perception of climate change risks, support and opposition for climate policies, and willingness to make individual behavioral change. His research investigates the psychological, cultural, political, and geographic factors that drive public environmental perception and behavior. He has conducted survey, experimental, and field research at scales ranging from the global to the local, including international studies, the United States, individual states (Alaska and Florida), municipalities (New York City), and with the Inupiaq Eskimo of Northwest Alaska. He also recently conducted the first empirical assessment of worldwide public values, attitudes, and behaviors regarding global sustainability, including environmental protection, economic growth, and human development. He has served as a consultant to the John F. Kennedy School of Government (Harvard University), the United Nations Development Program, the Gallup World Poll, the Global Roundtable on Climate Change at the Earth Institute (Columbia University), and the World Economic Forum.
Dr. Loren Lutzenhiser
Portland State University

LOREN LUTZENHISER is professor of urban studies and planning at Portland State University. Dr. Lutzenhiser's teaching interests include environmental policy and practice, energy behavior and climate, technological change, urban environmental sustainability, and social research methods. His research focuses on the environmental impacts of socio-technical systems, particularly how urban energy/resource use is linked to global environmental change. Particular studies have considered variations across households in energy consumption practices, how energy-using goods are procured by government agencies, how commercial real estate markets work to develop both poorly-performing and environmentally exceptional buildings, and how the "greening" of business, may be influenced by local sustainability movements and business actors. He recently completed a major study for the California Energy Commission reporting on the behavior of households, businesses and governments in the aftermath of that state's 2001 electricity deregulation crisis. He is currently exploring the relationships between household natural gas, electricity, gasoline, and water usage. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology.
Dr. Susanne C. Moser
Susanne Moser Research & Consulting

SUSANNE C. MOSER is director and principal researcher of Susanne Moser Research and Consulting. Previously, she was a scientist at the Institute for Study of Science and Environment at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. She has also served as staff scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists, a visiting assistant professor at Clark University, and a fellow in the Global Environmental Assessment Project at Harvard University. Her research interests include the impacts of global environmental change, especially in the coastal, public health, and forest sectors; societal responses to environmental hazards in the face of uncertainty; the use of science to support policy and decision making; and the effective communication of climate change to facilitate social change. Her current work focuses on developing adaptation strategies to climate change at local and state levels, identifying ways to promote community resilience, and building decision support systems. She is a fellow of the Aldo Leopold and Donella Meadows Leadership Programs. She received a diploma in applied physical geography from the University of Trier in Germany and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geography from Clark University.
Dr. Gary W. Yohe
Wesleyan University

GARY W. YOHE is John E. Andrus professor of economics and director of the John E. Andrus Public Affairs Center at Wesleyan University. His research focuses on adaptation and the potential damage from global climate change. It examines micro-responses to investigate the degree to which assuming efficient markets biases the estimates of cost and/or limits the range of potential adaptation; estimations of reduced-form cost functions when data are scarce; and the role of uncertainty and the search for robust and/or hedging strategies in formulating policy. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Yale University.


Dr. Michele M. Betsill
Colorado State University

MICHELE M. BETSILL is associate professor of political science at Colorado State University. Previously, she was a post-doctoral fellow with the Global Environmental Assessment project at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, the Colorado State University faculty in residence at the Central and East European Studies Program at the Economics University of Prague, and a visiting scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Her research focuses on global environmental governance, particularly related to the issue of climate change and more specifically the multilevel nature of climate change governance, including levels of political jurisdiction from the local to the global and across the public and private sectors. Her current projects investigate the transnational forms of climate change governance and the politics of carbon markets. She is coauthor of Cities and Climate Change: Urban Sustainability and Global Environmental Governance (Routledge, 2003) and coeditor of NGO Diplomacy: The Influence of Nongovernmental Organizations in International Environmental Negotiations (MIT Press, 2008) and numerous peer-reviewed articles. She received her B.A. from DePauw University, M.A. degrees from the University of Denver and the University of Colorado-Boulder, and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Colorado-Boulder.


Committee Membership Roster Comments

Note (09-30-09) There has been a change in committee membership with the appointment of Michelle Betsill.”

Events



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th Street, NW
Washington D.C. 20001

Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Linda DePugh
Contact Email:  ldepugh@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1273

Agenda





Addressing the Challenges of Climate Change through
the Behavioral and Social Sciences

Workshop #2: Adapting to Climate Change
Thursday, April 8, 2010
Keck Building, Room 101

8:30 am Breakfast Available in Meeting Room

Opening Remarks
- Roger Kasperson, Clark University

9:15 am Overview of the State of the Field
- Addressing Strategic and Integration Challenges of Climate Change Adaptation: Ian Burton, Meteorological Service of Canada/University of Toronto
- Addressing Barriers and Social Challenges of Climate Change Adaptation: Neil Adger, University of East Anglia

10:45 am Break

11:00 am Federal Climate Change Adaptation Planning
- Maria Blair, White House Council on Environmental Quality

11:30 am Adaptation in the America’s Climate Choices Study
- Claudia Mengelt, Panel on Adapting to the Impacts of Climate Change

11:45 am Plenary Discussion

12:30 pm Lunch and Plenary Discussion

1:30 pm Panel Discussion 1: Place-Based Adaptation Cases
- Cynthia Rosenzweig, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies
- JoAnn Carmin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
- Amy Luers, Google
- To Be Determined, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

3:15 pm Break



3:30 pm Panel Discussion 2: Adaptation and Natural Resource Management
- Bonnie McCay, Rutgers University
- Ashwini Chhatre, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
- Helen Ingram, University of California, Irvine
- Kirstin Dow, University of South Carolina

5:15 pm Adjourn


Friday, April 9, 2010

8:30 am Breakfast available in meeting room

Panel Discussion 3: Cross-cutting Issues in Adaptation I
- Kristie Ebi, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
- Jesse Ribot, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (via video conference)
- Neil Leary, Dickinson College
- Adam Henry, West Virginia University

10:45 am Break

11:00 am Panel Discussion 4: Cross-Cutting Issues in Adaptation I
- Howard Kunreuther, University of Pennsylvania
- Gary Yohe, Wesleyan University
- Maria Carmen Lemos, University of Michigan
- Susanne Moser, Susanne Moser Research & Consulting

12:45 pm Lunch and Plenary Discussion

1:30 pm Comments on Key Questions for the Workshop
- Richard Andrews, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
- Stewart Cohen, Environment Canada & University of British Columbia
- Michele Betsill, Colorado State University
- Maria Carmen Lemos, University of Michigan (CHDGC committee member)
- Susanne Moser, Susanne Moser Research & Consulting
- Other comments

2:30 pm Concluding Discussion
- Basic Principles and Insights – Thomas Dietz, Michigan State University
- Next Steps – Roger Kasperson, Clark University, Panel Chair

3:30 pm Adjourn
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2100 C St. NW
Washington D.C.
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Linda DePugh
Contact Email:  ldepugh@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1273

Agenda

Workshop on Addressing the Challenges of Climate Change
Through the Behavioral and Social Sciences

National Research Council
December 3-4, 2009
Members’ Room
National Academy of Sciences
2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington D.C.

This workshop, the first of two sponsored at the National Academies by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, will include four half-day sessions devoted to the following topics of pressing interest:

• Public Understanding of Climate Change
• Opportunities for Climate Change Mitigation by Household Action
• Public Acceptance of Energy Technologies
• Organizational Change and the Greening of Business

Each session will begin with presentations of current knowledge by leading social and behavioral researchers and will proceed to discussions of the practical implications of the knowledge for action by governmental and non-governmental organizations tasked with responding to climate change. It is hoped that the discussions will stimulate participants to undertake future activities, such as new policies, programs, or research activities, to develop and implement insights arising from the workshop.



Panel on Addressing the Challenges of Climate Change
Through the Behavioral and Social Sciences
Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change

Roger E. Kasperson (chair), George Perkins March Institute, Clark University
Richard N. Andrews, Department of Public Policy, University of North Carolina
Michele M. Betsill, Department of Political Science, Colorado State University
Stewart J. Cohen, Department of Forest Resources Management, University of British Columbia
Thomas Dietz, Department of Sociology and Environmental Science and Policy Program, Michigan State University
Andrew J. Hoffman, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan
Anthony Leiserowitz, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University
Loren Lutzenhiser, Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Portland State University
Susanne C. Moser, Susanne Moser Research and Consulting, Santa Cruz, CA
Gary W. Yohe, Department of Economics, Wesleyan University

Paul C. Stern, study director

Session #1 – December 3, 2009
9am – 12:30 pm
Public Understanding of Climate Change

Climate change as a phenomenon has attributes that make it is extremely difficult for non-specialists to understand. For example, although people typically rely on their senses and personal experience to assess conditions in the external environment, these sources are a poor guide to whether the global climate is changing or to the effects of such change. People often apply cognitive short-cuts to make sense of complex topics, but doing this with climate change easily promotes misunderstanding. The short-cut of relying on trusted sources of information is problematic because conflicting information sources claim expertise on climate change. The polarization of U.S. public opinion on climate change can be traced to such social and psychological processes.
This session will present the current state of knowledge about how non-specialists attempt to comprehend climate change and why public opinion has become increasingly polarized, even as scientific opinion has become less so. It will conclude with discussion of what might be done about this situation—in education, in the mass media, and through the communication efforts of the nation’s scientific community.


Welcoming comments, Roger Kasperson, Clark University, Panel Chair

Anthony Leiserowitz, Yale University, Session Moderator

Presentations:
Why is climate change hard to understand? – Susanne Moser, SM Consulting (tentative)

Mental models of climate change – Daniel Read, Yale University

Insights from research on risk perception – Elke Weber, Columbia University (tentative)

The polarization of public opinion – Riley Dunlap, Oklahoma State University

Comment and discussion topics
--Implications for climate change education
--Implications for the mass media
--Implications for scientific communication
Discussants:
Frank Niepold, Climate Program Office, NOAA (invited)
Bud Ward, Yale Forum on Climate Change and the Media
Session #2 – December 3, 2009
1:30 – 5:00 pm
Opportunities for Limiting Climate Change through Household Action

The most commonly proposed strategies for limiting climate change—developing low-carbon energy technologies and creating systems that put a price on greenhouse gas emissions—are likely to take a decade or more to yield appreciable reductions. Changing the adoption and use of existing technology can yield savings much faster if the requisite behavioral changes can be brought about.
This session will focus on the potential in the household sector—direct energy use in homes and non-business travel—which accounts for about 38% of U.S. energy use. It will present new estimates of the technical and reasonably achievable potential in this sector and knowledge about the effectiveness of various strategies for achieving this potential. It will conclude with discussions of attractive policy options for achieving significant emissions reductions from the household sector in a 5-10 year time scale.

Loren Lutzenhiser, Portland State University, Session Moderator

Presentations:
The national potential for emissions reduction from household action – Thomas Dietz, Michigan State University

Achieving the potential for residential energy efficiency – Karen Ehrhardt-Martinez, American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy

Inducing action through social norms – Wesley Schultz, California State University, San Marcos

Interventions in the supply chain for consumer products and services – Charles Wilson, London School of Economics

Comment and discussion topics
--Economic perspectives on household actions
--Policy opportunities and barriers
Discussants:
Jerome Dion, Buildings Technology Program, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy
(Others to be confirmed)
Session #3 – December 4, 2009 – 9:00 am – 12:30 pm
Public Acceptance of Energy Technologies

Many current proposals for limiting climate change depend on the development and expeditions deployment of new low-carbon energy supply technologies and new technologies for energy efficiency. Past and recent experience make clear that public acceptance often slows these processes, sometimes significantly.
This session will present summaries of knowledge about the conditions under which public acceptance issues have and have not significantly slowed implementation of new technologies, particularly energy technologies, and about the effects of different ways of addressing public concerns. Discussion will focus on the implications for the development and deployment of such technologies as wind power, bio-energy technologies, and carbon capture and sequestration. It will surface ideas about how to reconcile pressures for rapid deployment and for well-informed democratic decision making.

Roger Kasperson, Clark University, Session Moderator

Presentations:

Lessons from the past: Governance of emerging energy technologies - Nicholas Pidgeon, University of Cardiff

Lessons from the past: Addressing facility siting controversies - Seth Tuler, Social and Environmental Research Institute

Public acceptance issues with renewable energy: offshore wind power - Jeremy Firestone, University of Delaware

Public acceptance issues with carbon capture and storage – Wändi Bruine de Bruin, Carnegie Mellon University

Comment and discussion topics:
--Implications for managing technology development and introduction
--Implications for reaching carbon reduction goals
--Acceptance issues with other new technologies: bioenergy, geoengineering, etc.
--Can government learn the lessons of past energy technologies?
Discussants:
Robert Marlay, U.S. Climate Change Technology Program
Baruch Fischhoff, Carnegie Mellon University

Session #4 – December 4, 2009 – 1:00 – 5:00 pm
Organizational Change and the Greening of Business

Businesses are major contributors to climate change through their direct use of energy and land and through their effects on the life cycles of goods and services they use, process, and sell. Behavioral evidence shows that significant resistances exist in business organizations to making transitions to “greener” operations that would be economically rational.
This session will begin with presentations on barriers to change in business that have been identified in organizational theory and research and will then move to a discussion of practical knowledge about the greening of business and about barriers to change. It will end with discussions of what businesses, business organizations, and governments can do to facilitate transitions to greener business practices.

Andrew Hoffman, University of Michigan, Session Moderator

Presentations:

Psychological barriers to organizational change – Max Bazerman, Harvard University

Organizational and institutional barriers to change – Royston Greenwood, University of Alberta

Survey results on barriers to change in businesses Clay Nesler, Johnson Controls, Inc.

Roundtable discussion among practitioners:
Andre de Fontaine, Markets & Business Strategy Fellow, Pew Center on Global Climate Change
Melissa Lavinson, PG&E
Meg McDonald, Director, Global Issues, Alcoa
Kevin Leahy, Managing Director, Climate Policy, Duke Energy (invited)
Clay Nesler, Vice President, Global Energy and Sustainability, Johnson Controls, Inc.

Comment:
Policy possibilities for facilitating organizational change - John Dernbach, Widener College of Law




Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th Street, NW
Washington D.C. 20001

Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Linda DePugh
Contact Email:  ldepugh@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1273

Agenda

This meeting was held via conference call and was closed in its entirety.
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Roger Kasperson
Richard Andrews
Stewart Cohen
Thomas Dietz
Andrew Hoffman
Loren Lutzenhiser
Susanne C. Moser
and Gary Yohe were present on the conference call.

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Discussions topics during closed session were: Confidential Conflict of Intrerest Disclosure, Coordination with the America's Climate Choices (ACC) Study, Possible Topics for Workshops, Issues of Balance and Expertise on the Panel, and Template for Proposing Workshop Sessions.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
June 23, 2009


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th Street, NW
Washington D.C. 20001

Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Linda DePugh
Contact Email:  ldepugh@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1273

Agenda

This meeting was conducted via conference call and was closed in its entirety.
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Members present were:Roger Kasperson
Richard Andrews
Thomas Dietz
Gary Yohe
and Anthony Leiserowitz.

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Topics discussed were: Welcome and Discussion of Panel's Task; Background Information and Confidential Conflict of Interest Disclosure; Consideration of Needs for Additional Panel Expertise; and Identifying Key Workshop Planners and Discussion of Time Window for the Mitigation Workshop.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
June 03, 2009

Publications