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Project Information

Project Information


Learning Sciences: Foundations and Applications to Adolescent and Adult Literacy


Project Scope:

In response to a request from the National Institute for Literacy (NIFL), the Center for Education will convene a committee to conduct a study of the scientific foundations of adolescent and adult literacy with implications for policy and practice. In particular, the study will synthesize research-based knowledge on literacy from the multidisciplinary perspectives of education, cognitive and behavioral science, neuroscience, and other relevant disciplines; and will provide a strong empirical foundation for understanding the main factors that affect literacy learning in adolescence and adulthood generally and with respect to the specific populations served by adult education. The committee will develop a conceptual and methodological framework to guide the study and conduct a review of the existing research literature and sources of evidence. The committee's final report will provide a basis for research and practice, laying out the most promising areas for future research while informing curriculum and instruction for current adolescent literacy and adult education practitioners and service providers.

This study will (1) synthesize the behavioral and cognitive sciences, education, and neuroscience research on literacy to understand its applicability to adolescent and adult populations (2) analyze the implications of this research for the instructional practices used to teach reading in adolescent and adult literacy programs and (3) establish a set of recommendations or roadmap for a more systemic approach to subsequent research, practice and policy. The committee will synthesize and integrate new knowledge from the multidisciplinary perspectives of behavioral and cognitive sciences, education, neuroscience, and other related disciplines, with emphasis on potential uses in the research and policy communities. It will provide a broad understanding of the factors that affect typical and atypical literacy learning in adolescence and adulthood generally and with respect to the specific populations served by adult education and such related issues as motivation, retention and prevention.

The following questions will be among those the committee will consider in developing its roadmap for a more systematic approach to subsequent research, practice and policy:

-- Does the available research on learning and instruction apply to the full range of types of learners served by adult education? If not, for what specific populations is research particularly needed? What do we know, for example, about how to deliver reading instruction to students in the lowest achievement levels normally found in Adult Basic Education?
-- What are some of the specific challenges faced by adults who need to learn literacy skills in English when it is their second language? What does the cognitive and learning research suggest about the most effective instructional strategies for these learners?
-- What outcome measures and methods are suggested from research addressing literacy remediation and prevention in both adolescent and adult programs?
-- Where are there gaps in our understanding about what research is needed related to retention and motivation of adult literacy learners?
-- What implications does the research on learning and effective instruction have for remediation and prevention of problems with literacy during middle and/or high school?
-- What is known about teacher characteristics, training and capacity of programs to implement more effective literacy instructional methods?
-- Are there policy strategies that could be implemented to help assure that the evidence base on best practices for learning gets used by programs and teachers?


The project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education.

The approximate start date for the project is September 30, 2008.

A report will be issued at the end of the project in approximately 36 months.

Status: Current

PIN: CFEX-Q-08-03-A

Project Duration (months): 36 month(s)

RSO: Welch-Ross, Melissa

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Center for Education

Topic(s):

Education



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 03/26/2009

Alan M. Lesgold - (Chair)
University of Pittsburgh

Alan Lesgold (Chair) is the Dean of the School of Education at the University of Pittsburgh. Prior to this position, he served as the Executive Associate Director of the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh from 1997 to 2000. Other previous positions at the University of Pittsburgh include Professor of Psychology and Intelligent Systems, Co-Director of the Graduate Program in Intelligent Systems Studies and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and Director of the Learning Skills Research Unit at the Research and Development Center. He holds an honorary doctorate from the Open University of the Netherlands and is a fellow of the APA Divisions of Experimental Psychology, Applied Experimental and Engineering Psychology, and Educational Psychology. He was Secretary/Treasurer of the Cognitive Science Society from 1988 to 1997 and continues to serve on its Board of Governors. In 1995, he was awarded the Educom Medal by Educom and the American Psychological Association for contributions to educational technology. Dr. Lesgold served on two Congressional Office of Technology Assessment advisory panels and was the chair of the Visiting Panel on Research of Educational Testing Service. Dr. Lesgold and colleagues developed a technology of intelligently coached learning-by-doing over the period from 1986 to 1999, with sponsorship by the U. S. Air Force, US WEST, and Intel Corporation. More recently, he and colleagues also developed a technology for supporting rich collaborative engagement of students and professionals with complex issues and complex bodies of knowledge, including professional development for teachers. Dr. Lesgold served as a member on NRC’s Board on Testing and Assessment from 1993 through 1998. He is a National Associate of the National Research Council of the National Academies. The NRC Chair designates individuals for this special honor under guidelines established by the NRC Governing Board. Membership in the Associates is for life, and recognizing past service. He received his Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University in 1971.


Karen S. Cook
Stanford University

Karen Cook is Chair and Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor of Sociology Stanford University and currently is chair of the Faculty Senate at Stanford University. Currently Dr. Cook’s research focuses on social exchange theory and issues of trust in social relations and networks. She has studied power-dependence relations and physician-patient trust, including how interactions between physicians and patients with different racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds can affect health outcomes. She was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (1998-99) and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1996 and the National Academy of Sciences in 2007. Dr. Cook received her Ph. D. in sociology from Stanford University in 1973.
Aydin Durgunoglu
University of Minnesota, Duluth

Aydin Y. Durgunoglu is a Professor and Head of the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota Duluth. Dr. Durgunoglu received her Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology at Purdue University. She conducts research on the literacy development of both adults and children in different linguistic contexts as well as on bilingual cognition. Her work has focused on cross-linguistic transfer and the effects of first languages on second-language learning as well as the information processing of bilinguals related to reading and oral language. She has edited (with L. Verhoeven) a book entitled Literacy
Development in a Multilingual Context: Cross-Cultural Perspectives. Dr. Durgunoglu helped to develop and improve an adult literacy program for the Turkish Mother Child Education Foundation. This program has been implemented in 18 provinces in Turkey and has reached over 60,000 people in the last fifteen years. It has recently won a UNESCO King Sejong Literacy Prize.

Arthur C. Graesser
University of Memphis

Arthur C. Graesser is a Professor of Experimental and Cognitive Psychology, an adjunct professor in Computer Science, and co-Director of the Institute of Intelligent Systems at the University of Memphis. His primary research interests are in cognitive science, discourse processing, and the learning sciences. More specific interests include knowledge representation, question asking and answering, tutoring, text comprehension, inference generation, conversation, reading, education, memory, artificial intelligence, and human-computer interaction. He served as editor of the journal Discourse Processes (1996–2005) and is the current editor of Journal of Educational Psychology. In addition to publishing over 400 articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, he has written two books and edited nine books (one being the Handbook of Discourse Processes). He has designed, developed, and tested cutting-edge software in learning, language, and discourse technologies, including AutoTutor, Coh-Metrix, HURA Advisor, SEEK Web Tutor, MetaTutor, ARIES, Question Understanding Aid (QUAID), QUEST, and Point & Query. Dr. Graesser received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at San Diego.
Steve Graham
Peabody College of Vanderbilt University

Steve Graham is the Currey-Ingram Professor of Special Education and Literacy at Vanderbilt Peabody College. His research interests include learning disabilities, writing instruction and writing development, and the development of self-regulation. Dr. Graham is the editor of Exceptional Children and the former editor of Contemporary Educational Psychology. He is the co-author of the Handbook of Writing Research, Handbook of Learning Disabilities, Writing Better, and Making the Writing Process Work. He is lead author of Writing Next: Effective Strategies to Improve the Writing of Adolescents in Middle and High School, a research-based report for teachers recently commissioned by the Carnegie Corporation of New York. In 2001, he was elected a fellow of the International Academy for Research in Learning Disabilities. He is the recipient of career research awards from the Council for Exceptional Children and Special Education Research Interest Group in the American Educational Research Association. He received an Ed.D. in special education from the University of Kansas.


Noel Gregg
University of Georgia

Noel Gregg is a Distinguished Research Professor at The University of Georgia. She is a faculty member in the Department of Psychology and the Department of Communication Sciences and Special Education, as well as, the Director of the UGA Regents’ Center for Learning Disorders. Her areas of specialization include adolescents and adults with learning disabilities and AD/HD, accommodations, alternative media, assessment, written language disorders, and test validity. She has been a national expert witness for several key legal cases pertaining to accommodating adults with learning disabilities and AD/HD on high-stakes tests. Dr. Gregg has published four books, as well as, numerous scientific articles and book chapters. Her most recent book, Assessing and Accommodating the Adolescent and Adult Populations with Learning Disabilities and AD/HD came out Spring 2009. She received her Ph.D. in communication disorders from Northwestern University, Illinois.
Joyce L. Harris
The University of Texas at Austin

Joyce L. Harris is an associate professor in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department at The University of Texas at Austin. She is the Director of the Language and Cognitive Aging Laboratory. Her current research involves the study of text comprehension in aging, particularly the comprehension of text-based health information. Harris teaches courses in acquired neurogenic language disorders in adults and the sociocultural bases of communication. She is co-editor of and chapter contributor to Literacy in African American Communities (Erlbaum, 2001). Other print scholarship focuses on normal and disordered communicative process across the human lifespan. Harris has served as an Associate Editor for Language for the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Chair of the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing’s Board of Directors, and as a member of the Publication Board of the American Speech- Language- Hearing Association of which she is a Fellow and Life Member. Harris holds a Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology (CC-SLP) from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and received her Ph.D. from The University of Texas at Austin.
Glynda A. Hull
University of California, Berkeley

Glynda Hull is currently a Professor of Education in the Department of Teaching and Learning, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, at New York University. She has spent most of her career at the University of California, Berkeley, as a professor of Language, Literacy, and Culture in the Graduate School of Education. Dr. Hull’s expertise is in adult cognition, learning, education, and adult identity formation. Her work focuses on workplace literacy, adult writing in and out of schools, use of multimedia technologies with at-risk students, and understanding the roles that literacy and new information technologies play in the workplace, particularly for low-income and at-risk populations. She has expertise in the use of qualitative and ethnographic methods. Dr. Hull served on the National Academies’ Committee on Performance Levels for Adult Literacy. Her books include School’s Out! Bridging Out-of-School Literacies with Classroom Practice and Changing Work, Changing Workers: Critical Perspectives on Language, Literacy, and Skills.
Maureen L. Lovett
University of Toronto

Maureen Lovett is a Professor of Paediatrics, Psychology, and Medical Sciences at the University of Toronto and a Senior Scientist for the Neurosciences and Mental Health Program at The Hospital for Sick Children. She is also founder and director of the hospital's Learning Disabilities Research Program (LDRP), a clinical research unit dedicated to developing and evaluating different forms of remediation for children with developmental reading disabilities. Her research program is devoted to the study of reading disorders in children and adolescents, and methods of intervention for their effective remediation. She is recognized internationally for contributions to reading disabilities research and to the development of interventions that address basic learning problems that interfere with the ability to read. She studies individual differences in response to intervention among children with language-based learning disabilities and developmental neurocognitive disorders as well as methodological and training issues in the rehabilitation of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral disorders. Dr. Lovett completed post-doctoral training in neuropsychology at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. She has a Ph.D. in psychology from McGill University.
Daryl F. Mellard
University of Kansas

Daryl F. Mellard is Associate Research Professor in the School of Education and Director of the Division of Adult Studies, Center for Research on Learning, at the University of Kansas. His research focuses on education and employment issues for adults and interventions to improve adult literacy in adult education and other programs such as Job Corps. As co-principal investigator of the National Research Center on Learning Disabilities (NRCLD), Dr. Mellard directed its review of Responsiveness to Intervention, and conducted studies of education, social, and employment issues for adults with disabilities. Dr. Mellard just completed a five-year study funded by the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute for Literacy and the National Institutes of Health to develop, implement, and study the effectiveness of adult literacy interventions for low-literate adults, including the role of decoding, vocabulary, fluency and comprehension instruction and explicitness of instruction. A current IES funded development study focuses on developing literacy skills of Job Corps participants in vocational trades. He has served as a co-chair to the Kansas Coalition on Adult Literacy and Learning Disabilities and on the board of directors for a local independent living center. Dr. Mellard received his Ph.D. in Education from the University of Kansas.


Elizabeth B. Moje
University of Michigan

Elizabeth B. Moje is an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Literacy, Language, and Culture in Educational Studies at the University of Michigan. She also serves as a Faculty Associate in the University’s Institute for Social Research and a Faculty Affiliate in Latino/a Studies. Dr. Moje’s work focuses on adolescents including high school students and the development of literacy skills in disciplines such as social studies and science. She studies the relation between formal and informal literacy experiences, informal reading habits, and engagement in diverse literacy activities. She is an expert on adolescent identities related to literacy and how these develop through participating in literacy practices of homes and communities and in ethnic, popular, and school cultures. Dr. Moje sits on the Carnegie Corporation of New York’s Adolescent Literacy Council and is Research Chair of the National Conference on Research on Language and Literacy (NCRLL). Her books include Reframing Sociocultural Research on Literacy: Identity, Agency, and Power; Constructions of Literacy: Studies of Literacy Teaching and Learning In and Out of Secondary Schools; and All The Stories We Have: Adolescents’ Insights On Literacy And Learning In Secondary School. She is also a co-editor of the Handbook of Reading Research, Volume IV. She received her Ph.D. from the School of Education at Purdue University.
Ken Pugh
Haskins Laboratories

Kenneth Pugh is President and Director of Research at Haskins Laboratories, a Yale University affiliated inter-disciplinary institute, dedicated to the investigation of the biological basis of language and human communication. He also holds an appointment of Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Yale University School of Medicine and is the Director of the NIH-funded Yale Reading Center. His primary research interests are in the areas of cognitive neuroscience and psycholinguistics. He was among the first scientists to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to reveal brain activity associated with reading and reading disabilities. His current research employs combined behavioral and neurobiological measures in the study of typical and atypical reading and language development, with a particular focus on learning and plasticity in disabled readers. Dr. Pugh received his Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from the Ohio State University.


Chris Schatschneider
Florida State University

Chris Schatschneider is Professor in the Department of Psychology at Florida State University. His expertise is in reading early reading development in children and learning disabilities. His research focuses on individual differences in the development of reading and the discovery and measurement of skills needed to acquire reading and that can be used to identify children who are at-risk for reading problems. Dr. Schatschneider completed a post-doctoral fellowship in statistics and research methodology at the University of Houston, and is a leading expert in quantitative methods, statistics, and research design. His interests include multi-level modeling, growth-curve analyses, theory building and testing, intervention design in field settings, and item-response theory. He serves as an Associate Director at the Florida Center for Reading Research at Florida State University and was a member of the National Early Literacy Panel which synthesized scientific research on the development of literacy in children. He earned his Ph.D. in psychology from Case Western Reserve University.
Mark S. Seidenberg
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Mark Seidenberg is the Hilldale Professor and Donald O. Hebb Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin. He is a cognitive psychologist with neuroscience training who studies language and reading, with the goal of understanding how these skills are acquired and used, and the brain circuits that support them. The work involves a combination of behavioral studies, neuroimaging, and computational (connectionist) modeling. His reading research addresses the nature of skilled reading, how children learn to read, dyslexia, and the brain bases of reading, using the tools of modern cognitive neuroscience: behavioral experiments, computational models, and neuroimaging. He has examined educational implications of reading research, how language background affects early school achievement, reading achievement of low-income and minority children, and relations between African American dialect and the language of schooling. He has published over a hundred scientific articles and was recently honored as one of the 250 most-cited researchers in the areas of psychology and psychiatry. He received a Ph.D. in psychology from Columbia University.
Elizabeth A. Stine-Morrow
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Elizabeth A. L. Stine-Morrow is a Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology and a member of Beckman's Human Perception and Performance group at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her research focuses on cognition and the capacity for learning throughout life. Her work builds on past research showing that "mental mechanics" (fluid abilities, working memory capacity, computational speed, effortful processes requiring attention) show age-graded declines in many contexts, whereas crystallized abilities (verbal ability, knowledge, acculturation) show continued capacity for growth. Dr. Stine-Morrow studies the implications of these findings for decline and growth in language comprehension and memory. As part of this work, she has used eye-movement methodologies to examine self-regulated reading in adulthood and has shown how shifts in reading strategies can mitigate declines so as to enable more effective learning throughout the life span. Dr. Stine-Morrow serves as Associate Editor of Memory and Cognition and the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences. She is a Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and Fellow of the American Psychological Association. Her current work on age differences in reading strategies and on health literacy is funded by the NIH National Institute on Aging. Dr. Stine-Morrow received a Ph.D. in general-experimental psychology from Georgia Institute of Technology.

Committee Membership Roster Comments

Dr. Francisco Rivera-Batiz resigned from the Committee in November 2009.

Events



Location:

J. Erik Jonsson Woods Hole Center
314 Quissett Ave.
Woods Hole, Massachusetts
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mary Ann Kasper
Contact Email:  mkasper@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1816

Agenda
This meeting is closed in its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Alan Lesgold
Karen Cook
Aydin Durgunoglu
Arthur Graesser
Steve Graham
Noel Gregg
Joyce Harris
Glynda Hull
Maureen Lovett
Daryl Mellard
Elizabeth Moje
Kenneth Pugh
Chris Schatschneider
Mark Seidenberg (via teleconference)
Elizabeth Stine-Morrow


The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The committee discussed the draft report during the meeting. The first day of the meeting they discussed the chapter on literacy instruction for adults; the executive summary; the conclusions and recommendations; and the chapter summaries. The second day they held an in-depth discussion of each chapter; reviewed the conclusions and recommendations; and reviewed the executive summary.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
September 27, 2010
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mary Ann Kasper
Contact Email:  mkasper@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1816

Agenda
This meeting is closed in its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Alan Lesgold
Aydin Durgunoglu
Arthur Graesser
Steve Graham
Noel Gregg
Joyce Harris
Glynda Hull
Maureen Lovett
Daryl Mellard
Elizabeth Moje
Kenneth Pugh
Chris Schatschneider
Mark Seidenberg
Elizabeth Stine-Morrow

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The committee: reviewed the study timeline and the National Research Council report review process; discussed the draft report outline; reviewed draft sections of the report; discussed commissioned papers relating to adult literacy instruction for diverse groups of adults; deliberated about coverage of assessment and technologies for learning; discussed major findings in each section of the report, identified conclusions, and began discussion of possible recommendations; planned next stage of drafting, and reviewed the work plan and due dates.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
May 25, 2010
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mary Ann Kasper
Contact Email:  mkasper@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1816

Agenda
Committee on Learning Sciences: Foundations and Applications to
Adolescent and Adult Literacy
Agenda, Meeting 3
December 10-11, 2009

National Academy of Sciences
Keck Building, Room 105
Washington, D.C.

Meeting Goals: Gather information from research and practice on factors that affect persistence in adult education and literacy instruction, learning outside of programs, challenges to conducting research, and progress with literacy among English Language Learners.

Day 1: Thursday, December 10

CLOSED SESSION 8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

OPEN SESSION 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

8:30-8:35 Welcome and Introduction to the Day’s Open Sessions
Alan Lesgold, Committee Chair

8:35-11:30 Panel on Persistence, Motivation, and Engagement with Learning
Moderator, Alan Lesgold

Format: 15-minute presentation with 10 min Q&A after each presenter followed by general discussion.
Guiding Questions: 1. What evidence suggests that persistence and motivation are important issues to address through instruction to improve adult literacy? Adolescent literacy?
2. What is known about the conceptual and functional relations among persistence, motivation and engagement?
3. What are the best-established approaches to increasing persistence, motivation, and engagement that hold promise for adolescent and adult literacy instruction, including approaches (e.g., via computer-based tools) that are self-directed? Why do they work (what are the mechanisms)?
4. Where, given current theoretical and empirical work, do you see the most promising approaches for adult literacy learners, but not yet adequate data? Why should these approaches work (what are the mechanisms)? What data are needed?

8:35-9:00 Persistence in Adult Literacy Programs
John Comings, World Education, Inc.

9:00-9:25 Facilitating Optimal Motivation and Psychological Well-being in Adolescent and Adult Learning
Edward Deci, University of Rochester

9:25-9:50 Motivation Issues in the Context of Adult Workplace Training: Implications for Adult Literacy Education
Ruth Kanfer, Georgia Tech

9:50-10:15 Cross-cultural Perspectives on Motivation and Engagement with Adult Literacy Instruction
Dan Wagner, University of Pennsylvania

10:15-10:30 Break

10:30-11:30 Panel discussion with members


11:30-12:00 Adult Literacy Development Outside of Programs and Issues in Conducting Longitudinal Research with Adult Learners
Steve Reder, Portland State University

Format: 30-minute presentation followed by 30 minute discussion
Guiding Questions:
1. What is the best available evidence on the ways, outside of literacy classes, in which adults make gains in literacy?
2. Which approaches show signs of promise for instruction, but do not yet have adequate data? What research is needed?
3. Which populations have been included in this research? What constraints have been observed with serving segments of the population with literacy-improving options outside of programs?

12:00-1:00 Working lunch as discussion continues with Steve Reder

1:00-3:15 Panel on English Language Learners
Alan Lesgold, Moderator

Format: 15-minute presentation with 10 min Q&A after each presenter followed by general discussion.
Guiding Questions:
1. What are the unique social and cultural factors that affect literacy learning for adolescent and adult ELLs?
2. What is the cognitive and neurological context of second language literacy learning in adolescents and adults?
3. What evidence exists on how social and cultural factors interact with cognitive and neurological factors to make it more difficult for adolescents and adults to overcome literacy problems?
4. What are the best-established approaches that hold promise for adolescent and adult literacy instruction for English language learners?
5. Given current theoretical, empirical or field work, what other approaches appear promising but do not yet have adequate data? What research is needed?


1:00-1:25 Literacy Education for Adult English Language Learners: A Perspective on the State of Research and Practice
Heide Wrigley, Literacy Works, Inc.

1:25-1:50 L2 Language and Literacy Instruction: Findings and Implications for Late Adolescent and Adult Learners”
Nonie Lesaux, Harvard University

1:50-2:15 Cognitive and Cognitive Neuroscience Approaches to
Late Second Language Literacy
Judith Kroll, Pennsylvania State University

2:15-3:15 Panel Discussion with Committee Members

3:15-3:30 BREAK

CLOSED SESSION 3:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

DAY 2 Friday, December 11

CLOSED SESSION 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Alan Lesgold
Karen Cook
Aydin Durgunoglu
Arthur Graesser
Steve Graham
Noel Gregg
Joyce Harris
Glynda Hull
Maureen Lovett
Daryl Mellard
Elizabeth Moje
Kenneth Pugh
Chris Schatschneider
Mark Seidenberg (via teleconference)
Elizabeth Stine-Morrow

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

During the closed sessions the committee: discussed the study timeline and work plan; discussed evidence obtained from open-session presentations on persistence, motivation and engagement with learning; assessments of literacy practices and longitudinal methods; and English language learners. Workgroups also discussed research gathered from literatures on neuroscience and cognition, socio-cultural learning practices, reading and writing instruction across the lifespan, adult cognition and learning, principles of learning with implications for adult instruction, assessment (diagnostic, formative, and outcomes), and technology. The committee discussed a working outline for the report, progress on writing assignments, information to gather, and plans for meeting 4.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
December 22, 2009
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mary Ann Kasper
Contact Email:  mkasper@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1816

Agenda
Committee on Learning Sciences: Foundations and Applications to Adolescent and Adult Literacy

Agenda, Meeting 2
September 10-11, 2009

National Academy of Sciences
2100 C Street, NW, Washington, D.C.
RM 250

Meeting Goals: Gather information from cognitive and cognitive neuroscience research related to learning and literacy; Discuss workgroup reports of research being reviewed and potential conclusions; Develop plans for drafting; Evaluate progress toward study charge, continue work on commissioned papers and plans for other information-gathering; Plan meeting 3.

Day 1: Thursday, September 10

CLOSED SESSION 8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

OPEN SESSION 9:00 a.m. - 4:15 p.m.:

9:00-9:05 Welcome and Introduction to the Day’s Open Sessions
Alan Lesgold, Committee Chair

9:05-12:15 Panel on Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience
Moderator, Alan Lesgold

Format: 15-minute presentation with brief Q&A after each presenter, followed by general discussion.

Guiding questions: What neural and cognitive mechanisms are involved in successful reading and writing beyond the word level (e.g., comprehension and composition of various forms of connected text)? What are biological and environmental contributors to reading and writing (instructional, social, cultural, economic, genetic, congenital)? What research on neural and cognitive processes might now or in the future be used to help define and identify types of struggling readers to design more effective and efficient approaches to literacy instruction? How do age-related changes neural and cognitive processes affect learning; in turn, how does learning influence neural and cognitive processes at different ages; what are the implications for how to teach reading and writing to older adolescents and adults? What additional research is needed (hypotheses to test, possible designs, and types of measures or technologies to use or develop)?

9:05-9:30 Developmental and Neuroscience Models of Text Comprehension
Paul van den Broek, University of Leiden

9:30-9:55 Genetic and Environmental Influences on the Development of Reading and Related Cognitive Skills
Elena Grigorenko, Yale University

9:55-10:20 Maturation and Plasticity Changes that Affect Cognition and Learning in the Adult Life-Span
Denise Park, University of Texas at Dallas

10:20-10:35 BREAK

10:35-11:00 The Bi-Lingual Brain: A Developmental Framework for Understanding Neurobiological and Cognitive Substrates of Multiple Language Acquisition and Literacy Skills
Arturo Hernandez, University of Houston

11:00-12:15 Discussion with members, Alan Lesgold, Moderator

12:15-1:00 WORKING LUNCH
Speaker: Ken Pugh, Haskins Laboratories, Committee Member
Neurobiological Markers and Intervention Effects for Readers who Struggle: Implications for Assessment and Instruction
Discussion

1:00-4:15 Assessment: State of the Science and New Directions
Moderator, Alan Lesgold

1:00-1:30 Assessment of Comprehension in Older Struggling Readers
Gloria Waters, Boston University

1:30-2:30 Q&A and Discussion with Committee Members
Public Comment

Guiding Questions: What was the state of research that led to developing the assessment battery; what gaps is the research intended to fill? How do the preliminary findings relate to other published research on the role of oral language in developing written language skills? What challenges have you encountered in collecting these data? What are next steps for developing the battery and hypothesis testing? What are the implications of this work for adult literacy instruction? To what extent are different measures needed in adolescents and adults to track progress in learning to read? How well does this battery of tests correlate with evolving neuroscience-based measures of brain changes associated with reading facility?

2:30-2:45 BREAK

2:45-3:15 Title TBD
John Sabatini, ETS
3:15-4:15 Q&A and Discussion with Committee Members
Public Comment

Guiding Questions: State of assessment and Future Directions. What are current approaches to defining and measuring reading and writing skills in older adolescents and adults from beginning (decoding at the word level) to advanced (e.g., comprehension and composition of various forms of connected text? What are strengths and limitations of these approaches? What should the next generation of adult assessments look like for diagnostic, formative, and evaluation purposes? What domains should be included in the assessments given research findings and societal needs for literacy (education, work, home, health)? What de-contextualized measures and authentic assessments should be included? To what extent can literacy levels be inferred from patterns of competence in jobs or in everyday life requirements?

Guiding Questions: Descriptions of adult learners. What are the best data and other information available to describe the range of adults’ reading and writing needs and difficulties and associated cognitive and behavioral characteristics? What is the best characterization we can produce to date of the adult literacy population? What do we still need to know about the population, and what data should be collected to better describe sub-types of adult learners both for planning instruction and evaluating the effectiveness of instructional approaches?

CLOSED SESSION 4:15 p.m. -8:15 p.m.

DAY 2 Friday, September 11

CLOSED SESSION: 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

4:30 p.m. Adjourn.


Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Alan Lesgold (chair)
Karen Cook
Aydin Durgunoglu
Arthur Graesser
Steve Graham
Noel Gregg
Joyce Harris
Maureen Lovett
Daryl Mellard
Elizabeth Moje
Kenneth Pugh
Francisco Rivera-Batiz (by teleconference)
Chris Schatschneider
Mark Seidenberg
Elizabeth Stine-Morrow

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

During the closed sessions the committee: discussed the study timeline and work plan; discussed evidence obtained from open-session presentations on cognition, neuroscience, and assessment; and discussed literature being reviewed in neuroscience and cognition, socio-cultural practices, reading and writing instruction, cognitive and psychosocial development across the life-span, principles of learning with implications for adult instruction, assessment (diagnostic, formative, and outcomes), and technology. The committee discussed a working outline for the report, writing assignments, and other information to gather through commissioned papers and presentations at the next meeting.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
August 24, 2009
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mary Ann Kasper
Contact Email:  mkasper@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1816

Agenda
Committee on the Learning Sciences:
Foundations and Applications to Adolescent and Adult Literacy
First Meeting
May 21-22, 2009
500 Fifth Street, NW, Room 110
Washington, D.C.

Thursday, May 21

Closed Session

8:30 to 10:30 a.m.

Open Session

10:30 Public Welcome
Michael Feuer, Executive Director, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE), National Research Council (NRC)

Alan Lesgold, Committee Chair

10:45 Sponsor Perspective
Daniel Miller, Acting Director, National Institute for Literacy, U.S. Department of Education

11:15 Discussion of the Charge with the Sponsor
Alan Lesgold, Chair, Moderator

11:45 Continued discussion of sponsor goals. (Lunch will be available in the meeting room)

The Adult Literacy Learner in Context 12:30 to 3:15 p.m.

Guiding questions: What do we know about the population of adult literacy learners, including their literacy goals, needs, and challenges? What are emerging literacy demands? What literacy skills are people expected to have; what do they need to be able to do? What does adult literacy instruction and practitioner preparation look like across diverse delivery settings? What policies affect adult learners? What do policymakers and practitioners most need to know about adult learners from scientific research? What mechanisms exist or could be developed to translate scientific research about adult learners into practice?

Each 20-minute presentation will be followed by 5 minutes of Q&A, with 25 minutes reserved at the end for discussion.
12:30 Adult Literacy in the US: Results of the National Assessment of Adult Literacy, Recent Population Trends, and Implications for Research, Practice, and Policy (tentative title)
Mark Kutner, Vice President, American Institutes of Research
12:55 Reflections on what data imply for policy and practice in adolescent and adult literacy: A market view
T. Scott Murray, President, DataAngel Policy Research, Inc.

1:20 Q&A and Discussion

1: 45 Break

Each 20-minute presentation will be followed by 5 minutes of Q&A, with 45 minutes reserved at the end for discussion

2:00 Adult Literacy Learners: Goals, Challenges, Educational Experiences and Factors that Affect Learners’ Progress (Tentative title)
Alisa Belzer, Associate Professor, Rutgers University

2:25 Adult Basic Education Students and English Language Learner Enrollees: Reading and Instructional Challenges (Tentative title)
John Strucker, World Ed
2:50 Academically Underprepared Adolescents and Adults in Community College Developmental Education and Adult Basic Education Programs
Dolores Perin, Teachers College, Columbia University

3:15 Q&A and Discussion

4:00 Break

Closed Session

4:15 to 8:15 p.m.

Friday, May 22

Closed Session

8:30 to 5:00 p.m.

5:00 p.m. Adjourn
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Alan M. Lesgold (Chair)
Karen Cook
Aydin Y. Durgunoglu
Steve Graham
Noel Gregg
Joyce L. Harris
Glynda Hull
Maureen Lovett
Daryl F. Mellard
Elizabeth B. Moje
Kenneth Pugh
Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz
Chris Schatschneider
Mark S. Seidenberg
Elizabeth A.L. Stine-Morrow

Art Graesser attended portions of the closed meeting via teleconference.



The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Members discussed the charge, including boundaries for the study scope; recent data on adult literacy learners and the areas in which adults most urgently need to develop skills through literacy instruction; the range of factors (e.g., cognitive, neurobiological, social, cultural, motivational, systemic) that affect literacy development, instruction, and progress. They also discussed: major topics to cover in the research review, committee expertise and additional expertise needed in the form of commissioned papers and presentations to the committee; standards of evidence for making claims from research and drawing conclusions from the bodies of literature to be reviewed. In discussing the charge, the committee agreed that systemic issues relating to the delivery of programs though part of the instructional context of the adult learner will receive less emphasis.

The committee identified next steps for information gathering, including topics for possible presentations at subsequent meetings and commissioned papers both to summarize the state of knowledge in central topic areas and to explore innovative concepts and methods in learning research with greatest potential for the adult literacy field. Members also participated in an NRC-required conflict and bias and bias discussion.


The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

Power points, presentation summaries, and publications related to meeting presentations; background readings identified by NRC staff and the study chair, and other materials for background reading and to support discussions, prepared by NRC staff, the study chair and consultants.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
June 02, 2009
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office