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Project Information

Project Information


Early Childhood Mathematics


Project Scope:

CFE will undertake a 18-month study on early childhood mathematics to synthesize and analyze the past twenty years of research on early childhood mathematics from a number of disciplinary fields, draw out the implications for policy and practice affecting young children as they move through the preschool years and begin formal schooling, and provide research-based guidance to increase the numbers of young children, especially vulnerable children, getting off to a strong start in learning mathematics during their first years of schooling. It is designed to capitalize on the research literature in the field and consider its various implications for policymakers, practitioners and parents.

The committee will assemble the pertinent research literature from the multiple disciplines that have focused attention on the teaching and learning of mathematics by young children. They will analyze this literature in order to develop: 1) appropriate mathematics learning objectives for pre-school students; and 2) critical evidence-based insights related to curriculum, instruction, and teacher education for achieving these learning objectives. Finally, they will determine the implications of these findings for policy, practice, parent-child relations, future data collection and further research.

Questions the committee may address include:

-- What does existing research tell us about what preschool children can know about mathematics, and how they develop this knowledge?

-- Learning of which mathematical knowledge, skills and concepts in the preschool years increases the likelihood of successful mathematics learning in school and beyond?

-- What do international comparisons with respect to both preschoolers and primary grades students tell us about the nature of early mathematics learning and prospects for its improvement in the U.S.?

-- What policies and practices best lay the foundation for successful mathematics learning? What approaches in other countries with respect to interventions and ongoing support could usefully be applied here?

-- What can parents, preschool teachers and other adults who interact with young children do to promote their mathematical development?

-- How can we support the mathematical development of preschool teachers so that they will be able to promote young children's mathematical development?

-- How can further research in cognitive development and preschool education be focused to address issues that will lead to improvement in children's mathematical proficiency?

This project is sponsored by the Department of Health and Human Services, the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the National Research Council.

The approximate start date for the project is August 1, 2007.

A report will be issued at the end of the project in approximately 24 months.

Status: Current

PIN: MSEB-Q-05-01-A

Project Duration (months): 24 month(s)

RSO: Woods, Taniesha

Board(s)/Committee(s):

Center for Education

Topic(s):

Education



Geographic Focus:

Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 07/19/2007

Christopher T. Cross - (Chair)
Cross & Joftus, LLC

Christopher T. Cross (Chair) is chairman of Cross & Joftus, LLC, an education-policy consulting firm. He has been a senior fellow with the Center for Education Policy and a Distinguished Senior Fellow with the Education Commission of the States. In addition Mr. Cross serves as a consultant to the Broad Foundation and the C.S. Mott Foundation and is on the board of directors of TeachhFirst. From 1994 to 2002 he served as president and chief executive officer of the Council for Basic Education. Before joining CBE, Mr. Cross served as Director of the Education Initiative of The Business Roundtable and as Assistant Secretary for Educational Research and Improvement in the U.S. Department of Education. Mr. Cross chaired the National Assessment of Title I Independent Review Panel on Evaluation for the U.S. Department of Education from 1995-2001 and the National Research Council Panel on Minority Representation in Special Education from 1997-2002 and was a member of the International Education and Foreign Language project 2006-2007. He has written extensively in the education and public policy areas and has been published in numerous scholarly and technical publications, including Education Week, Kappan, The College Board Review, The Washington Post, the Sacramento Bee and the Los Angeles Times. Mr. Cross has a bachelor's degree from Whittier College and a master's degree in Government from California State University, Los Angeles.


Oscar A. Barbarin, III
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Oscar Barbarin is the L. Richardson and Emily Preyer Bicentennial Distinguished Professor for Strengthening Families in the School of Social Work and a Fellow of the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Barbarin’s work has focused on understanding the roles that families play in preschool child competence, including the links between home and school, the early learning needs of African American children and families, early childhood mental health, ethnic and gender-based achievement gaps, and the factors associated with and outcomes of preschool quality. In addition, Dr. Barbarin conducted a lengthy longitudinal study of child development in South Africa after the end of Apartheid, including publishing a book in 2001, Mandela’s Children: Child development in post-Apartheid South Africa. Currently, he is leading studies targeting the academic needs of boys of color and their families. Dr. Barbarin recently organized and led the International Conference: Developmental Science and Early Schooling, sponsored by the Society for Research in Child Development, the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, and the Foundation for Child Development, which involved presentations and discussion of issues of translating research into practice. Dr. Barbarin received his B.A. from St. Joseph’s Seminary College, a M.A. from New York University in Counseling Psychology, and a M.S. and Ph.D. from Rutgers University in Psychology.
Sybilla Beckmann
University of Georgia

Sybilla Beckmann is a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Georgia. She received her Sc.B. in Mathematics from Brown University, and her Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania. Her mathematics research is focused on algebra/group theory, arithmetic geometry/algebraic number theory, commutative algebra/algebraic geometry, and tilings of the plane. Dr. Beckmann has recently completed the second edition of Mathematics for Elementary Teachers along with an activities guide and instructor resource guide. Her recent work has focused on professional development of preservice and inservice mathematics teachers, including preparing mathematicians to teach math content to teachers and directly leading professional development workshops with teachers of mathematics. Dr. Beckmann was a member of the Curriculum Focal Points writing team conducted by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. In addition, she was a member of an expert panel on mathematics teacher preparation for the National Research Council committee on teacher preparation. Dr. Beckmann also taught a daily class of sixth grade mathematics during the 2004-2005 school year.
Susan Bredekamp
The Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition

Susan Bredekamp is the Director of Research for the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition in Washington, DC. In her current role, Dr. Bredekamp conducts research and develops resources related to the administration of the Child Development Associate National Credentialing System. Previously, during her tenure at the National Association for the Education of Young Children, Dr. Bredekamp developed the accreditation system for early childhood programs and co-authored the initial and revised edition of Developmentally appropriate practice in early childhood programs. Throughout her career, she has focused on promoting the professional development of the early childhood workforce and developing standards for practice, also serving as a consultant to numerous programs and initiatives. Dr. Bredekamp received her B.A. in English, her M.A. in Early Childhood Education, and her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with concentrations in Early Childhood Education and Human Development from the University of Maryland.
Douglas H. Clements
State University of New York at Buffalo

Douglas Clements is a Professor in the Department of Learning and Instruction at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. Dr. Clements has led, participated in, and published books resulting from a number of initiatives aimed at identifying the key standards for early childhood mathematics, including participating in the writing group of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics’ (NCTM) “Curriculum Focal Points” to specify what mathematics should be taught at each grade level. In addition, Dr. Clements originated, led, and chaired a joint initiative between the National Association for the Education of Young Children and the NCTM to produce a joint position statement on the mathematics education of young children. He is also a member of President Bush’s National Math Advisory Panel. Dr. Clements has focused his research and published extensively on early childhood math development, particularly on children’s development of geometry skills and the use of computers in math education. He has also co-authored a number of curriculum products based on his Curriculum Research Framework, including a preschool curriculum, Building Blocks, which includes print, manipulatives, and the Building Blocks software, as well as extensions of that software up through the grades. He has published over 100 refereed research studies, 8 books, 50 chapters, and 250 additional publications. Dr. Clements received a B.A. in Sociology, a M.Ed. in Elementary and Remedial Education, and a Ph.D. in Elementary Education from the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. Dr. Clements also holds permanent certification to teach in the State of New York at the nursery, kindergarten, and first through sixth grade levels.
Karen C. Fuson
Northwestern University

Karen Fuson is Professor Emerita at the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. Dr. Fuson’s recent work has focused on the continued development and revisions of Children’s Math Worlds, a research-based program for students in grades kindergarten through fifth grade developed over 10 years in a wide range of classrooms and now published by Houghton Mifflin as Math Expressions. This research focused on developing a research-based coherent sequence of supportive representations and classroom structures through extensive classroom-based research and using analysis of curricula and strategies from a variety of countries. Dr. Fuson through the years has devoted particular attention to the teaching of math understandings and skills from age 2 to 8 and has also done extended research concerning math learning of Latino and urban children. Dr. Fuson has studied and published widely on children’s development of number concepts and arithmetic operations, word problem solving, as well as on mathematics education pedagogy. Dr. Fuson was a member of the Mathematics Learning Study Committee of the National Research Council at the National Academies of Science from 1999 to 2001. Dr. Fuson received a B.A. in Mathematics from Oberlin College, and a M.A.T. in Mathematics Education and Ph.D. in Teacher Education with emphases in mathematics and psychology from the University of Chicago.
Yolanda Garcia
WestEd

Yolanda Garcia is the Director of the E3 Institute Advancing Excellence in Early Education at WestEd in San Jose, California. In this role, she supervises the Compensation and Retention Encourages Stability (CARES) Program as well as other efforts to improve local early education in a variety of settings and program types through professional development, recruitment, and financial incentives. In addition, she is engaged in research to determine the impact of such programs on child outcomes. Ms. Garcia’s other research interests have been focused on preschool English language learners and language development. Prior to her work at WestEd, she served for 20 years as the Director of the Children’s Services Department of the Office of Education of Santa Clara, California, overseeing services for more than 3000 children in Head Start, state preschool, and other child care programs. Ms. Garcia has served as a fellow with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and a senior program officer for the Charles Mott Foundation focusing on strategies for grant programs on early education and family support. In addition, she was a member of the Head Start Quality and Improvement Panel and the National Academy of Sciences Panel on the Integration of Sciences in Early Childhood Education. Ms. Garcia received her M.A. in Education Administration from San Jose State University, and her M.S. in Social Services Administration with an emphasis in child welfare and public policy from the University of Chicago.
Herbert P. Ginsburg
Columbia University, Teachers College

Herbert P. Ginsburg is the Jacob H. Schiff Foundation Professor of Psychology and Education at Teachers’ College at Columbia University. He is also a Professor in the Department of Mathematics Education and a Fulbright Senior Specialist. Dr. Ginsburg’s research interests have been focused on intellectual development and education, especially among poor and minority children, development of mathematical thinking, mathematics education and assessment, and the professional development of teachers. His current research involves evaluating Big Math for Little Kids, an early childhood mathematics curriculum co-authored by Dr. Ginsburg; examining the use of web-based video vignettes as a professional development tool; and studying computer-guided mathematics assessments for children. He is the author of numerous books, chapters, articles, and reviews, as well as several mathematics textbooks. In addition, Dr. Ginsburg is a co-developer of the Test of Early Mathematics Ability. Dr. Ginsburg received a B.A. from Harvard University in Social Relations and a M.S. and Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Nancy Jordan
University of Delaware

Nancy C. Jordan is Professor of Education at the University of Delaware. Since 1998 she has been principal investigator of an NICHD funded project on children's math difficulties and disabilities. She is the author or co-author of many articles in math learning difficulties and most recently has published articles in Child Development, Journal of Learning Disabilities, Developmental Science, and Journal of Educational Psychology. Her work focuses on early prediction and prevention of math difficulties and connections between math and reading difficulties. Professor Jordan holds a bachelors degree from the University of Iowa, where she was awarded Phi Beta Kappa, and a masters degree from Northwestern University. She received her doctoral degree in education from Harvard University and completed a post-doctoral fellowship from the University of Chicago. Before beginning her doctoral studies, she taught elementary school children with special needs. Dr. Jordan also taught and did clinical work in the Center for Development and Learning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Sharon L. Kagan
Columbia University, Teachers College

Sharon Lynn Kagan is the Marx Professor of Early Childhood and Family Policy, as well as the Co-Director of the National Center for Children and Families, Associate Dean for Policy, and Director of the Office of Policy and Research at Teachers College, Columbia University. In addition, Dr. Kagan is also a Professor Adjunct at the Yale Child Study Center at Yale University. Scholar, policy advisor, and author, Kagan’s career has focused on the application of scientific knowledge to the construction of policies for young children and families. In over 200 publications and 14 books, she has examined the effects of policies and institutions on the development of children aged birth to eight and their families, with particular interest in low-income children, private-public collaboration in service delivery, as well as standards, professional development, organizational change, and family support. Currently, she is currently working with UNICEF on the development, validation, and implementation of early learning standards in forty countries across the globe. Domestically, she is the Chair of the National Task Force on Early Childhood Accountability, the co-author of a recent book on the early childhood teaching workforce, the director of the Policy Matters Project, and a consultant to states and foundations, and political leaders on early childhood pedagogy and practice She has also served in many leadership roles, including President of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, and President of Family Support America, chaired numerous panels and commissions including the National Education Goals Panel work on Readiness. She has been a member of national panels on Head Start and Chapter I, and was a member of the Committee on Early Childhood Pedagogy for the National Research Council. Early in her career, Dr. Kagan was a Head Start teacher and director. Recipient of the nation’s three most prestigious educational awards (the Conant award from the Education Commission of the States, the Distinguished Services award from the Council of Chief State School Officers, and the McGraw Hill prize, Kagan received her B.A. in English with a teaching certificate from the University of Michigan, her Master of Liberal Arts from Johns Hopkins University, and her Ed.D. in Curriculum and Teaching from Columbia University.
Susan C. Levine
The University of Chicago

Susan Levine is a Professor of Psychology and Chair of the Developmental Psychology program at the University of Chicago. Dr. Levine has studied early math and cognitive development beginning in infancy, focusing most recently on the role of math language and gesture inputs by parents and teachers. She was a co-author on the recent book, Quantitative development in infancy and early childhood. Dr. Levine’s work has focused on basic cognitive developmental research to understand the nature of mathematical development in areas such as early numerical development, measurement, mental rotation, and proportional and spatial reasoning. In addition, she has examined the effects of brain injury and stroke on brain and cognitive development. Dr. Levine received her B.S. from Simmons College, and her Ph.D. in Psychology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Kevin F. Miller
University of Michigan

Kevin Miller is a Professor and Co-Chair of the Combined Program in Education and Psychology at the University of Michigan, where he is also Professor in the Educational Studies and Psychology Departments, the Center for Human Growth and Development, and the Center for Chinese Studies. Dr. Miller has conducted extensive cross-cultural research between China and the United States in the areas of cognitive and mathematical development, specifically examining the role of culture, linguistics, and classroom practices in contributing to children’s learning. More recently, he has been studying how video representations of teaching and learning can be used in understanding the relations between teaching and learning, and improving the preparation of prospective teachers. Dr. Miller is Chair of the Mathematics Education Review Panel for the Institute of Education Sciences at the U.S. Department of Education and is a member of the Mathematical Sciences Education Board for the National Research Council. He received his B.A. in Psychology from Haverford College, and his Ph.D. in Child and School Psychology from the University of Minnesota.


Robert Pianta
University of Virginia

Robert Pianta is the Novartis US Foundation Professor of Education and Dean of the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia, as well as a Professor in the Department of Psychology. He also serves as the Director of a National Center for Research in Early Childhood Education and the Center for Advanced Study of Teaching and Learning. Dr. Pianta’s work has focused on the predictors of child outcomes and school readiness, particularly adult-child relationships, and the transition to kindergarten. His recent work has focused on better understanding the nature of teacher-child interactions, classroom quality, and child competence, through standardized observational assessment. Dr. Pianta has also conducted research on professional development, both at the preservice and inservice levels. He has recently begun work to develop a preschool mathematics curriculum, incorporating a web-based teacher support component. Dr. Pianta received a B.S. and a M.A. in Special Education from the University of Connecticut, and a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Pianta began his career as a special education teacher.

Events



Location:

J. Erik Jonsson Woods Hole Center
314 Quissett Ave.
Woods Hole, Massachusetts
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mary Ann Kasper
Contact Email:  mkasper@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1816

Agenda
This meeting is closed in its entirety.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Christopher Cross
Oscar Barbarin
Sybilla Beckmann
Susan Bredekamp
Douglas Clements
Yolanda Garcia
Herbert Ginsburg
Nancy Jordan
Sharon Lynn Kagan
Susan Levine
Kevin Miller
Robert Pianta

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Findings and conclusions; recommendations; key chapters and any revisions; executive summary; sign-off and next steps.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
June 03, 2008
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center
100 Academy Way, Irvine, CA 92617
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mary Ann Kasper
Contact Email:  mkasper@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1816

Agenda
February 25 and 26, 2008

Closed Sessions only.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Christopher Cross
Oscar Barbarin
Sybilla Beckmann
Susan Bredekamp
Douglas Clements
Karen Fuson
Yolanda Garcia
Herbert Ginsburg
Nancy Jordan (morning session February 26)
Susan Levine (February 26 sessions)
Kevin Miller
Robert Pianta (morning session February 25)

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Discussed evidence base for each major topic: teaching and pedagogy, teaching practices and early math learning standards, learning goals and child outcomes, families and young children's acquisition of mathematics knowledge, early cognitive development and individual differences, and neurological development. Discussed and provided feedback on commissioned papers. Discussed conclusions and whether any preliminary recommendations could be drawn from these conclusions. Discussed next steps in writing assignments; and report review process and criteria.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
March 13, 2008
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mary Ann Kasper
Contact Email:  mkasper@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1816

Agenda
THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES
CENTER FOR EDUCATION
COMMITTEE ON EARLY CHILDHOOD MATHEMATICS

Agenda for Second Committee Meeting

The National Academy of Sciences
500 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC 20001
Keck 101

November 30 – December 1, 2007

November 30, 2007

CLOSED SESSION, Keck 101

8:30-11:00


OPEN SESSION, Keck 101

Information Gathering: Early Childhood Curriculum Models

11:00-12:00 The Range of Possibilities in Approaches to Early Childhood Math Education: An Examination of Educational Philosophy, Research, and Pedagogy
Lawrence Schweinhart, High/Scope, President, High/Scope Educational Research Foundation
Linda Bevilacqua, Core Knowledge, President, Core Knowledge Foundation
Toni Bickart, Creative Curriculum, Vice President, Teaching Strategies
* Additional curriculum representatives have been invited as audience participants


CLOSED SESSION, Keck 101

12:00-1:00


OPEN SESSION, Keck 101

Information Gathering: Preparation and Training for the Early Care and Education Workforce

1:00-1:30 Overview Presentation on “The Early Care and Education Teaching Workforce at the Fulcrum: An Agenda for Reform”
Sharon Lynn Kagan, Committee member, Teachers College, Columbia University
1:30-1:50 Committee Questions and Discussion


1:50- 2:10 The cost of professional development for early childhood mathematics educators
Sarah Archibald and Michael Goetz, University of Wisconsin – Madison
2:10-2:40 Committee Questions and Discussion


2:40-3:00 Pre-service, licensure, and accreditation for early childhood mathematics education
Marilou Hyson, National Association for the Education of Young Children and George
Mason University
3:00-3:30 Committee Questions and Discussion

CLOSED SESSION, Keck 101

3:40-5:30

5:30-6:30 Break

6:30-8:30


Saturday, December 1


CLOSED SESSION, Keck 101

8:00-8:15


OPEN SESSION, Keck 101

Information Gathering

8:15-8:50 A Conversation about Moving From Research to Practice: Lessons Learned from Literacy
Catherine Snow, NRC Committee Chair, Harvard Graduate School of Education


8:50-9:20 Parent Involvement and Mathematics Outcomes: Site specific findings from Preschool Curriculum Evaluation Research (PCER)
Prentice Starkey, University of California – Berkeley
9:20-9:50 Discussion of Presentation

CLOSED SESSION, Keck 101

10:00-3:45
NOTE: This meeting is being held to gather information to help the committee conduct its study. This committee will examine the information and material obtained during this, and other public meetings, in an effort to inform its work. Although opinions may be stated and lively discussion may ensue, no conclusions are being drawn at this time; no recommendations will be made. In fact, the committee will deliberate thoroughly before writing its draft report. Moreover, once the draft report is written, it must go through a rigorous review by experts who are anonymous to the committee, and the committee then must respond to this review with appropriate revisions that adequately satisfy the Academy's Report Review committee and the chair of the NRC before it is considered an NRC report. Therefore, observers who draw conclusions about the committee's work based on today's discussions will be doing so prematurely.
Furthermore, individual committee members often engage in discussion and questioning for the specific purpose of probing an issue and sharpening an argument. The comments of any given committee member may not necessarily reflect the position he or she may actually hold on the subject under discussion, to say nothing of that person's future position as it may evolve in the course of the project. Any inferences about an individual's position regarding findings or recommendations in the final report are therefore also premature.
Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Christopher Cross
Oscar Barbarin
Sybilla Beckmann
Susan Bredekamp
Douglas Clements
Karen Fuson
Yolanda Garcia
Herbert Ginsburg
Nancy Jordan
Sharon Lynn Kagan
Susan Levine
Kevin Miller
Robert Pianta

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Identification of information committee may need; agenda items relevant to each working group; update of background information; presentations; draft report; and writing plans for the winter.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
December 12, 2007
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Mary Ann Kasper
Contact Email:  mkasper@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1816

Agenda
Committee on Early Childhood Mathematics Meeting: August 9-10, 2007
National Research Council
Center for Education
500 Fifth Street, NW, Room 201
Washington, DC 20001

AGENDA

Thursday, August 9

BACKGROUND AND SPONSORSHIP OF THE STUDY

10:15-10:30 Welcome and overview

Christopher Cross (Chair), Cross & Joftus, LLC
Patricia Morison, Center for Education

10:30-11:00 Background regarding an NRC study of early childhood mathematics

Kevin Miller (Committee member and MSEB member), University of Michigan

11:00-11:45 Department of Health and Human Services interest and background

12:00-1:00 Working Lunch
Questions from the committee and discussion

1:00-1:30 National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Daniel Berch and James Griffin

1:30-1:45 The Kauffman Foundation

EXPLORING THE LANDSCAPE AND CONTEXT FOR THE STUDY

1:45-2:45 Current Early Childhood Education Context

Steven Barnett, National Institute for Early Education Research, Rutgers University

2:45-3:00 Break

3:00-4:00 Previous National Early Mathematics Initiatives

Doug Clements (Committee member), Department of Learning and Instruction, The State University of New York


Supporting File(s)
-
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Christopher Cross
Oscar Barbarin
Sybilla Beckmann
Susan Bredekamp
Douglas Clements
Karen Fuson
Yolanda Garcia
Herbert Ginsburg
Nancy Jordan
Susan Levine
Kevin Miller
Robert Pianta

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The committee discussed the study charge and background, the committee balance and composition, the major issues for the study, the study timeline and methods, and working groups.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None.

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
August 13, 2007
Publication(s) resulting from the event:

-

Publications

  • Publications having no URL can be seen at the Public Access Records Office