Public Access Records Office
The National Academies
500 5th Street NW
Room KECK 219
Washington, DC 20001
Tel: (202) 334-3543
Email: paro@nas.edu
Project Information

Project Information


Mathematics and Science Partnerships: Helping Partners Understand and Implement Improvements to STEM Education Programs Based on Research and Best Practices


Project Scope:

The Center for Education and the National Science Resources Center will
collaborate to provide a program of workshops that will assist the NSF's
Mathematics/Science Partnership (MSP) awardees, future applicants, and the NSF
and Department of Education staffs in improving K-16 STEM education programs
through the MSP initiative. The content of these workshops will focus on
recent and future reports published by the National Academies that are directly
relevant to the work being conducted by the leaders of the MSP projects.
Participants will have the opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of
research and issues contained in these reports, examine emerging "best
practices" representing effective, evidence-based applications of the research
to K-16 mathematics and science education programs, and apply these findings to
their overall project designs and implementation work. To facilitate a learning
community, the workshops will actively engage participants and model a learning
process for adults.

Two workshops each on two different topics (i.e., a total of four workshops in
two workshop series) will be offered annually for three years. The first
workshop series would be repeated each year for the most recent grantees and
prospective applicants. The topics for the other workshop series would vary
each year and would be open to all MSP grantees and prospective applicants. An
annual series of porceedings with transcript highlighting the discussions and
activities from the two workshop series that year will be made available
electronically to the MSP grantees and the mathematics and science education
communities via the Internet. The reports will provide an overview of the
critical issues raised in the NRC report(s) that form the basis for the
workshops and will present a summary of the implementation strategies and
proposed solutions to problems that emerge from the discussions from all of the
workshops in a given year.

To assess the effectiveness of program activities and their impact on the MSP
projects, the Center and NSRC will develop and undertake ongoing formative and
summative evaluations of this initiative. The evaluation process will be
designed and overseen by a Steering Committee in consultation with an outside
evaluator.

Following the start of the project and the conduct of the initial workshops, it
has been decided that a Proceedings will be issued for each two-workshop series
on the same topic instead of an annual series of committee-authored reports as
originally indicated above. The Proceedings will contain a compilation of
verbatim transcripts of the individually-authored presentations, ensuing
discussion at each workshop, Powerpoint presentations, and various materials
and resources provided to participants. The Proceedings for each two-workshop
series will be listed in the project record when issued.

This project is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Department
of Education. The approximate starting date for this project is October 1,
2002.

Status: Current

PIN: CFEX-Q-02-08-A

Project Duration (months): 36 month(s)

RSO: Labov, Jay


Committee Membership

Committee Post Date: 03/14/2003

Dr. Melvin D. George - (Chair)
University of Missouri-Columbia

Melvin D. George is president emeritus and professor of mathematics emeritus at the University of Missouri and the president emeritus at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota. Dr. George is very active in issues of science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education, primarily at the postsecondary level, and was the chair of a National Science Foundation Committee that produced the report, ?Shaping the Future: New Expectations for Undergraduate Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology.? Dr. George currently serves as a member on DBASSE and the Board for the Center for Education. He previously served on NRC?s Mathematical Sciences Education Board, the Committee on Next Steps in Education Research, Practice, and Progress, and the Committee on Mathematics and Science Education Around the World: Continuing to Learn from TIMSS. He is nominated to serve on this committee because of his expertise in mathematics research, his past experience analyzing TIMSS data. Dr. George has a Ph.D. in mathematics from Princeton University.

Dr. Herbert K. Brunkhorst
California State University, Carson

Herbert Brunkhorst is professor of Science Education and Biology at California State University, San Bernardino, and is currently chair of the Department of Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education in the College of Education, as well as the Department of Biology in the College of Natural Sciences. Dr. Brunkhorst was co-principal investigator of the NSF funded California State University Science Teaching Development Project and served as a senior faculty researcher on a U.S. Department of Education?s Office of Educational Research and Improvement project for improving science and mathematics teacher education. For the past eleven years, Dr. Brunkhorst has served as co-director of the Inland Area Science Project, a regional collaborative professional development program in science for K-12 teachers under the sponsorship of the California Subject Matter Projects. In 2001, Dr. Brunkhorst received the Supervisor of the Year in Science Education Award from the California Science Education Advisory Council/California Science Teachers Association. Currently Dr. Brunkhorst is the president of the Association for the Education of Teachers of Science and a member of the national Council of Scientific Society Presidents. His previous NRC service was as a member of the Committee on Science and Mathematics Teacher Preparation. Dr. Brunkhorst has a Ph.D. with majors in science education and plant physiology from the University of Iowa.

Ms. Mary P. Colvard
Cobleskill-Richmondville High School [Retired]

Mary Colvard is a biology teacher retired from the classroom after 31years. She presently works as a consultant to the New York State Education Department. Her excellence in teaching has been recognized through awards such as the Radioshack National Teacher Award, Access Excellence Award, Science Teachers Association of New York State Fellow, Sigma Xi Outstanding Science Teacher, and NABT Outstanding Biology Teacher in New York State Award, and NABT Excellence in Encouraging Equity Award. Ms. Colvard is a leader in the National Association of Biology Teachers and the Science Teachers Association of New York State and has participated in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute undergraduate grant directors meetings. She is a Cold Spring Harbor Dolan DNA Learning Center Teacher Fellow helping to develop educational materials that support teacher and student use of a new web site. Ms. Colvard recently served on the Committee on Undergraduate Science Education. Ms. Colvard has an M.Ed. in Secondary Biology from the State University of New York at Oneonta.

Dr. Jerry P. Gollub
Haverford College

Jerry P. Gollub is John and Barbara Bush Professor in the Natural Sciences (Physics) at Haverford College. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a recipient of a research award from the American Physical Society. His research focuses on nonlinear and nonequilibrium phenomena, including instabilities and pattern formation in fluids, chaotic dynamics and turbulence, and granular materials. He is coauthor of Chaotic Dynamics: An Introduction, an undergraduate textbook. Since 1981 he has also been affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania, where he is a member of the graduate groups in both physics and mechanical engineering. Dr. Gollub has served as Provost of Haverford College and currently chairs its Physics Department. He has served on the Advisory Board of the National Science Resources Center, curriculum developers for schools, and has been a member of the National Research Council?s (NRC) Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications. He received his Ph.D. in experimental condensed matter physics from Harvard University.

Dr. Susan Hackwood
California Council on Science and Technology

Susan Hackwood is currently Executive Director of the California Council on Science and Technology and Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of California Riverside. Previously she was department head of Device Robotics Technology Research at AT&T Bell Labs, professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California-Santa Barbara, and founder and director of the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Robotic Systems in Microelectronics.

In 1990, Dr. Hackwood became the founding Dean of the Bourns College of Engineering at the University of California, Riverside, where she has overseen the development of all research and teaching aspects of five-degree programs. Dr. Hackwood's current research interests include science and technology policy, distributed asynchronous signal processing and cellular robot systems. Dr. Hackwood has published over 140 technical publications and holds 7 patents. She is a Fellow of the IEEE and the AAAS and holds honorary degrees from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and DeMontfort University, UK. Dr. Hackwood previously served as a member on the NRC?s Committee to Assess the US-Japan Industry and Technology Management Training Program and the Workshop on Japanese Participation in U.S. University Research. Dr. Hackwood received a Ph.D. in Solid State Ionics in 1979 from DeMontfort University, UK.

Mr. Mark L. Kaufman
Technical Education Research Centers

Mark Kaufman is currently co-director of the Center for Education Partnerships and director of the Eisenhower Regional Alliance for Mathematics and Science Education, located at TERC, Inc. in Cambridge, Mass. He is also the Co-Principal Investigator for a Math-Science Partnerships Research, Evaluation and Technical Asssistance design grant and was the Principal Investigator for an NSF grant supporting the development of a technical assistance network among State Systemic Initiatives. In addition, he is the TERC leader for a grant with the Council of Chief State School Officers studying the use of the CCSSO Surveys of Enacted Curriculum for middle school improvement. He serves on the advisory boards for several mathematics, science and technology projects across the northeast region. Prior to coming to TERC, Mr. Kaufman served as a K-12 Director of Curriculum and Instruction, K-8 Superintendent of Schools, Elementary Principal and Teacher. He also served as a member of the NRC?s Continuing to Learn From TIMSS Committee and has presented nationally on using the TIMSS research to support local improvement efforts.

Dr. Susan B. Millar
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Susan Millar serves as a senior scientist at UW-Madison, where she directs the Learning through Evaluation, Assessment and Dissemination (LEAD) Center. The LEAD Center, an organization of some 12 professionals, supports faculty (primarily in the science and engineering fields) engaged in educational reform activities by providing evaluation research. Most of her LEAD Center projects take a systemic approach, entailing diverse factors that affect student learning processes and outcomes, the organizational and cultural factors that influence faculty reform efforts. Her work at the LEAD Center led her to consider how the emerging information technologies can best be used to help SMET faculty education reformers achieve their goals for student learning. This, in turn, led her to accept the role of "Lead Fellow" for the 1999-2000 Institute on Learning Technology, a project of the NISE's College Level One team. Susan currently serves on several national boards, including the Advisory Committee of the Education and Human Resources Directorate of the NSF.
Susan was trained as a cultural anthropologist at Cornell University. In previous positions, she taught with the UW-Madison Women's Studies Program, managed large-scale databases and conducted analysis for the University of Wisconsin System Administration, co-directed the Pew-funded National Study of Master's Degrees, and conducted research as a member of the Center for the Study of Higher Education at Pennsylvania State University.

Dr. Andrew C. Porter
Peabody College of Vanderbilt University

Andrew Porter is professor of Educational Psychology and Director of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has published widely on applied statistics, psychometrics, large-scale evaluations, assessment and accountability, education indicators, and research on teaching. His current work focuses on curriculum policies and their effects on opportunity to learn.
Dr. Porter's research has led to over 140 publications and technical reports. He has served on nine editorial boards of scholarly journals and held numerous offices and committee assignments in professional organizations, including currently President of the American Educational Research Association. He serves on many advisory boards for national research centers and studies, and is a member of the National Academy of Education. Dr. Porter was a member of the NRC?s Committee on Appropriate Uses of Educational Testing and the Board on Testing and Assessment, and he is currently a member of the Board on International Comparative Studies in Education. Dr. Porter has a Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Dr. William T. Trent
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

William Trent is Professor of Educational Policy Analysis at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His principal area of research is the sociology of education, focusing on issues of inequality, race and ethnicity, and gender. He currently serves as a member of the Panel on Racial Dynamics in Colleges and Universities at Stanford University. He has been an expert witness for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People?s Legal Defense and Education Fund and for the courts in litigation involving issues of racial inequality and segregation. Dr. Trent also has been a consultant to the U.S. Department of Education and the North Central Regional Education Laboratory. He was appointed chair of the Educational Testing Service?s Visiting Panel on Research (1995-1997). He is a member of the editorial boards for the American Educational Research Journal, Review of Educational Research, and the Journal of Negro Education. In the past he served as deputy editor for The Sociological Quarterly and Associate Editor of Social Forces. He has published a book and numerous monographs, book chapters, and articles that focus on issues of desegregation, equity in education policy, and education research. Dr. Trent recently served on the Committee on Educational Excellence and Testing Equity and the Board on Testing and Assessment. Dr. Trent has a Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Events



Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry Holmer
Contact Email:  tholmer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1462

Agenda
AGENDA
WORKSHOP ON
?Making the Transition: What Do We Want to Sustain? How Do We Do That??
October 28-30, 2005
National Academy of Sciences Building
2100 C Street, NW Washington, DC

Friday, October 28

1:00 pm Welcome and Introductions
Jay Labov, Senior Advisor for Education and Communications, National Research
Council
Mel George, Chair, NRC Steering Committee

1:30 pm How Can the Research Literature Inform Decisions About What Can
and Should Be Sustained?
Jeanne Century, University of Chicago
Iris Weiss, Horizon Research
Jeanne Century has done extensive research about the sustainability of reform
and will share some of her findings. She will discuss the distinction between
sustainability and maintenance. Iris Weiss has done research with a focus on
MSP projects and will talk about how MSPs might utilize data to make decisions
about what is worth sustaining.
3:00 pm BREAK

3:15 pm What is the Role of Partnerships in Sustainability and How Does
This Apply to MSPs?
Gordon Kingsley, Georgia Institute of Technology
Dr. Kingsley is the PI for an MSP Research, Evaluation and Technical Assistance
project that is designed to improve understandings of how partnerships
influence science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educational
outcomes. He will discuss what he has learned thus far and how this might
affect decisions about sustainability.
4:30 BREAK
4:45 pm Panel Discussion: What Can We Learn from Earlier Systemic
Initiatives?
This panel will be composed of individuals associated with earlier NSF-funded
systemic initiatives, some of whom are also now involved with MSP projects.
Each panelist will discuss how they applied the knowledge they gained from the
earlier initiative to the operation and infrastructure of their MSP or other
current large-scale project.
Madeleine Long, Hunter College
William Badders, Cleveland Public Schools
Vena Long, University of Tennessee
5:45 pm Adjourn and Dinner for All Participants



Saturday, October 29, 2005


7:45 am FULL BREAKFAST

8:30 am THE INTERSECTION OF SUSTAINABLE STEM EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND
NEEDS OF STUDENTS AND THE WORKPLACE IN THE 21ST CENTURY
This session will provide an overview of what workplace skills will be needed
in the 21st century and how this will drive educational needs to meet economic
demands. Will this influence the evolution of reform and the sustainability of
individual projects?
Jo Anne Vasquez, National Science Board
A ?Perfect Storm? in U. S. Science Learning & Competitiveness
Rethinking Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education to Meet the Needs of
Workers and Citizens in the 21st Century

9:30 am BREAK

9:45 am
CONCURRENT SESSIONS I: 21st Century: SUSTAINING WHAT IS NEEDED
Three concurrent sessions will provide facilitated discussions about the
workplace skills, student and workforce diversity, and economic competitiveness
issues during the near- and longer-term future.
Diversity Issues: James Stith, American Institute of Physics
Education and Economic Competitiveness: Marc Tucker, Center for Education and
the Economy
A Practical Framework and Methods for Implementing Higher Ed and Workplace
Goals in MSP Projects: F. Joseph Merlino, La Salle University, The Math Science
Partnership of Greater Philadelphia (MSPGP)
11:45 am MSP TEAMS MEET OVER LUNCH TO SHARE INFORMATION FROM MORNING
CONCURRENT SESSIONS

1:15 pm CONCURRENT SESSIONS II: ANALYSIS OF SUCCESSFUL, SUSTAINABLE
PROGRAMS
Session A: Reeny Davison, ASSET (Achieving Student Success through Excellence
in Teaching) Inc.
Session B: Vena Long, University of Tennessee, ACCLAIM (Appalachian
Collaborative Center for Learning, Assessment, and Instruction in Mathematics)
Session C: Francis Eberle, MMSA (Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance)
Speakers will talk in depth about former NSF-funded projects that have evolved
and have been sustained many years later. What has changed about these
projects and what can be learned from the process of change in sustaining other
projects?
2:45 pm MID-SESSION BREAK FOR ALL SESSIONS

3:00 pm CONCURRENT SESSIONS CONTINUE
3:45 pm FACILITATED PLENARY DISCUSSION AND Q AND A
Mel George, NRC Chair, facilitators and Steering Committee Members
5:00 pm ADJOURN AND DINNER ON YOUR OWN


Sunday, October 30

8:00 am FULL BREAKFAST
Teams meet over breakfast to begin preparing responses to discussion questions.
8:45 am Making the Connections: Implications and Applications for MSP
Projects
Jeanne Century, University of Chicago
Dr. Century will facilitate a discussion that will include workshop
participants and presenters.
10:00 am MSP TEAM MEETINGS TO CONTINUE DISCUSSING THE IMPLICATIONS AND
APPLICATIONS OF RESEARCH TO THEIR MSP PROJECTS, AND FINALIZE RESPONSES TO
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS. FACILITATORS WILL BE AVAILABLE.

The goal of this session will be for each team to decide on three ?actionable?
items for their MSP project. One item should be what they plan to do within the
first six weeks following the workshop, the second should be what they plan to
implement within six months, and the third within 12-18 months. Refreshments
will be available.

10:45 am MSP TEAMS REPORT THEIR GOALS AND COMMENT ON GOALS OF OTHER
PROJECTS

11:15 am COMMITTEE AND PARTICIPANTS? FINAL COMMENTS
12:00 pm ADJOURN (Box lunches)
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry Holmer
Contact Email:  tholmer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1462

Agenda
TENTATIVE AGENDA
WORKSHOP #2 On CHALLENGING COURSES AND CURRICULA
September 25-27, 2005
Keck Center, Washington, DC

Sunday, September 25

1:00 pm Welcome and Introductions

1:30 pm What are the Characteristics of Challenging Courses and
Curricula?
Ruth Parker, CEO Mathematics Education Collaborative (affiliated with Greater
Birmingham MSP)
A group of teachers and principals provide their perspective in a short video.
2:30 pm Review of April Workshop and Discussion Forums on MSPNet
Brian Drayton, MSPnet, Mary Colvard, NRC Steering Committee, Herb Brunkhorst,
NRC Steering Committee
In this session, the goals and objectives for the workshop series will be
reiterated for the benefit of those participants who did not attend the April
workshop and reinforce those goals and objectives for people who did
participate.

3:15 pm BREAK
3:30 pm Concurrent Sessions:
A: Mathematics Deborah Hughes Hallett, Professor, Mathematics, University of
Arizona
B: Science Sharon Sherman, Professor of Science Education, The College of New
Jersey
These facilitated sessions will both extend and focus the general conversation
in the previous session to more specific considerations of what constitutes
challenging courses and curricula in mathematics or science. Discussions will
consider both opportunities and potential impediments for revising courses and
curricula in these disciplines to make them more challenging for all students.
Another objective of these sessions is for participants to begin to focus on
how the development of increasingly sophisticated habits of mind and actions
could be applied to make articulation between pre-college and higher education
more seamless in mathematics and science for all students and the education of
teachers.
4:45 pm MSP teams meet to discuss what they learned in the afternoon
sessions and the potential implications and applications of research to their
MSP projects. Facilitators will be available.

5:30 pm Adjourn and Dinner for All Participants



Monday, September 26


7:45 am Full Breakfast

8:30 am Are There Elements of Professional Development that Enable
Teachers to Offer Challenging Courses? Mark Kaufman, TERC
This session will look at the results of a 10 year study done by Horizon
Research of the LSC program.

10:00 am BREAK

10:15 am
How to Help K-12 and College-Level Teachers/Faculty Design Challenging
Courses, Part I
Barbara Tewksbury, Professor, Geology, Hamilton College

11:45 am Discussion of the morning sessions

12:30 pm Lunch in the Keck Atrium

1:15 pm How to Help K-12 and College-Level Teachers/Faculty Design
Challenging Courses, Part II
Barbara Tewksbury, Professor, Geology, Hamilton College

2:45 pm Break

3:00 pm Concurrent Sessions, Part I: What Changes in Teacher Education
and Professional Development (for both K-12 and Higher Education Faculty) Will
Be Needed to Enable Teachers and Schools to Offer More Challenging Courses and
Curricula?
II-A: Mathematics Patsy Wang-Iverson, Research for Better Schools and Richard
Askey, Professor, Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Using TIMSS Videos to Improve Learning of Mathematics

II-B: Science Terry Favero, Professor, Biology, University of Portland


4:30 pm MSP Teams meet to share information from morning and afternoon
concurrent sessions and to prepare for Tuesday mornings? concurrent sessions.

5:15 pm Adjourn and Dinner on Your Own





Tuesday, September 27

7:45 am Full Breakfast


8:15 am
Concurrent Sessions, Part II: What Changes in Teacher Education and
Professional Development (for both K-12 and Higher Education Faculty) Will Be
Needed to Enable Teachers and Schools to Offer More Challenging Courses and
Curricula?
II-A: Mathematics Patsy Wang-Iverson, Research for Better Schools and Richard
Askey, Professor, Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Using TIMSS Videos to Improve Learning of Mathematics

II-B: Science Terry Favero, Professor, Biology, University of Portland


9:45 am Break


10:00 am
am MSP team meetings to discuss what they learned in Tuesday morning
sessions, the implications and applications of research to their MSP projects,
and finalize responses to discussion questions. Facilitators will be available.

The goal of this session will be for each team to decide on three ?actionable?
items for their MSP project. One item should be what they plan to do within the
first six weeks following the workshop, the second should be what they plan to
implement within six months, and the third within 12-18 months.

11:00am MSP teams report their goals

11:45 am Committee and Participants? Final Comments
Discussion with MSP and MSPNet officials about continuing the conversation with
the MSP community

12:30 pm Adjourn. Meal vouchers available for lunch in the Atrium.




Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry Holmer
Contact Email:  tholmer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1462

Agenda
NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
NATIONAL SCIENCE RESOURCES CENTER

MATH/SCIENCE PARTNERSHIPS WORKSHOP
Focusing on Higher Education in Mathematics and Science Partnerships

The Keck Center, 500 Fifth St., NW, Room 100
Washington, D.C.
June 26-28, 2005

Draft Agenda

June 26-- Sunday

1:00 OPENING REMARKS
Jay Labov, Senior Advisor for Education and Communications, National
Research Council
Melvin George, Chair, NRC Steering Committee
Elizabeth Vander Putten, Program Director, National Science Foundation

OVERVIEW OF THE WORKSHOP

1:30 UNCOOKING THE LAB
Sarah Lauffer, Co-Director, HHMI New Generation Program for Scientific
Teaching, University of Wisconsin-Madison

3:30 BREAK

3:45 ?SCIENTIFIC TEACHING?: BRINGING THE CULTURE AND
APPROACHES OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH TO TEACHING AND
LEARNING
Amy Chang, Director, Education Programs, American Society for Microbiology
Jim Gentile, President, Research Corporation
Sarah Lauffer, Co-Director, HHMI New Generation Program for Scientific
Teaching, University of Wisconsin-Madison

5:15 MSP TEAMS MEET WITH FACILITATORS

6:00 Adjourn for the Day and Shuttle Bus to Holiday Inn Central and
15ria Restaurant

6:15 CASH BAR RECEPTION

6:45 WORKING DINNER FOR ALL PARTICIPANTS AT 15 ria







June 27 -- Monday

7:45 FULL BREAKFAST

8:15 FACILITATED DISCUSSION: WHERE HAVE WE BEEN IN IMPROVING
UNDERGRADUATE STEM EDUCATION: WHERE DO WE STILL NEED TO GO?
Melvin George, President Emeritus, University of Missouri, and St. Olaf
College
Brad Kincaid, Professor, Biology, Mesa Community College
Jim Gentile, President, Research Corporation
Amy Chang, Director, Education Programs, American Society for
Microbiology


10:00 BREAK

10:15 FACILITATED DISCUSSION: FINDING COMMON GROUND BETWEEN IHE AND K-12
EDUCATORS: EXAMPLES OF IMPLEMENTATION
Jerry Gollub, (Member, National Academy of Sciences) Professor,
Physics, Haverford College
Stephen Pruitt, Education Program Specialist, Georgia
Department of Education
Dorothy Zinsmeister, Associate Project Director, University
System of Georgia
Alexander Norquist, Assistant Professor, Chemistry, Haverford
College
Gail Fairchild, Mathematics Teacher, Academy Park High School,
Pennsylvania

11:45 LUNCH
Each participant will receive a voucher for lunch in the Atrium cafeteria.

1:15 CONCURRENT STRANDS ON DESIGNING EFFECTIVE COURSES, ACTIVE LEARNING,
AND ASSESSING STUDENT LEARNING
(Refreshments for Breaks will be available outside Room 100 as needed)

? A Practical Goals-based Strategy for Designing Effective and
Innovative Courses
Robert Beichner, Alumni Distinguished Professor of Physics, North Carolina
State University

? Active Learning: From Brain to Practice
Robin Wright, Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs, University
of Minnesota

? Assessment of Student Learning: What Kind of Data Are You Getting?
Karen Oates, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Harrisburg
University of Science and Technology


4:15 MSP TEAMS MEET
Each member of the team shares what s/he experienced during the Monday
afternoon sessions and how this information and perspectives might be
applicable to their MSP projects.

5:00 Adjourn ? Dinner on Your Own

June 28 -- Tuesday

8:00 FULL BREAKFAST ?

8:30 FOSTERING QUALITY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: LESSON STUDY AS A WAY
OF CULTIVATING COLLABORATIONS BETWEEN K-12 AND HIGHER EDUCATION
Emily Borda, Assistant Professor, Chemistry , Western Washington
University
Benjamin Fackler-Adams, Chair, Physical Sciences Department, Skagit
Valley College
Don Shepherd, Science Teacher, Sehome High School, Washington

10:15 BREAK

10:30 TEAMS MEET TO DISCUSS WORKSHOP QUESTIONS, APPLY WHAT THEY HAVE
LEARNED TO THEIR OWN PROJECTS, AND DRAFT A FRAMEWORK OF ACTION.
Teams plan next steps in involving more higher education STEM faculty in MSP
activities.

11:15 MSP TEAMS REPORT THEIR PLANS TO SHARE WITH THE GROUP

12:00 Committee Reflections and Participant Discussion

12:30 Lunch and Adjourn



Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry K. Holmer
Contact Email:  tholmer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1462

Agenda
TENTATIVE AGENDA
WORKSHOP #1 ON CHALLENGING COURSES AND CURRICULA
April 17-19, 2005
Keck Center, Washington, DC

Sunday, April 17

1:00 pm Welcome and Opening Remarks
Jay Labov, National Research Council

Overview of the Workshop
NRC Committee Member (Herb Brunkhorst?)

1:30 pm Can We Recognize a Challenging Course or Curriculum When We See
One?
Iris Weiss, Horizon Research Inc.
Iris Weiss will discuss her paper posted recently on MSPNet about the
characteristics of challenging courses and curricula (available at
http://hub.mspnet.org/media/data/MSP_CCC_Framing.pdf?media_000000001275.pdf)
(see http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/11111 ).

2:00 pm (continued)
Can We Recognize a Challenging Course or Curriculum When We See One?
Mary Colvard, NRC Committee
Participants will view some video examples of different courses and participate
in a facilitated discussion. The facilitator will help participants ?unpack?
what they consider to be characteristics of challenging courses and curricula.
How do these characteristics fit with the previous discussion? (A break will be
called during this time.)

3:45 pm Perceptions of Challenging Courses and Curricula from the
Perspectives of K-12 and Higher Education Partners
David Conley, University of Oregon
The purpose of this facilitated session is to allow participants from K-12 and
from higher education to articulate more clearly how they characterize
?challenging? from their perspectives. The two sectors will meet separately and
see if they can reach some consensus about the five most important descriptors
for what constitutes ?challenging? as the term relates to courses, curricula,
and learning outcomes for all students. The two groups will then reconvene,
report out, and engage in a facilitated discussion about their ideas. The
conversation that emerges from this discussion also will serve as a basis for
the next day?s activities.

5:30 pm Adjourn for the day and dinner for all participants

6:30 pm Meeting for Committee members, Monday/Tuesday speakers, staff.








Monday, April 18

7:45 am Full Breakfast

8:30 am What are the Implications and Applications of Research on
Learning on Making Courses and Curricula Challenging?
Joyce Van Tassel-Baska, College of William and Mary
This session will focus on the implications and applications of the findings in
How People Learn as they apply to designing challenging courses and curricula.
In addition, participants may explore some of the research in the area of
gifted and talented students and the design of courses and curricula.

10:00 am Break

10:15 am What are the Implications and Applications of Research on
Assessment of Learning and Pedagogy/Instruction in Making Courses and Curricula
Challenging?
Participants will be engaged in two concurrent sessions: one focusing on the
applications of the research on assessment of learning to the issue of making
courses and curricula challenging, and the other session focusing on
applications of research on pedagogy and instruction. Participants will be able
to participate in one or the other, with the recommendation that teams split
up.

11:45 am MSP teams meet over lunch to discuss what they learned in the
morning sessions and the implications and applications of research to their MSP
projects.
We will distribute meal vouchers so that participants can get their lunch and
then adjourn to the 3rd floor atrium, the 10th floor outdoor patio, or reserved
breakout rooms for discussions among themselves. Teams can request a
facilitator to join them if they so desire.

1:15 pm Concurrent Sessions
Participants may choose from three concurrent, interactive sessions with
facilitators that will focus on learning, assessment, and pedagogy/instruction,
respectively. The task for each session will be to think about the
characteristics that make a course, curriculum, or program ?challenging? as
discussed at the end of Sunday afternoon. Participants in each session will
think about how the habits of mind and action can be translated into learning
goals, appropriate assessments, and effective instruction for both K-12 and
higher education faculty (both pre- and inservice). How can such habits of mind
and action be woven into an educational framework that allows students to
become increasingly mature in these attributes as they advance through the
educational system?

The goal for each concurrent session will be for participants to develop the
beginnings of a framework that will help their MSPs, and the larger MSP
community, think more deeply about these habits of mind and action as they
attend to developing specific courses or programs for their projects. The
products that emerge from these sessions and the ones that follow on Tuesday
morning will be posted on MSPNet and serve as the basis for further comment and
refinement by the larger MSP community.

4:30 pm Adjourn for the evening. Dinner on your own.



Tuesday, April 19

8:00 am Full Breakfast

8:45 am Reporting Out from Concurrent Sessions and Group Discussion

9:45 am Break

10:00 am Groups in Monday?s Concurrent Sessions reconvene to refine
their draft frameworks
The purpose of this session will be to use the feedback in the reporting out
session to further revise or refine the frameworks that they developed. Working
groups also will begin to suggest ways of applying the frameworks to MSP
subject areas (mathematics and science). These final products will be made
available to all participants following the workshop and, in cooperation with
the leaders of MSPNet, posted for further comment and refinement by the MSP
community. They also will serve as the starting point for work at the September
workshop.

11:15 am Break

11:30 am Next Steps ? Discussion with Leaders of MSPNet About the
Comment and Discussion Phase of this Project

12:00 pm Final Thoughts and Comments
Committee members and participants offer final ideas and comments for inclusion
in the workshop Proceedings

12:30 pm Adjourn ? Lunch vouchers available





April through August: In collaboration with MSPNet, comment and refinement of
the frameworks developed at the April workshop will be solicited from the MSP
community. The discussion forums will be closed by the end of August so that
comments can be collated, analyzed, and synthesized for use during the
September workshop.
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry Holmer
Contact Email:  tholmer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1462

Agenda
NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
NATIONAL SCIENCE RESOURCES CENTER

MATH/SCIENCE PARTNERSHIPS WORKSHOP
TEACHER EDUCATION FOR EFFECTIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING

The Keck Center, 500 Fifth St., NW, Room 100
Washington, D.C.
October 30-November 1, 2004

AGENDA
[Return to Introductory Letter]
Oct. 30 (Saturday)

1:00 Opening Remarks
Martin Orland, Director, Center for Education
Jay Labov, National Research Council (NRC)
David Marsland, National Science Resources Center
Melvin George, Chair, NRC Steering Committee
Elizabeth VanderPutten, National Science Foundation

Overview of the Workshop

1:30 Teacher Learning and Teacher Education: Insights from Research
Hilda Borko, Professor of Education, University of Colorado,
Boulder

3:30 BREAK

3:45 Using Video Cases as Opportunities to Improve the Teaching and
Learning of Content
Nanette Seago, WestEd, Project Director, Professional Development in
Mathematics through Videocases

5:30 MSP Teams Meet with Facilitators

5:30 Feedback Panel Meets

6:15 Dinner for all participants in the Keck Center Atrium




Oct. 31 (Sunday)

8:00 Full Breakfast

8:30 From Case Studies to Content Leadership: A Vision for Teaching and
Learning in Classrooms
Katherine Merseth, Director of Teacher Education, Harvard University and Senior
Lecturer at the Graduate School of Education

10:00 BREAK

10:15 From Case Studies? continues
Lucy Michal, MSP Director of Mathematics and Science, El Paso Collaborative for
Academic Excellence, University of Texas, El Paso

11:45 MSP Teams Meet with Facilitators

12:30 LUNCH

1:30 Breakout Sessions

? Models of Teacher Induction: How to Get Started, Room 101
Lynn Kepp, Science Outreach Coordinator, New Teacher Center, University of
California, Santa Cruz

? K-12 as a Partner to Support Teaching & Learning in the K-18+
Continuum, Room 105
Liesl Chatman, Science Innovation Specialist, Saint Paul Public Schools

? Striking the Right Balance: Bringing together Schools of Science,
Engineering and Education with K-12 Partners to Enhance Teacher Development
Sharon Sherman, Chair and Professor of Science Education, The College of New
Jersey

3:00 MSP Team Jigsaw

3:45 BREAK

4:00 The Practice of Science and the Science of Teaching: The Role of
Scientists in Improving Teacher Education
Mary Ann Rankin, Professor, Section of Integrative Biology, Dean,
College of Natural Sciences, University of Texas
Michael Marder, Research Professor, Physics, Center for Nonlinear
Dynamics, College of Natural Sciences, University of Texas

5:30 Adjourn

6:00 Dinner on your own

Nov. 1 (Monday) Keck Center, Room 201

8:00 Full Breakfast

8:30 Teaching as a Career Continuum: Ongoing Challenges
Herbert K. Brunkhorst, Department of Science, Mathematics and
Technology Education, California State University, San Bernardino
W. Jim Lewis, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of
Nebraska

10:00 Transition to Break-out

10:05 Break-out Sessions
? Key Elements of a Professional Development Science Program: Ongoing
Collaboration, Committed Scientists and Teachers, and a Permanent Site, Room 105
Barbara Schulz, NRC Teacher Advisory Committee
Mary Vail, Associate Director, Science Education Partnership, Fred
Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle

? Using Professional Standards to Improve Teaching Quality, Room 205
Jeanne Harmon, Executive Director, Center for Strengthening the Teaching
Profession

? Middle School Math, Room 213
W. Jim Lewis, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Nebraska,
co-PI, MSP ?Math in the Middle Institute Partnership?
Ruth Heaton, co-PI, MSP ?Math in the Middle institute Partnership?

11:30 MSP Team Jigsaw

12:00 Committee Reflections and Participant Discussion

12:30 Box Lunch and Adjourn

12:30 Feedback Panel Meets
Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Melvin D. George (chair)
Herbert Brunkhorst
Mary Colvard
Jerry Gollub (by phone)
Mark Kaufman
Andrew Porter (by phone)

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

Bias and conflict of interest

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

none

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
November 11, 2004


Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry K. Holmer
Contact Email:  tholmer at nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1462

Agenda
National Research Council
National Science Resources Center

Math/Science Partnerships Workshop
How People Learn
Keck Center
500 Fifth Street, N.W. Room 100
June 27-29, 2004
EXPANDED AGENDA
June 27, 2004 (Sunday)

1:00pm Opening Remarks
Jay Labov, National Research Council
Sally Shuler, National Science Resources Center
Martin Orland, NRC Center for Education
Janice Earle, (invited) National Science Foundation

Overview of Workshop: Melvin George, President Emeritus, University of Missouri
and NRC Chair, Mathematics and Science Partnerships Committee

1:45pm Bridging Research and Practice: An Examination of a Teaching and
Learning Model
Participants will work in groups to examine a teaching and learning model based
on a ?floating and sinking? inquiry.
Sally Goetz Shuler, Executive Director, National Science Resources Center
Christos Zahopoulos, Director of Projects SEED & RE-SEED, Northeastern
University
This presentation will provide participants with the opportunity to examine and
discuss the characteristics of a research-based model of teaching and
learning. The design of the session will be based on a learning cycle that
begins with participants sharing their perspectives about the current and
desired state teaching and learning. Following the discussion, participants
will be engaged in a hands-on investigation and review two videotapes of
classrooms at the middle school level. Participants will be asked to reflect
upon these experiences and to compare the ways in which they are or are not
representative of effective teaching and learning.

3:45pm Break


4:00pm Bridging Research and Practice (continued)
Classroom videotapes and discussion

5:00pm Adjourn

5:15pm Dinner

6:15pm Meeting: Facilitators, Presenters, Committee Members, and NRC
staff


June 28, 2004 (Monday)

8:00am Full Breakfast

8:30am Greeting and Overview of the Day?s Goals and Activities:
Melvin George, President Emeritus, University of Missouri and NRC Chair,
Mathematics and Science Partnerships Committee

8:45am Keynote Address and Discussion: Research on Human Learning:
Understanding and Applications
Jose Mestre, Professor of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
A committee convened by the National Research Council released a report in 1999
titled How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School, which not only
synthesizes learning research from the last 25 years, but also presents
exemplars of how this research can be applied to teach mathematics, science,
and history. In this talk I will begin by summarizing the salient findings
from that report as they apply to science learning. I will then, through an
audience participation activity focusing on some simple physics concepts, model
how learning research can be applied to teach science in a way that actively
engages the learner. I will conclude by summarizing the implications of
learning research to instruction.

10:15am Break

10:30am Break-Out Sessions: Encouraging the Metacognitive Process for
the Improvement of Teaching and Learning

Human Learning

Jose Mestre, Professor of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
This session provides the opportunity for participants to ask additional
questions about How People Learn, specifically, or research issues in science
learning in general. Dr. Mestre will be available to expound on his earlier
presentation and field questions. He can also discuss additional research
findings related to the activity that he will do with you during the keynote
address.



Higher Education Applications
Bonnie Brunkhorst, (invited) Professor, Geological Science and Science,
Mathematics and Technology Education, California State University, San
Bernardino
Herbert Brunkhorst, (invited) Professor, Science Education and Biology,
California State University, San Bernardino, and Steering Committee Member
Improving Teaching and Learning in Our Own Classrooms.
Exploring the attributes of learning environments that need cultivation as
outlined in How People Learn. (p.23-27).
................................................................................
..................................

K-12 Science and Mathematics Applications
TBA and
Laura Maitland, Science Department Chair, Mepham High School, Bellmore, NY
By working through a series of activities focusing on cognition (learning,
memory, and thinking), participants will gain a better understanding of
metacognitive processes. Take-home activities will model how to engage students
in recognizing what it means to ?pay attention,? how we put information into
working memory, move it to long-term memory, and meaningfully connect it to
prior knowledge in order to retrieve it later. Examples using science and
mathematics concepts will be used to illustrate the importance of schema as
they relate to reading and understanding.

11:45am Understanding the Principles of Learning More Deeply
Summary Discussion

12:00 LUNCH

12:45pm ?Jigsaw? Groups Form consisting of representatives from each
break-out session. Members of the new groups will share what they have
learned in morning break-out sessions and how those insights will be useful to
MSP participants in general.

2:00pm Break

2:15pm Discussion of Principles of Learning as Applied to Higher
Education
Bonnie Brunkhorst, (invited) Professor, Geological Science and Science,
Mathematics and Technology Education, California State University, San
Bernardino
This session will focus on the need to consider how to help our students
develop conceptual understandings for applicability to further connections and
usefulness in science and to real world situations. Using student
understandings of photosynthesis we will discuss ways to identify and build
fundamental understandings. One set of experiences in geological sciences and
science and technology courses may assist consideration and transfer to each
participantís areas of expertise, K-16.

3:15pm How Students Reflect on Their Learning ? Presentation and
Interactive Discussion
Michael Martinez, (invited) Associate Professor, Department of Education,
University of California, Irvine

4:30pm Short Break

4:45pm ?Jigsaw? Groups Reconvene:
Discussion of how the activities and information gained during the day could be
utilized in the MSP projects. Each group will select the most useful thing
they have learned for application to their MSP and one issue that needs greater
clarification. One person from each group will report out.

Summary Discussion

6:00 pm Adjourn


June 29, 2004 (Tuesday)

8:00am Breakfast
Extended time during breakfast for MSP Teams to meet and work.

8:45am Greeting and Overview of the Day: TBA

9:00am Break-Out Sessions: Application of the Principles of Learning to
the Classroom

Human Learning
Michael Martinez, (invited) Associate Professor, Department of Education,
University of California, Irvine

Dr. Martinez will be available to expound on his earlier presentation and field
questions.

Higher Education Applications
Herbert Brunkhorst, (invited)Professor, Science Education and Biology,
California State University, San Bernardino, and Steering Committee Member
Bonnie Brunkhorst, (invited) Professor, Geological Science and Science,
Mathematics and Technology Education, California State University, San
Bernardino
Continuing cultivation of attributes of learning environments in higher
education and implications for working with K-12 colleagues in your MSP.

K-12 Science and Mathematics Applications, NAS 250
Laura Maitland, Science Instructor, Mepham High School, Bellmore, NY
This session will examine:
? activities that enhance the ability of students to read and
conceptualize.
? student designed laboratory investigations.
? formative and summative assessment strategies and why they are
critical.
? methods for uncovering misconceptions.
? metacognitive strategies that foster thinking about thinking

10:30am Break

10:45am ?Jigsaw? Groups Reconvene to share what they have
learned.

11:30 Implications for MSPs
TBA

12:00 Committee Reflections and Participant Discussion

12:30pm Adjourn ? Box Lunches



Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry Holmer
Contact Email:  tholmer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1462

Agenda
NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
NATIONAL SCIENCE RESOURCES CENTER

MATH/SCIENCE PARTNERSHIPS WORKSHOP
ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING

The Keck Center, 500 Fifth St. NW, Room 100
Washington, DC
May 16-18, 2003

TENTATIVE AGENDA

May 16 (Sunday)

1:00 Opening Remarks
Jay Labov, National Research Council (NRC)
Sally Goetz Shuler, National Science Resources Center
Mark Kaufman, NRC Steering Committee
National Science Foundation Representative

Overview of Workshop: Mark Kaufman, Mathematics and Science Partnerships
Committee, Co-Director of the Center for Education Partnerships

1:30 Exploring the Process of Classroom Assessment, George Bright,
Professor Emeritus, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

3:00 BREAK

3:15 Exploring the Process (continued)

4:15 Implications for MSPs of Large-Scale Assessments
Marge Petit, Senior Associate, National Center for the
Improvement of
Educational Assessment

5:15 Wrap-up: Mark Kaufman

5:30 Dinner

6:30 Meeting: Facilitators, Presenters, NRC and NSRC Staff




May 17 (Monday)

8:00 Full Breakfast

8:30 Assessment as a Primary Means for Promoting Student
Learning ¡V
An Overview of the Research Literature and Its Implications
Robert Hauser (invited), Member, National Academy of Sciences, School of
Education, University of Colorado, Boulder

10:00 Break

10:15 Break-out Sessions:
?á Ongoing Classroom Assessment for Mathematics: Assessing for
Understanding
Marge Petit, Senior Associate, National Center for the Improvement of
Educational Assessment
?á Formative Assessment in Science: Small Strategies that Work in a Big
Way
Mary Colvard, Consultant, New York State Education Department, and Steering
Committee Member


11:45 MSP Teams: Networking and time with facilitators

12:15 Lunch

1:15-2:45 Concept-mapping: A Research Tool
Diane Ebert-May, Professor of Plant Biology, Michigan State
University

2:45 BREAK

3:00 Break-out Sessions:
?á C-TOOLS: Concept-map Tools for Online Learning in Science
Diane Ebert-May, Professor, Plant Biology, Michigan State University
?á Implications of Formative Assessment for Curriculum Development
And Professional Development
Robert Hauser (invited) Member, National Academy of Sciences, School of
Education, University of Colorado, Boulder

4:30 BREAK

4:45 MSP Teams: Networking and time with facilitators

5:30 Adjourn and Dinner (on your own)


May 18 (Tuesday)

8:00 Full Breakfast

8:30 Equity and Access: The Implications of Accountability
Diana C. Pullin, Professor of Education Law and Public Policy,
Boston
College

9:45 Break

10:00 Planning for Change in Assessment
Mark Kaufman, Co-Director of the Center for Education Partnerships,
TERC

11:30 Committee Reflections and Participant Discussion

12:15 Box Lunch and Adjourn
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

National Academy of Sciences Building
2101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20418
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry Holmer
Contact Email:  tholmer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1462

Agenda
National Research Council
National Science Resources Center

Math/Science Partnerships Workshop
How People Learn

2100 C Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.
Lecture Room
March 7-9, 2004
TENTATIVE AGENDA
March 7, 2004 (Sunday)

1:00pm Opening Remarks
Jay Labov, National Research Council
Sally Shuler, National Science Resources Center
Martin Orland, NRC Center for Education
Janice Earle, National Science Foundation
Overview of Workshop: Herbert Brunkhorst, Professor, Science Education and
Biology, California State University, San Bernardino, and Steering Committee
Member

1:45pm Bridging Research and Practice: An Examination of a Teaching and
Learning Model
Participants will work in groups to examine a teaching and learning model based
on a ?floating and sinking? inquiry.
Sally Goetz Shuler, Executive Director, National Science Resources Center
Christos Zahopoulos, Director of Projects SEED & RE-SEED, Northeastern
University

3:45pm Break

4:00pm Bridging Research and Practice (continued)
Classroom videotapes and discussion

5:00pm Adjourn

5:15pm Dinner, Members Room, 2100 C Street, N.W.

6:15pm Meeting: Facilitators, Presenters, Committee Members, and NRC
staff


March 8, 2004 (Monday)

8:00am Continental Breakfast

8:30am Greeting and Overview of the Day?s Goals and Activities:
Katherine Merseth, Director of Teacher Education, Harvard University and Senior
Lecturer at the Graduate School of Education
Mary Colvard, Consultant, New York State Education Department, and Steering
Committee Member
Herbert Brunkhorst, Professor, Science Education and Biology, California State
University, San Bernardino, and Steering Committee Member

8:45am Keynote Address and Discussion: Research on Human Learning:
Understanding and Applications Focus on research on learning and cognition as
they relate to the classroom.
Jose Mestre, Professor of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

10:15am Break

10:30am Break-Out Sessions: Encouraging the Metacognitive Process for
the Improvement of Teaching and Learning

Human Learning, Lecture Room
Jose Mestre, Professor of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Higher Education Applications, NAS 180
Bonnie Brunkhorst, Professor, Geological Science and Science, Mathematics and
Technology Education, California State University, San Bernardino
Herbert Brunkhorst, Professor, Science Education and Biology, California State
University, San Bernardino, and Steering Committee Member

K-12 Science and Mathematics Applications, NAS 150
Mary Colvard, Consultant, New York State Education Department, and Steering
Committee Member
Laura Maitland, Science Department Chair, Mepham High School, Bellmore, NY
Mary Kosky, retired, Dept. of Mathematics, Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake High
School, Burnt Hills, NY

11:45am Understanding the Principles of Learning More Deeply
Katherine Merseth provides an overview of the morning?s sessions and provides
MSP teams and small groups with charge for afternoon activities.

12:00pm Lunch

12:45pm ?Jigsaw? Groups Form consisting of representatives from each
break-out session. Members of the new groups will share what they have
learned in morning break-out sessions and how those insights will be useful to
MSP participants in general.

2:00pm Break

2:15pm Discussion of Principles of Learning as Applied to Higher
Education
Bonnie Brunkhorst, Professor, Geological Science and Science, Mathematics and
Technology Education, California State University, San Bernardino
This session will feature a videotape on photosynthesis entitled, ?From Thin
Air.? Dr. Brunkhorst will focus on the need for higher education faculty to
consider how our students develop conceptual understanding.

3:15pm How Students Reflect on Their Learning ? Presentation and
Interactive Discussion
Michael Martinez, Associate Professor, Department of Education, University of
California, Irvine

4:30pm Short Break

4:45pm ?Jigsaw? Groups Reconvene:
Discussion of how the activities and information gained during the day could be
utilized in the MSP projects. Each group will select the most useful thing
they have learned for application to their MSP and one issue that needs greater
clarification. One person from each group will report out.

Summary Discussion led by Katherine Merseth

6:00 pm Adjourn


March 9, 2004 (Tuesday)

8:00am Breakfast
Extended time during breakfast for MSP Teams to meet and work.

8:45am Greeting and Overview of the Day: Mary Colvard, Consultant, New York
State Education Department, and Steering Committee Member
Herbert Brunkhorst, Professor, Science Education and Biology, California State
University, San Bernardino, and Steering Committee Member

9:00am Break-Out Sessions: Application of the Principles of Learning to
the Classroom

Human Learning, Lecture Room
Michael Martinez, Associate Professor, Department of Education, University of
California, Irvine

Higher Education Applications, NAS Boardroom
Herbert Brunkhorst, Professor, Science Education and Biology, California State
University, San Bernardino, and Steering Committee Member
Bonnie Brunkhorst, Professor, Geological Science and Science, Mathematics and
Technology Education, California State University, San Bernardino

K-12 Science and Mathematics Applications, NAS 250
Mary Colvard, Consultant, New York State Education Department, and Steering
Committee Member
Laura Maitland, Science Instructor, Mepham High School, Bellmore, NY
Mary Kosky, retired, Dept. of Mathematics, Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake High
School, Burnt Hills, NY

10:30am Break

10:45am ?Jigsaw? Groups Reconvene to share what they have
learned.

11:30 Implications for MSPs
Nancy Shapiro, Director, K-16 Initiatives, University System of Maryland and
PI, Vertically Integrated Partnerships K-16

12:00 Committee Reflections and Participant Discussion

12:30pm Adjourn ? Box Lunches

Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry Holmer
Contact Email:  tholmer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1462

Agenda
NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
NATIONAL SCIENCE RESOURCES CENTER

MATH/SCIENCE PARTNERSHIPS WORKSHOP
ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING

The Keck Center, 500 Fifth St. NW, Room 100
Washington, DC
February 1-3, 2003

TENTATIVE AGENDA

February 1 (Sunday)

1:00 Opening Remarks
Jay Labov, National Research Council (NRC)
Sally Goetz Shuler, National Science Resources Center
Martin Orland, NRC Center for Education
Melvin D. George, Chair, NRC Steering Committee
National Science Foundation Representative

Overview of Workshop: Melvin George, President Emeritus, University of Missouri
and NRC Chair, Mathematics and Science Partnerships Committee

1:30 Assessment as a Primary Means for Promoting Student Learning
Lorrie Shepard, Dean of the School of Education and Chair of the Research and
Evaluation Methodology Program, University of Colorado, Boulder

2:30 What Assessment Issues are MSPs currently confronting?
Panel: Three MSP teams discuss assessment decisions

3:30 An Assessment Exercise (This session will look at certain
principles and procedures that can be applied to sample assessments and sample
content standards.)
Andy Porter, Patricia and Rodes Hart Professor of Educational Leadership and
Policy and, Director of the Learning Sciences Institute,
Vanderbilt University

4: 45 Break

5:00 Debriefing of Assessment Exercise and Participant
Discussion
Andy Porter, Lorrie Shepard, MSP team panel

5:45 Adjourn

6: 00 Dinner

7:15 Meeting: Facilitators, Presenters, NRC and NSRC Staff


February 2 (Monday)

8:00 Breakfast

8:30 Cognition and Assessment, What the Research as Analyzed in NRC
Reports Tells Us
James Pellegrino, Co-Director, Center for the Study of Learning, Instruction, &
Teacher Development, University of Illinois, Chicago

10:00 Break

10:15 Equity in Assessment
William Trent, Professor of Education Policy Studies and Sociology, University
of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

11:15 Classroom Assessment of Learning: What Does It Mean for
MSPs?
Lorrie Shepard, Dean of the School of Education and Chair of the Research and
Evaluation Methodology Program, University of Colorado, Boulder
(talk and brief exercise)

12:15 Lunch

1:00-2:00 Implications for MSPs of Large-Scale Assessments
Marge Petit, Senior Associate, National Center for the Improvement of
Educational Assessment
(talk and brief exercise)

2:15 Break-outs:
?á Assessment of Learning Through Concept Mapping
Diane Ebert-May, Professor, Plant Biology, Michigan State University
?á Classroom Assessment of Mathematics and Science
Marge Petit
?á Information Technology: Implications for Assessment of Learning
Ellen Mandinach, Associate Director for Research, Center for Children &
Technology
?á Assessment (topic of choice)
Lorrie Shepard
?á Formative Assessment: Small Strategies that Work in a Big Way
Mary Colvard

3:45 Break

4:00 MSP Teams: Team Networking andTime with Facilitators

5:15 Adjourn and Dinner (on your own)

5:30 Feedback Panel

February 3 (Tuesday)

8:30 Breakfast

9:00 An Assessment Exercise and Discussion
Diane Ebert-May, Professor of Plant Biology, Michigan State
University

10:30 Planning for Change
Mark Kaufman, Director TERC, and Co-director of the Center for Education
Partnerships

11:45 Group Discussion and Possible Next Steps

12:30 Box Lunch and Adjourn
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry K. Holmer
Contact Email:  tholmer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1462

Agenda
THIS MEETING HAS BEEN POSTPONED UNTIL JANUARY.

NATIONAL RESEARCH CENTER
NATIONAL SCIENCE RESOURCES CENTER

MATH/SCIENCE PARTNERSHIPS WORKSHOP ON HOW PEOPLE LEARN

The Keck Center, 500 Fifth St. NW, Room 100
Washington, DC
October 19-21, 2003

TENTATIVE AGENDA

October 19 (Sunday)

1:30 Opening Remarks:
Jay Labov, National Research Council (NRC)
Sally Goetz Shuler, National Science Resources Center
Martin Orland, NRC Center for Education
Melvin D. George, Chair, NRC Mathematics and Science Partnerships
Committee
National Science Foundation Representative

Overview of Workshop: Melvin George

2:00 Floating and Sinking: A Hands-On, Inquiry-Based Exploration of
Science Learning based on How People Learn: Bridging Research and Practice.
Sally Goetz Shuler, Executive Director, National Science Resources Center

3:30 BREAK

3:45 Debriefing on Floating and Sinking exercise. What was learned? How
might these principles be applied to classroom practice?

5:00 Adjourn and Reception

5:30 Dinner

7:00 Meeting: Facilitators, Presenters, NRC staff





October 20 (Monday)

8:00 BREAKFAST

8:30 Keynote Address: How People Learn and related research.
José Mestre Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

10:30 BREAK

10:45 Understanding the Principles of Learning More Deeply: Break-out
sessions with interactive activities, each addressing one of the major
principles of learning research (preconceptions, knowledge base, transfer of
knowledge among subject domains, metacognition); The sessions will be led by
José Mestré and other facilitators.

11:30 Understanding the Principles of Learning More Deeply. Break-out
sessions are repeated to enable participants to attend two different sessions.

12:15 Teams regroup, debrief, compare notes, decide what questions were
not answered.

12:45 LUNCH

1:30 Panel Discussion: How People Learn and MSP Initiatives: How
Partnership Members Can Contribute to Improving Learning for All Students

Facilitator: Katherine K. Merseth, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Panel:
MSP PI (TBA) (PI perspective)
Teacher (TBA), Teacher perspective
Herbert Brunkhorst, California State University, San Bernadino
(Professional Development perspective)
José Mestre, University of Massachusetts, Amherst (University
Science/Mathematics Faculty Perspective)

2:15 Break-out sessions: Each panel member will facilitate a break-out
session. Each break-out session would model a problem related to implementing
the principles of learning in classrooms from their professional perspectives.
Each break-out session will consist of demonstrations, discussions, and
opportunities to practice using the methodologies presented in each session.

4:15 Panel reconvenes: Katherine Merseth will facilitate a discussion
and Q and A about issues that arose in the breakout sessions that require
further discussion and consideration..

5:00 Adjourn. Dinner on your own (A list of local restaurants is
provided in your briefing book and at the reception table).




October 21 (Tuesday)

8:00 Breakfast

8:30 How Students Reflect on Their Learning ? TBA
This speaker will provide an overview of the process referred to in
?How People Learn? as ?metacognition.?

9:15 Faculty Panel and Breakout Sessions: Encouraging the Metacognitive
Process

Facilitator: Katherine K. Merseth, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Panel:
Mary Colvard, Consultant, New York State Education Department, and Steering
Committee Member
Diane Ebert-May, Professor, Plant Biology, Michigan State University
Mary Kosky, retired, Dept. of Mathematics, Burnt Hills-Ballston Lake High
School, Burnt Hills, NY
Dayo Akinsheye, Mathematics Teacher, Seaton Elementary School (DC, invited)
José Mestre Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Laura Maitland, Science Instructor, Mepham High School, Bellmore, NY

How K-12 and university faculty help students develop metacognition to improve
learning in mathematics and science. This session will focus on how to
implement metacognition in the classroom as well as the other principles of
?How People Learn.? A panel discussion will introduce participants to various
approaches to increase metacognition. Breakout sessions will then allow
participants to engage in hands-on activities to practice these approaches to
improving student learning.

11:15 Katherine Merseth ?wraps-up?

11:45 Logistical wrap-up and preview of February 2004 Workshop on
Assessment and Accountability

12:30 Adjourn ? Box Lunches available






Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry Holmer
Contact Email:  tholmer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1462

Agenda
IMPROVING STUDENT LEARNING
THROUGH STRONG PARTNERSHIPS
WORKSHOP

JULY 21-22, 2003

DRAFT AGENDA

July 20 (SUNDAY)

Keck Center, 500 Fifth St. NW, Room 1000

5:00 Steering Committee and Facilitators Discuss Workshop

6:30 Reception

7:00 Dinner

July 21 (MONDAY)

Keck Center, 500 Fifth St. NW, Room 100

8:00 Continental Breakfast

8:30 Opening Remarks:
Jay Labov, National Research Council
Melvin D. George, Chair, Mathematics and Science Partnerships Committee
Janice Earle, National Science Foundation
Sally Shuler, National Science Resources Center

9:00 Science Learning Activity (Sally Shuler)

10:00 How People Learn, Suzanne Donovan, NRC, Study Director

11:00 Break

11:15: MSP Team Presentation: University of California, Riverside,
Richard Cardullo, PI

12:15 Working Lunch: Discussion of MSP presentation with guided
questions

1:15 Katherine K. Merseth, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Suzanne
Donovan, NRC, MSP TEAM (debriefing and discovering ideas)

2:15 Break-Out Sessions: Facilitators will lead MSP team discussions

3:15 Break

3:30 Wrap-Up: A summation of one reporter from each team. The focus is
on one idea that could be implemented upon their return.

4:30 Networking Activity

5:30 Reception

----------------------
July 22 (TUESDAY)

NAS Building, 2101 C St. NW, Lecture Room

8:00 Continental Breakfast

8:30 Benefits Of MSP Learning Network (How NSF Can Help)

9:00 National Science Resources Center: A Theory of Action and Strategic
Planning

10:00 Break

10:15 Partners In Science: The Business World and Math-Science
Partnerships (Panel TBA)

11:15 Wrap-Up

11:45 Lunch

Adjourn
Is it a Closed Session Event?
No



Location:

Keck Center
500 5th St NW, Washington, DC 20001
Event Type :  
-

Registration for Online Attendance :   
NA

Registration for in Person Attendance :   
NA


If you would like to attend the sessions of this event that are open to the public or need more information please contact

Contact Name:  Terry Holmer
Contact Email:  tholmer@nas.edu
Contact Phone:  202-334-1462

Agenda
AGENDA
APRIL 7

Open Session

8:00am Continental Breakfast

8:30am Welcome and Background
§ Jay Labov, National Research Council
§ Melvin George, University of Missouri
§ Sally Shuler, National Science Resources Center

Introduction of Panel Members

9:00am Math and Science Partnership Program Overview
James Hamos, National Science Foundation

10:00am BREAK

10:15am Committee Statement of Task and Discussion of Objectives
Melvin George

11:00am Overview of National Research Council Reports
Jay Labov

Closed Session

11:45am Bias and Conflict of Interest Discussion
Kirsten Sampson Snyder, National Research Council

12:15pm LUNCH

Open Session

1:00pm First Workshop: Agenda and Topics
Melvin George and Sally Shuler

2:30pm BREAK




3:00pm Second Workshop: General discussion
Melvin George

3:45pm Survey Instrument: What do we need to know from awardees?
Jay Labov

4:30pm Adjourn

APRIL 8

8:30am Continental Breakfast

9:00am Discussion of Evaluation Component of the Project
Jay Labov and Melvin George

10:30am Suggestions for Speakers at the First Workshop

12:00pm Box Lunch and Adjourn



Is it a Closed Session Event?
Yes

Closed Session Summary Posted After the Event

The following committee members were present at the closed sessions of the event:

Melvin George
Herbert Brunkhorst
Mary Colvard
Jerry Gollub
Susan Hackwood
Mark Kaufman
Carlo Parravano
Andrew Porter
William Trent (by phone)

The following topics were discussed in the closed sessions:

The committee discussed bias and conflict of interest issues.

The following materials (written documents) were made available to the committee in the closed sessions:

None

Date of posting of Closed Session Summary:
April 18, 2003

Publications